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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/illio60univ 



1960 ILLIO 




Volume 67 




University Life and Administration 

Residences 

Activities 

Athletics 

Organizations 

Seniors 








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p***. 



Marylin Daly. . 



John Clem 



Editor 



Business Manager 



uJ* 1 ^^ 



Victoria Feit 



Albert Herman 



Kathy Manning 



Associate Editor 



Associate Editor 



Associate Editor 



Carol Leonard. .Associate Business Manager 
Donald Huizinga. . . .Chief III io Photographer 



John Bledsoe. . . . 



Artist 



Toshi Utagawa 





AND 



ADMINISTRATION 




A UNIVERSITY 




Is Life, Learning and Tradition: This Is Yours 



In another month, the Class of 1960 will gradu- 
ate and be finished with college. We will become 
alumni, ending another University of Illinois gen- 
eration. For 92 years people like us, some more 
dedicated, some not seeking education at all, have 
quietly entered and departed from the University. 
They leave behind them the work, the culture, and 
the tradition that make Illinois what it is today. 
And so it is to the 300,000 Illini who preceded us 
up the ramps of Memorial Stadium and along a once 
treelined Broadwalk that we dedicate this ILLIO. 

Three faculty members, 77 students and one used 
building were the core of the University in 1868. 
All this seems very far away knowing our sprawling 
campus with its 20,000 students and currently 201 
sections of freshman rhetoric courses. Our campus 
is known for being big, busy and brainy. Illinois 
is renowned as a giant in education, and a leader 
in many fields of research. This is the legacy of 
those who studied, taught and worked before us; it 
is their achievements that made possible much that 
we are learning now. And we should be very proud. 
Times change and so do the people, places, and 
institutions. The traditions of the past are gone 
now. Freshmen don't wear beanies. No longer is a 
class hatchet passed from seniors to juniors each year 
at Commencement. No one knows the difference 
anymore if sophomores sit on the Senior Bench. It 
appears we have grown too large for those intimate 
customs that once marked the progress of a student 



towards graduation. Some of us miss these things; 
and though few of our traditions remain today and 
almost none are starting, we shall attempt on the 
pages that follow to uncover, define and reminisce 
about what we do have that makes Illinois unique. 

Few of us will forget the noise and dust of the 
Armory on Sheequon week-ends, or the short excite- 
ment of the fraternity pajama races in autumn, or 
the chimes ringing in Altgeld tower as we shivered 
home from a four o'clock in December. We remember 
the times when we had real spirit — the day we beat 
Army — the night the team returned from Wisconsin. 
And there was spirit in the disappointment we felt 
when we knew there was no longer a chance for the 
Rose Bowl. Some day we shall try to recapture the 
way we felt in 1960 and remember what it was like 
when an hour exam was the biggest of our problems, 
and we could forget it all in the usual smoke and 
noise of a Friday afternoon in Kam's or Bidwell's. 

On these pages we shall go back to what we have 
seen and done and lived with on campus. Find your 
place in the section because you are a part of all 
that is Illinois. Although this year has gone by, 
our work and dreams have cleared the way for what 
shall happen beneath the Orange and Blue in future 
years. And now in our last college days the words 
beneath the Alma Mater statue come alive: "To thy 
happy children of the future, those of the past 
send greetings." Now we are the past of Illinois. 
May the future continue for "Learning and Labor." 



Students and Fall Descend on Campus Together 




The rustle of a crazy-quilt of leaves underfoot signals the beginning of another fall — another school year. Fall is a season remembered 
by frosty mornings, green color fading to rust and brown, sweaters, soaked raincoats, drizzles and the transition to winter. 




The steps of the auditorium provide a meeting place during the fall. There, 
we discover our social life is an important part of a formal education. 



Fall is football, Block I and Chief llliniwek. Block I, 
which was the first flash-card section, always gives 
llliniwek a mighty cheer as his dance ends. 



Long Lines and Confusion Highlight Registration 




Registration is one of the necessary evils of a University. We stand in long lines to find a section we 
wanted just closed. Somehow, we're glad when it's over, especially if we have a good schedule. 



During registration, we learn to follow directions faithfully. For if we miss a sign, we find ourselves in a jumble of wandering people. 
Truly, it is said, "If you can get through registration, you can get through school." Fortunately we register only twice a year. 




10 



Before Classes Begin 



After Summer School is over, the University lies 
dormant for only a lew weeks. Then, the highways and 
railroads leading to Champa ign-Urhana become clogged 
with students and faculty coming to school. For the 
senior and the freshman alike, there is a thrill at the 
thought of leaving to go to the University. We don't 
arrive at the same time, though. 

Freshmen, who are going through Rush, and fra- 
ternity men are here on campus about two weeks before 
school begins for Rush Week. After Rush Week is 
over, entering Freshmen are required to be here for 
Freshmen Orientation Week. The week is a turmoil of 
meetings, tests, lectures, conferences and the first regis- 
tration. And the first registration is hectic. 

While Freshmen are being orientated, the remainder 
of us are trying to go along, with the system of register- 
ing. But it isn't so easy to figure out the complex regis- 
tration system; consequently, many of us fight the sys- 
tem each time we register. It is remarkable how many 
times we stand in line for a certain class or section only 
to have it close when we are next. Then, we have two 
alternatives, either wait for the section to open again 
or take the class at a different time. There is one more 
detail to attend to after registration and before going to 
our classes — buying books, an education in itself. 

But the University does try to facilitate registration 
and orientation for freshmen by employing the use of 
Freshmen Advisers. Selected and elected on the basis of 
their knowledge of the campus and its customs, they are 
most helpful to newcomers. 

Debate has been going on this year as to whether 
freshmen should possibly register first. Under classmen 
say Yes; the seniors vote No. 




Freshman Advisers either know the answer to a reg- 
istration problem or direct you to someone else who does. 




During registration week, the president holds a recep- 
tion for the faculty who have just joined the staff. 



Hosts and hostesses for the President's reception are selected from Angel Flight and various branches of the ROTC. As the reception h 
usually held in the Union, these students are invaluable to the new faculty members in helping them to locate the reception room. 




I 






Making signs for pep rallies is another tradition of the Uni- 
versity. It's the spirit not the spelling, that counts. 



Friday Night Before 




Chief llliniwck assisted the cheerleaders at pep rallies. Illini- 
wek has now become the symbol of the "Fighting lllini " 



Cheerleaders form the nucleus for the team support at pep 
rallies. It is through their efforts our spirit is generated. 



12 




To watch football, we arm ourselves with pen- 
nants, drinks and food and the ability to sit. 



In the fall, before every home game, 
we gather on the terrace of the Ulini 
Union for a team "booster" — a pep rally. 
In all kinds of weather, we get dates, 
organize to make signs, carry them over 
to the Union and hold them high 
enough for all to see our accomplish- 
ments. 

The next day we march to the stadium 
to watch the Illini battle and some of 
last night's spirit is still with us, for we 
cheer en masse when the cheerleaders 
preform a cheer. 




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When the game is over, we filter out in all directions to celebrate victory or ver- 
bally replay loss, but as soon as one is over, we're ready for the next. 



The Game Means a Pep Rally 



Much of the energy and pep we have for our team must be uncovered and developed by our cheerleaders. With a crew of cheerleaders 
like this, how could we possibly have an apathetic spirit at a pep rally or game? It's pure Illini tradition when one yells. 




13 



Let Down the Hair and Go to a Pledge Dance; 





Behind a bead curtain, lurks pledge-dance- intrigue as 
,, man in .1 raincoat" ,md "a lady in a floppy hat" confer. 



Using cardboard, paint and our ingenuity, we can transform our 
houses into anything. Choosing the theme is the difficult part. 



Every fraternity and sorority usually has two pledge dances 
per year, one in the tall and one in the spring. On the day 
of the event, the house is transformed into a setting for 
the theme of the dance. The decorating job is done by the 
members of the house, who find themselves getting up at 
an early hour of the morning to get the job done. When 
the decorations are finished, the assembly of appropriate 
costumes tor the dance comes next and anything goes when 
you're making the final costume selection. 

After you and your date have seen each other in your 
costumes, (and you've stopped laughing to some degree) you 
proceed with the rest of your house to campus where others 
stare at you in amazement. Then, you return to the house 
and set yourself in the mood of the dance. At the stroke 
of twelve, we must go, but already we await the next one. 



Not only the "French maid," but everyone at a pledge dance loves to 
rock 'n' roll when the drummer starts his "swinging" solos. 



14 




It's the Fall of the Year-You Go "Gung-Ho!" 




A "demure little miss" and her 

'gambling" man look preoccupied. 



It's not always the costume that makes the 
impression, it can be the way you're made-up. 



The dress of this couple suggests they are 
at the famous "Shantytown Shuffle" dance. 



Bowls an * a", this pair appears to have come straight from China to attend this dance. Anything goes at a pledge dance and we see all 

types of costumes and make-up whrch create definite impressions, for example, the fellow in the Homburg looks like a diplomat. 



15 





MfPA 



Since the origin of Homecoming on the campus 
in 1910, there have been 49 meetings of past lllini 
with current lllini. From that first year, Home- 
coming traditions have swollen to gigantic propor- 
tions. Each year, we find more ways to show the 
alumni our gratitude. 

Traditionally, we have open houses during the 
weekend, where the alums may gather or recall 
fond memories, but the preparation for Home- 
coming starts on the campus long before the alumni 
arrive to see the progress of this generation. 

The two features of Homecoming are Stunt Show 
and decorations, both of which take planning, 
everyone's effort and plenty of time to perfect. 

This year's theme of "Cartoon Colossus" was 
carried through in both Stunt Show and decora- 
tions and acclaimed by the alumni as "the best 
Homecoming ever." After Homecoming is over 
and the alumni leave, we are still faced with re- 
turning to the books to pick up where we left off. 



Mr. "lllini" Clean was really working in washing out Minnesota in 
the winning Homecoming decoration constructed by the TEKE's. 



Campuswide Events 





Homecoming is a meeting of past and present. Here, Robert C. 
Matthews, first lllini cheerleader, confers with M.iry Sue Drendcl. 



Even "Dogpatch" citiiens were here at Homecoming. They 
mel m Granada's winner i<> defeat the "Golden Gophers." 



16 




Gina Gudaitis, left, was accompanied by her sister and escort as she reigned as 
this year's Homecoming Queen. She sparkled everywhere she appeared during her rule. 




A napkin and wire sign takes a long time 
to make, but the reward equals effort. 



Make Each Homecoming a Day of Memories 




A top prize in the Homecoming decorations went to Phi Kappa Tau for their clever cartoon characterization of Illinois as a golfing bear 
and Minnesota as a defeated gopher returning home. In fact, all campus looked like a huge carnival with decorations, cars and crowds. 



17 




The immense Homecoming decorations that are built in front of many houses must be pre-assembled on the ground. This pre-assem- 
bly takes us many hours, but it's "for the house." We don't worry about the work; we worry about meeting the deadline. 

Writing and Rehearsing — Planning and Building 



You can't have Stunt Show without costumes which are usually 
made by the sorority and it's quite a job. 




Stunt Show requires props which the fraternity makes. The 
design may be simple; the representation is obvious. 




18 



Once each spring and once each fall the entire 
campus chips in together to present a bigger and 
better show than ever before. It was a weekend in 
the middle of October that the Illini laid out their 
red carpet lor returning alumni. As the various 
graduates were shaking familiar hands and re- 
unioning at the Union, some of the present stu- 
dents were back at the house catching up on the 
sleep that they had lost the past couple of nights 
stuffing a "Hi Alums!" sign or sewing the hem 
into someone's costume for Stunt Show. An amaz- 
ing amount of ideas, sweat, and toil goes into the 
house decorations, water shows, stunts, dances, and, 
of course, the football game. Spirits ran high along 
with the competition that kept us pushing. It's 
always a let down on the Sunday evening after, 
maybe even sheer pleasure to pick up a book 
again, but after several weeks, we wish we were 
back practicing dancing on Sunday afternoons. 




"The Marriage of Prince Violet" was the story worked up by the 
Chi Omegas and the Sigs who took second place in Stunt Show. 



Are Necessary for a Successful Homecoming 




The Alpha Delta Phis worked up a clever character to welcome back their alumni this year. This is only one of the many extraordina 
house s.gns you would have seen either Friday or Saturday night if you braved the traffic and joined the slow-moving tour. 



ry 



rih n?!' iCVe '*£' 1°*'J but u this J is ;' Sho ''t Ribs ° f Troy" in the making! The Alpha Gams may have been rubbing their ligaments minus a 
rib, or even with a broken hand after this strenuous stunt show practice with the ATO's, but nevertheless, "It sure was fun!" 








A heap of hats and a heap of fun are all a part of the 
Dad's Day Committee's plans for a traditional weekend. 




'J, 





A special tribute to the dads is made by the cooperation 
of Block I and The Marching I Mini at the game. 



It's Dad's World as 
Illini Celebrate Their 
Traditional Fall Event 



[llini Dads were greeted in grand style as they attended 
the activities of the thirty-ninth annual Dad's Day Week- 
end, held November 8 and 9. Ken Kreutziger, the world's 
friendliest man, toured the campus shaking the hands of 
the Dads and their campus companions. Ken broke the 
world's hand-shaking record by shaking 10,676 hands in 

ten hours. 

Tradition played a prominent part in the activities 
of the weekend. Events have expanded in the thirty-nine 
years since the first all-campus Dad's Day celebration held 
in 1920. However, the Dolphin Show and the Little Inter- 
national Horse Show were a part of the original weekend. 
The University's first Dean of Men, Thomas Arkle Clark, 
originated the idea, and the activities held at the first Dad's 
Day included a pep rally, visits to classes, an ROTC parade, 
and a smoker. In 1922 the Dad's Association was formed, 
and "Hail to the Orange" was presented for the first time. 
The year 1948 saw the beginning of the strong tradi- 
tion of '"King for a Day." This year's "King" was Irwin 
Meyer who is the father of Roger Meyer, a sophomore in 
commerce. 

The activities of the weekend were many and most ot 
the Dads went home looking forward to a good rest. How- 
ever, they left behind them a tremendous number of weary- 
students who had been working lor months in advance to 
make the 1959 Dad's Day Weekend a success. 



Intensive rehearsals for Dad's Day Review begin early in the semester for all the 
cooperating independent houses participating in this annual vanety show. 



20 









The outstretched hands of Ken Kreutziger symbolize an unusual feat. In 
ten hours, Ken Shook 10,676 hands, setting a new handshaking record. 



Mr. Irwin Meyer was the "King for a Day' 
Dad's Day, but, in reality, all dads were King. 




Dolphtn's S h°ow h All S nZ d nf \1£ in J'r C ° mple t !f With water ' s r aying Palms beautiful girls, and a huge native king, was this year's theme for 
uoipnin bhow. A feature of the show was the crowning of the pretty Dolphin Queen on Saturday night of Dad's Day weekend. 



21 




The fraternity men take the indees in 1959. Things like the IF-MIA Tug-Of-War give 
us a rlhef from our" brainwashing studies, and add fun to college days, as we watch or take part. 



Little Things Mean a Lot when It 




Fall is still here, but the ice rink opens early 
to give both young and old practice time. 



As campus leaves turn to mellow gold and crimson, the 
Illini are busily working at all the little events that add up 
to a rememberable fall. Enthusiasm runs high at this time 
ol" year, for students still retain some of their energy after a 
restful summer vacation. It's not uncommon at all to hear 
someone about 6:30 in the evening say, "Grab your jacket 
and let's get over to Pennsylvania Avenue for the Pajama 
Race!" A traditional sport at U. of I., the pajama races are 
advertised all over the campus. Fraternity pledges carry little 
signs around on their backs to let fellow classmates know when 
their particular street race is going to be held. The winners 
of the previous year officiate the contest which, believe it or 
not, brings fellows out into the streets in their pajamas! 

An attempt to save the past tradition of tug-of-wars across 
the boneyard, the IF and MIA Councils challenge each other 
to a tug-of-war, which is held in the quadrangle. A great big 
rope and all their men with well planted feet, plus a cheer- 
ing crowd, are all it takes. These are just a few of the short- 
lived events in the fall. 



tudents will do anything. The annual fall pajama races always attract crowds of people like this, 
are held early in the evening" and only last a short while, so loyal lll.ni come ol- 



It's different, but college stu 



jut to cheer their favorite house on to victory. 






Armistice Day was recognized by everyone — ROTC, the Regimental Band, and students, 
too, especially because we got out of the first fifteen minutes of our eleven o'clock classes! 



Comes to Annual Fall Activities 





Actives and alumnae of most of the houses work together throughout the year 
on various projects: founder's days, Homecoming, initiations, and philanthropy projects. 



Both the actives and the alumnae of 

Sigma Kappa are proud of their new house. 



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Pajama Races — a traditional fall event — add to the rousing campus spirit. 
Here the Delt's team cheer for themselves after winning the John Street races, 



Grinning Sig Nu's are keeping a tight hold on the 
trophy that they won at the Penn Ave. P. J. Races. 



23 



Excitement of Fall Events Keeps Us on the Go 











"The Cadets are coming to Champaign!" and a large crowd 
awaited them as they lined up into their traditional formation. 



With 600 extra men on campus, the girls, as well as the ef- 
ficient Block I staff, were kept mighty busy at the Army game. 




A memorable scene m our (.,11 U,nv,,.,l y Life is this one. Here 70,000 loyal students and campus visitors, jessed for the WMthei _0< 
the day huTry toward our Memorial Stadium in time to be seated before the 1 :30 buzzer sounds, beg.nnmg another lllini football game. 



24 



Alter we've settled into the 
comfortable routine of classes 
and going to school again, we 
find or make time lor extra- 
curricular fall activities. 

On Saturday afternoons, we 
either listen or go to a game. 
Friday afternoons are for TGIF- 
ing. Ten o'clock breaks are for 
a cup of coffee. And there's 
always house meetings on Mon- 
day nights. Of course, there are 
other traditional events we go 
to such as Homecoming, Turkey 
Run, Stunt Show, dances, dates 
and Union movies. 

Fall is also the time for hay- 
rides, wiener roasts, raincoats 
and clear, crisp mornings. 

But, the greatest event of fall 
is returning to school. 




As the football team left for the Wisconsin game, so did loyal I Mini supporters. The 
Phi Delts were smart to charter a bus, as many others did, because of road conditions. 




An annual fall event, held on the quadrangle, is Turkey Run, which 
draws entries from the fraternities and sororities, who are paired. 



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The necessary equipment for Turkey Run is both odd and assorted. Two people, a bi- 
cycle, a gunny sack and a football are all needed and used in the race that's for the' birds. 



Any time of the day from ten minutes to the hour until the chimes sound, this crosswalk between the Library and D K H has enough 
trattic to keep the policeman busy. On rainy days, the stream of raincoats crossing the street is broken only when a car passes by. 



fe. " 



Out of the Rubble Come 
Traditions of the Past 
& Forms of the Future 



...„ . om in the wor |d and at Illinois, too! In every direction one can see new buildings in construction. These lines 
3 nd ^:^TZT^ZZZore e Zl '^learning to carry on the ways of the past and the prospenty of our future chHdren. 




26 




The cupola on the lllini Union exemplifies the Union; in 
fact, it is so well known, it is used as their "trademark." 




On every quarter-hour, the chimes, which we associate as 
a part of the University, ring out from Altgeld Hall tower. 





To keep up with the expanding enrollment, we build constantly. 
Burrill Hall was finished for use in the 1959 summer session. 



One of the newest buildings on campus is the Fine Arts Build- 
ing, but even with this new expansion more room is needed. 



Adding to the old and the familiar are the new. Wesley 
Foundation's interior resembles a maze before completion. 




27 




■ 



mm^m 



28 




We Know That It's Mid- 
year As Winter Brings 
Us a Sleet Coated Quad 




A typical coed butters up Santa at the lllini Union Tree Trim Party. 
During the busy season students help trim 4 or 5 trees. 



Mother Nature and man-made reflecting lights work together to 
add an artistic touch to our Georgian style lllini Union. We're not so 
sure the shivering couple waiting in the bus stop agrees that the 
Champaign weather adds to the beauty of our campus. 



29 




Studying can be reduced to a formula. Find a quiet place, get into a comfortable position and study until an interruption. 

We Study to Learn and We Learn to Study 



If you don't understand a problem, just ask someone to explain it. 




If there is one thing we all have in common 
here at the University, it is studying. We study in 
many varied ways. Some go faithfully to the 
library every day, some must go to seminars 
every night, others go to Kamm's to study be- 
tween coffee and classes, but most of us find that 
studying in our own room is the method to get 
the optimum results. 

There is a rule of thumb about studying which 
says two hours outside for every hour of class 
but this is sometimes mathematically impossible 
and we find ourselves "cramming" and reflecting, 
"If I'd only planned ahead." 



Rarely do we see this scene, both roommates studying. 




30 




We can find our concentration in unusual positions at odd times during the night and day, but it's each to his own study habits. 

And We Strive to Better Ourselves Sdiolastically 




There are times when we just can't concentrate on anything but sleep. 



Often, we need a change of environment to study effectively, but is it for the better? 
I 






31 





We Learn to Relax 




On Thursday nights, we are able to vacate our books 
and meditate on the "coolest of sounds" at Jazz-U. 



The sound of a trumpet slicing through the dusky light in the 
Tavern" at the Union turns attention to the "man with a horn. 




On any floor of the library, the stairs serve as a congregating place 
for us to "take a break" for a few minutes from our reading. 



32 




The place to relax in the library is on the first floor 
stairways, no "NO SMOKING" signs, either! 






by Completely Divorcing Ourselves from Studies 



There are moments when the 
pressure of school builds on us 
and we have to "let off steam." 
Other times, when we're tired 
of studying, we take a break. 
And sometimes, we don't need 
an excuse, we go out to "have 
a ball," it's just GO! 

Regardless of why we go out 
to relax, it is a most essential 
part of our life here. 

The campus offers many var- 
ied amusements. We can go to 
a show, play bridge, listen to a 
concert, play golf or do any of 
the other numerous activities. 

Friday afternoon is the best 
time for relaxing and our TGIF- 
ing which is a tradition with 
many active participants. After 
the last class on Friday, we throw 
away the books for a while and 
"move out" to the nearest cam- 
pus hangout and "have a ball." 




There are many ways to relax, and shooting a game of pool is just one of them. 
In fact, we do everything from listening to jazz to bowling to going for a quiet walk. 



The basement of "Kamm's" isn't exactly the best place to play a chess game, but we all find relaxation in many different ways. If the 
spectators aren't very interested in the game and are more interested in "partying," it doesn't matter, they're all having fun. 




33 




The attendant of the "Lost and Found" department is one ex- 
ample of the many jobs that the I Mini Union offers for students. 



We can always use more money while we are going 
to school. Often the money we earn during the sum- 
mer just isn't enough to see us through a school year 
and; consequently, many of us must take a job in 
order to be able to go to school. Or maybe, we just 
want to earn some extra money on our own while 
we're here at school. In either case, many of us work 
at different jobs while furthering our education. 

There are many job opportunities here at school, 
which include washing dishes to sorting and testing 
soil samples. One of the most common jobs is work- 
ing as a waiter or dishwasher either in an organized 
house or in one of the restaurants on campus. The 
pay for a "meal job" is exactly what the name im- 
plies — a meal, but free meals help defray expenses as 
much as being paid money. 

The working student does make his own way, for 
his job often requires that he stay up very late at 
night studying to make up for study time he loses 
when he works. 



Many of Us Have to Work and Go to School 





Many working students work as part-time librarians in the vari- 
U ich I libraries and find they have to work very quietly. 



Even at mcal-timc, this waiter still finds time to squeeze in 

a couple of minutes of studying between his meal and job. 



34 





The children's bedtime takes these students from thoughts 
of books and school to other important responsibilities. 



"Say, Dad, let me read that book, too!" Like father, like son, 
these ambitious engineers study for the next day's hour exam. 



Married Students Find Their Roles on Campus 




Two can live as cheaply as one is the belie! of many 
of the University of Illinois students as shown by the 
fact that approximately 4,408 students are married. In 
many cases, the wife works to put "hubby" through 
school. Others depend upon scholarships, parental help, 
and loans. A large portion of the income goes for a place 
to live. The University provides some apartments for stu- 
dents, but most of the young couples must find a suit- 
able place off campus in the Champaign-Urbana area. 
Activities of the couples include cooking meals, drying 
dishes, taking care of the children as well as studying 
lor the next hour exam. 

Lots of pinned couples no doubt envy these happily married two 
who now study side by side as the baby "Toby" enjoys a nap. 



Gary couldn't ask for a better waitress than his own wife, 
3arb. who perks up his studying with real homemade coffee. 



35 



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Courage and Skill on Wheels-It's Gizz Rids 




A wheelchair batter swings at a high, hard one as spring- 
time draws paraplegics' attention to America's national sport. 




Wheelchair fans give enthusiastic support as handicapped 
athletes meet in hotly contested game at Illinois armory. 





As wheelchair athletes play, it's a small wonder enthusiasm runs 
high with these cheerleaders to lead a crowd in yells for the team. 



No sport's too tough for the handicapped athletes of Illinois 
and bowling's no exception — Here's a strike on the alleys. 



Over the last ten years, the Illinois wheelchair basket- 
ball team, commonly known as the Gizz Kids, has 
played a number of exhibition games in addition to 
its regular conference schedule. The profits from these 
games have been donated to organizations devoted to 
the discovery and cure of severe disease and disability. 
Over the years, the team has contributed over $15,000 
to such agencies as the American Cancer Society, the 
National Polio Foundation, and the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association. In recognition of the team's service, the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association this year awarded the 
team a citation. 

The Gi/z Kids are sponsored by Delta Sigma Omi- 
cron, a co-educational service fraternity lor disabled stu- 
dents. This organization also sponsors wheelchair foot- 
ball, baseball, and bowling. These spoils, however, are 
not just restricted to the male contingent, lor a squad 
of cheerleaders keeps the team's morale high. Competi- 
tion among the girls for a position as cheerleader is 
high, and they, too, put hours of their time into drills 
and cheers. 

It is evident Erom these varied activities that DSO 
has been organized t<> promote not only the academic, 
bui the physical and social welfare of the handicapped 
Students. Also, (he organization explores educational 
possibilities on the higher levels and investigates occupa- 
tional opportunities Eor its disabled members. 



36 



We Seek the Goal of International Friendship 



The Eoreign student is a person often forgotten on 
our campus. He has much to offer us if we take time 
to meet him. Today's college students are in part, 
tomorrow's leaders. Learning other nations' customs, 
ideals, and opinions would be interesting and would in- 
crease international understanding and friendship. Let's 
be good neighbors and hosts! 

Pictured on the right is Virginia Chamy, a student 
from Rancagua, Chile. We see her as a typical exchange 
student, taking part in the many activities offered to her 
at the University. He story reveals that of many of the 
international students here. 

At lower left are two Oriental girls, seen as they dance 
together at International Fair. It is in this co-operation 
that we Americans can broaden our horizons. 




There are the times when we work together or dance together, 
and we begin to learn and understand more about our foreign ties. 



There is a time for study, and Ginny finds, as do many 
other students, the necessity of many hours with her books. 





There are also the quiet times when one can relax or talk. 
Here a group of friends learn the customs of dress in Chile. 



There are gay times when laughter or dancing can break 
the monotony which comes with excessive hours of study. 



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Even in the middle of a crowded dance floor with the band 
playing, you can find a way to talk together quietly. 




Maybe you could dance all night, but at least once you'll slip 
off your shoes and sit the next one out with your date. 



That certain thrill of getting autographs from entertainers 
seems to have a drawing power that attracts everyone. 



Formal Dances Are One 



During the course of the school vear, there are many University dances, most of which are held in Huff Gym. The size of these 
dances grows every year and sometimes it's hard to go through the crowd, much less find space to dance and still hear the band. 



38 





Falling streamers reflect a shadow over the dance floor, 
creating a mirage of light and slender floating clouds. 



Several times every year Illinois coeds anxiously 
look forward to the night of the hig dance, one of 
the six campus-wide formals held at the University 
each year. The nights of these dances mean some- 
thing special to most students — the beautiful formal 
gowns and sparkling cocktail dresses of the coeds, the 
neatly groomed men in their tuxes, the colorful 
decorations in the gym, the soft, romantic melodies of 
lively beat of a "name" dance band, and the crown- 
ing of a pretty queen. When the coed leaves her date 
at two o'clock, the special curfew for these dances, 
she has many pleasant memories of a wonderful 
evening. She'll add another bid to her bid string 
and wish for a date for the next dance. 



Aspect of Illinois' Social Whirl 



From a trombonist's view, we see the popular lllini Union Ballroom filled with an array 
of couples; some are blind dates and some may be pinned, but to us they all look the same. 




You name it! It might be the jitter bug, the bop, the cha cha, or 
even just a plain old "fast dance" at a dance in this decade. 



The Queen rates a special kiss at 
the annual winter formal, Sno-ball. 




39 




Religion Is a Necessary Facet of Campus Life 





A favorite time for all the Congregational students at Sea- 
bury Foundation, is when the Supper Club buffet is ready. 




The Congregationaiists sponsored an old-fashioned taffy pull this 
year. Result? Plenty of fun and gooey, sticky hands for everyone. 



Members of the Lutheran faith share a common feeling 
when they read responsively in an evening worship service. 



Majestically standing at the corner of Green and Mathews 
is a new Methodist Church. It was dedicated in February. 




These vicars of the Episcopal Church rated special balcony seats to 
watch the Sheequon parade as it progressed down Wright Street 



40 







One of the advantages of a state uni- 
versity is the fact that we can associate 
with people of a variety of religions. 
They may be Catholic, Protestant, Jew- 
ish, or ever Humanist. Regardless of 
the faith students follow, some type of 
religion is an important facet of their 
college life. No matter what their be- 
lief might be, students can find a famil- 
iar place to worship. There are sixteen 
organizations and churches that direct 
their services toward the students. They 
provide many activities and fellowship 
groups. There are the Sunday morning 
or Friday evening worship services, sup- 
per clubs, Wednesday night vespers, 
choir singing, discussion groups, and 
many, many more. 




A popular minister with the students is Dr. 
James Hine at McKinley Memorial Foundation. 





All is still, and then with joy we rise to "Sing Praises Unto the Lord" as 
the choir enters to begin the Sunday morning worship service. 



At both the 9:30 and 1 1 :00 services students 
and faculty stream into foundations on campus. 






41 




Many Cultural Traditions 
Enrich Campus Heritage 



The University of Illinois has always been a strong cul- 
tural center and each year the tradition increases. Many 
noted men and women in the fields of humanities and 
the arts have found recognition here. Currently, we have 
on our campus a living legend in the person of Dr. Paul 
Landis. Dr. Landis, who is in his own right a scholar in 
the field of Shakespearian Literature, is best remembered 
as the "reader of the Christmas Carol. He is, in fact, a 
living tradition, for some of our parents can recall hearing 
Dr. Landis read the Christmas Carol when they were here 
at the University. 

Another one of the truly great persons we were privileged 
to have speak to us was the famous contemporary poet, 
Robert Frost. We were so anxious to hear him speak, that 
on the Friday night he spoke in the Auditorium, all the 
seats were filled forty minutes before he came on stage and 
many of us were turned away at the doors. 

But, these two events were a very small segment of all the 
cultural events on campus. 



Visiting artist, Samuel Adler, left, looks on as two I Mini 

Union members hang a painting in an exhibit. 



This year students and faculty enjoyed readings of famous literary- 
works given by professors of the English Department at the Union. 





With his familiar low voice, Dr. Paul Landis brings to 
life characters in Dickens' famous Christmas Carol. 



42 



We heard Robert Frost say: "Good 
fences make good neighbors." 






William Primrose, well known violinist, and Professor Bernard Good- 
man, University Orchestra Conductor, converse before Star Course program. 



Theatre Workshop provides an opportunity for 
students to broaden their cultural desires. 



43 




International Fair brings students and many outsiders from afar to- 
gether for fun and learning. These Greek students host their booth. 





It was a white Christmas at the Union this year, as stu- 
dents worked together decorating the "modern" festive trees. 



One of the many Lithuanian students on campus displays a Christ- 
mas tree, her native style. Compare it to our white flocked one. 



Our Campus Winter 




Rain or shine, snow 
or slcct, our "Alma 
Mater" still 
watches over us. 



44 




Champion hockey players rest after hard practicing. The Ice Rink has a 
full season, with various exhibitions, classes and general public use. 




The real Christmas spirit is captured by these 
houses during their party for cerebral palsy. 



Spells a Need for Stadium Boots and Parkas 



When the lamp posts on the 
quadrangle become barber poles, 
decorated with red ribbon and 
evergreen, and the Alma Mater 
is dressed in her winter coat 
of ice, then campus knows that 
winter is here. It's a good time 
to stay indoors and study, but 
it's also a stimulation for snow- 
ball fights and a jaunt over to 
the Ice Rink for hockey. 

One of the biggest events at 
midyear is International Fair. 
At this time every foreign stu- 
dent on campus has the oppor- 
tunity to familiarize us with his 
own country. This is done thru 
exhibits, movies, pageants, pas- 
try shops, and bazaars. Also, 
popular at this time of year are 
various Christmas parties, often 
given for groups off of campus. 




IHSPA means I Mini High School Press Association and also a jam-packed day of learn- 
ing on the U. of I. campus. It's workshop day for newspaper and yearbook editors. 



45 





Throughout the year, as long as the sun is shining, the 
sundial south of the 1 Mini Union marks the time. 



One of the familiar sights on the campus south of Gregory 
Drive is the ivy-covered gate near the Architecture Building. 



Day in, and Day out, 




This fellow may not be making his first million the easy way, but he is un- 
daunted. Daily, he stands at the corner of Fourth and Armory selling his wares. 



Here, on the campus, is the grave of Illi- 
nois' first regent, John M. Gregory. 




At any time of the day, 10 A.M. espe- 
cially, "Kamm's" is a popular meeting place. 



46 





This is the "Senior Bench." Yes, sixty years ago the graduating class left this as their memorial and designated it to be used only by 
honorable Seniors. How many of us share in the guilty consciences of breaking another one of U. of l.'s changing traditions? 



We Pass These Ever Familiar People & Places 



A U. of I. antique, this Clock, be- 
longed to David Kinley, former President. 





"And we dunked him in the muddy Bone Yard" was originally a traditional 
freshman initiation, but now we know it only thru the words of the song we sing. 



47 



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The greatest part of life in the spring is relaxing outside. Often 
though, we find ourselves sleeping instead of relaxing. 



Spring Pushes Us Outdoors to Study and Play 




'.-,j^'&i&;$$mKUKBE 



Late spring brings another one of the I Mini traditions — the outdoor concerts. On Wednesday evenings, the quadrangle is dotted with 
people who sit on the grass listening to the band as they perform on the Auditorium steps. Here is the utmost in relaxation. 



After being confined by winter weather, we yearn for 
the day we can study outside. The first day we can go 
out and study and enjoy the sun, spring and life, we do. 



55 



The Engineers: Application = Understanding 




Every spri 

students, townspeopl 



in* the Engineering College holds an Open House to show scientific progress. The north campus fills with high school 
"people, and students from other curriculums who are amazed and .mpressed with the modern developments of eng.neer.ng. 



56 





Possibly these future lllini are already at work on their engineer- 
ing problems that they hope to be facing fifteen years from now. 



A popular place during Engineering Open House is the "Double 
E" Building where fellows work on such electronic devices as this. 




Every half hour swarms of people crowd around the mechanical engineering lab in every way possible, to see how much force it takes 
this hydraulic testing machine to smash this solid concrete cylinder all to bits. The loud noise shakes everything north of Green Street. 



57 




Barelegged gals, blaring house combos filled Wright Street as Sheequon officially began Friday at noon. The stunts were meant to 
publicize the events in the Armory— most of us find the purpose more that of letting off steam after much work and just plain partying. 

We Gave the Campus Back to the "Indians" and 




A walk-weary Indian follows his floal on the long parade trek 
through Champaign — do modern Indians wear tennis shoes? 



Willingly we donate our energy and study time to 
create a presentation lor Sheequon. Sheequon means 
"spirit of spring" and comes from the language of 
the Menominee tribe who once inhabited this area. 
In all probability, their meaning and ours coincide 
exactly, for Sheequon is the campus-wide event which 
marks a peak of each spring semester. In our minds, 
we don't think of it as an activity providing the 
Campus Chest with funds, but as a trophy case filler 
and an opportunity for parties and dates. Many a 
merchant in town always wishes he had had a bigger 
supply of grease paints and muslin when we decide 
to become Indians for this weekend. 

Sheequon 1059, in its second year, became much 
bigger and belter. More of us participated in the 
"big show" and it added a new dimension to "spring 
fever." In the parade, we tried to be legendary or 
historical or contemporar) in our float design. 

Saturday afternoon was exciting whether we rode 
on our floal or pounded nails in the dusty Armory. 
For an afternoon, we completely Eorgol our student- 
type existences and were transformed into Indians 
oi A/ice gods, or perhaps even a series oi tepees. 

Sheequon, with all its noise and color, remains an 
mini tradition which will continue as il gives us 
,111 opportunity to express oin talents for something 
othei than examinations and papers. 



58 




♦u W ? " S ! * he , utmos ' in S enui 'y ' n constructing floats that bring home a trophy. The Legend of the Piasa Bird is enacted on wheels as 
these relaxed Indian maidens smile down at the throngs of students and townspeople who turn out for the colorful "Indian Incidents." 

We Found in Ourselves the "Spirit of Spring" 




uftwmm wre 



Montezuma triumphed as Fiji and Theta took first prize in the parade with the impressive "Montezuma Immortal " Costumes and 
bare skin cauced great concern on a gray day threatening rain on all the beautiful floats made mcstly of colored paper. 



59 




"Sheequon Saturday" Is 



On the Saturday afternoon of Sheequon, the parade route 
is lined with people who view what we've constructed. 




To stimulate interest i 

lai to the old-time "Medicine" s 



n the Sheequon night show which is held in the Armory, entering groups will often hold an outside show simi- 
ine" show— lots of loud music, beautiful girls and a short preview of "what s gonna happen tonight. 



authentic historical to the contemporary humorous. The source 



The entries in the parade run the full range of themes from the very at 
of propulsion for these floats runs a similar range, from convertible-powered floats to ones motivated by man power. 





a 61 



Full of Color and Noise 




As the parade draws near, all attention focuses on getting 
a good picture — no matter how good the "hand" is. 



After the pairings for Sheequon come out, preparation 
for "Sheequon Saturday" starts. We begin planning, de- 
signing, rehearsing and building for a weekend months 
ahead. Then on the "Saturday of the Indian," all the 
work, time and effort comes together into a pageant simi- 
lar to a "party that stretches from one end of campus to 
the other and lasted from Friday afternoon until Satur- 
day night." One part of Sheequon is the parade that begins 
in downtown Champaign and ends near the Armory. 

The parade is a colorful affair and spectators select prime 
positions to watch the parade from, hours before the parade 
arrives. The spectators are not disappointed either, for 
the parade contains every imaginable type of entry. The 
parade lasts for approximately two hours and leaves a last- 
ing impression on both the people who see it and the 
people who are in it — "Whata parade!" 



On Saturday night after the parade, the crowd 
ventures into the Armory to see the second-half 
of Sheequon — night show. After the parade and 
before the night show begins, the Armory is a 
madhouse of activity. Everyone has to put finish- 
ing touches on their booths; props are brought in, 
trucks are everywhere, the sound of hammering 
is all over the Armory and people are running in 
every direction. Everyone entertains the thought, 
"we can't possibly get done in time." We do. 

The doors open on the show and the crowd 
flows in. Here, finally, is the realization of months 
of work, but the success of the show doesn't depend 
on the crowd, who pay their "tokens" to see a 
show; success is measured by our fun. Night show 
over, Sheequon (except Sunday clean-up) ends. 



One of the unrehearsed shows of last year's Sheequon was a flood 
of water that engulfed part of the night show in the Armory. 



This show was advertised to "bring a lake to Champaign.' 
They did! University firemen then tried removing it. 




61 





i 










Careful planning had to go into the construction of this 
float, as it had to be hinged in order to allow for its passage 
under the viaducts on the parade route. 



The Final Product of 



On Sheequon weekend, the attitude toward school 
and studies changes markedly. The whole campus 
becomes wrapped in an atmosphere only a parade 
and a show can give. In the time elapse of a tew days, 
we remove all thoughts ot studies and the routine ot 
lite here and concentrate our efforts on maintaining 
the tradition to Sheequon-making this year's float and 
show better than it was last year and having more 
tun doing it. 

Our Sheequon atmosphere is infectious to everyone 
that comes in touch with it. It is reflected in the faces 
of the dancers and builders, but noticably in the ex- 
pressions and actions of the multitudes of onlookers. 
Visitors and people seeing Sheequon for the first time 
are literally astonished at its si/e and the ones of us 
who have seen it before, share their feelings, for each 
Sheequon is excitingly new. 

The credit for making a successful Sheequon must 
go to the members of the various committees who 
move behind the scenes at Sheequon. These are the 
people who organize and control the entire scope of 
Sheequon. They must start planning Sheequon 
months before any of us start to think about it. 
Their rewards for the job they have done often comes 
at the wrong time-during Sheequon when they're 
often too busy to acknowledge their praise with more 
than a casual nod of the head as they go about their 
work. Often they don't get to see the result of then- 
work. 



Another one of the .moressive floats in the parade was one depicting an ancient Indian legend about a big fish. Since the theme of 
this Sheequon was one of Indians, there was a representat.on of Indians from all parts of the world, as well as American Ind.ans. 



62 




Sheequon Is a Campus of Tired, Happy People 




The lllini Hall Steps furnish an excellent vantage point to see the parade when it comes down Wright Street. All along the parade route 
little clusters of people gather everywhere imaginable to see the parad: — they are on steps, roof tops, balconies and car tops, too. 



One game booth in the Armory was a pitching contest. If 
you hit the bullseye, this Indian fell into water. 



The night before Sheequon, the Armory was full of scaffold- 
ing, 2' x 4's and people readying booths for the next day. 



63 





The Psychologists Tell Us Repressed Desires 




The moment a phone rings during MERC week, everyone hopes for a feminine voice. 



During the spring, the campus under- 
goes a miraculuos change. For a full 
week, the boy-girl relationship is re- 
versed. This turnabout week is "Men's 
Economic Recovery Week." 

Throughout the week, the girl takes 
all the privileges of the male. She is 
the one who must call for a date, set 
the time of the date, go over to the 
boy's house to get him, provide trans- 
portation and pay for the date. In addi- 
tion, she must take care of all the little 
things that a boy must do when he is 
on a date, such as, opening doors, light- 
ing all of his cigarettes and making sure 
he is happy. 

Perhaps the most unusual aspect of 
this week is the nature of the dates, 
for they are anything, but ordinary. The 
women think of all types of money- 
saving devices and the dates are all the 
more fun lor it. Last year, the trans- 
portation provided by one group of girls 
was roller-skates. Another good dale 
that is used is the "study" date and 
coffee dales an- also ver\ popular as an 
inexpensive dale. 

As thi' week draws lo a close, main 
girls breathe a sigh of relief because 
their financial resources are somewhat 
depleted, bui the nun chaw a sigh ol re- 
lid ,dso Inc. lUSe, though i( was lun. it's 
good dial MERC Week is jus! a week. 



64 



Are Released During the Spring— Merc Week! 




It's form a "kick-line" for your choice of candidates during the Most Eligible Bachelor on Campus Contest! 
This method of transportation for a date may not be as fast or nice as a car, but it's twice as much fun. 




To achieve that feeling of "togetherness," the women sometimes resort to tactics of mass exchange during this turnabout week. 





The officials' stand for the lllini Grand Prix Bike Races is all set up and ready to go for the race that goes by the Architecture Building. 
Fellows line up and we're off for another one of the many individual street •-aces, a unique custom on the U. of I. campus. 

Bike Races, Greek Week, Mother's Day, and 




Every week is something special and 
this time of the spring brings us around 
to Greek Week. One ol the very special 
elections during this time is tor Mr. 
MEBOC, Most Eligible Bachelor On 
Campus. Naturally, the main require- 
ment lor the candidates, sponsored by 
each house, is that they be single, neither 
pinned or engaged, and the typical 
bachelor. All types ol campaigning are 
done, and many favors are passed out 
to all the girl's houses, the legitimate 
voters. Creek Week also includes a 
special kickoil banquet at the Moose 
Club, exchanges, open houses and lllio- 
Olympics. The latter, held on Friday 
of the week, brings forth the best chariot 
pulling teams around. The fraternities 
build a real chariot, choose a pretty 
maiden to ride in it. and then draft their 
lastesl running pledges to pull it around 
the Armory track. The final event ol 
the week is I.F. Ball on Saturday night. 
Mr. Mcbot is announced — won this yeai 
l>\ Al Gerstein. Pat Boughton was named 
queen and wore a crown laiden with 
lili\ some [rate! nii\ pins. 



Mr. MFBOC campaigns bring |. 
Mnds as this out on Wright Street .it noon hours. 



66 




A competitive nonprofessional sport during the spring is the fra- 
ternity Bike Races, which are sponsored by Delta Upsilon. 



Hour Exams; It's Spring 




■ *,- * iJ* € t 



A young man's fancy turns to b^ssball in the spring, just in 
time to get in practice for the snnual intramural games. 



"Eye's Right!" Air Force men, and don't get out of step because your mothers are watching. One of the many events of Mother's Day 
Weekend is the RCTC Review which includes marching exhibitions and the presentation of special awards in recognition of top service men. 








, wm 



67 




Will, portrayed by Jim Wallace, tells listeners about his trip to Kansas City, where everything is up-to-date and where "They've 
About As Fer As They Can Go" with their modern gas buggies, telephones, skyscrapers and daring "burlique" shows. 



Gone Abou 



Rogers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!", Highly 



Ado Annie, played by Linda Bennett, laments to Laurey, 
Carol Oyster, a habit of being unable to resist men. 




Here on the campus, we set aside the first May 
weekend as Mother's Day. The mothers arrive on 
the campus on Friday or Saturday and live with us 
until Sunday. During this period, there are many 
events and traditional activities. The weekend is 
full of bridge tournaments, serenades, "look alike" 
contests, banquets and merriment. 

Spring Musical is just one of the traditional events 
that occurs on Mother's Day. It is given on Friday and 
Saturday nights and is consistently one of the best 
received events of the weekend. Fast year's produc- 
tion of "Oklahoma!" was no exception. All who saw 
it, enjoyed it thoroughly. The comment that the 
musical was "very professional" was a tribute to the 
time and effori put Eorth by all those connected with 
the show. 

Another ol the various activities held on this week- 
end is the downing ol the Mother's Da) Queen. The 
Queen is the personification ol the ideal Illinois co-ed. 
she is chosen on the basis ol hei beauty, personalit) 

and poise. ,k li\ ilies and S( holarship. 

How often do we hear, though, alter the last mom 
lias gone, "She woie me out trying to see everything." 
But we all were happ) to have Mom here lot a while. 



68 




The peddler, played by Raoul Johnson, believes himself quite 
the ladies' man and often finds himself in very hot water. 




Lovely Carolyn Meadors, our 1959 Mother's Day Queen, ac- 
companied by her charming court, proudly displays her trophy. 



Praised as Brightest Event of 1959 Mom's Day 



When Laurey discovers Curley, he is with another girl. The girls sing a song vowing never to sigh about a boy who has left, for a man 
is only a man among men, and a girl can easily forget him by getting herself a new dress or by washing her hair. 




Traditions Come & Traditions Go- 




Mrs. Saul Gelman, lllirti Mom, reigns happily wih her son, Wil- 
liam, on the platform at the Mother's Day May Queen ceremonies. 



Modern campus is a far cry from what it used to 
be when freshmen all wore beanies and the seniors 
had a prom. Regardless of the changing people and 
their different ways, a few traditions have survived. 
The tapping for honoraries has lived down through 
the years. Mortar Boards still go tapping in the night 
in their black caps and gowns. As the campus grew 
and there was more competition, Shorter Board was 
added to recognize more of the honored senior girls. 
Ma-Wan-Da and Wa-Na-See, senior men's honoraries, 
have endured changing times. 

Now instead of sipping cider through a straw out 
at Dunlap Orchard (now the Paradise Inn), students 
find relaxation in TGIFing, the Friday afternoon 
beer blast, and precede their finals with a Water 
Fight. Even Alma Mater was changed into a white 
faced scoling beatnik and paths were worn across 
the middle of a grass filled quad. What's happening 
to the "younger generation?" Not a thing. It's just 
that an afternoon at the Lake of the Woods or a ride 
in a top down convertible is more a part of the 
modern day trend. Students are still human and in 
the end they proudly march in the traditional gradua- 
tion processional to receive their diplomas. 



- 

- ■ ■ ■■:■ ■ ■ ■ ■;■ ■■;■ -_''''.' .. ■■ .:.' i' :' ': 




Pranksters keep the physical plant 
busy at work reviving our traditions. 



70 



Few Endure the Changing Times 





Please . . . 



"26 de Mayo" was the prewarning of this year's water fight. The tradition, however, 
was somewhat squelched by the University administration and the Tribe of the lllini. 




"A true lllini never curs" is the old 

saying. Often we need a reminder! 




Down through the years has lived the tradition of the Mortar Bjard girls, senior activity and scholastic honorary. The week before 
Mother's Day weekend, their song can be heard as they come tapping in the night, fulfilling the college dreams of 25 coeds. 



71 



Graduation Marks the End of A Way of Living; 




Mommie anrf daddy and daughter, too, are dressed for the graduation parade. On commencement day, everyone (cols the excitement 
of the mcrnon t, for it it then we leave the University and venture into the world. We leave with ml xed emotion. 



72 



It Is the Beginning of Our Use of Learning 




We sit in the stadium and listen as degrees are conferred to us. 
It is a solemn, yet happy moment for everyone. 




Our University President, David D. Henry, is a busy person at 
commencement, for he confers all our degrees. 




for Jftl Permitting, we receive our degrees in Memorial Stadium. This academic procession is the end of learning at the University 
for most. When we enter the stadium, we present a picture of thousands of black robes moving slowly forward. 



73 




Louis B Howard, Dean of ths College of Agriculture, also acts 
as Director of the Agr. Experiment Sta. and Extension Service. 




Ag & Home Economics 



"lllini Rusty," a University of III. Hereford steer, captured first 
place at the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago. 



Agriculture was one of the main purposes for the 
establishment of this Land-Grant College in 1867. 
Today it still reigns high, being one of the campus 
colleges to offer the most varied careers. Ag School, 
including Home Economics, is changing its patterns 
of education and now offers nine complete options: 
Ag. Economics, Ag. Engineering, Agronomy, Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, Food Technology, Forestry, 
Horticulture, and Plant Pathology. A new advance- 
ment in its teaching methods is the teaching machine, 
developed by Darl M. Hall of the Extension Dept. 

Home Economics, headed by Dr. Janice Smith, ful- 
fills the feminine side of south campus. Home Ec. 
is the study of family living, which is today the most 
complex human relationship. Home Economists often 
have the hard job of convincing outsiders that "Home 
Ec. is learning to appreciate one's children, art, 
music, literature, and people. It is a scientific field." 
A degree in Home Ec. is a magic door to good employ- 
ment in child development, home furnishings, ap- 
parel design, textiles, retailing, foods, institutional and 
restaurant management, household management, 
teaching, and extension. 



Way south on campus in the Agriculture Engineering Building, students run various tests on such , f arm structure designs as this. 
Ag. Engineering offers a number of options in power and machinery, rural electrification, farm structures, and 



soil and water engineering. 




-A Way to Many Careers 




A favorte time at the Child Development Laboratory on Nevada Street is when 
the graduate assistant gathers the children all around her for "Show and Tell." 



Taking a look at some of the new materials and methods used in making House- 
hold Equipment are a graduate student and her competent instructor, Miss Lorch. 





Creating a flat pattern for any dress design — 
another one of Home Ec's special training areas. 




That's what it is — a "Teaching Machine." Dr. 
Hall explains its workings to an Ag student. 



75 




Expanding Institute of 
Aviation Soars Ahead 



The Institute of Aviation, directed by Leslie A. 
Bryan, offers aviation instruction, flight maintenance, 
and a professional pilot curriculum to 100 students 
within the school and to 350 other interested students 
in the University. 

The airport, composed only of a few runways and 
a lone hangar in 1946, has become larger in area than 
Chicago's Midway Airport. The Institute has gained 
a national reputation for its many advances, but it 
continues to look ahead. 

A present expansion program includes the building 
of a one-half million dollar terminal building and 
control tower. The building provides office space for 
the Ozark Airlines; the tower operates as a part of 
the Interstate Air Traffic System of the United States. 
A quarter-million dollar project to increase the much- 
ly needed ramp and parking space is also a part of the 
Institute's goal. 



All-hough his student enrollment is relatively small, Director 
Leslie Bryan has a big job heading the growing department. 



The lines and forms of this artistic design make up the University of 

inois Airport, which is always in use — be it noon or midnight. 





The Link Trainer Room is where students learn 
the basic principles of their Flight Instruction. 



76 




The acting Dean of the College of Education, C. M. Allen, 
smiles, regarding a group of books, the tools for education. 




Pictured above is a class for the teachers of exceptional chil- 
dren, including the advanced and mentally retarded ones. 



College of Education 
Increases Research 



The College of Education prepares our potential 
leaders lor their teaching of special educational serv- 
ices. The school offers curricula lor elementary teach- 
ing, industrial education, home economics education, 
and education for exceptional children, mentally 
handicapped, deaf, and hard of hearing. The cur- 
ricula draws on the broad resource of the University 
for general education. Graduate courses are offered 
for development of appropriate fields of specialization. 

The percentage of people in the field of education 
has increased nearly one hundred-fold in the past 
ten years, and more are turning to teaching. Over 
half the students enrolled in education are in ele- 
mentary education. 

Research, a major facet of the work of the college, 
is increasing its programs greatly. University High 
School provides facilities for testing and developing 
new programs. The School of Education receives 
many land grants to aid improvement. 




Through this door, that of the Dean of the College of Educa- 
tion, walk educational leaders of the present and future. 



77 



Commerce Aims for the Well-Rounded Education 




One of the many professional fraternities of Commerce, Alpha Kappa Psi, celebrates its Founder's , Day Banquet. Other P™^*"* 1 

jr-anizations connected with Commerce include the Society for the Advancement of Management, the Marketing Club and Insurance Club. 




David Kinley Hall, better known as "D.K.H.," 
is one of the busiest buildings on campus. It is 
the established landmark of the College of Com- 
merce and Business Administration. 

Through training in modern business practices 
and in the fundamentals of economics, this col- 
lege seeks to develop in its student the abilities 
necessary for responsible positions in business and 
government. It offers a unified program of basic 
studies for freshmen and sophomores and a variety 
of fields of concentration for juniors and seniors. 
Though the factual contents of many of the courses 
are directly useful in specific vocations such as ac- 
counting, banking, selling, and teaching, students 
expect to serve an apprenticeship in the fields that 
they enter alter graduation from this College, if 
they wish to prepare themselves for higher posi- 
tions. While concentrating in a special field, they 
are required to select courses offered in other col- 
leges and schools of the University and to secure as 
liberal an education as possible to avoid the nar- 
rowing ellccis ol overspeciali/ation. 

The program for the first and second years is 
organized around courses in accounting, and ceo 
nomics, mathematics and science, language and 
literature and speech. While this program is de- 
signed as preparation for the third and Eourth years 
ol the curriculum, it affords a well balanced com 
bination ol studies Eoi those who are in college 
onl\ two years in preparation Eoi work. 



Dean Paul Green serves both as Dean of the College of Com- 
I lean ol the Graduate School of Business Administration. 



78 





This typing class attests that education in the College of Com- 
merce involves practical, as well as theoretical learning. 



In the computer lab, commerce students learn basic fun- 
damentals of skillful operation of many business machines. 




The Illinois chapter of the Marksting Club sponsored a three-day trip to Indianapolis this year for the purpose of seeing marketing 
principles studied in class put into operation on the job. The bus was full, even though the trip began at 7:15 on a Monday morning. 



79 





Graduate engineers inspect the focal point of the moon beamer, 
recently installed atop the Electrical Engineering Building. 



The moon beam deflector provides an excellent opportu- 
nity for students to turn theory into practical application. 



Rapidly Expanding College of Engineering Adds 




During the course of their studies, engineering students come in contact with many devices. Here the instructor explains the opera- 
tion of this instrument to his class. Through demonstrations of equipment the students gain a comprehensive picture ot the course. 



80 



William L. Everitt, Dean of the College of Engineer- 
ing, has the responsibility of heading one of the fastest- 
growing departments in the University. Dr. Everitt is 
the President of the Joint ECPD-EJC Committee on the 
Survey of the Engineering Profession; he is on the Ad- 
visory Committee for the Pacific Missile Range ol the 
U. S. Navy and on the Army Scientific Advisory Panel. 
These are only a few of Dr. Everitt's many interests, but 
they indicate his enthusiasm lor the engineering profes- 
sion and its developments. 

Dr. Everitt visited Russia's teaching and research in- 
stitutions last November as he participated in an ex- 
change program sponsored by the American Society for 
Engineering Education. This year Dr. Everitt was in- 
vited to visit Greenland to see the "DEW" line, the 
Distance Early Warning radar picket line, which looks 
across the poles over northern Canada, Alaska, and 
Greenland and warns of the approach of manned air- 
craft. Dr. Everitt enjoyed this trip in December. 

This year's plans for the College of Engineering in- 
clude the construction of the Nuclear Engineering 
Building, located behind the Physics Building. The 
building will house a nuclear reactor, which is expected 
to be installed and operating in early spring. An elec- 
trical radio telescope is being built as a joint operation 
between the Electrical Engineering and Astronomy 
Departments. 




Dean William L. Everitt, who has the responsibility of 
heading the College of Engineering, examines test models. 



Nuclear Building and Installs Nuclear Reactor 



Students in a mechanical engineering lab conduct efficiency tests 
on a model central station electric turbo-generator system. 





Mechanical Engineering staff members perform neutron 
experiments with the aid of an uranium light-water reactor. 



81 



University Extension Composed of Nine Sections 





Top notch organizations are the keywords of the Audio-Visual 
Aids Service, the world's largest education film lending library. 



Associate Dean Stanley Robinson, acting administrative head of 
the Division, checks through one of their many files. 




A reflection in <i foreground lake 01 in the miml\ of people who 
hay, ittended conferences at; Allerton Park find this typical scene. 



Here's a division of the University that has no Eaculty! 
This is absolutely the truth because members of the 
faculties of every other college on campus participate- 
in the Division of University Extension. There are nine 
particular sections to the department: (1) Short Courses, 
Conferences, and Institutes; (2) Correspondence Studies; 
(3) Extramural Classes; (4) Audio-Visual Aids Service; 
(5) Music Extension; ((>) Engineering Extension; (7) 
Police Training Institute; (8) Vocational Testing ami 
Counseling lor Adults; (9) Information Services. En- 
gineering Extension has a Firemanship Training pro- 
gram, too. 

1960 marks die twenty-sixth year of service that Ex- 
tension has given to the University. One ol the inter 
esting lads about their teaching is that it is done in 
classrooms throughout the state. For many years, Uni- 
versity Extension lias maintained Allerton Park, ami last 
year just added die Evergreen Lodge there. The Eacili 
lies at Allerton are used lor dinners, conventions, ami 
camps. Te beautiful grounds and interesting imported 
an works provide a popular place lot students. The 
lad that Extension covers so man) areas keeps their 

ollue a populai plate. 



82 



Institute of Government 
And Public Affairs Is 
Public Service for All 



In addition to the many Colleges on the campus, the 
University also provides services to many organzations. 
One of these services is the Institute of Government 
and Public Affairs. This service is designed to furnish 
information and collective data to individuals and 
groups and government and state officials requesting 
various types of aggregate data. 

Graduate students are employed by this office to do 
field research and process the data to the different 
levels of government as well as other groups. 

A feature beneficial to students looking for employ- 
ment in government is given by the Institute. Often, 
the Institute acts as an agent between students interested 
in governmental jobs and the jobs by providing in- 
formation about these jobs. 




Director G. Y. Steiner has a massive chore in heading the assem- 
bly of data in the Institute of Government and Public Affairs. 



Labor And Industrial Relations Institute Aids Us 




Over the desk of Director Martin Wagner flow the many prob- 
lems confronting the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations. 



A branch of one of the fields involving required study 
of sociology, psychology, management and other re- 
lated fields is the Institute of Labor and Industrial 
Relations. The Institute is broken clown into three 
distinct divisions. 

The first area is the teaching by the case-history 
method, using students enrolled in the Institute's pro- 
gram. Secondly, students and faculty are employed by 
the Institute to do reseach on problems that currently 
face labor and industrial relations throughout the nation. 

The third area of the Institute's work is joining in 
extension work within the state. This entails organizing, 
preparing and teaching courses to interested personnel 
from all stations of business and labor, so they may 
have a better view of problems facing them. 



83 



mmmamm ^* <i 




Dean Weller takes time out from his many duties as head of 
the College of Fine and Applied Arts to relax in his office. 



The College ol Fine and Applied Arts, administered 
by Dean Allen S. Weller, is one ol the best colleges ol 
its kind in the country. This college offers courses in 
the Departments of Architecture, Art, City Planning, 
and Landscape Architecture, and in the School ol Music. 
Also included in the college are the Bureau ol Com- 
munity Planning, the Small Homes Council, and the 
University Bands. 

In keeping with the University's program of giving 
more advanced instruction to exceptional students, the 
School of Music offers the Illinois Summer Youth Music 
program. Fifteen hundred talented high school music 
students may attend the University for two summers 
and receive full college credit for the courses they have 
taken . 

Two new buildings, the Krannert Art Museum, a gift 
of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Krannert, and the Fine and 
Applied Arts Buildings, should be finished soon. Fea- 
tures of these new additions to the campus include a 
glassed-in lounge connecting the two buildings and a 
reflecting pool. Since the Art Department has vacated 
the Architecture Building and moved to the new build- 
ing, the old structure is being used soley for architectural 
and administrative purposes. 

Honoring the campus with his presence as a visiting 
professor this year was Samuel Adler, the noted painter 
and contemporary artist of New York University. 





Interested art students carefully study a painting in the Art 
Gallery, which is located in the Architecture Building. 



This lithograph in the basement of the Architecture Building 
enables art students to print the sketches they di.iw in class. 



84 






Music, Architecture, and Art Included in FAA 





A music instructor explains the fundamentals of theory in a 
course which is required of all students in music curricula. 



The teacher of this beginning piano class drills some of her stu- 
dents in pitch while the others play the notes on the piano. 



Practicing for a recital are four talented young ladies, members of the department of music's harp ensemble. This ensemble and many 
other similar instrumental groups add to the cultural offerings by performing for various recitals and programs throughout the year. 




85 



Journalism and Communications College Changes 




i , 




In the college's two-year program, degrees are given in 
the advertising, news-editorial and radio-TV fields. 



In the basement of Gregory Hall, a clatter of typewriters denotes 
that the reporting lab is in session and students are creating again. 





This weird-looking "tinker-toy" is (he schematic diagram of personality. An 
important part of communications is Its effect on personality. 



The typography lab furnishes students practi- 
cal printing experience on a limited scale. 



86 



Advertising, Editorial and Radio -TV Programs 



This year, the College of Journalism and Communi- 
cations formalized its program in the Advertising, 
News-Editorial and Radio-TV fields. This College 
has offered a degree in Journalism since 1922, but 
it was not until last year, that the formal division of 
the field was made. 

The College oilers both the theoretical and the 
practical plus some "on the job" experience. The 
courses that are taught in the Radio-TV field, for 
example, involve working with TV equipment and 
producing TV shows. The college even maintains its 
own Radio-TV station, WILL. Students in profes- 
sional fraternities of Advertising and News-Editorial 
have an opportunity to display their talents, also, lor 
Sigma Delta Chi publishes a newspaper once yearly 
and Alpha Delta Sigma pledges have to sell "sand- 
wich" board advertising to be initiated. 

Each spring, outstanding (acuity and students of 
the college are honored at the "Brown Derby" ban- 
quet. One of the main attractions of this show is the 
skits put on by the faculty and the students, which 
are satirical sketches of faculty as been by the stu- 
dents and vice-versa. 



II*'!'* 1 1 III 

ii il j^^ 

9 J ■ 

1 ^Li A 1 




J Mr; ^ 


^T- ; 4B 


flflL f^^PfjB 










1 






In addition to his duties as Dean of the College, Dean Peterson 
still takes time to teach some Journ courses during the semester. 




In this copy and layout course, practical experience is provided. In this course, as in many of this College's courses, practical appli- 
cation is made of the principles taught. The experience gives students a taste of the problems they will be meeting in the future. 



87 





The Law Library is one of the most complete in the country and Law stu- 
dents make considerable use of this quiet, well-lit part of the Law School 



This small ante-room across from the law auditorium 
provides a comfortable place to relax between classes. 



Law Students Find 




Law Sc 

located on Pcnnsy 



hool with its modern design makes it one of the most beautiful schools on the campus. The School, built five years ago, IS 
'cnnsylvama Avenue and the only complaint many students have about school is its distance from campus. 



The program of education in Law School is 
very different from the standardized lecture and 
discussion type of learning many under-graduates 
are exposed to. Much of the learning in the 
school is done by the case history method and 
its application to modern Law. 

The school plays host to a number of varied 
traditions and activities. One tradition is the 
wearing of bowlers and carrying of canes by the 
graduating seniors on Wednesdays. Other tradi- 
tions include applauding each instructor out of 
the classroom on the final day of class, mock 
courtroom trials and Moot Court. Moot Court is 
designed to give freshmen in Law experience in 
courtroom policy and proceedings. 

One of the highest honors of Law School is an 
acceptance of an article written for Law Forum, 
the magazine put out by the school dealing 
with current legal problems. Students writing 
the best articles are selected as permanent mem- 
bers of the staff. Another honor is to be selected 
as one of a team of four students to debate before 
a Supreme Court in the spring. Selection is 
made on the basis of performance in the Moot 
Court of the Law School. 




Dean R. N. Sullivan heads the Law School here, from which many of 
this country's top lawyers and judges have been educated and graduated. 






Education in Simulated Court Room Proceeding 




Students are given a chance to show their talents as prospective lawyers in these mock court room trials and hearings. The tribunals 
of judges are men who have great knowledge of the field. This type of experience is invaluable to the student when he starts his practice. 



89 




A scribbled blackboard with outlines and diagrams is a 
good visual aid for the students in Botany lecture. 



With the largest increase in enrollment on the (Jrbana 
campus, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences made 
highly important advances this year in se.eral different 
ways: a new Language Laboratory; a new program of 
"honors" courses lor superior students in all classes; and 
a new advisory system in which each student has an in- 
dividual adviser, a long needed program. 

The new Language Laboratory has greatly improved 
instruction in all ot the modern languages. Equipped 
with the most modern electronic devices, the laboratory 
is used by hundreds of students each week to perfect 
their speaking and understanding of the six different 
languages taught in the college. 

Measured in terms of total impact on its undergradu- 
ate students, probably the most significant development 
in L.A.S. this year is the guidance system which is 
particularly helpful for incoming freshmen. Faculty 
members spend time helping students work out a pro- 
gram, overcome academic difficulties, and plan careers. 
Systems as this have worked well in other colleges, but 
because of its size, it was impossible before in L.A.S. 



Increasing Enrollment and Developing Various 



The typical lecture section shown here appears only to be the instructor talking and the students writing. We have all been in this 
scene at some time. We wait for the bell and our attention shifts from lecture notes to clock-watching and planning for after class. 





~ - mamm^ 




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Instrument's such as these characterize the modern trend in 
educational research, a changing and motivating field in itself. 



Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, L. H. 
Lanier, heads one of the largest divisions of the University. 



Programs Describe New Advancements in LAS 



It's a new language laboratory! Professor Birke instructs studrnts from the console at the beginning of a half-hour session with mod- 
ern language students. Those in the front row are studying German, those in the second row French, and the third row Russian. 




91 



Liberal Arts Adds New School of Life Sciences 




Observing some interesting Petri Plates in the spore laboratory are mem- 
bers of the University Board of Trustees as they tour the new structure. 




1959 summer school students in bacteriology I now called microbiology) 
had the privilege of initiating the new modern equipment and laboratory. 



*!* 



i* 

*« 






■-. 



k 





As students looked through their time- 
tables this past fall and checked where then- 
classes were to be, they asked, "Where's Bur- 
rill Hall?" Sure enough, there's a new build- 
ing and a new school on campus. The School 
of Lite Sciences includes the Departments 
of Botany, Entomology, Microbiology, Physi- 
ology, and Zoology. No longer will students 
of these classes have to crowd into the old 
Natural History Building which was erected 
in 1892, the last major building for life 
sciences. With all this new space, plans 
are being made for broadening the research 
division too. 




Dr. Halvor O. Halvorson, chosen director of the 
new school, headed the Bact. Depart, for 10 years. 



Down Mathews Ave. stands the building named 
ill, >i .i great U. of I, botanist, Thomas J. Burrill. 



92 



Library Graduate School Works for All of Us 



Every student at sonic time during his college 
days will go to the library seeking help lor his 
Studies. His wishes should come true, for await- 
ing him arc one hundred thirty professionally 
trained librarians to guide him to any of over 
three million, eight hunched thousand volumes. 
In addition to the eleven special rooms in the 
main library which are devoted to a total of 
seventeen different fields, there are sixteen de- 
partmental libraries in various buildings 
throughout the campus. 

The U. of I. Library School recently changed 
its name to the Graduate School of Library 
Science. This school was founded in 1893 in 
Chicago but was later brought to a new build- 
ing in Urbana. In 1897 the school moved to 
i(s present location on the third floor of the 
main University library. Since the founding, 
over lour thousand men and women have gradu- 
ated from the school. The basis of the depart- 
ment is to train students lor careers as pro- 
fessional librarians. They receive job offers in 
public schools, colleges, universities, research 
libraries, and other special areas. 

The Library School Library was designed 
especially for the school and contains more than 
twenty thousand bound volumes, twenty-eight 
thousand library reports, and thirty-five drawers 
of vertical files. The Library School is the oldest 
of its type in the United States. 



0TY1 







Dean Robert B. Downs' official title reads "Dean of Library Ad- 
ministration and Director of the Graduate School of Library Science." 



A typical class discussion as this could be seen in one of the many class rooms on the second floor of the Main Library. The students 
you see could easily be graduates from colleges in California, Maine, or Alabama, as the School is known throughout the country. 





It's not uncommon at all to see a group such as this in front of Huff Gymnasium. 
This recreation class is certainly well equipped for a weekend camping trip. 




"Can you name every bird on the chart?" Part of the job as a recreation major 
is learning to set up visual aids and nature games for teaching purposes. 



II you want to be a Physical Ed. 
teacher, a coach, a city recreation direc- 
tor, a TV personality or "Slim and 
Trim," a health and safety department 
head, or even a dance director of a 
Broadway musical, then a major in the 
"College of Physical Education" is for 
you. It's been a "College" since 1957. 
Back in 1932 when "mamma" wore 
bloomers and middy blouses to P.E., 
the department began as a "School." 

This College may technically be new, 
but it is hard to miss on campus, for it 
touches almost all four corners. On the 
north side is Old Men's Gym. The Eng- 
lish Building, once "The Women's 
Building," still provides the ladies with 
a gym and swimming pool. On the 
east is the Women's Gym and we've all 
been to Huff which borders the west. 
Besides covering a broad land area, the 
College offers a broad program to stu- 
dents and boasts the largest enrollment 
in the U.S.A. 



Physical Ed. Offers Serious Study and Fun To 



Dean Seward C. Staley has been most faithful to the College of Physical 
Ed., for he was formerly director when it was still a school. 



This little chap finds it fun to learn how to use 

nature's materials for creating his own artwork. 





94 



The Program of the Graduate School of Social 
Work Includes Classroom and Field Instruction 



The School oi Social Work, unknown to some people, 
is tor graduates only. During the two year program ot 
classroom and field instruction, the graduates acquire 
an understanding of the social and economic aspects 
of the society, and a knowledge and skill in interper- 
sonal and inter-group relations. 

In order that students can better understand cur- 
rent problems and developments in the field of social 
work, the University has set up special relations with 
public agencies and institutions. By studying within a 
realistic situation, they can acquire social work skills. 
These various institutions provide students with invalu- 
able experience in research and constitute most of their 
field instruction. Assignments are given to students on 
the basis of their educational needs and their area of 
interest. The specific projects include Child Welfare, 
Family Welfare, Group Serving Agencies, Medical Social 
Work, Rehabilitation, Psychiatric Social Work and 
Public Assistance. 

A student may specialize in any of these fields, but 
the curriculum is designed to enable the student to ac- 
cjtiire a broad understanding of social work. This School 
places emphasis on learning the behavior and organiza- 
tion of individuals and groups in society. 




Director Marietta Stevenson coordinates 
classroom and field work in the School. 



Special Services Division Nears Its Demisal 



Director Frank A. Bridgewater's small but mighty important 
headquarters are on the second floor of the Armory Building. 




I960 will mark the last year for the Division 
of Special Services for War Veterans on our 
campus. This unique curriculum was set up 
soon after World War II in order for returning 
veterans to secure a liberal college education. 
Students have no longer been allowed to register 
in this division, for its purpose has now almost 
been exhausted. 

One might say that the division does custom 
made curriculum work for the men and women 
veterans, for each of their schedules are made 
particularly for them. Students may take courses 
in art, engineering, commerce, home economics, 
or whatever they choose. This enables them to 
pick up college credits where they need them 
without going through a complete specified pro- 
gram. This personal attention has proved to be 
a great asset to the veterans. 

Naturally the division is quite small. In fact, 
there are only (>1 enrolled this year. These stu- 
dents will either graduate or change to another 
curriculum in August, I960, when room 249 will 
no longer be open for service. 



95 



Continuous Progress 
Keys Expansion for 
Veterinary Medicine 



Although the College of Veterinary Medicine 
was established in 1944, it is not a new-comer 
to the campus. Courses in Veterinary Sciences 
were offered as early as 1870. At the present 
time, the number of undergraduate students en- 
rolled in the college is 156, the highest number 
in its history. With expanding enrollment, the 
college has grown in two directions-facilities and 
courses offered. 

Recently, a Federal Grant was received for a 
new Zoonoses Building — a secure isolation unit 
for research of diseases transmissible between 
animals and man. The use of radioactive 
materials has created the necessity for new 
courses in the college and courses in radio- 
phsiology were developed this year. The col- 
lege program also includes service programs for 
animal disease detection and diagnosis. 



An operation on a bull's eye is just one of the public services offered by the college. Last year, the ambulatory clinical services han- 
dled 29,103 animal patients. Facilities for handling the animals include both a Large and Small Animal Clinic here on the campus. 




Dr. C. A. Brandly, Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine, 
heads all phases of the college-teaching, public service and research. 




96 



The Graduate College which has the largest en- 
rollment of any College on the campus otters stu- 
dents advanced study in many different fields of 
learning. As the field of man's knowledge increases 
so do the numerous fields of graduate study, for 
work and research is being done in all fields of 
science and art. Often the work includes the 
tying together of research clone in one field with 
its application in another field. Quite unlike the 
undergraduate colleges at Illinois, graduate college 
draws its students from all over the nation rather 
than mainly from this state. Many students return 
to school alter work experience. 

Although each College has its own graduate col- 
lege, they are all united under the Graduate Col- 
lege with its office located in the Administration 
Building. The graduate program at Illinois is one 
of the best in the country due to its organization. 



AH Phases of Higher 
Education Covered in 
The Graduate College 




Dean F. T. Wall views the campus from his office knowing that 
anywhere he looks, he will see a part of Illinois' Graduate College. 




Graduate students increase their knowledge of 
their subject by close contact with the instructors. 




A nuclear reactor, resembling the one in this sketch, will soon be built on 
campus for further graduate research in the field of nuclear physics. 



97 




Miriam A. Sheldon, Dean of Women, takes time out 
from her many responsibilities to enjoy a cup of hot coffee. 




Eunice M. Dowse, the Daan of Residence Had Counsel- 
ing, has a large number of girls under her guidance. 




Mrs. Beth Hinchcliff, the Social Adviser, w il m.imly 
/7l ih the many activities "I the modem college women 



' 



The Deans of Women & 



The officers on the first floor of the south part of the 
English Building are known to all women students of the 
University ol Illinois, for here is where our Dean oi Women 
and her staff carry on their many very important services 
to help make a girl's college days more enjoyable and 
beneficial to her. 

The Dean of Women and her assistants are responsible 
for the general welfare and the out-of-class life of the 
undergraduate women. They very cheerfully and willingly 
help in these areas of responsibility: individual counseling 
on general problems; referrals, where appropriate, to other 
offices and services; group advising; and personnel services 
for women. 

They also take a special interest in particular problems 
concerning a woman's education, vocation, employment, 
and housing, as they differ from the general educational 
needs of all students. 




Mary E Harrison, Dean of Independent Women, helps promote 
scholarship and good citizenship through Women's Group System. 



Ann J MclMamera, Dean of Freshmen Women, gives a helping 
hand to both the freshmen themselves and their very competent 
advisers. 




Men Serve All of Us 



Tins year there is a new hue at the Dean of Men's 
Office. Dean Knox, who was Dean of Men at a small col- 
lege in Ohio, is now Dean of Men here at the University 
of Illinois. He and his staff of three assistant deans are 
very busy throughout the year performing duties of their 
respective positions. Resides helping men students with 
their problems, there are staff meetings, interviews, tele- 
phone calls, and a million and one other things that must 
be done. They strive to help students obtain high scholar- 
ship. One means of promoting it is through the competi- 
tion set up among housing groups. Aside from on the 
job duties, the Deans are advisers to various organizations 
on campus such as Phi Eta Sigma, which is the freshman 
men's honorary. Yes, the Dean of Men and his assistants 
are very busy, but they always seem to have time for every 
individual who needs advice about almost any matter. 







Eldon Park, Dean of Fraternity Men, constantly strives to promote 
friendly scholastic competition among the various Greek houses. 



This is the first year at the U. of I. for Panhellenic Adviser, Joan 
Cochran, who is busy directing the activities of Greek women. 





Carl Knox, Dean of Men, is signing one of the many 
papers which pass through his busy office each day. 




Robert Culp, Dean of Independent Men, helps to pro- 
mote good scholarship and good will among students. 




A new position in the Dean of Men's Office is that cf 
Richard O'Leary, who acts as the Dean of M.I. A. 



99 



The Deans of Students, the Busiest of Them All 






Y 




jsaiflMSsxr^^-^^ 




Every d.iy Dean Turner has conferences with various students 
concerning aspect I ■. indent government and discipline. 



How well do we know our deans? We see them at 
open houses, honorary banquets, freshmen week speechej 
founder's day, and water fights. If we're among the top 
scholastic group, we may have the opportunity of re- 
ceiving their personal congratulations. We may be ol 
another special group and go to see them about "getting, 
back in." We're aware that there's Dean Turner when 
ii comes to CSA's passing a bill for a 2 o'clock night. 
It's when these crucial decisions conic to a head that 
we arc aware ol the top executive of our campus. 

Behind the scenes though, our deans perform a great 
many services lor us. Throughout the year they're alwaj 
on the go, giving speeches here and there, recruiting 
more members for our institution. The many papeffl 
thai pass through then offices in the Administratis 
building are the valuable documents ol furthering om 
highei educational system. II it were not for then 
competeni administering ol the technical affairs ol o| 

S( liool. I'. ol I. would be in chaos. 



100 



Office of Admissions & Records Admits 20,219 




HUM 



Charles W. Sanford, Dean of Admissions and Records, stands by the statistics on U. of I. residents from Illinois proving a high per- 
centage of the enrollment. Champaign County claims 2,368 students this year, with the Chicago and St. Louis areas running close behind. 



This past fall the Champaign-Urbana Campus was 
busting out all over! Literally, anxious coeds were living 
in the study rooms of L.A.R. and some were even over 
in McKinley Hospital. This went on about the first 
month of school until a lew of the not so anxious college 
prospects packed up and went home, leaving their 
rooms for those who were camping out. 20,219 was the 
highest enrollment yet to go through the bustling 
Admissions Office. Added with Chicago Professional 
College's 2,218, Chicago Undergrade 4,067, and 3,778 
students in Extramural Courses gives another all time 
high ol .10,282 lor the University of Illinois. Most ol 
these students were Illinois citizens, but 877 were from 
foreign countries. 

The Ollice of Admissions and Records is a spectacular 
place to see. It takes supreme planning and organization 
to keep twenty thousand transcripts and one hundred 
thousand class cards in their right place ai the right 
time. IBM has certainly speeded up die old traditional 
hand filing system of not too long ago. 




The Administration Building corridor looks familiar to every- 
one who has paid a bill, gotten special permits or dropped a 
course. 



101 




C. E. 



/en, secretary; Paul K. 



b^^'&w^ 



Illinois Alumni Are Still Active After Graduation 




Gene V.ince, standing, confers wilh members of the Alumni 
Association. He succeeded Mr. Bowen as an executive director. 



As soon as graduation is over, we step into the ranks 
of an alumni, but we are not forgotten. The Alumni 
Association extends a free two-year membership into the 
Association. We are then part of the more than 19,500 
due-paying alumni. 

Our Alumni Association is one of the largest ol its 
kind in the country and has, for 87 years, served alumni 
and students by attempting to build a better University. 
One of the principal functions oi the Association is 
keeping accurate data on the 100.000 plus Illini scattered 
throughout the world. 

In man) cities over the country, there are Illini Clubs 
which are sponsored hv the Association. The purpose 
ol these clubs is to bring Illini together lor fellowship 
and cooperation on projects ol assistance to the Uni- 
versity. 

Scott Tyler, the editor ol the "Alumni News." pre 
forms the function ol coordinating and compiling infoi 
mation about alumni and current University happen- 
ings into the Association's newspaper, the "Alumni 
\cws" which is issued eight times during the year. 



102 




Dining from left to right: James G. Thomas, vice-president; Charles C. DeLong, assistan 
executive director; Charles E. Warwick, secretary; Amos H. Watts, president; and directors James 
and Joseph D. Ator 



t treasurer; Joseph S. Begando, assistant to president; James C. Calvin 
es B. Campbell, Harold F. Glair, William A. Marsteller, Eugene D. Funk 



University of Illinois Foundation Recruits Funds 



Vitally interested in the general educational and 
research programs of the University of Illinois, is this 
active Foundation. It is a nonprofit corporation and 
acts as a money gatherer for the University. Two of 
its programs are the lllini Achievement Fund and the 
corporation's endowment fund. 

The service that they provide gives great opportuni- 
ties for men of research who need grants in order to 
carry out their talents. They not only aid graduate 
students but undergrads too. Each year the Founda- 
tion provides scholarships for students who prove 
themselves of excellent aptitude and need financial 
assistance iii order to come to college. 

Another one of the U. of I. Foundation's interests 
lies in the enrichment of library resources. They 
carry on a special program of collecting volumes to 
add to the University Library. 

Many special projects go through their hands, in- 
cluding memorials lor deceased members of the Uni- 
versity staff. 




Amos H. Watts from Chicago often makes a trip to Cham- 
paign-Urbana to officiate his job as president of the Foundation. 



103 





The Health Service in the familiar Health Center on Wright 
Street is under the auspices and direction of Dr. O. S. Walters. 



Director Miodrag Muntyan is in charge of the University Press, 
•hich recently moved into its new location West Gregory Drive. 



At one time or another, all of us will become ac- 
quainted with one or more of the departments on this 
page. It we feel sick, the Health Service will try to 
cure us. Although we may not come in direct contact 
with the Physical Plant, we are aware ot its influences 
in clean Moors and newly painted rooms. 



Another service ot the University is the University 
Press which prints many ot the textbooks, lab manuals, 
pamphlets and bulletins we use. The Office of Public 
Information serves us by disseminating publicity con- 
cerning the University all over Illinois and the United 
States. 



Our University Constantly Strives to Serve Us 





Director S. Havens is the man of the minute every minute of 
the day, for he is the head of the University's Physical Plant. 



All of the publicity for the University is channeled through the 
Office of Public Information under control of Director C. E. Flynn. 



104 





Gordon N. Ray, Vice President and Provost, took over the 
duties of President Henry during the latter's trip to India. 



In charge of allocating all University funds is H. O. Farber, 
who holds the office of Vice President and Comptroller. 



Heading the administrative staff of the University 
is President David Dodds Henry. President Henry, 
unlike past presidents, spends much of his time in an 
effort to obtain funds for the operation and expan- 
sion of our campus. During the past year, Henry 
spent two months in India to foster human relations 



and study conditions there. Working closely with 
Henry are the two vice presidents, Provost Ray and 
Comptroller Farber. Another of President Henry's 
duties is to meet periodically with the Board of 
Trustees, the group which approves all appointments 
and makes decisions concerning University policy. 



President Henry Heads Administration Officials 



Assembled for a Board of Trusrese meeting are (left to right) Wayne Johnston, Timothy Swain, Wirt Herrick, Mrs. Frances Watkins 
A. J. Janata, Kenney Williamson, David O. Henry, Earl Hughes, Harold Pogue, Richard Harewood, Howard Clement, and George Wilkins 




UNIVERSITY 



OF 



ILLINOIS 



Decembei 



2h, 1959 



off ' c 



the 19» W" f S 
tiDg university "adit^ tnro^ the »"*- 
VH7S2£ interests to reade ^ 

a thCT e vhieh will rema ^ are those buBOr ous 

*» traditions t^^^t^^^ ^ 

aspects 01 *• a hee quon, Bone?^ 

illustrative. ^1 -^ * vever, vnich in 

few - are memorable sym , ve rsity, ^ v f.^/ nf campus 



«- -^aceufafera reaction ox 
jnany ways are even j^. speak: 

^3e and nave deeper ^ _ __ + ^^ Van D oren + ^ Aition < 

n 



Lli~ „ aCCU-i a,v ^* 

„any way. are even *> ^ .^ speaking 

X and have deeper P°* *^ V £££ traditions: 

* ** ^^^e -rds also deserve our gr 

of America's myths, s P eaX \ our ." 

. . — 4-v^p nath, tney ~ v erv hour. 



yths, ^ speak. 

"Oigantic on ^£^S£* every hour. 
Unwitnessed, ^ ^ 



-Gigantic on -^ ^^ through 
Unwitnessed, tney ^ ^3 we w 

lik e Mr. Van Doren's ^^folkvays our h^its 
Traditions, ^^ granted; they are Q ur nfe as w 

fl feel and take things for g^^^ged forms 
and ieex <^« unaware, tne u*— 

of which ve are una ^ tradi tions of aca- 

programs - ^ „ ar e also a par 

P to Forum lectures To those who have 

Illinois. 



are <*- 1-**^ * 
TO ,^_.J= rture ' TO those who have 

lUiD ° i3 - , j, ls a wonderful trad^n. ^tions ahd 

^s^ehal? o? the University ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ c 

_ -.^ar-Vved 



^Ho?^ University. 
behalf 01 message, 1 B 1 ^ 

«* are reached hy this ILLI° 
T o those who are 
dial Illini greetings. sincerely, 



"b^ 









Pres 



ident 



lb 





N 




108 





<fl 






f% 




<A 




FRATERNITIES 

SORORITIES 

INDEPENDENT 

HOUSES 



109 



They came. They saw. They con- 
quered. That's what those Alpha Chi 
pledges did one fine spring evening last 
year. The event was the annual Alpha 
Chi Senior Banquet, which at Alpha Chi 
Omega is given by the pledge class for 
their "elders." The theme last year was 
a Roman one — therefore it seemed very 
natural that the plebes dress as slaves 
and wait on their guests. Yes, that ban- 
quet was quite a sight — and the crown- 
ing glory was the pledge who, with an 
apple in her mouth, was carried in on 
a platter by her fellow pledge sisters. At 
any rate, the event certainly set a tradi- 
tion that'll be hard to live up to! 




Ann Ferry, president 



"Well, for heaven's sakes, lookee what I found!' 




Alpha Chi Omegas Succumb to the Lure of Ancient Rome 



Top Row: Sharon Sweeney, Margaret Belsley, Mary Aller, Winifred Mofield, Anida Miller, Alice Fisher, Anita Getman, Suzanne Martin, Sandra Schwab, Sandra 
Thorton, Jean Wedberg, Patricia Wise, Mary Houser, Louise Darby, Cheryl Potter, Janet Meadors, Suzanne Roche Fourth Row: Elizabeth Hewett, Mary Manning, Anne 
Ferrell, Patricia Boughton, Peggy Kurzweg, Janet Ellis, Patricia Allen, Joyce Williams, Helen Culkin, Susan Basedow, Judith St. Clair, Kathenne Mueller, Charlotte 
Scoville, Carolyn Curtis Third Row: Helen Dangerfield, Ardith Lamps, Lucia Andrle, Janet Reeves, Nancy Pierce, Mary Inwood, Ann Ferry, Mrs. Daley, Nancy Dinnella, 
Rosemary Just, Kathryn Manning, Jean Brummer, Virginia Temple, Sharon Williams Third Row: Joan Agrella, Kathleen Edler, Barbara York, Suzanne Jordan, Joan 
Wedberg, Mary Shryock, Donna Wene, Nancy Fleck, Jean Jordan, Susan Hotchkiss, Nancy Noll, Nancy Inwood Bottom Row: Frances Paulsell, Susan Arnold, Pamela 
Petry, Susan Olson, Jo Wooldridge, Marlene Yontz Not in panel: Sonja Alexander, Elissa Weaver, Katherine O'Brien, April Appelquist 




110 






m ■ • | j 

*jfj£*i 






i*t 



According to an ADPi song, no fun'll 
pass them by. The girls are beginning 
to wonder, however, if it's not OX, the 
Theta Chi mascot, that won't pass them 
by. He seems to enjoy following the 
ADPi's on shopping sprees and wander- 
ing into their dressing booths! 

As if dogs aren't enough, the ADPi 
symbol is the lion; luckily the girls 
haven't gotten around to taking in one 
of the jungle cats for companionship! 

As the swallows return to Capistrano, 
so the pigeons inevitably return to the 
ADPi house every year. It seems as if 
the Alpha Delta Pi's will soon be spon- 
soring a wildlife reservation! 



Yep, the ADPi's are sitting on top of the — wall! 



Barbara Keough, president 



Alpha Delta Pi's Find Dogs and Fowl Lively Company 




Top Row: Judy Tibbetts, Mary Forestner, Virginia Pagels, Marianne Burgbacher, Genevieve Glass, Peggy Parks, Sybil Burgin, Nancy Klindera, Janice Edmundson, 
Eileen Hoffman, Marianne Burke Fourth Row: Patricia Billings, Carol Singer, Sandra Olsen, Jean Hashbarger, Sharon Garman, Judy Elliot, Rose McMullen, Ruth Britt, 
Martha Jones, Mary Gaitens, Bette Griffith, Judith Stader Third Row: Linda Lingle, Georgia Ford, Sheryl Clayton, Mary Tews, Barbara Bomhoeft, Barbara Keough, 
Mrs. Hart, Margaret Dempsey, Helen Wittenborn, Gail Dent, Patricia Gorman, Sarah Turner, Arlene Panek, Judy Ent Second Row: Drusilla Simms, Brenda Gleason, 
Marcia Daehn, Linda Mann, Joan Sanders, Karen Olson, Nancy Grant, Ina Gaines, Nancy Mees, Amy Thomas Bottom Row: Susan Ent, Janice Stiller, Nancy Harlan, 
Margaret Liddicoat, Lois Hogrefe, Judy Barton, Mary Kromer 



r 



*%*%<%<%<% 





fit *^w^ * 




in 




B IL b -J mit ^^^ 



Leslie Marks, Adrienne Kole, Rochelle Rosen, Donna Palast, Myrna_ Eiserman 

Oetting 

V 

Stern, Ging 



G^nge? Golden, Susan Rissman, Ann Davis, Joni Blumenthal, Marjorie Robmson, Susan Zalkind, Caryl Golden, Jud.th Berg, Elaine Fin 



Second Row: Gloria Edelman, 
kler Bottom Row: Margot 
k 



335, 



little Things Mean a lot to the Girls of Alpha Epsilon Phi 



Barbara Golden, president 



Mascots are fun — but they can also be 
rather expensive to keep around, as it 
has been found. But the AEPhi's have 
found the answer, they have a stuffed 
toy as their unofficial mascot! This cute 
little puppy, a white dachshund, is 
signed annually by the class having the 
highest grade average at the time. 

"Little Things Mean A Lot" they 
say, and the Korean orphan who was 
adopted by the AEPhi's undoubtedly 
(mils this to be so. Not only does the 
child receive gifts and letters from the 
ji.iK, but, thoughtful as they are, they 
are always trying to make his life hap 
pier. Mi- mighl also lie termed then 
rnasi ol! 



112 



As the years add up, so do the AEPhi scrapbooks. 





Wn , ,J P Ro T- Joann Mosetich, Carla Walborg, Terry Davis, Rita Farley, Diana Jecmen, Jane Hunter, Judy Schreiner, Margaret Miles, Linda Mueller Joan Seliq Stacia 
M 'otnna D^r^betT^nd ^'"t^H? L ^lam Diann Dennis Lois Harris Third Row: Donna Gleason, 'Claudia Thomas Penelope Grove?. Barb ra Wes 
ia°1' " ea " na | L, ° v ' s / r | t |lza beth Hendr ck, Susan Hitz, Linda Creamer, Elizabeth Frank, Diana Charter, Mari yn Pulley, Carol Rohner Susan Lustfield Second Row- 
Judith Krubl, Jane Allison Aurel.a McCormick, Susan Moldal, Edwina Garner, LaVerne Young, Mrs. Bruns, Joy Straka Genevieve' Genfes Audrey Gronert KarTn 

Mir.man U^Noler? 8 NantTrv^rro "w^ kT .U^? S P«f »' J™? Wolf Louise Wolf, Theodora' Andres. Barbara EldeTcwen Buck , Ma%aretTraka Sara 
v niaman, Linda Nolen, Nancy Fry, Sharron Womack, Kathleen Sfoeckel Not in panel: Penny Peterson, Linda Bennett 



Secrets Provide Merriment for Alpha Gamma Delta Girls 




And what's more collegiate than a hand of bridge? 



LaVerne Young, president 




"I've got a secret!" is a dangerous line 
around the Alpha Gam house — espe- 
cially if the speaker is a pledge and the 
time is right before the annual fall 
pledge dance! The theme of the dance, 
which is always given by the pledges, 
is kept a secret from the actives, who 
nevertheless try to find out what it is. 
As soon as the older members think 
they've guessed the title, they band to- 
gether and go parading through the 
house, singing an appropriate song and 
dressed as closely as possible to what 
the believe the theme is. At least, that's 
the way it happened this year! 



113 




r, 






■ 



..-s 



r-* 



■-*■ 



x 



This year finds the AKA's in a new 
house, which was completely repainted 
and remodeled over the summer. This 
apparently gave the girls something to 
live up to, as every evening from ten 
till ten thirty all members of the house 
engage in a period of free — and stren- 
uous — exercise to retain those curves! 
Those smart gals. 

But the Alpha Kappa Alpha's have 
proved themselves even smarter regard- 
ing their pledge dance. Admission to the 
dance was either a can of food or a 
guarter which in turn was used to pro- 
vide needy families with a good Thanks- 
giving meal. 



Now, girls, you have to look at the camera! 



Clotilde Phelps, president 



"Remodeling" Is the Password of the Alpha Kappa Alpha's 




Top Row: Helen Goff, Elaine Estes, Mrs. B 
Cooley Not in panel: Claudia Young 



rannam,, Barbara Livingston, Brucetta Hower Bottom Row: Nathalia Payne, Clotilde Phelps, Patricia Cross, Marlene 




114 



Every house has its clods — but the 
AOPi's have a name lor theirsl These 
girls, selected weekly by a purely biased 
vote, are known as "Fromps of the 
Week!" How does one qualify for this 
dubious honor? Merely follow the ex- 
ample of one AOPi who dropped a live 
ash in her hair, then placed the cigarette 
quite casually on her lap — and as the 
crowning blow, finally put the still lit 
object in a rather full wastepaper basket. 
Immediately after that, she was fined for 
breaking quiet hours as she screamed 
for help. And that, quote the AOPi's, is 
how one can easily become "Fromp of 
the Week." 




Frances Fishel, president 



The AOPi's spend a typical day in a typical way. 




Gracefulness and Charm Accentuated at Alpha Omicron Pi 



Top Row: Penelope Kacena, Joyce Hites, Roberta Herout, Joanna K 
Huck, Mary Lou Caughron, Audrey Shaw, Nancy DeLaurenti, I 




115 



April showers may bring dainty little 
articles like May flowers to some people 
— but to the Alpha Phis, the onslaught 
of rain often brings nothing but trouble. 
It seems that, in some delicate, unex- 
plainable way, the Alpha Phi buzzer 
system is connected to the basement. At 
any rate, when the lower world floods, 
the buzzers simply go berserk. Thus, on 
rainy nights, confusion reigns in the 
front hall — a nice system only if you've 
been dying to date your best friend's 
pinman. 

The Alpha Phis celebrate Christmas 
with a Saturday afternoon tea dance — 
complete with a pinmanned Santa Claus! 




Julia Jenkins, president 



'Remember the time we bid seven no and made it?" 




Alpha Phi Is Scene of Strange Electrical Occurences 




116 




The house that the Alpha Xi Delta's 
call home is one with an unusual and 
highly historical background. In the 
past, it was known as the Busey Mansion. 
And this many-gabled structure has an- 
other major distinction, for it was built 
entirely without nails. 

Another house which holds much in- 
terest for the Alpha Xi Delta's is Hull 
House, which the Alpha Xi's have 
pledged to help this year. 

On the less serious side, the Alpha 
Xi's each year take photographs of all 
unattached seniors for the house scrap 
book. There's just one reservation — 
each girl must be sucking a lemon! 



It is fun, for a change, to dress up for a meal. 



Carol Olin, president 



Houses and Events of Tradition Back Alpha Xi Delta 









JAVM^JWa*. 



117 




Sally Blair, Sara Johnson, Shirley Livesay, Carol Carlson, 

"eather Hansen, Carol 

Lesta Elliot, Virginia 

arole Stackhouse, Joan 

Mary Maloney, Julie 

Not in panel: Patricia 



Carroll, Judith Terp 




When Yogi Says "Chi Omega", That's What He Means 



The Omicron Owl is, supposedly, the 
Chi Omega symbol. However, the noble 
bird has. in the last year, received some- 
what <>l a rival— in the form of a char- 
acter called Yogi bear. A stuffed repre- 
sentation o\ the critter sits on the Chi O 
TV set, it is rumored. And another 
rumoi dials with the fad thai the bear 
is reall) the "Chi O Man" in disguisel 
\i am rate, the girls did use him i<> 
decorate the luscious Valentine thai the) 
m nl to the Phi Cams! 

\\ hilc they don'i sii|)])oi i a national 
philanthropy, the Chi O's do maintain 
.1 So< tal s< ience Award, given yeai ly to 
someone outstanding in the field. 



118 



Carole Stackhouse, president Smart, cute, musical too— what can't Chi O's do? 

_ 





Not Only Are Diamonds a Girl's Best Friends, But- 




'I hope the Housing Inspectors appreciate this!' 



Suzanne Haines, president 




— Just wearing one can get yon an in- 
vitation to the Tri Delts' annual Pansy 
Breakfast, held in the spring each year 
to honor all engaged senior women ol 
Panhellenic. After all the lucky girls 
have taken the ceremonial step through 
the huge Pansy Ring, they are treated 
to breakfast and a style show. 

Many things keep the year amusing, 
including the "get even" activities — 
which always occupy some of the Tri 
Delts' time. Poor OX, the Theta Chi 
mascot, often plays the role of victim — 
but then, perhaps he enjoyed being 
painted red for Valentine's Dav — at any 
rate, the Tri Belt's had fun. 



119 




Fahrnkopf, Katherine Kariher, Judith Stephenson 



Stairway to the Stars Graces the Delta Gamma House 




When in doubt, the DG's know what to lead — trump! 



Margery Hamilton, president 




One of the most engaging features <>L 
the Delta Gamma house is its quite 
lovely spiral staircase, which runs from 
the first up to the third floor. Impres- 
sively lit, timing rush, with candles held 
by the crooning DG's, this stairwell also 
has its attractions on Friday evenings 
throughout their year. At litis time, the 
DG's gather around it, again, this time to 
sing sorority and fraternity songs. Thus, 
this architectural feature serves as a uni- 
fying Eactor, almost as much as does the 
mystical "Hannah, my Delta Gamma," 
the spirit oi DG, who appears in many 
ol then songs and skits. 








(C 



Water, Water, Everywhere!" Wails Delta Phi Epsilon 



Leigh Nathanson, president 



Mu 



For many years the DPhiE's were able 
to brag that they had never been much 
bothered by floods. But last spring, im- 
mediately alter buying new furniture 
lor their recreation room, the girls were 
visited by their first Hood — of tidal wave 
dimensions! Now the girls are somewhat 
meeker when they speak of floods — or 
else they knock on wood! 

The Deefer's have found rather un- 
usual ways of supporting their national 
philanthrophy (the Cystic Fibrosis 
Foundation). Each year the girls in the 
house pledge a donation; this is then 
earned by the girls themselves. Even the 
housemother helps with this! 



sic, music, music: Johnny Mathis or Doris Day? 




"She may be an Omega sweetheart, or 
the Dream Girl of Alpha Phi Alpha; she 
may wear the Kappa diamond or her 
love may a Sigma be— but if she wears 
the Delta diamond, her first love is Delta 
Sigma Theta!" And her second, no 
doubt, is singing; for their love of sing- 
ing together is an outstanding charac- 
teristic of Delta Sigma Theta! The girls 
gather whenever they get a chance to 
croon sorority songs, popular tunes, 
spirituals, with even some classical num- 
bers mixed in for spice! There's another 
popular pastime that the girls also enjoy 
doing together — and that's playing 
bridge, of course! 




Theresa Leonard, president Singing together is quite an enjoyable pastime. 



r/^A) Girls of Delta Sigma Theta Find Many Enjoyable Pursuits 



Top Row: Norma Carter, Beverly Ball, Lucretia Gayden, Thelma Sterling Second Row: Emma Pipp 
Beverly Pruitt Bottom Row: Patricia Rounds, Marietta Skyles, Dolores Johnson 



Pippins, Theresa Leonard, Mrs. Terrill, Marlene Washington, 




122 




The DZ's are certainly playing "Double 
or Nothing" when it comes to support- 
ing a national philanthropy, for the 
sorority has not one charity, but two! 
For one thing, Delta Zeta supports a 
patient, Anne Civil, at Hansen's Disease 
Hospital, in Louisiana. The woman re- 
ceives magazines, gilts, and stamps, as 
well as a weekly letter from the girls of 
Delta Zeta. Another organization re- 
ceiving help is Gallaudet College, a 
school for the deaf, located in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Pastels have played a big part in DZ 
redecorations. The living room is now 
pink; the solarium, lavender. 



Stop, look, relax with a hand or two of bridge. 



Carolyn Peterson, president 



Good Deeds Play Dominant Role in Delta Zeta Annum 




Barbara Ho?,on?7udf»h^ Kabele Nancy Culbertson, Martha Gilkerson, Carole Grant, Marge Helgren, 

Strube, Mary Rothermel, Nancy Bear, Nancy Wood Myma Rea Barbara E™rs Franca rZLS™ Jh"Fi /" S « amS ' £'*" An D derson ' Sandranne Milleitner, Norma 

Mrs. Donnelly, Carolyn Peterson, Gay^e Haglund Ruth Ha^iqan June H ft ? B r 1 .Third Row: Kay Maze, Therese Perri, Fredna Ray, Phyllis Peterson, 

Annemarie Klink, Janet Schoett e, Karen Groff ^Madeline Marti BotVom Row !^, F L T'" 6 il ka$ ' Ch n ene ^t^™' J ° yCe Fuhrken ' Jane F ^"9, Frieda Durkin, 

Nancy DuClos, Ellen Hausermann Not in panel Ann Tice Encksen, Joan Adams, Donna Rottner, Kay Knight, Sandra Hedstrom, Sally Ronk 



f> o a n O 




no* 




123 





Gamma Phi Beta's Moon Over Their Uncooperative Clock 



Yes, there are times, declare all the 
Gamma Phi's, when they'd like to send 
their grandfather clock to the moon! 
This wish is usually the result of the 
dock's weekly breakdown (did anyone 
ever wonder why lew Gummy Pho's arc 
ever punctual?) <>r <>l the fact that the 
< lo< Is is again ten minutes last no 

pleasant tiling when the house ( loses 1>\ 
the same ( lO( k! 

I he Gamma l'hi's use the moon lor 

mote than puns, lot the ( icsienl moon 
in iheii symbol. It serves as the theme 
Ini such things .'^ •' heavenK I tish skil, 

in which all the GPhiB's appeal as 
( herubs 01 angels. Hmml 



124 



Diana Kramp, president 



Beta's and Gamma Phi's "Dennis MacBeth" acts up. 





tl- j d P a u W: J\\ M , lL 5 r v R jy , ? a Zechman, Naomi Bitterman, Lynn Cornick, Barbara Polisky, Lynn Singer, Lorna Klorf.ne, Laurel Satin, Elaine Stone, Bari Cohen 
D cr W u 1 /u 3 Mlller ; ( Judlth Cohn - ina Penn, Rita Levey, Shiela Greenberg, Ruth Marcus, Martha Shane, Sharlene Pearlman, Yarol Gerry, Sharla Waitzman Second 

Row: Elizabeth Schwartz, Mariorie Tepper, Harriet E man, Gail Spero, Miss Friedlander, Reva Stone, Judith Mesirow, Janet Engler, Fern Levy Bottom Row: Sheila Gom- 
berg, Adrienne Skolnik, Sheila Pinto, Susan Gelfand, Sandra Heller, Bonnie Eisenberg, Thelma Ruvinsky, Sharon Birney, Barbara Berger Not in panel: Doris Siegal 
rraicme rnedman r " ' 



The Year is Happy and Colorful for Iota Alpha Pi 




"Hey, come here — look at this picture we found!" 



Reva Stone, president 




Colors play a big role in the daily 
lives of the Iota Alpha Pis. To give 
a good example, the girls pay honor to 
the red rose as their national flower. 
Every year on Founders Day, the Iotas 
tarry a rose all day. To fulfill the scheme 
further, the annual Red Rose formal, 
Iota Alpha Pi's spring dance, was high- 
lighted by fresh rose decorations (and 
they were red — natch!) 

Again, colors have been important in 
house redecorating, as, in September, 
the entire first floor was redecorated in 
blue and green shades, with black and 
white accents. The garden effect is an 
appropriate setting for roses! 



125 




Between classes several Thetas gather for cokes. 



Molly Moore, president 



If you're a U. of I. Theta, not a mem- 
ber of Mortar Board or of Shorter Board, 
and have committed some embarrassing 
social blunder in your past, you may be 
eligible for Springboard. The first step 
in gaining admittance into this organi- 
zation, designed as a consolation for 
Thetas not tapped for other service 
honoraries, is to dash off a petition list- 
ing your qualifications. You'll receive 
an official Springboard sweatshirt for 
your work! 

The seniors have a small wooden bug 
named Beatrice, who is annually bug- 
napped by the juniors — not only great 
sport, but also a great tradition! 



New Honor Society Begun by the Kappa Alpha Thetas 





126 



"There is no girl like ;i Kappa Delia 
girl" goes the old song, and many cam- 
pus males will attest to (his truth. As 
a matter of fact, the fellows got a chance 
to do just that, when they were dinner 
guests of the Kappa Delta pledges. The 
event, sponsored by the plebes, was en- 
titled "The Shaft Dinner" and was sup- 
posedly given to honor the active chap- 
ter. Of course, the guests couldn't be just 
anvone. So, in keeping with the theme, 
only old pinmen, ex-boyfriends and 
fiances of the actives were invited — cer- 
tainly a novel enough idea, but one 
which sounds just a little uncomfortable 
to outsiders! 




Carlotta Kaiser, president 



Telling stories is an old Kappa Delta tradition. 




"Ex's" and "Oh's" Characterize New Kappa Delta Game 






a« . d P T- 'i yr \i Albert, Rosemary Elsasser, Mary Coon, Barbara Meyers, Patricia White, Patricia Bethel, Nina Eastman, Laeila Holtfors, Marylee Chval Merle 

Martin, Ramona Livey, Madeleine Raymond, Rita Lauterbach, Linda Schroeder Third Row: Judith Morrison, Barbara Auble, Joann Tresselt, Lois Henderson, Nancy 
Wertheim, Virginia Riser, Mary Young, Margaret Goodmon, Helen Hewitt, Elsie Janes, Cynthia Patterson, Bonnie Auble, Dee Perry, Marilyn Rank Second Row Janice 
K.ortist, Sara Pearman, Sandra Potts Susan Rettko, Carlotta Kaiser, Mrs. Connell, Patricia Dominic, Carol Palmer, Judith Rohmer, Faith Cremieux, Marcia Crosby, Deirdre 
Under Bottom Row: Susan McMullen, Tracy Byrom, Ruth Riddle, Carol Wascher, Karen Cremieux, Judith Helm, Dorothy Payne, Julia Buck, Leila Gratchner 
Janet Johnson ' 




127 



Inter-sorority pranks certainly are not 
new to the Kappas, who once found 
their bathroom blessed with the pres- 
sence of Charlie, a traveling window- 
dummy from some local store. Suspicion 
pointed heavily toward the Thetas as 
the instigators of the whole plot. 

On the more serious side, the Kappas 
support the Kappa Kappa Gamma Stu- 
dent Loan Fund, giving financial assist- 
ance to any college woman under thirty 
years of age who has completed two 
full years of her college work. At least 
one year of her schooling must have 
taken place in an institution where a 
chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma is 
located. 




Sarah Wrobke, president They could be reading poetry— but they're not 




a 



Good Heavens, Charlie B!" Yips Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Top Row: Ju.ia DeLonc, Ruth Lance, Patricia Bubeck Diane ^^ 

Linda Colegrove, Carol Gilbert, Helen Pan, Mary Sue Drendel, Diane Teeter, "™g J™"*™ ™™ £° san WattS/ Janice Mock, Dorothy Allyn, Linda Pickett, Joan 
Judy Narland, Julie Olds, Nancy O'Connell Sue AAittendorf, Lynne I Nelson Judith D azn.k, g^ ^hu^e* Dohme, Sarah Wrobke, Mrs. Binde, Mary Collins, Betty 

^%^^r^*<X:, Ci'e VrlfcJSrJr^ Brothers Not in pane,: Camille Kearns 

. __. — - -Bii TT-d m ■ ■ — — - — - < -n— — najojM - ■ ~ E9H&9 I _ m^M E&liafcn 




128 




Sing a Song ol the South — and that's 

just wliai the I'hi Mu's do as they all 
blend voices in their favorite tunc. This 
song, (ailed "Picture a Girl," presents 
the ideal I'hi Mu: a girl of rare beauty, 
dressed in rose and white and standing 
in the candlelight. And il this picture 
has a Southern belle tinge to it, there's a 
reason! With Georgia as the state in 
which they were founded, the Phi Mu's 
take on a Southern theme quite natural- 
ly. For instance, their annual Spring 
formal is known as Magnolia Ball. Fur- 
thermore, a painting of a plantation was 
just hung in the Phi Mu's dining room! 



Yes, they're certainly cards at the Phi Mu house! 



Carol Leonard, president 



The Old South Provides Inspiration tor Girls of Phi Mu 




Top Row: Jeanette Lohbauer, Sandra Winter, Lynda Songer, Lois Goodell, Martha Molitor, Savilla Anderson, Betty Zinser, Nancy Kohlenberger, Leora Taylor, 
Alice Helm, Linda Sorrells Third Row: Marlene Munson, Diane Malmberg, Margaret Molitor, Jeanine Sanquist, Lorna Armstrong, Mrs. DeLano, Carol Leonard Nancy 
Herman, Nancy Parker, Corinne Huffer Second Row: Janet Moody, Margaret Griffith, Virginia Klingensmith, Sondra Sapora, Ruth Edwards, Sarah Whiting, Carol 
Osrrom, Patricia Kern, Diana Francis Bottom Row: Nancy Stanley, Ruth Jones, Karen Brown, Elizabeth Cunningham, Ruth Schoenbeck, Penelope Nichols Not in 
panel: Mary Fries, Lynne Rader 




129 





Odd Remembrances Make Up Phi Sigma Sigma Memories 



When the girls of Phi Sigma Sigma 
sing, "Through the years there'll always 
be memories of our sorority" you can 
bet that they have something definite 
in mindl For instance, there are those 
quainl little green stools that belong to 
the pledges, and which arc so useful to 
them . . . and who could forget the den, 
which is so popular a place thai the 
girls even have to sign up to reserve it! 
Other more serious memories might deal 
with the lac idty dinner, to which ea< h 

gii 1 in\ ilc-s an insli uc loi . . . 01 with die 

various ways die girls have worked to 
make money with which to help rheu 

mat i< c in Mi i ii 



130 



Judith Moss, president 




Ike., 




Pi Beta Phi Arrow Aims Toward Helping Unfortunate 



'-<^- 



Pi Phi smiles and Pi Phi tunes liven up the day. 



Nancy Wilson, president 




A Pi Phi may be an angel in disguise 
but there is nothing disguised about Pi 
Phi's national philanthropy. This in- 
volves the able administration of a settle- 
ment school in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. 
During the year, the alumnae and chap- 
ter members held a sale with the mer- 
chandise, including handwoven linens, 
pottery, woodwares and jewelry (any 
golden arrows?), all made al the Pi Phi 
settlement school. 

The Pi Phi's seem to enjoy giving out 
honors (perhaps they realize the value of 
praise) for among the awards given with- 
in the house is that to the senior who 
has contributed most to the house. 



131 




Top Row : Bonn, ZeNe, Arlene Rom. Jane, Jacobsor , Marda gftSJ^*^ "SH ^.W-*™ J^B^^mSE^ 

Merle Miller Alice Lvons, Iris Efron, Paula Noms, Joanne Gottlieb, Barbara Kalver .Bonnie , tltman inira Djane A Hamet pme|j MaHene 

Judith Pttner Ruth" Klotz, Jane. Greenberg, Ann Blond, nez Butterman ™? ^ Ha ang mda h in Ida Bar.elstein, Mrs. Mize, Frances Schoen, Marca 

Schenberg, Susan Turitz Second Row: Elaine Nussbaum Joan Greenberg J"dlth M^ Me r Ma net Lang Nielson, Karen Goldblatt, Peggy Kruger Ton, 

Brir D So^ '-»* *■"•" sandra po11 - M - Rubni,z ' Josephme Meier5 ' 

Paula Foreman, Deny'se Rothenberg, Karen Weinstein, Jacqueline Simms, Anita Bear 



The Sigma Delta Tau's Proclaim loyalty to the University 




p_^o 




The gay and jovial SDT's gather around the piar 



Ida Bartelstein, president 




Be loyal— be an SDT! This is indeed 
a strange slogan — what lies behind it- 
Well, it seems that alter every Satur- 
day dinner, the girls have their tradi- 
tional Song Fest. The event begins with 
the singing of the Illinois song ol loyal 
ty, accompanied l>\ the rhythm ol tramp- 
ing leei, as the girls march Erom thl 
dining room. Other special songs Eol 
low in the living room after the forma 
lion ol a friendship circle. 
The SDT's mascot. George, is a ver] 

well traveled lellow. Among trips, lie 

even spent a weekend .u Purdue as thl 
guesi ol a fraternit) there. 1>\ the wa| 
"George" is a small white statuel 




a Endsley, LaVerne Jaros, Jean Taylor, Meredith Magcnheimer, Barbara Sternaman, Joanne Eicher, Carolyn Burrell 



, j- u D ?? w: ? ere , n , ice . Niendorf Sonny Su.ir, Pa'ricia Endsley, LaVerne Jaros, Jean Taylor, Meredith Magcnheimer, Barbara Sternaman, Joanne Eicher, Carolyn Burrell 
Judith Buehler, Sa.,dra Harris Fourth Row: Patricia Bell, Audrey Huck, Joan Tomkinson, Lynn Kuehn, Marcia Gerrib, Marcia Hathorne, Nelda Stacell, Margaret Allen' 
Sandra Rayburn Carolyn Eckman, Martha Slayman Third Row: Ardis Hill, Florence Gegel, Patricia Hunter, Nancy Wightman, Joan Edmonds, Darlene Clever Barbara 
Hummer, Lynn Skeen, Patricia Lowman Second Row: Susan Boggs, Eleanor Beauchamp, Judith Edlund, Virginia Cooper, Leah Myers, Millicent Eichin, Janet Shuman 
Sa-a Dempsey, Charlene Blake Bottom Row: Keville Conrad, Diana Dittman, Yolanda Soucie, Kathleen Healy, Karen Spitzer, Sharon Reifsteck 




Seniors Rate High in Importance with Sigma Kappa Girls 



Joan Edmonds, president The Sigma Kappa's can tie up the phones for hours! 



There are several sororities on cam- 
pus who have the tradition of senior 
will and prophecy, but few make such 
a fuss over their seniors as do the Sigma 
Kappa's. These girls dedicate the en- 
tire last week of school to their retiring 
members. During Senior Week, the 
seniors eat meals at a seperate table, s:> 
as not to be contaminated by their un- 
der* lass sisters; furthermore, these older 
girls can request various skits from other 
Sigma Kappas. 

All on campus are raving about the 
way the Sigma Kappa house has been re- 
decorated. The basic colors are acpia, 
while and gold — very elegant, indeed! 




If House Beautiful is looking for a 
house to feature, the Tri Sigs would un- 
doubtedly offer up theirs. It seems that 
the girls have put a lot of work into get- 
ting their house ready for the school 
year, especially as they were moving into 
a new house! During the summer, several 
Tri Sigs came down to spend several 
weekends scrubbing the floors and just 
cleaning up. With help from outside — 
the fathers painted the downstairs — plus 
a little time before school started spent 
finishing painting — the house opened in 
September in quite fine style — and just 
in time to house a "Shipwreck" of a 
pledge dance! 




Karen Yeager, president Collegiate, collegiate, yes, they are collegiate ! 




Members of Sigma Sigma Sigma Move Into New Home 



Top Row Karen Magner, Paulette Kaminski, Jacqueline Prokopf, Carol Odiet, Diane Parrish, Patricia Mears, Nancy VanTuyle, Beverly Gallup Third Row: Katri- 
ne Gooch Carole Jester, Shirley Franklin, Carol Marvin, Kay tash, Carol Swanson, Sarah Burke, Bonnie Parsons, Barbara Williams Second Row: Beverly Kaminski, 
arilyn Zeit'er Carol Dick Marilyn Stephenson, Mrs. Barlage, Karen Yeager, Claire Johnson, Barbara Pierce, Mary Babler Bottom Row: Maureen O Laughlm, Judy Drost, 



lene 

Marilyn Zeiter, Carol Dick, Marilyn _. 

Priscilla Fett, Linda Sandwick, Charlene Urbauer, Vera Anderson, Marlene Brown, Helen Geroff, Phyllis Muhlenbruch 




134 




"Where did you transfer from?" "To 
whal sororit) do you belong?" These 
questions were the most popular ones 
around Sycamore Hall last September, 
as 39 girls representing schools all over 
the country, as well as a few national 
sororities, moved in together to form 
the second Panhellenic transfer dorm 
on campus. Whether the attraction was 
the last social pace, a hoy friend, close- 
ness to home, or the wide variety of 
educational opportuities, these girls 
came from as far west as the U. of Colo- 
rado and as far east as City College of 
New York to become a part of the 
Orange and Blue. 



Formal and informal meetings dominate our lives. 



Elizabeth Martin, president 



Many Colleges Contribute Girls to Form Sycamore Hall 




135 




r^ r rv n .„4»ll Man, Rulfin Revprlv Kimes Julia Gates, Mary Fitzgerald, 

Top Row: Suzanne Ti.ll, Ann Ward, Peggy Wellman, Jody Thompson Nancy Darling Diane ^J^^X \^ Third 'Row: Barbara Perry Andrea 
Patricia Szczepanik, Mary Haun, Cynth.a Cordes, Mary Musselman JudiJA b'inger Ann Cork, 1 1. p ane £ J E|aine K Gretchen Garthe, Ellen Re, mann, 

Blanda Carol Miller, Eileen Sullivan, Diane Pettingell, Arlene McGrath Albert %^'ovanni^ Mary n,cn Lau e Elizabeth Fiedler, Karen Branch, Hildegard Schroeder, 
Sharon O'Neill, Lucia Winslow, Gail Phimister, Sandra Grass, J"d,.h Lyman Second ^ R ^ren Smith, Join Bolin IkStom Row:' Carol Strickland Sue Fehrenbacher 
Cor[nne T 0=^ tS&ftSn Cro^ Rosemary Stolfa, Joyce Cleaver, Nancy Love No, ,n pane.: Jud„h 

Menke, Judith Randall 




Theta Upsilon Year Greatly Influenced by French Customs 



Shirley Hill, president 



The Theta Us brush up on their sorority's past. 



Though the Theta Us themselves prob- 
ably don't realize it, the sorority is 
really pretty indebted to French cus- 
toms and the like. For instance, for their 
official flower the Theta Us have selected 
the emblem oi France herself— the fleur- 
de-lis, which is even found on the 
Theta Upsilon pledge pin. Moreover, 
the Illinois ( hapter models their spring 
dance on a Mardi Gras theme, complete 
with excitement, gayety, and colorful 
costumesl This alone is enough to make 
;m\ guy sing "Youi I heta U girl, she's 
the only one lot you; she will stand by 

you in all thai you do!" And lliey do 
sinj; il! 



136 





a* A,u ?? Row: u K athryn Castor, Nancy Booth Janice Eikenmeyer, Ann Brockman, Emily Krueck, Jeanine Heberer, Beverly Harrel, Nada Rubin, Karin Ekdahl 
Meredith Osman, Virgmia Remecke, Barbara Bluth Dale Primrose, Marlene Olson Second Row: Andrea Koehler, Patricia Connor, SuAnn Johnston, Barbara Jensen 
b« Mrn k", «'» r V I,woh,g, Patricia Anderle, Carol Schmalz, Britta Liljeros, Rebecca Nash, Judith Ash, June Harris Bottom Row: Joann Thompson 

Bene McCullough, lenore McCora, Deanna Van Kleef, Susan Dilly, Nancy Strawser, Susan Hornstein, Arlene Verbeski, Ann Coleman, Sandra Olson, Nancy France Sharon 
bross Not in panel: Marilyn Goles, Sandra Loeb 



Kitchen Facilities Offer Advantages to Walnut Hall 



e "Remember when . . .?" rules the day at Walnut. Susan Thomas, president 




The members of Walnut Hall, the 
Panhellenic sorority transfer dormitory, 
have found that, mealwise, they have 
quite a few advantages! For instance, 
they can eat at their sorority houses, 
or they can serve steak dinners within 
the boundaries of Walnut. The whyfore? 
Simply because the apartments available 
each provide not only living room, bed- 
room and bath for four, but each also 
has its own kitchen! 

Because Walnut Hall doesn't have a 
central dining room for all its residents, 
bullet luncheons, prepared by the girls, 
are often served, instead, in the lounge — 
for special events. 



137 




West, Alice Adams Not in panel: Dareve Aide, Judith Dickinson 




Mischief Runs Rampant Among Those Zeta Tan Alpha's 



Merle Kuyrkendall, president 



Gather 'round, girls, and lift your voices high! 



The ZTA's certainly have had their 
moments of Inn. For instance, one Fri- 
day one of the girls came home to find 
aboul twenty parasols hung all over her 
loom. Another time brought the dis- 
covery ol an inter-house zoo — someone, 
taking all the slullcd animals in the 
house, distributed them about the en- 
trance hall. Among the conspirators 
was the Z'l A housemothei ' 

Zeta I au Alpha lias found numerous 
ways to support the Cerebral Pals) Foun- 
dation, Informative films and booklets 
on the afflii tion, < oupled with hospital 
equipment, are several ol the ai i i< les 
naid foi by the /I V 



hi; 





The Girls at Philea Find Time to Engage in Pranks 



What are they watching? It could be television! 



Anne Price, president 




Although almost every girl at Philea 
has a part time job, this doesn't put 
the clamper on lull time prank pulling, 
for which the girls always have time! 
For example, a "Room for Rent" sign 
in a window in the vicinity of the rear 
ol the house actually brought two un- 
suspecting 'male applicants to inquire 
about renting a room there! As to how 
the sign got there — that's a mystery! 

But there's surely no mystery about 
the affair that the girls at Philea have 
tagged "Suppressed Desire Night." At 
this time, the girls go to dinner dressed 
as their deepest desire; and, in general, 
almost "anything goes"! 



139 




Dog Wrecks Tranquil life of Allen Residence Hall, North 



Lucia Thomas, president 



Meetings in arty surroundings are the best knd! 



By now, it's pretty easy to see that 
the Theta Chi's Saint Bernard, OX, is 
quite often the unwilling villain or un- 
knowing hero of some hilarious episode. 
Well, al Allen North, lie's done it again! 
One evening the dog wandered casually 
into the bottom flooi restroom, and 
absolutely refused to move! 

I he girls •'' Alien North are really 
working hard to improve then grades, 
I his year the) started a stud) seminar 
in the dining room; iliis runs Eoi two 
hours, (lining which there is a shori 
break, Moreover, ii is vei \ quiel al ihis 
i (me and no one is obligated to attend. 

I |k \ hope lllis will uol k well! 



HO 





Carole Abrams, Leta Ackerman, Annette Alonzo, Joyce Anderson, Nancy Babbitt, Phyllis Baggesen, Nancy Barrett, Cherie Batt, Ladonne Bender, Mary Berger, 
Susan Berk, Geraldine Berman, Andrea Biere, Melsa Bobrich, Janet Bolt, Betty Brady, Barbara Bren, Ruth Brewe, Georgia Broadrick, Ruth Brook, Sally Brubeck, Janice 
Bublick, Elaine Budach, Sharon Cassell, Carole Chanock, Kayla Chase, Josephine Cibulsky, Barbara Close, Nancy Coffman, Jane Cohen, Linda Cohn, Elaine Coorens, Carol 
Crar.dall, Phyllis Dannells, Nancy Deutch, Florence Dix, Alma Drake, Janet Dubisky, Arlene Eckhaus, Roberta Edwards, Rochelle Ezgur, Regina Fog, Marlene Forland, 
Carlo Fox, Judith Franzen, Jan Fritz, Rosaline Froehlich, Elizabeth Fuss, Beverly Gardner, Patricia Geissman, Sandra Gilbert, Barbara Glow, Florence Goldman, Adrienne 
Gordon, Sally Greenberg, Benita Greenman, Judith Gustafson, Grace Habben, Ann Halin, Kathy Hameder, Virginia Harrell, Patricia Helm, Judith Hildenbrand, Judith 
Hirsch, Ellen Hollowick, Sharon Hovey, Jurate Narbutas, Sharon Neemann, Marlene Nico, Judith Oenibene, Janice Palmer, Sara Parker, Brandyn Pastor, Miriam Pern- 
burn, Irene Pilafas, Mary Poag, Penelope Pope, Lee Pritikin, Ruth Reints, Judith Roberts, Donna Rohr, Judith Rosenberg, Donna Rott, Beverly Rubin, Linda Ruby, Mary 
Ryan, Karen Scheirman, Laura Scrimpsher, Merle Shapiro, Monica Siewert, Marilyn Shor, Karen Smedberg, Kathleen Smith, Louise Steinman, Marlys Sternberg, Hylene 
Sriefel, Donna Stone, Roberta Stutz, Susan Sweeton, Beverly HuFFord, Janet Irick, Paula Jenson, Alice Johnson, Jeannette Johnston, Joanne Jourdain, Karen Kahn, Judy 
Kamerlink, Patricia Karas, Deborah Kaufman, Ruth Keil, Patricia Kenny, Louise Korzonas, Joan Kottler, Marilyn Krause, Cecilia Krcmer, Shirley Kroencke, president; Karen 
Kuhl, Elaine Kurlansky, Natalie Kushner, Marlene Lance, Harriet Landy, Rita Lei Horn's, Elinor Lerner, Beverly Levin, Myrna Loring, Ramona Luckman, Jo Ann Msckey, 
Kaliopee Malagaris, Gail Malizia, Lynne Marin, Eileen Massallek. Judy McCarty, Ann MacFarland, Sharon Meadows, Gloria Mengarelli, Leslie Meyer, Jacqueline Migdal, 
Eileen Miller, Janice Miller, Myrna Millman, Arlene Minkus, Elizabeth Moles, Bonnie Tarry, Bonnie Uhlir, Dorothy Vanderbuilt, Carol Veikman, Helene Vogel, Dale 
Wagenheim, Dorothy Wales, Linda Wallin, Sara Weiner, Francine Weisenberg, Georgia Wemhaner, Verity Whitley, Judy Whittaker, Janice Wilz, Jeanette Wissmiller, 
Marcia Wolf, Joan Woltzen, Margaret Yoshida, Judith Zikas, Thelma Zuckerman, Catherine Zakas 

The Machine Age Comes To Allen Residence Hall, South 



Round table discussions can solve many problems. 



Shirley Kroencke, president 




Modern appliances have made their 
mark at Allen Residence Hall, South. 
The first in a long line of equipment 
was a goal post, which was placed on 
the pavilion next to the front door last 
year during the water fight. Now an 
electric door has been installed; this 
article has caused a little bit of trouble, 
because the people using it always ex- 
pect it to open inward, which it doesn't 
do. Ever been slapped by a door? But 
even that can't beat the redecorating 
l ha l is always being done lor the Board 
ol Trustees Dinner, which is held in 
I he spring. The decorating takes all fall. 



141 




T\Td ly Rot r teonato y c^o K Rrb n ecc N a 0r Hts f : ffia" Lipsey Au^e ^,^1,^ Hermani Bonnie Brienza, Helen Johnson, Antonia.Risk, Unda^Steingraber, Anne^HaskJ 




Busey Hall Stages Never To Be Forgotton Spectaculars 



Nevada Street is the setting for Busey Hall, a splendid example of Georgian architecture. 




One night never to be forgotten was 
the night that Lucy Busey died, accord- 
ing to the popular campus song. But 
there are other nights never to he lor- 
gotten concerning L.B.'s namesake, the 
celebrated busey Hall. One such evfl 
ning fell on the night ol Preside!! 
Henry's speech to the incoming liesli- 
men, during Freshmen Week. At dial 

time, a Hub \l ike Todd Spec lalulat was 

staged; 200 girls were fixed up for da 
eventl 

Buse) Hall prides itscll on being a 
Iricndb group. Not only do the gills 
sing on the \va\ to (linnet, hut also en 
gage in Inn filled pajama patties cool 

plele with costumes and games. 



142 








* 



* 







Pajama Parties Are Another Part of Life at Busey Hall 



One pajama party that provided fun 
especially was that held during Mom's 
Day. The girls put on skits, alter which 
thev picked the mother-daughter look- 
alikes — and it's often hard, they say, to 
tell which one is the mother! 

With the Christmas season comes a 
party of a more serious nature. Going 
under the heading of a "Taking Down 
1 he Tree" party, the occasion also fea- 
tures readings from the Bible about the 
Christmas story and about Hanakkah. 
Continuing in the same vein, the party 
ended with the singing of Christinas 
carols and the dancing ol the liora — a 
way o| bettering intcrtaith relations. 



Sandra Seegren, president The Bug rides again — and so does the house director! 





... D T £r?u&?vK^^ 




Mix Ups Bring Lots of Laughs to Girls of Evans Residence Hall 



They're leaving a gift for posterity — their voices! 



Myrna Siegel, president 




Sometimes the girls at Evans Hall air 
a little mixed up. Take April Fool's 
Day, for instance. Dinner time dis- 
played a scene of utter havoc — tables 
set wrong, sugar ami sail reversed, and 
a multitude of other things obvious! 
not in their right order! 

Hut the crazy antics certainl) don't 
end — or begin— with a special day; no. 
they go on all \ear. Included on the 
agenda are after-hour exercises held in 
the halls, snowball lights with the waiters 

ami an annual waterfighi between llu' 
members ol third floor only! But, though 
the girls al Evans ma) be a little mixel 
lit), they have Eunl 




Evans Also Indulges in Activities of a Much More Serious Nature 



The pillared next door neighbor of Busey is the impressive, stately Evans Hall 



Glancing briefly over the score, it 
seems that there are a lot of little things 
that the girls who have lived at Evans 
this year will always recall: codec hours 
and open houses alter the football games 
(whether we won, lost, or whatever); 
that Christmas party lor needy children 
in which Evans supplied its own Santa 
and clowns; caroling at Christmas, even 
(hough a lack of snow dampered the 
holidays spirit somewhat; the newly in- 
itiated scholarship award dinner; Mom's 
Day Weekend, with its fabulous brunch, 
|>a jama parly and big dinner; faculty 
dinners — my, this was certainly a busy 
year for Evans Hall! 




145 




Cleaves, Carole Kosvick, Paula Rubenstein, Beatrice Anderson, Caroline Martin, Mary Braden 



Surprises Abound at Lincoln Avenue Residence, North 



Karen Person, president A bevy of beauties prove they've also got brains. 



Fate seems to have marked LAR North 
as the stage tor some mighty strange 
happenings this year. A good example 
revolved around the surprise received 
by the residents when a future scientist 
losi control of a chemical experiment 
going on in the basement. No doubt 
dreams turned <|ui(kly into night-mares 
;is a rather conspicuous smell steeled 
down ovct LAR dial nightl 

Miss Connell, a head resident with 

a sense ol humor, also received some 
whal ol a surprise when, on hei birth- 
day, she found that he) bed had been 

rathei mystei iously shot tsheeted. To the 

guilty ones, she sent bet lb. inks! 



146 





M?1% ^r Vn A P f kS ' A ^" a Fen , 9 ? rs ' - Ji sabe ," a Selega Bethany Hage Sharon Pantel, Sandra Sandsmark, Carol C'lammer, Denise Wachowiak, Monty Dixon Second Row- 
Linda Sugar, Joanne Schneider, Jacqueline Sherman, Marsha Boyansky,_ Connie Lundeen, Rita Pilipaviciute, June Zitek, Phyllis Cohen, Karen Myers, Jo Levin, 

torn Row: Judy Baus, 
Hillman, Judith Ellis, 



r-,""' u m ,oJ A l icnne.aer, Jacqueline Sherman, Marsha Boyansky, Connie Lundeen, Rita Pilipaviciute, June Zitek, Phyllis Cohen, Karer 
Anita Lesser, Marlene Rhine, Mary McCartan, Caro yn Soneson, Barbara Primack, Sharon Primack, Judith Berliner, Joy Rickert, Elizabeth McLeod Bottoi 
Jill Gerdes, Judith Vonn, Barbara Silverman Adele Sable Judith Kaplan, Judith Gold, Mary Stein, Linda Richert, Ellen Filurin, Shari Elias, Juanita Hi 
Leslie Leving, Linda Ross, Judith Simon, Caro! Anderson, Shelley Kaplan, Judith Lawless, Sandra Kagan 



Originality Prevails at Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall, South 



Pert and pretty are these ladies from LAR South. 



Margot Wien, president 




At Lincoln Avenue Residence, South, 
the girls must work overtime thinking 
up original titles for house events. Some 
of their dances are: Candy Cane Cotil- 
lion, Crewcut Capers, and Capers in 
Confetti. The C's predominate! 

Just to prove how friendly they are, 
the girls at LAR held an "at home" in 
November, to which the deans and sev- 
eral men's houses were invited. Along 
the same order, LAR can offer biweekly 
cocoa hours (especially nice during all 
those cold winter evenings) and monthly 
birthday dinners. These events indeed 
help to make the large dormitory "a 
home away from home" to its inhab- 
itants. 



147 




Top Row: Virginia White Judy Prochnow. ^«!>J^ k f°^i wXr", ES^aM^^^^ De^ToH^n 

Carolyn Davenport Arlene Brumhk, Judy °<™**-% ni )Z r fi'\teC«° "„ Carrol, Betty Rothacker, Barbara Burns, Barbara Carlington, Carla Kunkel, Carol Reichard, 
Sixth Row: Paula Roth, L.nda Pedersen Hinda Haperr '.Marion _B se, ^yn <-an o v , jg ^^ EMh e] Jq Stemmann, 

Maralee Shields, Marge John, MarcjaSarbel, Dixie Nelson Mar lynNeuman in o Chambers, Vorma Zara, Carol Olson Fourth Row: Kate 

Sue Heinrich Sh-ry C ylek -A b d el1 ', J^^'^^l ° d s ^, Sea V "Defter Rayno Michael, Ann Montgomery, Connie Dvorak, Lucille Karpiv, Judy 
Lindbloom, Bonnie Grinker Ruth Good Julie filbert, marciamenaeisor Cherry, Lela Potter, Bonnie Molander, Marge Enckson, Mary 

Vodrazka, Sandy Harris. Gloria Laner Judy Sterlz nede Car olyn Weiss Th rd Row . Juditn mee Anna Galik, Ruth DeVries Second Row: Marcia Murray, 

Dean Jenkins, Sharon Grusdis, Sandy Pope, Den.se Lundquist Sue ™ c ™™7 J .° a ? e ^ s ™ U sh" ron Miller, Sandra Hart, Dorothy Robra, Diane Bandyk, Sylvia Fisher Bottom 

£^tt;^^ ° eatrice Mill " er ' Toni Greene ' Judy Moyes ' Julie Kraft ' Sharon 

Berkiey, Barbara 'Breitenbach, Penny Wheeler, Janet Schauffler, Mary Irvine 

Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall, North 



Lincoln Avenue Residence Hall, South 



Top 

Hill, Maureen 
Gloria Smith, 
Carol Clasky, 
Josephine Ma: 
Row: Bonnie 
Jean Stewart, 




Judith Kleppinger, Anita Affolter, Joyce Burkhardt, Murna Kawach 




■ M ?gj «€l — ^MlW *** * ^W^g ■■■■■H jHHBH ^ ^ nHMlt IbbJL flSSa'* * vSII^Smk "i' 




Top Row: Paula Feinberg Virginia Zachgo Barbara Alderson, Linnea Pearson, Penelope Pietrus, Marilyn Mitchell, Marietta Herweg, Geraldine Johnson Milli- 
cent Bissi, Launa Cramer, Dianne Sweeney Second Row: Francine Berliner, Alma Midd'eton, Carla Knepp, Marsha Burley, Nancy Kohner, president; Mrs. Ross Rita 
Stackhouse Barbara Hartstem, Ruth Hadler, Marilyn Breeze Bottom Row: Nicole Garrison, Margaret Shutzbaugh, Patricia Carroll, Judith Johnson, Mary Chapman Janet 
A« a w/'- ii° n ' Ch ,f rlene L y, ebke . Elaine Kasen, Constance Argires, Christine Buzdygan Not in panel: Mary Foerner, Arlene Goldberg, Judith Kramp, Susan Lee, Eileen 
McWilliams, Suzanne Peters, Joan Rinken, Virginia Rokusek, Janet Thalmann, Arlene Stemler 



Cedar Hall 



Maple Hall 



Top Row: Nancy Rorer, Tena Rimland, Sandra Haese, Sondra Peters, Sharon McCauley, Eileen Bloom, Patricia Tieje, Bonita Melnick, Carolyn Brash Second 
Row: Barbara Riddiford, Harriet Merlander, Cyrelda Tarter, Angela Sklavounos, Sheila Rooney, Beryl Smith, Irys Kogen, Arlene Schweigerdt, Anne Mahler Bottom 
Row: Barbara Johns, Judith Meyer, Gail Golan, Beatrice Klazmer, Helen Easton, Dorothy Kehart, Sue Anway, Louise Cattapan 




Let it never be said that the girls at 
4-H House aren't avid tans of U.I. foot- 
ball. One Saturday morning, as a matter 
of fact, found the girls so excited over 
the impending game that a few careless 
mistakes were made— and a pressure pan 
full of potatoes exploded as a result. 
That afternoon one poor freshman girl 
listened to the game on the radio; at the 
same time, she scraped potato remains 
from the battle scarred ceiling! 

Even if the damage had been perma- 
nent, the girls wouldn't have been too 
upset, as future plans include a new 
house for the girls at 4-H House. 




Georgia Allen, president 



If books are castles, that's a real fort they've go I 



Girls at 4-H House Get Steamed Up Over U. of I. Football 



„„,«, & -TunsaSH Knur .erK^KtLS B^rE^££Bs?xiB^B 




150 




Turn about is lair play with Intleco 
House (lining International Week! The 
gals didn'l have to search far for foreign 
students to invite for dinner as their 
waiters just happened to fill the bill! 
In lieu of masculine waiters, who were 
then guests, the girls themselves served 
as the waiters, to the tune of much fun 
and lolly. 

Indeco managed to carry out further 
an international good will policy, as 
they sponsored and helped support a 
Belgian foster child, Andre. The boy 
also received much mail from Indeco 
girls. Another international charity that 
received Indeco aid was CARE. 



'Aw, come on, now — just a hand before luncheon!" 



Judith Gelman, president 



Indeco Girls Woo and Win Allies for United States 



Top Row: Lois Rose Judith Slonim, Judith Myers, Saralee Medjes, Maxine Epstein, Ada Sutker, Carol Rubin, Barbara Pinsky, Audrey Johns, Susan Shackter, Julie 
Eger, Adrienne Miller Rochelle Graber Fourth Row: Maureen Mark, Rhoda Rosenreld, Diane Slein, Sandra Goiter, Shir'ee Rich, Sharon Ginsberg, Carole Hirsch Sheila 
Davis, Caro, Letwin Marion Banish, Judith Wright, Barbara Alexander, Barbara tazar Third Row: Noreen Crane, Mariorie Shagam, Barbara Fox, Judith Gelman, Mrs 
Godfrey, Eya Mand , Lynn Hamer, Judith Linkow, Leah Meyer Second Row: Phyllis Felton, Sandra Massel, Myra Rubenstein, Marcia Novoselsky, Dorene Shulman 
Maureen Feldman, Mer.e List, Rober.a Pines Bottom Row: Dale Sanger, Linda Nimz, Bonnie Gartner, Marlene Berholtz, Fern Edidin 




151 




Top Row. Anita Snu.man, Ruth Solomon, Arline ^™« Sh.M. Em r.a, Ve,™ Klein Eileer , Cohr , Marcia H.* = ^^Jitv^^ 
Se^d R^; d E rr : s&an! m R 9 a m y^ (^fXttiS^gSF E^n/SlS^' Bottom' Row : Susan Plotkin, Men, Chaet, Abb y ,srae,ow, Diane P.nker, 



Francine Feldman, Michelle Graver, Gail Spilky Not in panel: Harnet Becker 



'Something Old, Something New" Chants laurel House 



Corrine Epstein, president 



'But sir, it's one o'clock — and we're closing!' 



In one oi their songs, the girls at 
Laurel House praise the residence for 
bringing them together and cementing 
Long lasting friendships. Moreover, fol- 
lowing the same theme, one of the best 
known symbols ol Laurel House is the 
Laurel wreath engraved upon their 
from door. As any student of antiquity 
can tell you, the laurel is the symbol ol 
h iendship and cooperation. 

I.,,, kiK loi the members ol the resi 
dence, tile Hoc. is were recentl) pui in on 
the sci ond and third floors a deed greal 
K appre< iated by the gii Is in the house; 
they're hoping this'll mean the end <>l 
hardwood splintersl 



152 





Steaks and Seaweed Decorate Events of Leeman Lodge 



It's so nice to have a pianist around the house! 



Mary Keyes, president 




Anyone will tell you that college is 
definitely getting harder, which means 
that a little more effort and encourage- 
ment are needed to promote higher 
scholarship. The girls over at Leeman 
Lodge think they've found the answer: 
a Steak and Beans Dinner with a new 
twist. This time both the Steak-eating 
Snobs and the Bean-eating Bums dressed 
to befit their scholastic achievement. 
How does an "A" look? 

Leeman Lodge girls proved that they 
certainly weren't "all wet" when it came 
to giving "Underwater Fantasy," their 
annual spring formal, which included a 
lifelike sunken treasure! 



153 



The time? Many years from now. An 
old McKinley Hall resident, overhearing 
the word "college" begins to reminisce. 
Just what is it that she recalls about her 
McKinley Hall days? Two to one, she 
remembers those snowball fights with 
the waiters; those popcorn parties late 
at night to keep all the girls going dur- 
ing study sessions; that great demand 
for peanut butter for every meal . . . 
or maybe she thinks of the cluster of 
girls watching Wright Street parades 
(Sheequon, perhaps) from the third floor 
screened in porch. Then, there was the 
twisted house emblem . . . Memories, 
memories! 




Mary Beauchamp, president There is a lot of backstage work in giving a tea. 



"Memories Are Made of This" Quotes McKinley Hall 






Ton R»w Deonna Forman Helen Painter Doris Lum, Rosemary Kowalesik, Lyla Morine, Alice AAoreau, Martha Huxtable, Mary Brodd, Linda Kannmacher Louise 

pZ. "K^r^^S^^TS la a Beauc^tdy^X.s^n' ^t^^^^^t"^^^^^^ 
Greenwood, Nancy Stahl Second Row^ Dora Lee Caro^Wood ,1^6 ^ Beaucnamp > R ^ p; nke r,on, Mary McHose, Janice Kessler, Bonnie Swanson Rebecca Mcintosh, 

prc%tc^T'nenr]rhns F or;u 9 nethS J?n;% n ho.d%7/s"an , Wikof f : Sh 3ila Raymond, Judy Trei, Michaela Jordan, Eugenie Frank No, in panel: Ohma Cl.mp.tt, 

Lois Nestle, Carol Snyder, Joy Spartin, Ricki Szwiec, Phyllis Mack 





"High upon a hilltop," the opening 
line of one of the more favored songs 
of the girls living at Palamar, might 
stir up a hit of curiosity as to just 
what is up on that hilltop! Could it 
he Palamar itself? To get an answer, 
one had best contact Palamar. 

Palamar events this year are listed 
somewhat differently from those events 
of many other organizations. To give 
an example, here is one part of their 
busy social calendar: "Stole Granada 
Club's crest, returning it later with 
special ceremonies; set up diet table for 
those with will-power . . ." and so on, 
for this was merely a sampling! 



Six smiling sweeties — and all living at Palamar. 



Evelyn Brown, president 



Busy -and Unusual -Social Life Keeps Palamar Going 



Pabin, AnlrTy HX/v^ta^ar^San^raTa^n Dorts^onXd^h zSl ^salin^ Rh^d/^t^M ^Y™, ft"?' , Na -V Johnson, Constance Asper, Judith 
Row: Elizabeth Gabel, Jo Ann Qumlan, Margaret Wilfong, Pamela Tracy, Alice Paine Not in panel: Catherine joslin 



Is, Carol Kasanda, Sandra Turley Bottom 



i mi M§MaMm M 



\\r 



t 




155 



m^mm 




Top Row: Patricia Mo,ler, Virginia Vid. Joyce B.unde,. Sara McMurtne Helen Rast , Jane ^^^tfJSS E^« .^'fc « 
Nancy Lantz Sondra Pearson, Judith Moreen Th.rd Row: Anna Over on, ™ o x '" e R ^ re Vn n ^ Cravens Susan Seely, Ruth Cortright, Carol Crout, jan.ce Roberts, Jud.th 
Gwendolyn Hayes, June Hutchcraft, Sharon Spauldmg, «^ ^f ^ " T ; d d S 3 1 1 v S ° " t Bottom Row: Rebecca West, Elizabeth Anderson, Nancy Westover, Mane He.neken. 
&^V^?Z^<£3% f^^tV^t^^Z Webb, Manorie Cubbage 



Presbyterian Hall Celebrates the Year in Various Ways 



Patricia Goodman, president 



They're whistling a happy tune at Presby Hall! 



Presby Hall has been known as just 
that for so long that it is often a shock 
to hear it called Presbyterian Hall. How- 
ever, few outsiders probably know the 
residence's real name, which is Lyvia 
Hall Memorial Presbyterian House for 
Women. This house was left as a memo- 
rial to three Ball sisters. 

A Christmas tradition is to present 
eaeh other not <>nl\ with gifts, hut with 
poeti< tributes t<> one anothei these 
cm often he quite hilariousl 

Each spline the Grace Welsh award is 
presented to one ol the more outstand- 
ing seniors. The award is based on the 
girl's contribution to the" house. 



156 





m • I? P kT : , Ju 5 ll,h Lu'zhoff, Glenda Eshleman, Patricia Plaza, Susan Rains, Nancy Hermann, Virginia Valonis, Beverly Armstrong, Lou Dunham, Roberta Cowgill 
Olympia Dyer Nola Deimer, Janice Davis, Barbara Weiss, Bernadine Bednarz Third Row: Nira Davy, Marie Tomasic, Mary Mickey, Audrey Bruckner, Dian Krueger Lois 
Steben Mary Morehart, Judith Osborn, Barbara Haimbaugh, Marcia Kent, Sandra Young, Carol Coffman, Janice Scribano, Jeanne Cooper, Julie Bartolo, Dorinda Pierce 
Mary Divan, Lynn McCorvie Second Row: Marcia Wright, Gloria Rajewski, Marjorie Griffith, Sandra Renning, Barbara Mahler, Margaret Buchanan, Mrs. Dornoff, Nancy 
Lanier, Mary Lee Hale, Janina Wojciechowska, Evelyn Shouse, Patricia O'Rourke, Judith Schmidt, Phyllis Wendel Bottom Row: Joan Mair, Judith Peak, June Carlson 
Stelia Haney, Pamela Roski, Tamisse Trepamere, Judy Smith, Susan Lundstrom, Janet Weaver, Kathleen Cline, Sharon Zogas Not in panel: Diane Moran, Judith Rotter 



Sherwood Lodge Finds Itself Tagged With New Name 



-and at Sherwood, they're whistling right back! 



Nancy Lanier, president 




With a name like Sherwood Lodge, it 
really isn't surprising that the residents 
should receive a lot of strange phone 
calls asking for Robin Hood and Little 
John. But new fame — and a new name — 
this year came to the residence. It seems 
that, during fraternity rush, the Sigma 
Chi house was in somewhat of an uproar, 
due to the redecorating being done there. 
Therefore, Sherwood was used by the 
Sig's lor rushing purposes. Since then, 
many jokes have arisen as to Sherwood 
being the Sigma Chi Annex! 

Along with giving a Christmas party 
lor local orphans, Sherwood also gives 
a faculty tea, at about the same time. 



157 



While other residences might have 
received the benefit of a more glamour- 
ous scheme of decoration, none could 
beat, in humor, the decorative addition 
that recently graced the front of Strat- 
ford House— a sign advising the students 
to order their telephone service there! 
Amusing? It surely was! 

All roads led to Rome when it came 
time for Stratford's quite unusual ban- 
quet entitled, "Ides of March." And 
who presided? Julius Caesar, naturally, 
surrounded by the girls dining on mat- 
tresses and sipping grape juice out ot 
trophies. Toga-togged jesters helped 
provide the entertainment. 




Diana Chiles, president 



On a cold winter's eve, the fireside draws chums. 



Stratford House Falls Victim to False Advertising 



Top Row: Brenda Fisher, Linda Srnith Pauline Vaughan Nancy Wh.e Ann Thorn. Edna Sirns Janice Coykendai, ^^^ 

Spitzer, Sandra McCaslin, Marilyn Hawkins 




158 



. 




"Togetherness" might be the key word 
to describe Wescoga, where the members 
sing. "We will endeavor to strive for 
(.oil's kingdom on earth and in so doing 
prove Wescoga's worth." Here, working 
together, whether that means cooking, 
cleaning, or what all, seems to be the ve- 
hicle for much enjoyment. The secret 
spice behind it all can be found in this 
phrase: "co-operating on all matters of 
our own free will." This attitude has 
certainly paid off, not only scholastically, 
but also in the smooth operation of extra- 
(inricular events, such as the tea the 
Wescoga residents give for their sponsors. 



They're Marching for dear old lllini — to dinner 



Barbara Kumler, president 



.0 



Together We Stand" Must Be Basic Theme of Wescoga 



Barbara Voss IWbar, Mon« H-r, Z, ktw r* i^'*' m' 3 ™ . H V ' Jud 'I h la 1 9 k Lyiln Schaefer > L ^da Labertew, Lynn Kreuzberger, Claudette Olson, Margaret Eyer, 
KurnTer Ami' Butt Th,»r«« I » A 'l °t ,T' ' T"* ^d'"" c Ss " nd Row Vir 3 inia H ^er, Mary Geheber, Alice Gardner, Shirley Jones, Mrs Holton, Barbara 

Ma7y GaHkh Kayett'a Sinks PP ' Pa,rlCia Cra,er ' Lyn " Napoli ' NanCy Johnston < Car °'y" Howard, Margaret Smith, 




159 




m i aa „ il Knickerbocker Patricia Fox, Judith Voliner, Elinor Derman, Susan Price, Elizabeth Sokolovsky, 

Top Row: Frances Ashley, Patricia Rapp Noel I Mendicino, Ga,l Kn <*erbocke r ™ci 7*' Die trick, Anda Vinse, Sonja Hanson, Rema Paulionis, Sandra 

Norma Sw/nson, Norma Harris, Kristin Daniels Em.lyBubolz Carmen Manlono Jud * g^™™",™^^ Doral B ierly, Pauline Betz June Lundergan Mrs 

tc"T/F^ EliZabe ' h ^"^ ^ in Paneh SUSa " Sa " Zm3n ' 9erV V ' 

Davidson,' Mary Fritz, Elsie Yarham 



Birch Hall 



Pine Hall 



Top Row: E.inor Pletka, Joanne Nemec, Maureen McKernan Lezlie ^gan "^ 
Patricia Goldman, Sally Grimes, Marian Gronke, Jane McCartm, Fa.th Paul, pres dent Suzon H^ zeroth Bottom ^Ko . igsford PP S * anc ! ra Le boe, Gay Margolin Harr.ef 
Se^a^Co^^ ^ r,d?ng: n Be?,°e r iris^^hyi,i? re p , o^r, Ze D 9 oro,hy Hanging, Bonnie Rothstein, Margaret Sm„h, Karen 
Vincent, Marcia Janis 




p HP f) 








Top Row: Bonnie Van Buskirk, Georgie Swartz, Diana Carter, Mrs. Mary Garrard, Betty Shinkevich, Diane Lesinski, Patricia Verklan, Nancy Herman Third 
Row: Barbara Areson, Helen Maurer, Muriel Garvin, Jane Fitzgerald, Patricia Cramer, Cynthia Chlebicki Bottom Row: Charlotte Fidder, Mary Knight, Cynthia Browne, 
president; Estelle Jones, Janet Evans 



Gamma House 



Hoste House 



Top Row: Karen Goodall, Carol Comisky, Bebe Pritam, Karin Lenz, Nell Prather, Janet Chisholm, Linda Stephens, Jeanne Schmidt, Sarah Miller, Arlene Monroe 
Second Row: Mary Zawacki, Carolyn Shettron, Sara Ulrich, president; Mrs. Warwick, Mary Blair, Anne Smith Bottom Row: Janice Filip, Pat McKinney, Barbara Lap- 
ington, Colette Sroka, Lois Miller Not in panel: Judy Simko, Kathy Dieterich, Karen Doughty, Donna Tredrea 




161 







,sx ss ^suwaaas' mas "s=s wis? a. wwsx, Ms -asa? 



urek, Gail 
president; 



Eldred, 
Nelda 



Betty .. 

Thompson, Sharron Vondracek 



Alpha House 



Beta House 



Caroly 



Top Row: Deborah King, Bonnie Smith, Susan Staunton, Eileen Riccomi, Lorena Divan, Mrs Anderson Anna 5w« 
n Tullis, Judith Gabel, Mary Hoge, Georgia Lurie, Barbara Schubert, president; Marilyn Mitchell, Jacqueline Wi 



Anderson, Anna Swaar, Flo Corzine, Barbara Hooser Second Row: 
i'helmsen, Judith Lake Bottom Row: Nancy 



undquist, Ma'riorie Haines, Sandra Swiatowiec, Sandra Sefansky, Joanne Ragan, Margaret Burn 





Ma 
Tsa 
Sch 



Top Row: Sylvia Washtien, Phyllis Smolensky, Sandra Fee, Loretta Ottwell, Mariorie Dodd, Nancy Wilt, Rosemary Fagan, Patricia Au-Young Third Row: 
irie Uney, Jura Gelazius Gail Schlief, Mildred Fulton, Rita Pierce, June Panknen, Louise Volkstorf, Carol Blake, Joan Kelley Second Row: Barbara Barnstable, Loretta 
n, Jo Larkin, Mrs. Rohl, Vida Jucas, Marian Baker, Elizabeth Himes Bottom Row: Grace Lasterie, Bee Tan, Cynthia Zung, Naomi Barratt, Natalie Liss Karen 
ineider, Ardeth Clawson 



Vanlig House 



Linden Hall 



Top Row: Berenice Puchkoff, Mary Castagnello, Carole Fris, Carla Sommerfeld, Judith Braun, Kiyoko Nakawatase, Sharlene Pearlman, Rita Peters, Skaidrite 
Presserreisbergs, Diane Nordin, Sharon Cramer, Barbara Trickey, Carol Lusk, Loretta Bialy Second Row: Helen Jacobs, Jeanette Behner, Margaret Baldwin Charlene 
Schauff, Shirley Stimpert, Sally Davis, Karen Kraabel, Nancy Brown, Nijole Kazlauskas, Phyllis Blair, Carol Hoepe, Judith Leonard, Marian Kadlub Bottom Row Judith 
Waitzman, Elizabeth Childs, Sabra Goldflne, Barbara Bonesteel, Sandra Jacobson, Patricia Franklin, Ann Rankin, president; Maxine Kessie, Evelyn Wood, Barbara Tobor 
Ada Ross Not in panel: Patricia Anderson, Shirley Stimpert, Donna Saaring 



a 




■' '■.:; K ,.:■ 



4*. ir itf 




Top Row: KeHie ByeHy, Kenneth Smith Be, Sandor, ^(^c^nald Bean Leon ^Imer^e,^ %£&<&&$& ^^K^tJ 
Carll, Miles Hyde, Gerald Shriver, Ronald F.ckel Third Row: Richard B ;°™"' n M p '*^ s Howard Pratt, William Adams Second Row: John Reutter, Lawrence Adams, 
Robert Schmidt, Stephen Norton Robert Crev.ston. James "oekenhull, Joseph Phebus Howard rra i ^ R(jw James Wormley/ Rlchard Peters , 




Men of Acacia Trade One Old Tradition in on Another 



Max Schmidt, president A fireplace setting lends a tranquil atmosphere. 



While the Hatfields and the McCoys 
may never have settled their arguements, 
at least the Acacias and AKL's have man- 
aged to make up their differences. This 
event not only ended the imaginary lend 
between the two, but also put an end 
to their traditional lend dance. How- 
ever, the Acacias are not weeping, tor 
now they can present "Night on the 
Nile" instead. Not only is this dance 
traditional to all chapters ol Acacia, but 
it also serves as a reminder ol their 
Masoni< founders. 

Anothei A< a< ta tradition is to showei 
all new pinmen and since there've 
been a lot, the pledges have been bus 1 ) ' 



164 





Top Row: John Lebeck, Phillip Arnholt, Kenneth Breeding, James Davis, Frederick Wettering, LaVerne Newman, Dennis Duflfield Third Row: Joseph Yadron, 

George Loschky, Wayne Stephens, Donald Morrison, George Thompson, Gregory Leigh, Terry Romack Second Row: George Sellers, Kenneth Bonnem, Robert Behnke] 

Charles Mulletl, John Weisenberger, Gerald Wilson, William Yontz Bottom Row: Ernest Adam, Richard Schultz, Ronald Weber, Conrad White, Richard Murray Richard 
Ruddell, Joseph Fischer, George Ritscher Not in panel: Raymond Schroeder, William Brahms, Lawrence Grygienc 



Men of Alpha Chi Rho Often Retreat to Prehistoric Times 




East Side, West Side — but Front Side's the best! 



Charles Mullett, president 




The men of Alpha Chi Rho must be 
rough and tough. Why else would they 
choose a caveman theme for their pledge 
dance? Officially known as Caveman 
Drag, the dance presented the Crows in 
very ancient attire — like animal skins, 
even! (Could this be the answer to the 
Ivy League Look?) Then, of course, 
the house followed the theme by sud- 
denly becoming a fairly authentic cave. 
That happy hollow was entered through 
a long tunnel, both dark and dangerous, 
which ran through the basement. To 
complete the regression, all present con- 
sumed the meal in true caveman tradi- 
tion! 



165 







The pledge dance, "The Last Straw," 
complete with straw and house mascot, 
"Rughead," for that true barnyard effect, 
started off the social year. 

A Christmas tree decorating party 
erected a 28 foot tree to add its cheer 
to the Christmas Formal Dinner-Dance, 
proceeded by the Alpha Delt-Pi Phi 
party for underprivileged children of 
the Champaign-Urbana Community. 

The nationally traditional Dads Day 
was founded by Illinois Alpha Delts, 
and has special meaning at the house. 

Promotion of scholarship is sparked 
by cash grants to the men showing the 
best grade point and most improvement. 



With some outside aid, the Alpha Delt's sing out. 



John Kibler, president 



Great Variety of Events Make Alpha Delta Phi Year Full 




Bottom Row Carl Goetz, Robert Hruby, Richard Holmas, Paul Reback N,t in panel: Max Berns, Dav.d Brown, Robert Mech 




166 



It there's any truth in the saying, 
"Like lather, like son," then one can 
certainly expect a lot of laughs from 
the AEPis — who will only be living up 
to a tradition set by their dads! It all 
started, it seems, on Dad's Day this year, 
when the older men put on, for the 
benefit of their AEPi sons, a frolicking, 
rolicking satire of television cowboy 
programs. The audience was so busy 
rolling in the aisle with laughter and 
demanding an encore that they almost 
missed the example set! 

What does spring bring, but the an- 
nual AEPi Gaslight Parisienne (trans- 
lation: a Frenchified spring formal) . 




Edward Gerch, president 



-and here is our answer to the Kingston Trio! 




||l|' Alpha Epsilon Pi Dads Teach Their Sons a Thing Or Two 



Top Row: Barry Gordon, Gary Silverman, David Kirshner, Martin Losoff, Edward Fine, Michael Listick, Barry Shere, Ronald Robbins, Leslie Sussman Rona'd 
arrS j n c ,. Four,h . Row: Alan Friedman, Irwin Singer, Allan Carney, Perry Goldberg, Jack Rosenthal, Lewis Simon, David Russ, Richard Wintergreen, Edward Springer 
lavid Selig Third Row: Michael Joss, Gary Feldmar, Charles Goldstein, Edward Gerch, Ralph Loberg, Lawrence Field, Jerome Purze, Bruce Brenner Second Row 
Man Effron, Alan Cohler, Leslie Gurvey, Robert Satlow, Stuart Walcoff, Jeffrey Graubart, Joseph Alexander, William Ernstein Bottom Row: Alan Baiter, Harvey Leboe 
an Rozen, Howard Solomon, Joe Rubenstein, Paul Pompian Not in panel: Michael Moss, Henry Hechtman, Herbert Goldman, Abbey Silverstone 








inson, 

Will 

Mai 

Botto 

Robert Young 




Humor and Splendor Mark Alpha Gamma Rho's Spring 



Joseph Beckerman, president The AGRs all agree that practice makes perfect! 



While sorority senior banquets are 
usually tearful, fraternities seem to enjoy 
leaning in the other direction. A good 
example is the AGR's springtime ban- 
quet. At this time, their graduating 
seniors, in wild attire, proceded to give- 
away the many trinkets they'd accumu- 
lated at school. 

But the ridiculous quickly changes to 
the sublime when the AGR house be- 
comes decked with thousands <>l roses. 
The occasion is theii annual spring 

dance, the "Pink Rose formal." Again 
this yeai the vision ol "losey" loveliness 
became' a reality as the campus again 

received a beautiful event. 



168 




I 




Alpha Kappa Lambda Finds Self Steeped in Loeal Tradition 




he AKL's take care of those trophies they've won! Richard Schwarzlose, president 




The AKL's have some pretty unusual 
traditions. For instance, the sweetheart 
song of the fraternity was written by 
an honorary alum — Lloyd Morey, Presi- 
dent Emeritus of the University. 

Another tradition dealing directly 
with AKL involves their cook, who is 
their pingjrl — pinned to the entire 
house! She wears her pin constantly. 

The Alpha Kappa Lambda's have set 
aside a part of their house as "sacred 
territory." Called Happy Hollow, the 
section of the house claims a certain 
amount of sovereignity. Not only are 
partitions often used, but this part even 
has its own social exchanges! 



169 



I 




Top Row: Ma, N.rme,, John Stein.ann Ronald ^<f^'\^S^ 'SZFSSSt ^^r^^™^ &» sS 

Zielinski, Donald Schwalb, Ryland Koets Third Row: Fredrick F l e| de Thomas Schmen k jam es b , Hamilton, Richard Diedrich, Thomas Lehnen, James 

be^iSSn^^ Th °^ B ^ Rud0 ' Ph Mudi - Jam6S KinCann ° n ' Henfy Sher0 ' R ° V 
Latka Leon Harlan Not in panel: Henry Carroll, William Schaffer, Neil Frankel 



The Alpha Rho Chis Do Not Build Their Houses on Sand 




Yep; paddles, they get paddles at Alpha Rho Chi! Richard Diedrich, president 




A unique APX tradition is that every 
semester the pledge class throws the 
graduating seniors into a mudhole lo- 
cated in back ol their house. Now, this 
is especially ironic, as Alpha Rho Chi is 
basically an architectural Iraternity— 
and what nice, modern bit ol architec- 
ture has something as trite and old 
Eashioned as a mudhole around? 

Also, on the realm ol the unique is the 
art show which is held cadi year in the 
Alpha Rho Chi house. This is how the 
Eellows show that they lived up to their 
oath to build anything Erom temples to 
cans. However, their mudhole isn'i part 
ol the exhibition. 





Strange Acquisitions Characterize Alpha Sigma Phi's 



Roger Jones, president 



The Alpha Sig's have managed to pick 
ip some strange things around campus. 
For a short time this year they were 
he proud possessors of the front and 
jack doors of Sigma Sigma Sigma. But 
tetectives in search of these fixtures 
vould've had a hard time quizzing the 
Upha Sig's, who have acquired a novel 
anguage all their own. They call it 
luck talk, and it usually revolves around 
ather confusing antonyms. 

Reverting to the more sophisticated 
leutrals for their Black and White 
formal, the Alpha Sig's wore black tuxes, 
vhile their dates, in white, also matched 
lie dance decorations. 



Sometimes it's hard to convince people I'm right!' 




Besides he tact that they enlarged 
their house by some eighteen rooms and 
several floors, the ATO's, during the 
year, also acquired another new addi- 
tion—a house mother. Because of the 
fact that their recent construction in- 
cluded (besides an indoor barbeque pit) 
ample quarters for their new house- 
mother, she fits in just fine! 

Nothing amusing ever happens at 
ATO— at least they won't tell about it, 
which makes it hard to write anything 
about them. Their hall clock works 
perfectly, and they don't even snowball 
each other, just sororities. What a year 
for those "hairy chested men!" 




Richard Walbaum, president But who ever heard of a real live magic carpet 




Ruh, Rah, Rega; New Aquisitions Hit Alpha Tau Omega 



172 




The men of Beta Sigma Psi have found 
the worth of their kitchen help. For 
one thing, the fraternity has, as its em- 
ployee, a cook with a quite developed 
sense of humor. This characteristic 
came to light one April Fool's Day, as 
a cotton ball was placed in the center 
of each homemade roll tor dinner. 

The Beta Sig's also have found that 
their waiters are unusually talented. 
One night at dinner, alter a series of 
clownish antics on both sides, a song 
was sung by the waiters for their em- 
ployers. The Beta Sig's enjoyed the en- 
tertainment so much that now the wait- 
ers sing about once a week for them. 



When fellow 



meet, anything can happen ! 



Thomas Hecht, president 



Talented Cook and Waiters Entertain Beta Sigma Psi's 




Top Row: Ronald Schroeder, Dale Brindmann, Richard Remmert, Raymond, Fritzsche, teroy Mosny, Rona'd Junker, Aaron Johnson, Charles Ponelett Ronald Ehr- 
nardt, Robert Bitter, Eldon Mattick Third Row: David Migit, Arthur Twietmeyer, Joseph Doninger, tee Jensen, Darrel Junker, Robert Bloechle, Richard Hacker, Edward 
Bugnis, Ralph Folkerts, Daniel Ford, James Zaruba, Howard Seizinger Second Row: Donald Robins, tloyd Karmeier, Michael Welge, Don Bienfang Mrs Harlow 
Thomas Hecht, Thomas Wegener, Wilbert Rueter Bottom Row: Evan Sommerfeld, Clifford Kiehl, William Quehl, Gary Kermer, Ronald Filip, Harold Kunz Stanley 
Schaumberg Not in panel: Donald Metzger 




173 




Smart, smooth and sophisticated are these Betas. 



Jerry Manion, president 






The Betas received the benefit of a 
redecoration spree this year, for the en- 
tire interior of their house was done 
over. On the outside the familiar Beta 
pillars received a new coat of white paint 
— and numerous attempts have been 
made to alter their appearance since that 
time, it is rumored. 

Another object of many pranks is a 
large oriental gong which the Betas, be- 
tween pep rallies, guard with their lives. 
It seems that the gong has a habit of 
wandering — to other fraternity houses. 
Now the relic is safely cached in the 
house mother's quarters! (Apparently 
Mrs. B. is to be feared!) 



Beta Theta Pi House Benefitted by Redecorating Scheme 




Top Row: Richard Toth, Steven Sample, Joseph England, Robert Brown. Ja.es ^s ^rnes G^on, ,0^ Jrul^irn ^g^^' 3gj 

Ellen Stephen Knapp, John Wisnosky, Noel Thyson, Alan Buckles, Mrs. I *"'""; J ^* Manor, byron , Derwe|| David p olask |, D ld Gubser, Raymond 

« ^^^^B^^ R^ow^^Ro^r^tMnrred^Kra^'AXw^L'^ther, Philip Stewart, Arthur Hass, Ward Johnson, Jerry Ozanne, Kenneth 
Heineman No» in panel: Thomas Swan, Dan.el McKmney 




174 



The day that the rains came was a 
rather disastrous day indeed for the Chi 
Phi housemother. At that time, she had 
to be rescued from her basement apart- 
ment, where the water level had risen 
to more than twelve inches! 

A quite progressive pledge system is 
the pride of the Chi Phi's; according to 
their system, actives and pledges share 
house duties. But rowdy times prevail 
on other occasions, none-the-less, and a 
newly pinned brother is still apt to find 
himself receiving a mudbath. This latter 
deed might someday prove a tragedy, as 
a new living room rug was just installed! 




Ned Wheeler, president 



Play a simple tune, just a simple tune, brother! 



► 4 



Water and Mud Play Havoc with the Chi Phi's House 



a, r- P j ^ Robert Hoffman, William Cage, Charles Stonberg, Philip Hinze, Richard Flemming, Carl Peters, Lawrence Marshall, Richard Heinmiller, Thomas Payne, 
Alan Gossard, Alfred Herbster Third Row: Richard Smith, Stephen Allison, Larry Koch, Dan Arangelovich, William Hinze, Rochard Perotto, Barry Coomber, George 
Stemach, James Weatherly, David Metzler Second Row: Bernard Bishup, William Diehl, George Podlin, Larry Lessen, Ned Wheeler, Theodore Allison Brian Berg 
Walt Heimerdinger, James Staif, Wayne Chikote Bottom Row: Donald Allen, Alan Coxhead, Henry Blada, Philip Kasik, Richard Terlep, Robert Bush, Michael Pleck' 
Joseph Andrews, Robert Manfred Not in panel: Myron Taliafero 




It's a fact: Chi Psi was the first fra- 
ternity in the world to have a fraternity 
house. (Actually, the building was an 
unused hunting lodge situated in Ann 
Arbor, Michigan.) The acquiring of 
the building was quite a revolutionary 
step — especially since fraternity houses 
were illegal at that time! By the way, 
apparently in memory of that first build- 
ing, Chi Psi's always call their fraternity 
house a "lodge." 

At the end of last year, the Chi Psi's 
gave what they had thought would be a 
very impressive Founder's Dinner. It 
was impressive, alright. It seems as if 
the kitchen caught on fire that night! 




John Forsyth, president 



and here's another good one! brings a laugh. 




First and Firemost in Everything Is Chi Psi Fraternity 



Crackel, John McGowan, Guy Zeller, Willmore Hastings 




176 







"To each his own" is apparently the 
feeling thai prevails in the Delta Chi 
house. At any rate, each senior room- 
mate receives ten dollars at the begin- 
ning of the year to paint his room as 
he sees fit. Also, he is free to make other 
improvements to the room. 

The Delta Chi's and dates really go 
hobo for their Warehouse Dance. The 
decorations, naturally, revolve about ad- 
vertisements, posters, billboards. 

Spring is an ideal time lor charity 
the Delta Chi's feel — especially when 
their "good deeds" evolve around a Boy 
Scout troop which they sponsor. Hikes 
in the spring are part of the agenda. 



The key to modern living: controlled casualness. Walter Schramm, president 



Paint, Posters and Packs Are Trademarks of Delts Chi 




Top Row: Corwin Holmes, Alfred Kersten, Charles Woltz, Mark Gaynor, Howard Partch, Richard Lohner, Lynn Dueser, Jon Besig, David Watt, James Breyer, 
Gregory Jordan Third Row: Albert Til, William Epperson, Ronald Norton, Frederick Koester, Leroy Gurd, Dennis Brunnenmeyer, Robert Breyer, Thomas O'Beirne, Paul 
;lr?r ' D Reinho ' d . S : h , u A m f nn i M ' chael Hamblet, Thomas Welch, Albert Landeck, Kenneth Spangler, Richard Marsho Second Row: David Hamrick, Darrell Lohmeier 
William Bean, Daniel Mills Frank Voris, Walter Schramm, Daryl Strahan, Charles Henness, Dennis Venzon, Dennis Stehlik, John Ewigjebin Peter Roe Bottom Row 

Donald Bergen, James Pohlig, Delmar Gordy, William Aiken, Frank McGinty, Lawrence Ball, Thomas Stuart "«* ■" ~™ I. cj..,,„j m_pi i 

Larson, Jerry Jamieson, Frederick Lincicome, Gregory Jordan, Patrick Sheehan, Julius Thorton, John Breyer 



Not 



Darrell Lohmeier, 
■M^e Bottom Row: 
panel: Edward Nellessen, James Smock, Ronald 




177 




:ur»i1R^^^ 



Top Row: Carso 
Second Row: Richard O'Brecht, . 
Harry AAcCulloch, Michael McAAurry, Thomas Ros=, John Bailleu 




Life Is Merely One Big Blast to the Delta Kappa Epsilons 



Gary Devine, president 



Near the piano is as good a place to meet as any. 



One ol the "band oi brothers in DKE" 
one day got the bright idea of trying 
to startle the other DKE's by throwing 
an envelope lull ol explosives into a 
house' fireplace. Unfortunately, this 
siuli was more powerful than he antici- 
pated. The envelope detonated just as 
he neared the Inc. and the blast ncai 1\ 
blew (he culpril through die wall, as 
well as depositing die sool from die 
(himnc\ all ovei the loom. Everyone 
goi a lu.ii i \ laugh (ii sa\s here) ovei 

iln whole .ill, hi . I ,u< kil\. no one was 
loo sci iousb injured! ( Is il am won 

dei . then, thai theii mascol ia a neurotii 
boxei I 



178 





Top Row: Jonathon Flowers, Clifford Brouk, Ronald Reich, James Wallace, Todd Snow, Robert Scott, Douglas Wallace, Robert Tripp, Owen Knutson Myron 
.arpenter Lowery Stahl, Dona'd Anderson, Steven Colburn Third Row: Michael O'Laughlin, William Rumsey, Floyd Dierzen, Vonne Linse, Gary Young Dennis Leonardi 
_harles Thomas, Richard Snyder, Curtis Hampton, James Collins, Daniel Niemeyer, Larry Thomas, Kenneth Biek, Keith Cutler, Jerome Bacchetti Second Row Kenneth 
Harbison, John Tascher, Roger Stenberg, Robert Aten, Jerry Stelle, Ted Smith, Douglas Rickard, Edward Snyder, Richard Peters Bottom Row: James Johnson Gerald 
.eszczynski, Joseph Weidmann, Cameron Baughn, Louis Welge, Robert Zakes, James Morvay, James Kline, Robert Adams, William Eggert 



For Something New and Better, Contact the Delta Phi's 




/ '■- 



A Delta Phi plunks "The Old Piano Roll Blues." 



Jerry Stelle, president 





%£$& 


*1 


[ 


r 


,_ 1 

1 






J 




In search of something new to do — 
that's Delta Phi. And they certainly have 
found new horizons! For example, how 
many fraternities have "dorm ex- 
changes?" On the night of the event, the 
Delta Phi's put on their pajamas, 
grabbed some pillows, and marched on 
the sorority. Once there, the members 
rushed into the living room to the lively 
tune of their dorm song! 

Schizophrenics had a hey day at one 
of the Delta Phi "at homes" this year. 
The do-it-yoursell type entertainment 
included a linger painting lest; the color- 
lid results were then analyzed by one 
of the house psychology students! 



179 




Delta Sigma Phi Indicates Interests in Egypt and Mnsic 




Yes siree, it's a winner every time at Delta Sig! 



William Burke, president 




The fact that their national symbol 
is the Sphinx must have influenced the 
Delta Sigs somewhat. For instance, the 
boys certainly went Egyptian when it 
came to choosing and naming a mascot 
The pet? An alligator (stuffed, that is) 
and appropriately named Pharaoh. 

Let it never be said that Delta Sigma 
Phi is not a musical house. For. among 
the dew (hat make their home then- 
arc two drummers who are apparently 
so inspired 1>\ their evening meal that 
they engage in drum duels almost evetj 
night, right alter dinner. However, thev 
don't have much accompanimeni the 
piano is broken. 




Top Row: Kenneth Gitzendanner, Ned Tyler, Dale Hartwig, Kenneth Dickey, Kenneth Thomas, Robert Martin, Jeremiah Manley, Donald Otterstrom, William 
Reno, Robert Bruns, Tom Mclver, Ronald Day, Inno Rasina, Mark Healy, John Kaufman Third Row: Steven Mugg, Richard Williams, Thomas Mulcahy, David Beal 
Donald Drever, William Bruggen, Joseph Cablk, Neil Anderson, Harold Roos, Melvin Shaver, Frederick Thayer, Robert Halliday, George Doering, James Donahue! 
Duane Hanna Second Row: David Wuesteman, Myron Gross, John Schrader, Bernard Wall, Bruce Duff, Mrs. Griffith, John Ehrmantraut, Lawrence Moore, John Legendre! 
David Sattem, Peter Kendall, Dale McDyer, Dernard Richards, William Bauer Bottom Row: Stephen Smith, George Lochmann, James Tambling, David Eickemeyer] 
Dav.d Olson, Ronald Heflin, Robert Fulton, David Calhoun, Dimitri Beres, William Allison, Larry Long, Ronald Ziegler, Alvin Hand, Dean Smith, Roy Etnyre Not in 
panel: Clem Georlett, Terry Deiro, Thomas Moore, Bruce Quayle, James Staes, Bruce Stewart, John Ehler, Phil Gierman, Charles Weber, Robert Salata, Joseph 
Wendryhoski, Stanley Yukevich, Lloyd Gadau, Danny Laughhunn, Harry Kavetas, John Gunn, Fred Warrick, Robert Pfeiffer 




Delta Tau Delta Hosts and Wins Own Basketball Tourney 



Perhaps the biggest event on Delta 
Tau Delta's sports calendar this year 
was the Delta Tau Delta Invitational 
Basketball Tournament. Held in Decem- 
ber, this year's tourney was the first in 
what promises to become an annual 
series. In all, fifteen fraternities com- 
peted for the, Beer Keg Trophy, but the 
Delts, playing the role not only of 
"host" but of "victor," still managed 
to walk off with their own prize. 

A new mascot graces the Delt house 
this year — Pharoah, a Boxer puppy, who 
is being groomed, boast the Delts, to take 
on Theta Chi's "OX." The battle has 
not occurred yet — officially. 



John Ehrmantraut, president 



Bridge would be fun except that it's too legal! 





Busy, busy, busy boys are those mis- 
chievous DU's. Although, it isn't fair 
to blame them for all the pranks that 
they have been accused of playing, is it? 
Especially when one takes into con- 
sideration the fact that the DU's live 
midway between two arch (though 
friendly) foes, the Tekes and the Sig 
Pis. Egg throwing contests — from one 
dorm to the other — have proved a favor- 
ite recreation in the past. However, with 
the advent of winter — and with a little 
snow — a new weapon was discovered. A 
somewhat exaggerated report had the 
DU's losing twenty-two windows in one 
day — a record, il it's true! 



It looks as if the DU's need a fourth for bridge. 



Robert Young, president 



Oops! There Goes Another Window at Delta Upsilon 




• , n .i r- -_i /-■«-„ rk=rl« n=t» s nr, lee Duran Henrv Dralle, James Cunningham, James Whitlock, Warren Hanson, John 
' Vld Onoon Phil'fp GrTes'baum Ja B ey! dward Moll Hugh Fogler, Bruce Kriviskey Kenneth Kreutziger, Robert Larence 

' Third Row: John Clem, John Nelson, Ronald Magnussen, Eugene Schmitt, ^Robert 



Russo, John Guttman Fourth Row: Wayne 



Chiles" Nichols, Arthur Rommet Roger Davis Roger Fitzgerald Thomas Darnels .n,r« £w= - "RrAird^Poll.C'Oirli^to/H.roW'HVxenSuQh, Jack Rudy, Lee 



Walter Lange, Hogler Wast 



fund, Stephen Boroi. Carl Peterson! Charle. AAabry Not in panel: Frank Moschella, James Economos 




182 



The Palmer House's Rl>.\ Lacquer 
oom was the place; the occasion was 
,ans Scholar's Wintertime Outing. 
iven in conjunction with their six other 
apters, the event proved very popular. 
ne ol the highlights was an inter- 
apter basketball tournament. 
Supported by the Western Goll Asso- 
ition, Evans Scholars is in iis Erst year 
a member of the Interfraternity Coun- 
. In the past, as a member of the 
en's Independent Association, the 
lolars led the league in many aspects. 
>w a part of the (week world, they're 
II riding high, displaying an unphased 
hit. 




Simon Sheridan, president 



The Western Golf Association'!! like this shot! 



The Evans Scholar's Wintertime Outing Proves Popular 



Top Row: John Chious, Carl Scafldi, Frank Cipnano, George Shields, Jason Morgan, Anthony Quirini, Laurence Salana, Walter Lenz, Frank Kekyra, Dennis 
mer James latnall, Anthony Cazolas, Arthur Garcia, John DeReu, Robert Kraiewski Fourth Row: Gerald Wolin, Dennis Ryan, John Albers, Samuel Garlovsky 
imes Kys, Albert Wiatrowski, Walter Harrison, James Ellinger, Edward Remmert, Fred Flener, Richard Kamin, John McEnroe, Alexander Ratkis Third Row Michael 
leary, Charles Simon, William Doyle, Melvin Krejci, Edmund Liss, Leroy Peterson, Simon Sheridan, Guy Marella, David Hanson, Thomas Tirado, Richard Lewis, Francis 
jwers, Roger Bredek Second Row: David Arehart, Thomas Clark, William Hayes, Don Moses, John Jadryev, Ronald Cranford, Alan Kaur, Howard Beyer, Raymond 
nitney, Richard Stahler, Kenneth Brady Bottom Row: Edward Zychowski, Thomas Tatnall, Stephen Kalus, Stephen Foerster, Donald Blum, Michael Stark, Thomas 
oettsche, David Mihevc, John Kirby Not in panel: Kenneth Swanson 




"There's a spot in m\ heart that I'm 
keeping lor m\ Farmhouse memories'' 
sine the members of this fraternity; 
"Where fond dreams shall ever be lin- 
gering." the\ continue, bringing the 
song to a logical conclusion and, at the 
same time, explaining just what it is that 
keeps those Farmhouse memories in- 
tact: "With dreams of m\ Farmhouse 
Sweetheart!" We would never have 
guessed! 

In between annual banquets lor such 
events as Homecoming, Dad's Day, 
Mom's Da\ and Founder's Day, the mem- 
bers of Farmhouse stepped aside and let 
their house undergo general interior re- 
decorating — what ever that might mean! 




James Bowers, president 




The Members of Farmhouse List Memories Through Son| 



Top Row: Robert Greive, Philip Deal, Robert C 
Third Row: Herbert Beanie, Dale Millis, J. W. Burrus 
Parochetti Second Row: Neal Setchell, Roger Gallup. 
Dan Gouwens, John Rosenberg, Larry McKee, Frank McCully, Martin Grose, William Mullins 



aughey, Gerald Palm, Gary, Kendle, Byron Jones, Kenneth Saures, Robert Hughes, James Carson, Richard Cochra 
Forrest Paxton, William Flynn, Clarence Miller, Duane Schroeder, Ronald Kollman, Richard Vatthauer, Jam< 
Norman Ehlers, James Bowers Richard Snodgrass, James Wiltjer, Richard Curtiss Bottom Row: John Cavit 




184 




"We're gathered here today, boys, in 
brotherhood so true; so let us all be gay 
boys as tine KDR's all do!" or so one ol 
the Kappa Delta Rho songs goes. They're 
right, too, about the happy-go-lucky 
spirit that prevails among members of 
the fraternity; this attitude is helped 
along by the casual, informal atmosphere 
ol their house. Also adding greatly to 
the spirit is what is commonly recognized 
as probably the largest Great Dane on 
campus, Caesar. He has developed the 
habit of lollowing his masters to class. 
As a matter of fact, he's probably been 
to more classes than any man in the 
whole KDR house! 



These Epicureans relax and enjoy life as it comes. 



Arthur Bower, president 



The Casual Life Appeals to the Men of Kappa Delta Rho 




<: II S P k Ro "i n° hn w ' en P- ^ylor Bell, Warren Schumacher, William Koelm, Frank Wooding, David Young, Kenneth Wagner Second Row Larrv Thn 

Swallow Robert SuM.van Arthur Bower Frederick Roland, Frederick Nicoll, Gary Post Bottom Row: Louis Krumwlede James Robertson James Bovd PW, 
Steven Schilson, Clifford Arbogast, Louis Cepon Not in panel: Kent Christensen, Robert Reichard Carl Larson Robertson, James Boyd, Phi 



omas, Richard 
Hip Pfleuger, 



fir.-'* 










185 





"For He's a Kappa Sigma" - Wearing a White Apron 



A rare night, indeed — that's just one 
way to describe an excursion into any 
campus spot that doesn't locate a small 
legion of Kappa Sigs — waiting on 
tables, ol coursel 

But the Kappa Sigmas have been en- 
volved in rare evenings before — such 
as thai ol the annual Barn Dance. At 
thai time, a marvelousl) constructed 
tunnel ol ha) suddenly look a turn 
loi the worse, at the expense of a few 
members and then dates who were hall 
way through the tunnel. 

(,,)i .1 hankei to hunker? Contact 
the Kappa Si^s, who were the first to 
bring this spoil to campus. 



186 



Roy Fonda, president 




W P* 




Lambda Chi Alphas Prove That There Is A Marlboro Man 



mand performance- — a jazz ensemble swings out. 



Jimmie Keller, president 





This has been an exciting year for 
the Lambda Chis. They started saving 
their Marlboro wrappers early and, by 
gosh, they won that fancy new stereo, 
(cough, cough!) Another type of vic- 
tory came about in Stunt Show, thanks 
to Casper and his Ghostnik friends. 

An annual Lambda Chi event is their 
yearly pledge-active football game — 
which almost always turns out to be a 
victory for the actives. Senior refs will 
do it everytime, they all say! 

No one'll deny that the Lambda Chis 
are a musical house. Besides a quite well 
known quartet, they also sponsor a jazz 
group, along with Sigma Nu. 



187 



The Phi Delt's have been excelling 
at athletics for so long that it is strange 
to think of them in any other capacity. 
Still, come their annual Community 
Service Day and those Phi Delt's all pitch 
in to serve any community organization 
requesting aid. Successful? Their na- 
tional headquarters apparently thinks 
so, as they presented the Illinois chapter 
with their national Community Service 

Award. 

When the campus lovelies begin to 
sport all blue outfits and cardboard 
pins, you can bet that there is one more 
annual Phi Delt contribution in the 
offing: the She-Delt weekend. 




Fred Guyton, president 



Men on the go, know. Or so the Phi Delt's think. 




Service-Plus Fun-Keynotes Phi Delta Theta Year 




188 




Relaxation is the key to success, say these PEP's. Arthur Serck, president 



Sometimes girls jusi don't appreci- 
ate anything you do for them. That's 
the sentiment of the Phi Ep's, especially 
after the experience of giving a "sleep- 
in formal." Because the guys would be 
moving out of the house for the night 
leaving their dates in control, the Phi 
Ep's decided to really give the old hut 
a thorough cleaning. And what hap- 
pened? The girls became jealous be- 
cause the PEP house looked so much 
better than their own did! 

Actually, the Phi Ep house is unusual 
lor more than its cleanliness — it seems 
that the house was actually (and un- 
intentionally) built backwards! 



House Cleaning at Phi Epsilon Pi Brings Strange Results 




Top Row: Steven Fishbein, James Radin, Stuart Bloom, Stuart Sirota, Michael Agay, Earl Silver, Ronald Port, Arthur Go'd, Michael Wallack, Larry Schelter, 
5 aul Katz, Jerry Steiner, Robert Strizak, Malvin Krinn, Burton Weinstein Fourth Row: Stewart Dan, Stanley Green, Michael Grouso, Michael Lissner, Mark Buch, Sey- 
■nour Melnik, Glenn Goldman, Allen Miller, Howard Schatz, Martin Spagat, Steven Salzberg, Burton Lipman, Daniel Sigband Third Row: Allan Youman, Michael 
[iserman, Richard Frenzel, Bernard Kirsner, Arthur Serck, Howard Kravatz, Richard Welleck, Stuart Werner, Theodore Goldstein Second Row: Larry Rosenberg, Jack 
cordon, Stephen Zucker, Michael Berger, Allan SchafFer, Robert Garmisa, James Haddon, Robert Rosenberg, Donald Hill Bottom Row: Alan Edelstein, Jeffrey Kuhn, 
2harles Turek, Lorin Spak, Barry Werner, Jerold Gold, Harvin Turbow 




189 




The nickname "Fiji" is apt to conjure 
up all sorts of visions. At the men- 
tion ot the word, some people immedi- 
ately think ot the annual Island Party, 
while others, particularly the Phi Gams 
themselves, might remember past Frank 
Norris Pig Dinners. Or a vision of the 
stately white pillared Fiji house just 
might flitter across someone's mind. By 
the way, this attractive edifice last sum- 
mer received an addition, in the form of 
an enclosed patio. Moreover, due to 
technical advances, the Fijis now have 
electric blankets in their dorm — even 
though the alums accuse them of get- 
ting soft! 






'Honest, sonny, it only hurts when he laughs — ! 



William leuter, president 



Phi Gamma Deltas Mix Sand and Swine for Good Times 



A 

# 



▼ 




190 



Things jusi aren't the same around 
the Phi Psi house these days. There's 
a big vacancy in the hearts (and the 
Fourth Street parking lot) ol the Phi 
Psi's. This spot was once filled by a 
large grey hearse, the private toy of 
the rather morbidly minded sophomore 
(lass, who had actually used the auto 
lor parties and dales — up until Thanks- 
giving vacation, that is. For at that 
time, two of the more adventurous mem- 
bers decided to take the vehicle home 
with them. However, engine trouble 
soon set in. The hearse now reposes in 
isolated splendor in a cow pasture some- 
where between here and St. Louis. 




Jerry Williams, president 



'They're rioting in Africa!" are those Phi Psis. 



<i 






Phi Kappa Psi's Put Their Hearse Out to Pasture 



Top Row: George Staudt, David Dandurand, Raymond Gibson, David Ash, Robert Stava, William Ayton, James Brown, Kenneth Telleen, Stuart Lockwood, Ben 
Waldie, Willard Nelson, David Boge, Robert Hill, Paul Clarey Fourth Row: William Stone, Kurt Youngstrom, Alexandre Jankowsky, Robert Rigdon, Theodore Kirkby, 
John Ravencroft, Norman Mayer, Edmund Long, Alan Swanson, Melvin Fink, Lawrence Tribbey, Ralph Larson, John McDonnell Third Row: William Johnson, Gerald 
Colangelo, John Dodson, Charles Pugh, Jerry Williams, James Benson, Clifford Wilderman, Donald Day, Stephen Johnson, David Martin Second Row: Gary Sather, 
Robert Boling, Joseph Day, Ken Velten, Howard Cronk, William Small, Kenneth Lopez, William Dunn, Charles Patti, William Bielfeldt, Gerald Pius Bottom Row: 
Bruce Dahlin, Jay Blomquist, Noel Zweigler, Thomas Liszka, Michael Gibson, Dale Hopper Not in panel: William Workman, Robert Hickey 





Top Row: Robe, Backoff, Ja.es .ckmann, *m- *«^g^^ 

Muir, Walter Schmeal, William Rosing. Kenneth Kapps Third Row^ Charles ^u^kenbrodt K,ch|ra ■ . ^^ ^^ James Sachtschale, 

Steinam, James Clayton William Penniman Neal Mart.n S«ond Row Donald McDonald, Ko fe Wa| John Fortner _ Dona | d Wagner , Fred Lord, John 

^k^rt Peh,k - °° n YeaZel Unde " LOVe " e,,e 




Skull and Bones Prevail at Phi Kappa Sigma Dance 



Raymond Cain, president 



Order prevails when "Sugar" conducts the meeting! 



One of the major events on the Skull 
social calendar during the year was the 
"Skull Dance," an informal affair held 
at the chapter house. The dance cen- 
tered around a haunted house theme as 
decorations such as a maze of tunnels 
in the basement and wierd drawings on 
the walls added to the quite sinister 
atmosphere already pretty prevalent. 

The pledges <>l Phi Kappa Sigma tried 
their hand at carpentry this semester 
by consti u< ting a powdei room in then 
basement. I he pledges did most ol the 
actual work in then spare time, bill 
;k tives pii< hed in with te< hni< al aid and 

( ousli in I ion mall rials. 



192 





Top Row: Gary Williams, Clarence Klaus, Larry Lackey, Roger Bushnick, Alan Schroeder, Charles Marshall, Richard Carlson, James Wright, John Melvin, Charles 
Hheffer, Keith McCloskey, Ronald Tellor, David Boone, David Roffey, Charles Miller Fourth Row: Robert Hennessey, Donald Spellman, Charles Alt, John Bartsch, 
Shawn Tabin, Robert Heidorn, Carl Budelsky, James Kennedy, William Cook, Albert Sittaro, Dean Hauptli, Roger Koontz, Robert Schultz, Max. McPeek, Gery Gross 
rhird Row: Donald Thompson, John Marshall, James Lashbrook, John Conant, Thomas Rowley, Donald Doherty, Roy Mallinson, Donald Browning, George Bossarte 
second Row: Philip Kucera, Cary Boyd, John Subat, William Dufner, John McGrew, Wayne Knight, Carroll Pedersen, John McCann, Charles Patrick, Leslie Simpson 
bottom Row: Roger Larson, Jay Butt, Ernest Collins, Philip Brown, Carl Bailey, Clark Bernard, Stephen Hanover, William Cowen Not in panel: James Hofer, Philip 
3urck, Kenneth DiPrima, Alan Lopatka, Albert Ruppert, Roger Martin, Richard Miller, Vernon Gillespie, James Kornwulf 



Phi Kappa Tan's Gravely Salute the Army With Song 




The Phi Taus display their rather unusual talents. 



Thomas Rowley, president 




The U. S. Army Cadets, on campus for 
the Illinois-Army football game, must 
have thought that the navy had beaten 
them here, heaven forbid! For, as the 
cadets marched by the Phi Tau house, 
the guys in grey were stereophonically 
heralded by the strains of "Anchors 
Away." After the game, to make amends, 
the Phi Tan's played host to ten of the 
same senior West Point Cadets. 

An annual winter formal with a very 
original twist was that given by the 
Phi Tau's. The theme was Scotch, and 
to prove that they meant it, the Phi 
Taus erected a Scottish castle, even 
with a drawbridge, within their house. 



193 



During the week before formal rush 
this fall, the men of Phi Kappa Theta 
entirely redecorated their house. An 
impediment occurred, however, as a gal- 
lon of paint managed to upset itself, 
thoroughly soaking a grand piano, wood- 
work, windows, and living room rug— 
the day before rush began! Needless to 
say, an "all nighter" was in order. 

A much beloved campus character is 
Smitty, the favorite cook of the Phi 
Kappa Theta's. Smitty, who has been 
supplying the chapter with tuna fish 
salad for many a Friday meal, not only 
wears a derby, but prides herself on 
being the only Episcopalian present. 




John McClory, president 



According to the rules of parliamentary procedure- 




Phi Kappa Theta Paints living Room -the Wrong Way 



Top Row: Michael Pinney, Theodore DeRousse, 



John Weides, .Thomas McDonald, Robert Chisek, John McClu.ky, Fr.nci. VanHoorwe^ 




Michael Haiii'gan, Stanley Ripshis, Gerald Peters, Peter Nutly,„. -- . 

Wojewoda, Joseph Garr, Brian Ruchalski, Gary Schroeder Not in panel: Raymond Feehan, Patrick McNe. 




194 




"For the Phi Sigs will win in the end," 
chant the Phi Sig Dells; "down the field, 
never yield, never bend — ." Except in 
the case of mascots, that is. In that 
category the Phi Sig Delts have had ex- 
traordinary luck — all bad. Their list of 
house pets runs thusly: 

1. Champion T. Dog, German Shep- 
herd (deceased) 

2. Boots F. Puppy, Boxer (deceased) 

3. Suzie Natasha, skunk (lost on 
campus) 

Well known for their zany antics, the 
Phi Sig Delts have entitled their winter 
dance "Purple Garter Formal!" 



"But I'm really sure there's something in there! 



Elliott Lisnek, president 



Phi Sigma Deltas Are Continually Shopping for Mascots 




Top Row: Edward Schneider, Melvyn Zahn, Stephen Lewis, William Goldman, Allen Mayer, Arnold Naiman, Allen Arieff, Marvin Kamensky, Gerald Newman, 
Arnold Perl, Donald Newman, Robert Karton, Herbert Schaffer, Michael Wasserman, Stuart Morris, Ronald Lovinger Third Row: Sidney Feldman, Jacques Schmoll, 
Go-don DeCook, Murray Kalis, Allan Weinstein, Gerald Frank, Kenneth Wolf, Lee Schnitzer, Sheldon Karras, Daniel Ragins, Orrin Radis, Jonathon Borus, Robert Lazarus, 
Gordon Schlifke, Gerald Weinberg, Michael Harris Second Row: Miles Kaplan, Burton Schmarak, Herbert Weinstein, Phillip Penner, James Pritikin, Elliott Lisnek, 
Roger Brooks, David Cohen, Steven Targum, Arnold Goldstein Bottom Row: Wayne Tenebaum, Arthur Schectman, Ronald DeCook, Sander Klapman, Lawrence Weprin, 
Michael Klein, Victor Eichler, Harvey Leva, Richard Schwartz, David Goldblatt, Sheldon Lewis Not in panel: Bruce Chertow, Irwin Frazin, Abraham Grossfeld, Gerald 
Steinberg, Robert Boehm, Jay Doniger 




195 




Top 

William Shelle 
Second Row 



Row: Kirhy John.cn , Jerome Haas.John Dale ^Ctoyd Kenneth Workman .J™*^^ ^rells, ^^^^^J 
Zj6Uo,6^X^c!^Kr^ Va C n H Ha d m °Gav,'on Shi Myron Babler Carl Sinder. Ronald Crowell Bottom Row: Steven Sh.nker, Fredenc 



Arbelaez, 

" II 
ck 



May, Larry Howard, Paul Cliff, Lyndell Guthrie, Samuel Lay Not in panel: Paul Vaiana, Charles Vohs 



"What's New?" the Campus Quizzes Phi Sigma Epsilon 




The knights of the round table discuss and plot. 



Gaylon Lathrop, president 




A newcomer to the Illinois scene, Phi 
Sig Ep, established on this campus only 
last year, spent some time hunting for 
a new house. Time and effort payed off, 
as this year they were able to move into 
the English Gothic house, vacated by the 
Tri Sigs at the corner of Third and 
Chalmers. To give the house a more 
masculine look, the Phi Sig lips com- 
pletely redecorated the living room, sun 
porch, besides most of their all impor- 
tant study looms. 

Begin on campus such a short lime 
hasn't slopped them in starting new 
traditions. Already they claim an an- 
nual Founder Da\ Celebrationl 




Top Row: Ronald Ellerbeck, William Skaggs, Robert Almquist, Edward Daly, Peter Wohld, Dennis Hall, Walter Heintzen, Ronald Blake, Kevin Lyons, Robert 
Squires, Richard Hartung, Bruce Dunworth, Jerry Wolf, William Ziegele, David Karas Third Row: Allan Edwards, William Machata, Charles Cameron, Vance Cummins, 
Rodney Fetterolf, Arthur Klaviter, Charles Didrickson, Harold Alford, Robert Fulmer, Edward Gieszelman, Richard Cervenka, Donald Anderson, Donald Miller, John 
Killian, William Broeck Second Row: David Sager, Glenn Belsley, William Lawrence, Arthur Carlson, David Johnson, Richard Lutz, Robert Downing, Robert Polston, 
Jerome Zerkel, Richard Coddington, John Washburn, Ronald Absher, Francis Webster Bottom Row: Ronald Godzinski, George Coghlan, James Hydahl, Paul Kreimeier, 
Bruce Eder, Richard Wendt, George Findlay, James Huddleston, Stanley Gresens, Jerry Pierce, David Danielson, Robert Thune, John Buente, Mark Laracy 




Monkey Who Thinks for Himself Hits Phi Sigma Kappa 



Richard Lutz, president A sunny day and a funny paper — it's pure heaven! 



According to the Phi Sig Sweetheart 
song, the girl with golden hair and eyes 
of shiny blue is the one that'll steal a 
Phi Sig's heart — and pin. 

But this scheme was definitely dis- 
turbed when Bo-Bo, a pet monkey, took 
up inhabitance in the Phi Sigma Kappa 
house. Harmless at first, he merely 
began swinging from room to room, in- 
vestigating all curious objects. But Bo- 
Bo's true character came out when he 
was exposed to women; he astounded 
the brothers by being hostile toward the 
fairer sex! Thus, it seemed, as long as 
the monkey remained there'd be no 
golden beauty for the Phi Sig's! 






m ^^mL ' -H ^t*" ^1 


^B 1 P^ tfflBfl 

I J I -11 








<*v" ' HHmfeT^i § 


** *^^^^^1A^^Hm^m^^IH^KlI 



197 




Top Row: John Suter, James Gutshall, James Van Ana, Kurt Berg, «° r ^^ fi ^L^Votl C-Vrald Stwlerl 

Richard Gillian, Fredrick Schaefer Fourth Row: R °^ Severs G|r^anUdanrtaR chard a ,f ^^ n /^.^^^p^'er, Samuel Skinner, Mrs. Moeller, Thomas Mc- 
Kenneth Miller, John Reinhardt, Jerry MacAfee, John Thomson Third Row. Walte £ah s ch ua , ^ M ^^ John B Bene Conway/ James 

^^0^0^^^ "on&d *•»«"■. Delber, Packwood, Kenneth Bnckman 




Pi Kappa Alpha Nays Slogan "Better Get a Horse" 



Thomas McKnight, president Relaxation is but another phase of college life. 



If a convertible can be denned sim ■■I. 
|,l ., , ., cai withoul a top, then thai is |yg" 
what the PikA's have! O! earl) vintage, tl±» 
the red and white Ford not onl) has l,*"" 
proved a familiar sight on campus, but 
also has provided the Pikes with much 
entertainment. When the weather per- 
mits, and when the brothers are in a 
dating mood, "Leapin' Lena" is apt to 

suddenly take to the open road. 

The Pikes created then own nighi to 
remembei before Chi istmas, when they 
sponsored a Christmas party for the 
orphans ai Cunningham Home, com 

pletC with a "ho-hoing" Santa Clans 

just jo\ ial Gene ( lonway in disguise. 



198 





Top Row: Harold Gehrig, Richard Wilson, Terry Burke, John Tremore, Adalbert Drogosz, Robert McKenzie, Arnold Smith Third Row: Edwin Hamilton, Larry 
-ink, William Schacht, Fred Fiala, Carl Marrone, John Means, Daniel Hoyt, Scott Seibert, Edward Hoffman Second Row: Jack Eden, John Moulton, David Traver, James 
5off, Roger Harrison, Grenville King, Joel Price, Clyde Faatz, John Stroehlein Bottom Row: John Prince, Claud Price, Michael Walsh, James Tomasello Not in Panel: 
5onald Steinwehe, Glenn Cuerden, Darrell Lane 



Irophies Are Causes of Confusion at Pi Kappa Phi 




The sports car phase is just one part of college! 



Carl Marrone, president 




"Where did this one come from?" asks 
a puzzled Pi Kappa Phi, holding up a 
trophy which, according to its inscrip- 
tion, was won by Pi Kappa Phi — but not 
at the University of Illinois! Last spring, 
it seems, brought a round of trophy 
"exchanging" among Pi Kap chapters 
in a two state area — and now no one is 
quite sure anymore just what trophies 
belong to what chapter! 

But in between secretive trips to other 
campuses, the Pi Kaps managed to take 
time off to absorb a little culture. The 
dinner music selections at meals ranged 
from Tchaikovsky to Brubeck and, at 
times, even to Elvis! 



199 



The pledge class of Pi Lambda Phi 
showed itself to be a competent group 
of missile men by building a gigantic 
rocket ship as a decoration for their 
pledge dance this fall. Guests at the 
dance passed beneath the ninety foot 
high ship as they entered the front door, 
and walked into the interior of the 
house, which was decorated to appear 
like the cabin of a space ship. 

In addition to enjoying a sparkling 
social season, the Pi Lam's topped off 
their athletic achievements by capturing 
first place awards in Intramural swim- 
ming, ping pong, and wrestling — show- 
ing a great diversity of talent! 




Jules Oettinger, president Faster than the speed of lightning — "Oh! Ouch! 




Pi Lambda Phi Pledges Are Only "Taking up Space" 



,„ *,, „„., e,„, ,„ «~"te «s m t';a:r ^■"sJIs^&i.f SiSAKJ"&^ffl& ? 



Myles Borshell, Ronald Chez, Charles Tipp 

Panto' 

Alia 

Leon 

Sheldon Sirosky, 




Arthur Bluestone, Donald Shapiro, Leonard Gelstem, 
Isaacson, Howard Simon, 
Reznik, Gerald Diamond, 




• • ' | Kkrf»i> « 



200 




"Will brains or brawn predominate?" 
is a sort of unconscious question that 
the Psi U's ask themselves come spring 
time. It's during this calmer season that 
the fraternity holds its annual "36 and 
over" softball game. Everyone with a 
thirty-six inch waist (or over) is on one 
team, which plays versus the other team, 
consisting of the Psi U's who don't quite 
"measure up." 

The fact that Psi Upsilon has estab- 
lished a million dollar scholarship fund 
is really no shock to the Psi U's them- 
selves — who know that, among their 
alums are men like Nelson Rockefeller, 
Cornelius Vanderbilt, and others. 



Serious intent's an asset even in a bridge game! 



Robert Pfeiffer, president 



Members of Psi Upsilon Engage in a "Numbers Game" 




Top Row: Samuel Armato, Joseph Mountjoy, Randy Stotler, Sheridan Lee, Phillip Wilken, Martin Lower, Terry Villwock, John Moelmann, Stephen Sward Third 
!ow: James Thomas, Jay Siegrist, Duane Haning, Nils Soneson, Roland Yeast, Richard Johnson, Henry Nowicki, David Gantt, Howard Iber Second Row: Ranse Kesl, 
3uy Fraker, Thomas Sykes. Sidney Frisch, Robert Pfeiffer, Duane Haning, Robert Olson, John Henbest, Juel Lee Bottom Row: Marvin Marquart, John Hyde, William 
icheiwe, Donald Best, Robert Dallach, Gary Olsen, John Garrison, Daniel Collins Not in panel: Neil Sterling, Ralph Westhoff. 




201 







Fight fire with fire? Well, that's not 
exactly the way the SAE's would do it. 
At the first alarm, the Emergency Fire 
Brigade would spring into action as 
two pledges would immediately shut up 
the telephones to make sure no one- 
could call the local fire department. 
Of course, the proper authorities un- 
doubtedly would be notified— a letter 
would probably be sent to the Arizona 
Fire Department. In the meantime, a 
tan would help spread the flames. Why 
are the SAE's so concerned about their 
house? It couldn't have anything to 
do with the fact that the house is one 
of the oldest buildings on campus. . . 



Play, brothers, play— referring to bridge, natch 



John Stevenson, president 




Sigma Alpha Ep*» Finds a Casual Way to Fight Fires 



mmmimmmmmmmmmm 

Eugene Bergeron, Gary Kolb 




202 



If the Sammies lead an eight sided 
life, it's no wonder! The fact that their 
national symbol is the octagon would 
almost be saying enough — almost but not 
quite, for the story is just beginning! 
For not only is the Sigma Alpha Mu pin 
in the shape of an octagon, but the na- 
tional government of the fraternity is 
formed, also, on an octagonical scale. 
Furthermore, the national magazine of 
the group is entitled — you guessed it! — 
the Octagonian. It seems that this sym- 
bol came from the eight founders of 
SAM. 

During Dad's Day, the fathers put on 
a fashion show for the house. 




Arthur Alpert, president 



Some music connoisseurs listen to — Julie London? 




Figure Eights Tell the Tale for the Sigma Alpha Mu Men 



o D Z P . V" : am Au f recht ' Arthur Thieme, Arthur Arkin, Stephen Gold, Morton Oberlander, Jeff Lampert, Bruce Lerman, Ray Cohen, Warren Wollheim, Ronald 

Rosea Robert Kayton, Allan Korsowen, Paul Glick, Sheldon Gomberg, Allen Barnett, Robert Goldwasser, Donald Friedman, Edward Colby Third Row: Michael Adler, 
aa°u i i- u u ' Arno d R°senbaum, Larry Kane, Barton Lipofsky, Arnold Goldstein, Gary Klow, Frederick Baker, Ronald Rubin, Robert Siegel, Fred Fabricant, 

Michael I Fishman, Howard Levy Jerrold Robin, Lloyd Levin Second Row: Herbert Golden, Edward Lewis, Kenneth Broun, Alvin Martin, Jay Silver, Arthur Alpert, 
Jack Litshin, Harry Sangerman, Mark Klein, Lester Baker, Leonard Mawrence Bottom Row: Joel Kanter, David Perkins, Stuart Greenberg, Arvin Kash, Ronald Erkes 
Leonard Flax, Herm Greenberg, Stanley Mayer, Howard Boehm, Norman Ross, Murray Favus 





Top Row: Dale Altmin, Robe, Gordon, Carl Allison ^^n^ Kn'^w^ 

William Hunt, Norman Carrier, Edward Cleveland, Jerald Dycus -Richard IF letemey r Steven ^ , Aus(in Furlong/ Christopher Lavick, Edward Harsh- 

Joseph Huyler, Peter Jackson, David Rademacher Rober Comd.sen, R chard Dudley M.chae , ^^ Third Rqw; Car l Faust. Gary f-Step James > Hart 

barger, Kenneth Schmidt, Robert Watson James Brady ^ *' char = u„ ^ w ,™ Is, David Thomas, James Majors, Lawrence Anderson Chester Ehas Second 
Richard Thomas, Richard Mcward, Stuart Galland Bruce Hart ^. J °£" ™*. s . se ^ J;" 3° n ™|J Dobb ins, Truman Esmond, James Dobbins, Richard Udlock, David Wilson, John 

Detny SwaX, JoL Da'^Joh^Easterbrook, Rober, Schmidt, Melvin Roman! 




Sigma (Ms Are All In a Whirl Over the Game of Frisbee 



Chester Elias, president 



Lift that hammer, tote that pail — build a house! 



Ever see a Sig without a frisbee in his 
hand? Such a sight is rare indeed, tor ever 
since the discus-like sport hit the campus 
some years ago, the title frisbee has been 
almost synonomous with Sigma Chi! At 
any rate, the Sigs have found it to be a 
real ice breakei on exchanges with sorori- 
ties. The game also gels a lot of practice 
on the home front, in the annual Sigma 
Chi intei house Fi isbee Tournament. Noi 
only do two all-star teams compete for a 
trophy, bul a 'Most Valuable Player" is 
selected ai the end ol the game! 

Othei news is tha( the Sig addition and 
house remodeling are now undei way. 



204 





Top Row: Richard Ellis, Jon Geerlings, Dennis Anderson, Larry Tinberg, Charles Walther, David Meinert, Alvin Voelkner, Peter VanDyck, Guy Williams, William 
Essex, Michael Dykstra, Dennis Carroll, Noel Workman, Michael Myers, Lawrence Keim, Larry Barton, David McFadyen Third Row: Karl Keller, John Werner, Robert 
Leslie, Denton Karle, Jeffrey Butler, Jeffrey Roski, Thomas Dolan, Richard Stafford, James LaVelle, James Clark, John Richardson, Daniel Vittum, Dean Langford, Donald 
Sommerville, Charles Heath, Thomas Polston, Ronald Kuykendall, Delwin Coufal, Alfred Pinger Second Row: Paul Gaecke, George McKinney, Terry Geiling, Urban 
Weidner, Paul Bowman, Mrs. Barnhill, James Huck, Bruce Johnson, Ronald Lisick, John Bledsoe, James Norton Bottom Row: Gordon Titus, Darrough Diamond, Tom 
Wiltrakis, Frederick Harris, Douglas White, David Schaeffer, James Nowlan, Nicholas Chipain, Gary Meyer, John Jacoby Not in panel: Paul Golazewski, Robert Lenz, 
Patrick Murphy, Frederic Collins, Jerry Curless, Gary Brown, Robert Mors, Robert Snow, David Jahn, Ronald Woods 



Yes Indeed, Sigma Nu Uses Sand on Dining Room Floor-- 




It's always great to have one of the alums back. Paul Bowman, president 




- - that is for their Beachcomber's Ball! 
Almost twenty-five tons of sand were 
put on the dining room floor to give a 
beach effect. Another Sigma Nu dance 
is the annual White Rose Formal, in 
which all the fellows' dates move into 
the house; appropriately, this dance is 
termed an "overnight"! Oh yes, the guys 
move out, incidently! 

The entire Sigma Nu pledge class in 
jail? Yes, this did happen — luckily, the 
fellows were on the right side of the 
bars! This event took place last year, 
as the pledge class literally drenched 
the Champaign City Jail by washing the 
cells and walls there. 



205 



We have been told that the Sigma Phi 
Delta house contains the greatest com- 
glomeration of "do-it-yourselfers" on 
campus— and this may well be, consider- 
ing the fact that the men are all en- 
gineers! To prove that this isn't all just 
theory, the men have worked about 
the house, doing things like putting in 
ceilings, landscaping, fixing the TV, 
building a house stereo, working on 
plumbing— and even moving the drive 
way over three feet - - quite a chore! 
Everything is not along the do-it-your- 
self line, however. The pinning showers 
inevitably turn into showers for every- 
one in the house! 




Ronald Johnson, president 



A friendly greeting can make the visit pleasant. 




Members of Sigma Phi Delta Are "Do-It-Yourselfers" 






Top Row: Robert Hermann. James Bruen, Ear, Severson, Clark Brigh, .Theodore k John.cn J ^ h S&*pS; Wp" 1 ^?^ 
? el S0 " W^m^nT «M! R t- «: K ra^S^a ttd"Un°ion. ^erri,, Hicks, Rober, Beals, M. S. Helm, advisor BoUom Row: 
So AAea'ey, Ala^Cas^X Heunemeier. Leonard Prescot,, William Roose, Glen Zumwalt 




206 




As a reporter informs us, "Brother 
Tom Knox is the proud owner of a silver 
Volkswagen — the pledges decided to let 
more people know of his means of trans- 
portation and put the little car on the 
chapter house front porch for the Satur- 
day of a football game, and then drove 
it back and forth as thousands of spec- 
tators streamed by. Red-faced Tom 
promptly registered his car — an item 
that he had omitted." 

Every Sig Ep house is marked by its 
red door and the heart above it. As 
the house pin is heart shaped, Sig Ep 
supports the heart fund, as well as three 
summer camps for children. 



It often isn't quite as easy as it might appear! 



Donald McSorley, president 



Sigma Phi Epsilon Finds Novel Way of Advertising Crime 




Top Row: Thomas Carr, William Nelson, Keith Thompson, David DyrofT, William Schweizer, Duncan Cooper, Russell Koss, Edward O'Bradovich, Edward Jenkins, 
Gerald Zimmerman, Donald Cobb, Richard Helgren, Terry Klaus, Paul Georgopulos, LeRoy Kraus Third Row: John Diserio, John Weinman, Dennis Denny, Kenneth Luke, 
David Selders, Gerald Verrneulen, Joseph Rutgens, Milan O'Bradovich, David Lunch, Douglas Tonkinson, William Brown, Truman Hix, Bruce Martin Second Row: 
George Thomas, Lawrence Showley, Robert Troutt, Mac Churchill, Norman Krause, Donald McSorley, Arthur Aldridge, John Ohslund, Eugene Racek, Harry Hartel, Kenneth 
Larson Bottom Row: Robert Cosme, Kenneth Donofrio, Donald Bowden, Jack Stout, Roger Bierman, Lawrence Mosner, Jacob Rechsteiner, James Heisler, Seaborn 
Smith, Virgil Kuehling Not in panel: John Call, Harris Vayo, Wilfred Robinson, Thomas Knox, James Heil, Glen Cartwright, Jerome Blankenship, William Erickson, 
Edward Dell in, Michael Rosenow 




207 




Top Row: L.rry Chapman, Mark Glidden, Stephen Allabau h, Rudolf ■ Dgn.; Ju.i-n Bur. Bruce jl-hnjon Al.n ^^^^^ 
Srodon, William Clinch, Keith Sorensen, John Caravello Fourth Row Leon Benne t, James ^ e '■ £.% R D ' ennis K| Reaugh Eaton , Walter Hopkins, Pau 

^■ R & Stz Ja K m ent KLr^pJ!S^2£tW WT^S ^sIcInd^Ro^^tneth Grohar, James .Jackson, ; Arnold . AUen ;J imothy J ,ar.p, <W 
Jette, 'Harry Dixon, Max Schmidt, Gary Lovested, Jan ^Berezniak, 



JcTie, nan y wi awn, i»iu« w>^ — - f t — - - • . 

Claude Cox, Gerald Schultz, James Heise, Stephen Nelson 
Spaulding 



Johr? AlbHgh Y t J mes" McSoweM ™B^^ KTai, Gary Burton Wayne Schue.zner, 
i in panel: George Utz, Anthony Parrilli, Joseph Krakoski, Ernest Kumerow, John Lannon, W.ll.am 



Not in panel 




Men of Sigma Pi "Go Native" and Back Again— and Quick! 



Richard Regentz, president 



Under a huge canopy extending from 
the Sigma Pi porch there was a beauti- 
ful Hawaiian setting including such 
rarities (to Illinois) as imported willow 
trees, orchids, a pond with goldfish, and 
a waterfall three stories high! Soon to 
appear on the scene were the fellows 
in Bermuda short-like tuxedos and with 
• hues dressed equally cooly. Now, this 
may sound line and picturesque, but 
i his happened to occur on a nigh) when 
winici made a last return to campusl 
All present soon moved into the house 
to dance on the Living room Moot and 
admire the decorations bom steamed 
up living loom windows. 



208 



Looking very official, the Sig Pi's open bidding. 

I i 





Top Row: Jerry Brinkerhoff, Donald DeChristopher, Leonard Czarnecki, Thomas Walters, David Lange, Eldred Olsen Third Row: /Milton Nevrenchan, Anthony 
juepin, David Berman, Kenneth Stimeling, Robert Schroeder, Julius Zschau, Eugene Capes Second Row: Alan Grubman, George Roman, Roger Banning, Albert Kleist, 
oseph Krai, Harold Kincaid Bottom Row: Robert Pokorny, Theodore Thomas, Raymond Galka, Dale Dornblaser, Darrell Nelson, Tommy Brinkerhoff Not in panel: 
arry Lusz, James Thomas, Lawrence Hengehold 




Sigma Tan Gamma Members Find Everything Against Them 



Tommy Brinkerhoff, president 



Not that this picture is very posed. No, not much! 



When a fellow is in a hurry, what 
loes he want the least? High on his 
ist is probably a temperamental shower 
hat changes from hot to cold with 
ickle abandon. But Sigma Tau Gamma 
uis such a shower! Luckily, their house 
s completely and soundly wired for 
lectric blankets, so those extra cold 
bowers aren't too horrible! 

An annual event of the house is the 
I'oilet Bowl game between alumnae and 
tctive members. The sport, which is 
taged during Homecoming weekend, 
nust involve some sort of "payola" — it 
cems as though the alums invariably win 
he event! But the actives keep trying. 





Allen Alderman, 



Top Row: Alan Kessie, Mitchell Krieger Melvin Hecktman Kenneth Sch a ^Stua^ 

n, Martin Fischbein, Howard Sch a chter,_George^Goldberg Fourt^ Row. ^Herbert Dacks^ B ^ e 7 so ^ m R e oberf Scadron; ' Gary Morgan Third Row: Bruce 

" Jerome Brodlie, Edward Stone, 
Norman Light, Jeffrey Sherman 
Myron Silver Not in panel; 

Milan KeSSer, \-HOHCS l.aii, v^ciaiu ^-, ..-.,, — • . 

Lesiie Appel, Raymond Moldow, Stuart Brand 





The Tan Delta Phi's Know What to Do lor Cold Showers 



Jerome Heller, president 



Just a bunch of good guys, that's what they are. 



One evening, the Tau Delt's suddenly 
were laced with an unexpected problem: 
their hot water heater had just broken 
down, loicing the boys to take their 
slimvcis al the fraternity next door. Both 
houses had their spring loimals thai 
night, which only added to the quite 
<>l)\ tous in< onvenien< e to all! 

Whal "little things" make the Tau 
Dell house differenl from all others? 
l-oi one thing, the members will sweat 
thai i licit w;iici (oolei has the coldesi 
watei on ( ampus. Moreover, they have 
a sixty-five yeai old porter who possesses 
l, in one tooth, .is well as .1 definitely 
astounding laugh! 



210 





Top Row: Lee Go'dstein, Ronald Sandler, Sheldon Lazar, David Herbst, Alvin Goldberg, Marc Passman, Ronald Rashkow, Edward Victor, Kenneth Deutsch, 
David Sidell, Michael Levinson, , Mitchell Klein, Keith Wallach, Stuart Shapiro, Robert Mai kin, Larry Glick, James Schwartz Third Row: Stephen Margolin, Leon 
Cooke, Michael Price, Arthur Berman, Howard Rothberg, Eugene Sagerman, Donald Waldman, Clifford Janoff, LeRoy Fine, Jerrold Aronson, Lawrence Wolf, Richard 
Rosenberg, Richard Altschul, Sheldon Shapiro, Jack Drexler, Edward Shulman Second Row: Bernard Petchenik, Joel Fischer, Myron Warshauer, Roger Mandel, Ray- 
mond Levine, Joel Slutzky, Jay Chapman, Alan Sandler, Aaron Levine, Michael Schwartz Bottom Row: Peter Levy, Barry Weinstein, Monte Strusiner, Edward Golden- 
berg, Barry Friedman, Shelby Kanarish, Michael Masser, Steven Sandler, Barry Karlov, Ronald Stone, Arnold Feinberg Not in panel: Michael Kien, Eugene Brodsky, 
Samuel DeNosaquo, Ronald Emmerman, Joseph Levine, Harvey Cole, Gene Slutkin, Eugene Bernstein, Laurence Pearson 



-And the Floods Came, Thanks to the Tau Epsilon Phi's 




t takes six big men to hold down one little dog! 



Raymond Levin, president 




The time: May of 1959, a momentous 
day in U of I history. At that time, 
the Armory floor was turned into little 
more than a mud pit. It seems as if 
the TEP's had boasted that they were 
going to bring a lake to Champaign — 
and they did. Their elaborate Sheequon 
booth, which included an actual water 
fall, began to leak, soon surrounding the 
booth and its neighbors with water. 
However, the TEP's managed to right 
all wrongs by sending nicely worded 
letters of apology to all groups with 
nearby booths. Now the campus is won- 
dering what the TEP's will find to grace 
us with this year! 



211 




The poor Teke's. Somehow, situated 
where they are, they can't help but end 
up in the middle of every water and 
snowball fight that rocks campus. Ot 
course, the Teke's themselves have 
nothing to do with starting the events. 

It's understandable that a complete 
remodeling of the first floor of the house 
is being planned for the summer. It 
seems that, during the annual Teke Cafe 
Carnation Rouge formal, the inside of 
the house is made to look like a garden 
— complete with flowing stream and 
waterfall. However, other decorations, 
such as a colorful canopy, have not 
deteriorated the house as much! 



Not only is it a beauty — it is even registered! 



Louis Landt, president 



Always Smack Dab in the Middle Is Tau Kappa Epsilon x^r^ 




212 



It seems as though OX, the Theta Chi 
Saint Bernard, is about the most popu- 
lar bachelor on campus - - so other 
MEBOC candidates had better prepare 
lor defeat if the well known dog is 
nominated! 

Theta Chi is trying to keep up with 
campus tradition — they have lost two 
trees from the Dutch Elm disease. In 
order not to become complete conform- 
ists, however, they hold some pretty 
unique events — a "Co to Hell" Dance, 
for example. But they still hang on to 
some tradition in that they claim to 
have initiated Mothers Day Weekend 
at the University of Illinois. So who 
says individuals can't be conformists? 




Jerry Langkammerer, president It's the Great Old Man himself with the Theta Chi's 




OX Proves Self Popular Both at Theta Chi and on Campus 



Top Row: Clyde Benford, Bruce Milligan, Gerald Swanson, James O'Brien, William Stephenson, James Cocagne, Frank Koster, Richard Stack, Donald Fritz, 
Richard Haines, Donald Hartter Third Row: Robert Hancock, Robert Latko, Gayland Scott, George Antonelli, William Brown, Gary Cooper, Robert Mayor, Edwin Gay- 
lord, Richard Willy, Robert Tewes, John Limber, Ronald Viemont, Charles Swanson, Philip Kellogg, Paul Ingerson, George Stoutin, Harry Doyle, Nick Landt Second 
Row: Larry Snyder, Jerry Latta, William Dooley, Dave Anderson, Jay Lytle, John Moss, Donald Whitsitt, Jerry Langkammerer, Bill Blake, George Smith, George Van 
Wagner, Ron Pearce Bottom Row: Richard Allers, Howard Williamson, David Winter, Michael Henry, Robert Thomas, Peter Songnefest, Jerry Beabout, Robert Jacobsen, 
Albert Krusemark, Norman Stoehr, Jerry Blair, William Haggerty, Albert Taylor 




When the poet, Robert Frost, an alum 
of Theta Delta Chi, visited their fra- 
ternity house this year, he was given 
a complete tour of the building; quite 
appropriately, this tour made the library 
of the house the last stop. But there 
the great man caused the Theta Delt's 
not a little embarrassment when they 
asked him to autograph a copy of one 
of his books. However, it seems that 
they didn't happen to have a copy in 
their library — what a time to find that 
out! (They've since ordered a copy.) 

If the Theta Delt's look tired, it's 
probably because of the extremely loud 
exhaust fan found in their dormitory. 




John Schelkopf, president 



"Keep informed" seems to be the Theta Delt motto. 




Theta Delta Chi Library Found Lacking at a Crucial Time 



Winte 
Leona 
Second 




Ws M°ek, George Krelcl' Clinton Phillips', James Arcus,' Gordon Thorson, Charles Marsh, Achilles Filios 



Paul Tyner, Floyd Dollerhide, James Smith, William Andrews, Garrett 
illiam Downey, Donald Newcomb, James Prell, Robert Reese, 
aid Love, David Atwood, Michael Livingston, Robert Burokas 
ph, Richard White Bottom Row: James Jerz, Wendell Miller, 




214 




The big secret is out — finally! As re- 
leased by Theta Xi (note that this is a 
quote) "We sponsor but avoid participa- 
tion in the annual Illinois Spring Water 
Festival." Now we know whom we're 
to thank lor helping ns get rid of our 
tensions. But what is this — it seems 
our Theta Xi reporter has added some- 
thing else — "Just kidding, honest!'' 

Last spring, the house succeeded in 
improving a great deal, sc holastically; 
the "non-participation in water fights" 
helped, maybe? The chapter was also 
very fortunate in having received, lor 
several years, a National trophy lor the 
outstanding Theta Xi chapter publica- 
tion. 



hese fellows keep the phone company in business! 



Ronald Bjiek, president 



Extra: Theta Xi Reveals the Originators of Water Fights 




Top Row: John Held, Paul Fagerman, Richard Kresse, John Ramey, Robert Fahey, William Purdy, James Tough, Rogert Serson, Robert Jugenheimer, James Knapp, 
Thomas Smith, Orville Krumdick, Jan Gray, Richard Kammann, Charles Akers, Roy Buckner, Thomas Colman, William Simmons, Edward Rezek Fourth Row: Merle 
Sapp, Richard Sanders, Bertil Larsson, William Fischer, David Wilson, David Johnson, Donald Sittnick, David McDowell, Benjamin Franklin, Arthur Fitzgerald, Robert 
Scharff, Edward Weis, Richard Eddy, Irvin Schafer, Charles Sommer, Robert Radtke, Bruce Kelley Third Row: Robert Czajkowski, John Hoinacki, Richard Ollila, 
Milton Otto, Nils Fagerman, Glenn Malmquisl, Ronald Bjick, George Daughters, Richard Tate, Carl Baumann, Louis Spizzirri, Robert Brand, Ronald Harris Second Row: 
Wilfred Cadwell, Edward Lyons, James Heiligenstein, William Payne, William Mahoney, Henry Isaacson, Ronald Sawyer, Leonard Litvan, James Simpson, Jerome 
Downer, Todd Parkhurst Bottom Row: Michael Giancarlo, Todd Piller, Ronald Shevlin, John Murphy, Robert Park, Donald Zix, William Holmes Not in panel: George 
Hays, Fred Moyer, Ramon Pellegrini, Joseph Klieber 




215 




Top Row: Warren BrolL Kenneth Linden Charles AAistrett. Michael Pisterzi, g^ert Ge.ser Th om| s Wen d ,, WIH.a^^ 
SIS^iS^a-EK £b»dS^^^ Stone, Richard Ehrman, Dale Fencken, James Stewart, Stanley 

Danek, Abdul Talukdor 




The Golden [Slide] Rule Directs the Lives of Triangle Men 



Bruce Anderson, president 



The question is — is he really playing or isn't he? 



Lest we forget — studying is still an 
intregal part of college life ( though 
we'd often like to forget it, if only our 
profs would let us) is an axiom practiced 
by the members of Triangle fraternity. 
Here, as a spokesman states, "the thing 
that characterizes this group from other 
fraternal groups is thai perhaps we study 
hardei than the average group, because 
we are all aspiring engineers." It must 
be ti uel 

Therefore, it is prett) eas) to say 
thai the slide i ule must be I riangle's 
symbol, just as it is ol every engineei ; 
everyone knows thai the slide rule is an 
engineers aid in many problemsl 



216 





v V <; ( ToP S?T R n° h J Aan , de "' L D aurent ;f, Novick, Hebert Abelson, Gerald Pines, Myron Sidon, Robert Pass, Stanley Rosenthal, Stuart Cohn, 
Kelin Steve Wales Don Simborg Barry Weiss Henry Klausman, Harry Stern, Ronald Pass, Howard Portugais, Andrew Shanfield Fourth R( 



Allen Sigoloff, Norman 
Row: Theodore Friedman, 




The Men with the Umbrellas Are Zeta Beta Tail's, Natch! 




All that glitters isn't gold — but it's impressive! 



Donald Bernstein, president 





fk? 




*H 




^» 1 




If there is a house on campus that 
can be typed as Ivy League, that would 
probably be Zeta Beta Tau. At present, 
the latest ZBT kick is pipe smoking — 
which always did lend a distinguished 
air to a man. Black unbrellas are also 
very much in vogue around the ZBT 
house — half of the members have them! 

The ZBT's had something very un- 
usual happen to them one evening when 
they all went to pick up their dales, only 
to discover the girls were gone. To find 
the girls, the fellows had to follow a 
treasure map, which led them, at last, 
to the Elmwood Roller Rink and to, 
at the same time, their lost dates! 



217 




Id Mi; 



£sa?^x B ^ 



n, Ronald Linden, Harry Remmers, David Storer, Larry Kroff Third 1 Rov 
jrand, Karl Weinner Second Row: Kaui 
Bottom Row: Wayne Machnik, John Kjellstrom, J 



G „, d .„ ss,?-s; n D £^ , as. l =.? =»?= rsi°s=i ,r \ js^=.gT.,rws» 




A Horse Steals the Day [and Mom] at Zeta Psi Party 



Edwin Franklin, president 



Dear Mom: I'm really studying hard this year. 



Now, it may seem strange to see a 
horse on John Street— but even stranger 
is it to see a "Zete Mom" riding on the 
animal! It seems as il included on the 
Zeta Psi social calendar is an event 
termed a Kentucky Derby Party, com- 
plete with a pari-mutual window, mint 
juleps and aulheniH del by programs. 
Moreover, the activit) lakes place during 
Mothers Day Weekend. I his year, one 
ol the mothers "losl her shirt at the 
race" and was obliged to ride a thorough 
hied horse down the center of John 
Streel a sighi indeed' 

\n.,iliei more Eamiliai si^ht on < am 
pus is Kirk, the Zete TGIFing (deal 

Dane. 



218 













:-.".".-.'jv. 


















9' A. 









\jH^^'-ij- 



san, Richard Martino, John Riley, John Modica, John Roberts, Evar Miller, Robert Switzer Dan Scharlach Daniel Wickiser 
.ten. Edmund K.lga. Robert Haskins, Castro Duran, Michael Kamen, Lenard Geraci, Bruce Miller, Norman Dean .Harold I Dvorin! Paul Appen 




Success Follows Luck and Hard Work at Armory House 



A/hen the men say they mean business — they do! 



Evar Miller, president 












r^C '■i 

Mr 


• 1> 


K 


1 W ■' Lrf 

Tl f jig 




fiii *• j* j 




m j| 


-««aaana 


B| 


te^ 


jk.i 


^ 


~^1 



Although Armory House is relatively 
new to our campus — three years is the 
life span of the residence — all sorts of 
nice things have happened. Prizes were 
taken in many past events, most of 
which were, moreover, large scale cam- 
pus events, such as Sheequon, Home- 
coming, and so forth. Of course, the 
fine results haven't been merely luck 
but actually bear living testimony to 
the saying that "all good things come 
to he who,'' which is what Armory has 
been doing these past three years! 

A more tangible acquisition is a new 
house crest. The five by three design 
in enlivened by a shield of pearls. 



219 



Did you say you had the blues? This 
is nothing unusual if it happens that 
you are a resident of Balmoral Club. 
It seems that the inhabitants have a 
tradition of giving a winter formal every 
year. Moreover, a change in the theme 
is in order from year to year. Now, this 
in itself is not especially unusual, for 
many other campus residents have simi- 
lar traditions. The difference lies in the 
theme itself! The last dance, entitled 
Blue Fantasy, centered around bluish 
decorations— blue lighting in particular. 
While the dance sounds lovely, still it 
must have been a shock to have a blue 
date! 




Donald Finlayson, president 



You can deal, but better let me cut the cards! 



Men oi Balmoral Club Celebrate Own Serenade in Blue 



Top Row: Cyde Sc hmink , Dennis Bo y ,e, Danie, Levine, »u, ■ Galons, Rober, ^W. '^"^ "BSS ^^^G^ StS2 

: n «,^:£i L uo«^ 5 - '- --'= iheodore James ' Dominic Di ° rio ' A on ' y 



Joseph 

fot Z^^r^^^^^'os^O^e, Bonaid frigoning, AMan Gorge 




220 




lis a not-too-well-known Eact that the 

world's best chefs arc men (a rumor 
undoubtedly begun by a man) . Prob- 
ably inspired by that statement were 
the men of College Hall who decided to 
try something a little out of the ordi- 
nal) on Mother's Day Weekend. The 
enterprising young men, it seems, not 
only gave a dinner in honor of their 
mothers at that time, but even cooked 
and served the meal themselves! This 
must have been quite a shock to Mom. 
Thanks to long hours of song prac- 
tice the members of College Hall were 
able to serenade the sweetheart of a 
member for the very first time! 



That's a powerful team — six fellows on one side! 



Loren Strohman, president 



Men of College Hall Prove Their Worth to Their Moms 



Top Row: Richard Klingbiel, Everett Smith, Raymond Eden, Kay Johnson, John Doria, Richard Ambrose, Warren Suzuki, Richard Alexis, Glen Hudrlik, James 
Rosen, Tin Aye, Frank Keough, Ronald Alexis, Harold Schmidt, David Shinsato, William AAossner, George Maniatis Fourth Row: Larry Clark, William Dunwoody, Charles 
Miller, Ralph Dillen, Alan Kluender, John Flynn, Glenn Speigel, Jerry Kapp, James Lester, Ted Strawzek, Sherwood Anderson, Dale Miller, Thomas Shepperd, Paul 
Plier, Michael Harshbarger, William Clark Third Row: Phillip Gritten, Harold Guard, Jerry Stout, Edward Kirk, Aurelio Jazo, Ronald Holloway, Ronald Durrett, Loren 
Strohman, Harold Tokujo, Donald Tremper, Howard Hill, Charles Paine, Steven Smith Second Row: Alan Whitman, Oliver Doe, Stephen Gritten, Dennis Coe, Claude 
Wiatrak, Rollin Strohman, Jerry Haynes, James Verb, David Gawlinski Bottom Row: Theodore Maniatis, James Keith, Glenn Irwin, Robert Wine, Ronald Haky, 
Richard Miyake 




221 




"Something new" and yet "something 
old" is one way to describe a recent 
acquisition of Granada Club — a house 
crest. Inspired by the family crest ol 
one Pedro de Granada, an olden clay 
Moorish prince, the present pattern was 
drawn up by a firm in England. 

That most loved of all flowers, the 
rose, reigned supreme at the Rose Room 
formal dance given by Granada Club in 
the fall. The lounge was decorated with 
approximately fifty do/en roses; after 
the dance, the girls were free to take the 
flowers home with them! Moreover, a 
large sign flashed out the name "Granada 
Club." 



To do or not to do, that certainly is a question 



John Bado, president 



Ancient Moorish Crest Is Taken Over by Granada Club 



Top Row: Joacuin Cicero, Richard Kleinbeck, Kent Crippen, Melvin "hod«, John Ow.„ William Ba^^ 
Keyes, John* Parrish, Elmer Jacobs, John Trubahaw, Dave Beke .me ler awr ^l r ^^ v '^^ v ^'\^° en : ' ohmon . Earl Sexton, George Turner David Ash, 
Harris, August Chidichimo, George Frey, James Wright, Richard Albright, Richard ^oeaer jo sep Charles Camplin, Harvy Sarnat, James Ke ser, 

Bruce Botsford, Richard Collier, Lee Steur, Gary Hacker, Dean Spielman ™ om « * n ^ s a k '' p K Xck Ro Y b er, Beyaert Dwight Shank, Max Pearson, Dale Walsten, Thomas 
Rudy Kight, EricOrkild, Ronald Helms, John MaslanW.lliam Johnson. Jack Wem^ 9 John p eftigrew , Jonn B ado, Joseph Kellen, 

K Lac^t^^ 

^o^nB^^^^ ^ ^ *~ "' J ""~ ""* ^ ^ 

Jackie Riddle, Robert Ritchey, Ronald Sanderman, Rodney Sturm, Thomas Truckenbrod, Robert Wittman 




222 



"Where are more buckets — we've jusl 
found another leak!" might have been 
a familiar statement as the dorm rool 
stalled to leak last spring, But there 
was a good side to (he problem; the 
buckets ol water collected worked beau- 
tifully lor interhouse fights! 

Koinonia, a co-operative house, is 
associated with the University Baptist 
Church. While only on campus lor six 
years, it seems to be quite active as 
they participate in Homecoming as well 
as several athletic events. Within the 
house, they have Homecoming and 
Mom's and Dad's Day Banquets, dinners 
with Stratford house, and initiate dances. 




Robert John, president 



The gang discusses bigger and better water fights. 



Leaky Roof Helps Bring About Water Fights at Koinonia 



Top Row: James Ashley, Kenneth Kreitner, Gerald Kreitner, David Tatman, Rodger Rothert Third Row: James Filler, James Elliott, Rodney Smith, Julian 
White, Ronald Thurman, Wayne Lundberg Second Row: Bruce Buescliel, Larry Gillingham, Roy Wachter, Michael Mourning, Robert Taylor, William Feddersen Bottom 
Row: Clayton Miller, Homer Wright, Robert John, Donald Gibbs, James Lesar, Robsrt Hansen, Manfred Rorig Not in panel: Harold Hoyer, Stephen Gay 





B „ „r &."« ^cX^raS'^^^ M '"' J "" h """"I 



Minawa Defines Purpose and Reason for Its Organization 



Donald Bartel, president 
Minawa, a house for Christian young „' tff : - • 

men at the U of I, provides an oppor- 
tunity for Bible study, both individual- 
ly and with groups. Besides their internal ' ^* mm \ 
activities, members participate actively j£p 
in other religious organizations. When 
men are available and opportunities M .ttTW* 
arise, members arc sent to nearby com- f^ 
muniiics, to help with church services 
01 youth groups. 

The nun ol Minawa boasi tha( their 
lincsi eveni ol the yeai is the Mom's 
Day Banquet, held during Mother's Da) 

weekend on campus. Not onl\ are the 

members' entire families invited but a 
promineni guesi speakei also comes. 



224 



It sounds like the Voices of America in action! 





Top Row: William Fedor, Robert Nolan, James Dierkes, John Benson, John Fruin, Frank Rizzo, Arthur Daniel, Alfred Knoll, Louis Lanzerotti, Michael Hippler, 
Charles Rehling Third Row: Jack Marcellis, Brendan Nelligan, George Stewart, Thomas Shilgalis, Palmer Lee, Richard Brugger, Peter Philhower, John Nemsick, Thomas 
McGlenn, John Huttenhoff, Robert Anthony, William Biallas Second Row: John Berney, John Henry, Francis Gannon, Reverend Martin, Reverend Kelly, Reverend Mac- 
Kowiak, Phil McLaughlin, Paul Huttenhoff, Theodore Ciasto, Edward Kuch Bottom Row: John Robinson, Robert Weinert, David McCracken, Ronald Knoerzer, Gordon 
Long, John Nelson, Donald Passaglia, Edward Phelan, Eugene Snyders 



Fun and Frolic Help Speed Newman Hall Year Onward 



Help from a higher up can straighten out problems. 



Francis Gannon, president 




Again playing host at Christmas time 
to the orphans of Anabel Hiding Memo- 
rial Home were the inhabitants of New- 
man Hall. F. J. Gannon, the president, 
got the pick of the crop in six-year-old 
Debbie, who managed to walk away with 
considerable loot by extracting a tooth 
(whose, we're not quite sine) in front 
of all the partygoers there. 

Newman Hall can also claim a great 
turnout lor the pep rallies. This is 
due in part to the fad that several of 
the cheerieaders stop by the cafeteria 
during suppertime. Another reason 
just might be that the raliy route cuts 
through several womens' houses! 



225 






Alcazar 




Top Row: Dennis Gran.ham, Donald Koch, Larry C-mpW' Kim Snjjr .Charles ££;«$„"& ^-^^^^^ 
Benoy, James Mateika, Jerome Barbien Rodge. _ Bogardus oe ^Dav^dBethke^ohn Rusher, John ™ »«» Wood L| d chase , Ber , Trilling. Lyl. Wyman 

£r!nX!?'Z\ ^"^Thlr^ la-ence Huesing, A.oys Litteken, Denn,s Litz, John Moore, Donald Powers, Gene 

Sullivan, Carl Vaupel, Charles Williams 



226 




Top Row: Ronald Worstell, Anthony Richards, David Anderson, Wayne Mara, Paul Clark, Dale Ewen, Richard McCormick, Homer Tice, George Oros, Thomas 
Heffernan Second Row: Robert Gronquist, Larry Keefe, Frank Mason, John Marshall, Walter Ginthers, president; William Heffernan, Kenneth Shaffer, Donald Coulter 
Bottom Row: Richard Wallin, Gary Jones, Robert Beatty, Kenneth Marshall, David Speers, Robert Stout 



Calhoun Hall 



Campus View Lodge 



Top Row: Lloyd Scott, Max Mitchell, Stewart Veeck, Russell Davis, Scott Meland, Lloyd Jones, Robert Fisher, Steen Munter, Charles King, Charles Boyd, Paul 
Adkins, Eric Strauss Fourth Row: Richard Carlson, Paul Martin, Arthur Skwerski, William DeVey, Paul Franciscovich, John Hocking, Gerald Johnson, Gene Ahlquist, 
Bruce Criley, Jerry Nofsinger, Peter Gilster Third Row: Harvey Chaplik, Richard Mitchell, Robert Burgoyne, Edward Gray, Robert Duffy, president; George Freese, 
Carroll McGinnis, Elmer Reis, Robert Fruland, Robert Holtz Second Row: Robert Reber, George Eickelman, Albert Nagele, James Shanklin, Alan Wilson, Eugene Boros, 
Ross McKendrick, Robert Yamamoto, Robert Stanford Bottom Row: Robert Shive, Edwin Loomis, James Wright, Brady Hancock, William Grosball, Jack Joines, Darrell 
Oyer, Larry Balden, Paul Hocking Not in panel: William Alton, Robert Curry, Clyde Hiss, Philip Pavlik, Peter Pawlak, Robert Piper, David Preves, Arthur Reisman, 
Keith Sims, David Ulfeng 




227 




Top Row: Robert Turner, John Karstens, Arthur Tuveson, Owen White Husain Khan 
Moses, Khaia Zuhuruddin Second Row: Sharda Singh, Karel Liem, Burleigh Branch, Gary 
Mohammed Safiuddin Not in panel: Samuel Martin, Craig Campbell 



Third Row Ronald Zung, Raymond Petkus, Algerd Monstavicius, Michael 
Tally Bottom Row: Michael Leavitt, Gary Abernathy, Forrest Tellis, 



Cosmopolitan Club 






Exmoor Hall 



Paul Anderson, Fred Anderson, president; Mrs. Pierson, Theodore Johnson, Robert Buser 



Bottom Row: Milton Haefner 



Fred Pocock, Carl Dockendorf, Lawrence Hoyle 
aft, Samuel Coe Second Row: 
Anton Carollo, Steve Heller, George Leno, 



Ronald Colv 



Not in panel: William Corbett 



228 





Top Row: Anthony Henderson, Robert Aye, George Muirhead, William Pursley, Lowell Krandell, Walter Bilisoly, Howard Bers, James Reed, Robert Stelzer, 
Hideo Idehara Third Row: Michael Donovan, Llewellyn Cubitt, John Solma, Peter Loschky, Ronald Bowman, Carl Strand, William Terpstra, Donald Dodson, Michael 
Culumber Second Row: Lanny Bender, Melvin Hassebrock, Marion Pasierbowicz, Harold Harris, William Brieser, Charles Stoll, Thomas Steffen, president; Clifford Harper, 
Richard Seilheimer, John McCabe Bottom Row: William Gard, William Decardy, George Kaplanes, Audrys Sidlauskas, Mrs. Jackson, Paul Jackson, Morton Jackson, 
house director; James Burgess, Darrell Stoll, Robert Coleman 



Four Columns 



Garnten 



Top Row: Gerald Quade, Roy Thackeray, James Schneider, Ray Anderson, Ray Youmans, James Dodge, Robert Kukla, Allen Huston Second Row: Larry Brown, 
Mark Templeton, James Friedrichs, Mrs. Garms, James Matthews, president; Harry Windland, Stuart Hawbaker, Richard Kodis Bottom Row: Daryl Feldner, Robert Plack, 
Brent Davis, Ronald Bellrose, Charles Tromblee, David Fletcher, William Schmittel Not in panel: Robert Doepp 




229 







Top Ro 
dall Cole Second 
Bottom Row: Elme 



r E Xrt lames Gay,' Donald Meyer, James Bugg, Jerome Bradley, Bert Fr.nger. John Woods 



Uli-Dell 



Illiknights 



Edward Gegan, Robert Parkison, 



Raymond Powell, 
John 



Top Row: John Riemer, Lanny Wells, Larry Wheat, Larry Fehrenbacher James glo^e Robert Willard.-.™- --,- -^ ^ Johnson 

^^^^Jrifc,^ Fay^.nlam S, S B^S B^e^onn Delaney, Frank Trombetta, Daniel Quane, Charles Ptacek, J 
Welton. 




1 i 


i 




^ j | 














LtJi &fl jbBjwK 






Mil 



/*". f 



231 



*^*9^- 




Top Row: Jerry Davis, Larry Simmons, Daniel Adami, Joe Hickman, Frank Stewart Third Row: Edward Ebel, Carl Seaburg, Gerald Thoeming, Donald Kush, 
Donald Fischer, Bill Sanders, William Scott. Douqlas Pihl Second Row: Kenneth Stickel, Charles Clover, Gene Brieser, president; William KeefFer, James Gibb 
Bottom Row: Robert Kocolowski, Michael Diercouff 



King's Kastle 



Lookout Manor 



Top Row: Ronald Lutz, Ronald Knake, Robert Crum, president; Orville Teske Second Row: Larry Ross, William Ingram, John Clickener, Raymond Crum 
Bottom Row: Raymond Burton, James McVicker, Phillip Rush 





Top Row: Donald Baudino, Frank Reiehenbach Larry Grammar, Jerry. McCannojIho.es Mih.W Burkhart ^f-f^f Ri ^^- F ^ h ^;;tra T n^ e0 H::dricfso r n d 



Mkhael Kiefer, John Winthrop Second Row: Richard S.gnst W,M,am HeacocK vv, nam ^ D z '^™ y ' ^7 •„' ^„ 6 | : John Anderson, Daniel 
e, Cha^s" D^C^ha^D^ °— KOeP ' e ' A,a " L0Vit5CK G ' enn MikySka ' J ° 5ePh 

■ I i* I II... V A / : I I ; ^ Ctnnkant 



Lambert Taylor 

Blake, Michael ^ 

Morgan, Romald Saballus, William Stephens 



The Mansion 






Medea lodge 



Top Row: Keith McReynolds, Jack Joynt, Roger Jarand Richard Daems, James Kolar James ^jeJ^K^* Pacer ^Ho'ken.^ohnUrnak, Martin 
Haas, Francis Nowik, Gerald Jack, Algimant Skirpstunas John Warsa Grant Re ha^d, ^er^^^'XsLew^' Kenneth Lindblom, David Mayhak Gerhard. Mohr, 
iS^feWn K?'jo! i'K" '^Z » Bo^m^^l^W.^'ohnStr,. George Miller, president; Ronald Lamer, Joseph Adams, James 
Wabol, James' Albrecht, Edmund Radavicius, Bernd Temmler, Larry Ph.ll.ppo Not ,n panel: John Smith 



11 







urn- r"? ?/ W: I' A f un, °"' David Close Gary F ickinger, Leonard Higgs, Charles Washburn, Gordon Gullakson. Lawrence Duewer, Edward Johnson Alvin Wire 

W.ll.am Cole, Vernon Brazle Second Row: Emil Pischel, Gerald Miller, AAark Zimmerman, James Schoonaert, Robert Reiners, Donald Beitz, Robert Baker Michali 
Leon Turner Br °° khart . Ro^rt Coffman Bottom Row: Glen Broom, Raymond Duewer, David Chris.opherson, Roger Higgs, president; James Melton, Thomas Melton 



Nabor House 



Park Lane Lodge 



Top Row: Richard Mulvey, Michael Fisher, Lonnie Navis, James Vasconcelles, David Matlock, Fred Holbert Carl 
Ronald Busby, president; Richard Williams Fourth Row: Myron Baker, Robert Clow, Dan McVickar, Hilmar Gruendlinq 
Roman Third Row: Charles Perrin, Larry Spears, Kent Monroe, Robert Gorski, Richard Olson, William Parker Second Ro 
flock, Morris Luck, Joseph Dilleon, Herbert Roskamp Bottom Row: William Sillman, Lanny Anderson, John Bunting, Wil 
Not in panel: Harold Austin, Anthony Divan, William Hinds, Don Larson, Ward Makisch, James Nugent, Frank Schm'ieder 



Linkinhoker 
Amos Che 
w: Dona!d 
iam Wood, 
Lawrence 



Allen 
noweth 
Cassel, 

Williar 
Martin 



Sypherd, Rona 

William McV 

John Wayden, 

i Schmidt, Don 



Id Davidson, 
nnie, Steven 
Everett Mur- 
ald Mathews 





in Williams Jerrv Spauoh, Jan Munch, Jack Buxton, Donald Meyer, Frank Cerven, William Harris 
Top Row: Larry Rochester, Wendell Rhine, James Antczak John W'Miams „ / n r a " 9 ,' ck Lundv Tom White, Olin Foehner, Jon Dixon, Randal Braun, James 
Third Row: P Rober, P,,chford, James S.allman Michael Schlue.er James Stem a me L^say Jack ^V. om ^ ^^ y . Tonjum Dale 

Saker Do^d" H^ingWe^^^^ D^Twiedman/ Carter Erantner, Joseph Florini, Roland Leisch, Arthur Lamp,,,, Roger Pe„y, 

George Armstrong, Wayne Marquardt Not in panel: John Dechow 



Price Club 



House of Roojah 



Top Row: Norris Lang, president; David Imig, Dale Larson, W 
Van Dyke, Tim Miller, Berlin Kelly Not in panel: William Hughes 



lliam McGuigan, David McCar.v Top Row: Don Torgersen, Elson Sims, John Fullerton, Cecil 




I 



±.id 



234 



iR P 




Jeal WricZ RoT vLnO LnH H^^ lh ^'V ' L fh ll f„ ; M ' l ' er V W ' 1 'j m c L , ane ' P'" 36 " Knap ' Clarence Davis, David Macomber, John Rathe Second Row: Lloyd Lehn, 
Jeal Wright Roy VanOstrand, Harold Schroth Kenneth Wright, Gerald Schmutzler, Oscar Wright, Thomas Mesetz Bottom Row: Ronald Klein president- Richard 
.ardner, Theodore Moeller, Mrs. Sons, Dav,d Clement, Hiram Bracken, Lyle Gerdes Not in panel: David Dumbaugh, Harold Evans, William Lentz MMton Trummel 



Son's Home 



Ten-0-One Club 



Top Row: Asa Roberts, William Remders, Clarke Neal, Alison Cotton, Glenn Trcka Third Row: Richard Westgard, Burt Swanson, Wayne Jordan Fred Kramer 
ay Buhrmester Second Row: Don Steinkamp, Rolland Ekena, Terry Rose, Dwight Heckert, Dale Storck, president; Richard Williams Bottom Row: John Trei Don Smerk 
arlos Garcia, Frank Zukosky, James Cummins, Kenneth Knoles Not in panel: David Abrahamsen, Robert Bleck, Willicm Christensen 




235 



Twin Estates 



i> -- .' "* Wl 




" Top Row: Marshall Parriott, John Hoyme, Larry Bearman, Richard Balash, Lawrence Strope .Gerald ^Kadow Third Row: Charles , Mu nc IT home ,s P Jarcy. £ober, 
& C £t^^^^^^ ^ ^ "-« Waners, Larry Par.e, S.an.ey 

Piszczek, Martin Huss 



236 




Top Row: Clifford Ganan, Harry Dyner, Gerald Silverman, Richard Goldman, Joseph Podolsky, Barry Lippa, Rodney Hambug, William Weitzman, Calvin Behr 
idney Zipperman George Gerstman, Richard Strauss, Lawrence Lieberman, Richard Strimling, Michael Gordon, Richard Horwitz, Lawrence Cohen, Paul Willis 
econd Row: Alan Schenk, Louis Feingold, Marvin Fruchter, Stuart Goldsand, Arthur Reisman, Barry Polsky, Michael Lapin, Harvey Pine, Charles Bley Bottom Row 
oward Pattis, Michael Piatt, Kenneth Branch, Henry Katz, Dona'd Margolis, Fred Rothenberg, Irvin Rosen, Michael Orlove, Fredric Mussman, Harry Levin Arthur Berman 
lot in panel: Mark Abrahamson, Harvey Chaplik, Lewis Collens, Herbert Goldman, Bernard Green, Emanuel Hurwitz, Daniel Schwartz, Frank Sulhoff Marvin Weiss 
Michael Schwartz 



The Praetorian's Marching Song Is a Key to Their Being 



letimes impromptu singing is the most fun of all. Arthur Reisman, president 




"One, two, three, tour; and now a 
tale of Praetorian lore" is how the 
Praetorian's marching song goes. The 
lore that they're singing about is, in- 
deed, quite interesting. It seems that 
the title of the organization is derived 
from the word "Praetor" which is actual- 
ly a proper name — the name of the chief 
of the Roman guards. This is certainly 
a romantic beginning! 

Praetorians is quite an unusual group. 
Not only do they not have an official 
residence, but they also have no com- 
pulsory events for their members and, 
glory be! no fining system whatever! 
The last is very unusual in itself. 



237 




T„„ Rnw Koith Romack Charles Coleman, Chung Park, James Hayward, John Bumgarner, Earl Neumann Richard Jamison Third 
3 rr Kenned Kohlsted Te"y Luriz io? Eric K^ch Randolph Nichols, Clifford Lawrence Second Row: Bruce Keck, Wayne Gruen, Earl Evans 
chard Sh, Joseph Miller Bottom Row: Jay Mitchell, Neil Nelson, Richard Doris, Judson Parker, Richard Farmer Not ,n panel: John H 



Third Row: Gary Cox, Harold 
president; James Harvey, 
awley 



Wesmen 



Lou-Mac Lodge 



Top Row: Stanley Crull, Albert Walters, John Crabtree, Roger Wesley, Joseph Fitzpatrick Brian Telander, Thane Allison John ^ Sprude L ^V B a rn es, Robert 
Condon Second Row: Lyle Martin, Loren Hall, Kenneth Helgeson, present; Donald Sperry, Roland Scholl, R.chard Marrs Bottom Row. James Lawson, t,ary Lawson, 
John Ryan, Benny Cop!an, Tom Book, Lamar Evans Not in panel: Michael Levitt, Dona.d Foss, Finis bchultz 





Top Row: Brian Bland, James Blankenburg, Joseph Michalcik, Charles Rudow, Charles Jeffries, John Petlicki, Ronald Roller, Ival Toepke, Thomas Bentley, 
<ichard Sutton, Wayne Reichard Second Row: Michael Ohler, Ron F.itsch, Jordan Danforth, John Hogan, Floyd Roush, Joseph Chen, William Maurits, Paul Ruzicka 
Jyde Smith Bottom Row: Larry Mayo, Richard Peterson, Paul Duckworth, Stanley Anderson, Martin Shaffer, Thomas Mueller, John Wellman Jeffrey McFadyen Carl 
i/acketta 



Barton Place, M.R.II. 



Barton Heights, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Walter Craigle, Donald Bernadin, William Sanneischield, Ronald Mraz, Eugene Holda, Harry Smith, James Bond, David Doney, Allan Sylacs, William 
'arrish, George Courier, Edward Bross, Claire Payne, Robert Czyszczon, Leroy Hardy, Robert Swalek Third Row: Ronald Eisenberg, James Halstead, Brian Lewis, 
Villiam Sears, Lawrence Schwartz, Larry Roseman, Walter Gilmore, Dale Anderson, Kenneth Malysh, Robert Spry, Dale Ebers, John Sweetnam, Jon Sandberg, Stephen 
:atz, Thomas Smith Second Row: Robert Hyten, Robert Fisher, Gary Packard, Richard Hanna, Peter Olson, John Becker, president; David Carter, David Orr, Robert Fox, 
7eorge Fleerlage, John Fisher, Stuart Posselt Bottom Row: Hobart Riley, Jerry Powell, James Place, Roger Pittman, Dale Weaver, James Walker, John Heath, Lyri 
'eterson, Richard Coon, Philip Bailie, Eugene Fowler, Gregory Stinnett, Lawrence Hickler 




239 





m Petit, Leonard Gonsewski, Roger Pletsch, John Greene, Stephen Hirsch Douglas Ruhmann Olaf 
Nesheim/Rav^ond HauschMd " Second Ro^™ g e ,, Joe, O-nman, ^Stewart Cl. rk Theodore JMudngM, .Dennis..Gordo. present; John^itzer, J, 
Russell Reid Bottom Row: Terry Coomer, David Hudgms, 



Top Row: John Fornof, Larry McCoy, Robert Arthur Willia 



e Joel Greenman, Stewart Clark, Theodore Plucinski, Dennis Gordon, president; jonn n 
John Hillebrand, James Hammond, Gordon Reynolds, James McQuilkin, Cheng Ngok Choi. 



Clark House II, M.R.H. 



Clark House III and IV, M.R.H. 



240 





Top Row: Kent Smith, William Often, Ronald Entzminger, Richard Lange, John Ward, William Lundell, John King, James Skinner, Clifford Schwartz, Gabriel 
: orero, Carlos Galarza Second Row: Rudy Frank, Gerald Kortness, Bruce Solberg, Donald Steinmetz, Thomas Tully, William Schuyler, president; Kenneth Viste, 
Iharles Stenberg, David Potter, Robert Fuss Bottom Row: Alan Drum, Roy Johnson, Charles Phillips, Donald Kasnak, Raymond Fortin, David Remely, John Pozdol, 
3ary Hunt Not in panel: Ralph Gauwitz, James Rissky, James Remer, Edward Quinn, William Radecke, Carmen Orsetti, John Fine, Richard Harding, Frank Garratt, 
isteban Quintero, Donald Hall, Robert Wilcox, Terrell Vaughan, Richard Owczarski, Hallett Baile 



Forbes I, M.R.H. 



Forbes II West, M.R.H. 



Top Row; Theobald Kauth, Allan Olson, James Karnes, William Muhlstadt, Karl Lindberg, Robert Jones, Vernon DeSelms, Barry Gale, Thomas Piper, Lawrence 
Volfley, Roger Roney, Robert Novotney, Jack Engbrecht, Sheldon Altshul, Joseph Galbraith, David Miller Third Row: Robert Becker, William Shriner, William Ayer, 
'nomas Balla, Byron Beck, Theodore Lotz, Alexander Gaydasch, Robert Eiermann, Sidney Zipperman, Charles Bley, Raymond Niccolai, David Selig, Robert Belna, Daniel 
)ickinson Second Row: Joseph Gregorich, Kermit McKemie, Irwin Rosen, Gerald Kitchen, Thomas Mosillo, president; George Nassos, Richard Jones, John Werner, 
oseph Borgra Bottom Row: Richard Lucksinger, John Wissmiller, Edward Kaiura, George Mishos, Dale Kopp, Frank Morrell, Dennis Kuchenmeister, Gerald Bork, Lynn 
ilder, Mineo Fujii 




241 




'I 




I i H! 



? <■ 




KA 



% 4 



W&& 



T„„ Bow lark Joseoh Lawrence Hodash Richard Truelick, Clint Cleveland, James Harsh, Bradley Hoffman, Ralph Shemik Bruce H ° ff T, an ' Jeff ' e \ £!? nn I 
Singer, Robert Vernetti, Steven Kaye, Ray Berg, Richard Stanton, Eugene Dinkm, Howard Smulevitz, Richard Liston 



Forbes Hilton, M.R.II. 



Forbes III West, M.R.H. 



Robert Barsky, Barry Seiller, William Waterman, Elwyn Henning, Rodney Jacobs Bot.om Row: Frank Alteno, Henry ll.i, oary orevens, 
Phillip Doppelt, Robery Korst, Richard Bergquist, John Penninglon, Howard Levin 



\ 






1 M lit 


ujipi 


tt III 1 Ir^ 




nil 




S M ulm 


B 1 
1 ff^^i 



4 % 



242 




Top Row: Thyron Marshall, Walter Weaver, James Cahill, Charles Schafer, Harrison Church, Ronald Topp, William Komarek, William Strasser, Richard Syljebeck, 
Robert Hopewell, Charles Daigh, Ken Rodeck, Gerald Johnson Third Row: William Brown, Michael Salkin, Frnest Richau, Jeffrey Durrie, Jack Cavanah, William Miller, 
John Fisher, Raymond Powell, William Olsen, James Millar, Alexander Sorton, Thomas Elliott, James Hall, John Riemer, Joseph Deal Second Row: Philip Kennedy, 
Ronald Fox, James Carberry, Dennis Novak, LeRoy Hasselbring, William Abel, Bradley Martin, John Deal, Karl Gardner Bottom Row: Paul Claudon, George Puzey, 
Stephen Young, Thomas Edwards, Stanley Glazer, Dean Rogeness, Donald Schrader, Barry Goldman, Emil Isaacson, Steven Tuma, Donald Perrero, Richard Ellis Not in 
panel: Andrew Flagge, Stephen Young, John Yokley, Philip Hupfer, Arthur Mazza, Kenneth Krzyzek, Wil'iam Krueger, Harden Troue, David Taft, Rondell Hodel, William 
McCraigh, John Sbarbaro, Timothy Swiecki 






Forbes III East, M.R.II. 



Forbes IV West, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Chester Goodrich, Terry Lewis, Otto Gaus, Roger Helm, William Storz, Gerald Deasy, David Kil ley, Charles Burgner, Michael Danoff, Robert Gold- 
man, James Salley, Allan Anderson Third Row: John Blanke, Paul Hermes, William Schallhammer, Thomas Daniel, Robert Biller, Allen Ciesiel, Jermoe Strofs, Clifford 
Tiedemann, Dennis Chirikos, Dennis Fruhauf, William Turner, Robert Stephens, John O'Donnell, Dennis Keck, Robert Weihl, Richard Boeving Second Row: Albert 
Johannsen, Sheldon Kramer, David Gale, Michael Wilson, Thomas Mansfield, president; David Winkelmann, David Isaacson, David Levin, Marvin Levin, Larry Milanovich, 
Donald Cohan Bottom Row: Richard Marks, Larry Feurer, Richard Smith, William Zumstein, Franklin Phillips, William Warner, Roger Crawford, Michael Merel, David 
Graham, Philip Greene, Ray Kipnis, Robert Stein Not in panel: David Apter, Lloyd Bradley, Jon Branna, Alan Ca'dwell, Glenn Chertkow, Ralph Converse, Hector 
Crocker, Lee Drefus, Howard Fohrman, John Johnson, Carl Rosenbaum, Gary Schwarlz, Jermoe Solar, Joel Swartz, Richard White 




III 



A 



L 



5^ 



: 



m *f^ 




J, m 

mm - ^Ei 

1. ■ 



u 




> V 




Top Row: A,an Berkoyitz, Sherwin Rosenfeld, Lawrence Sv.b. J.m«j . « Way, ^^JE* X3&I ."IfeS ^iSyKr^S^.'a^l'KS 
Hudson, James Peterson, Philip Hupfer, James Boyd Third Row: Edward Tho-npson Rot ert ^»- *»™» f de ^ ° Second Row: R Zaver , wi „ iam Beckman, Jeffrey 
Fox, Timothy Swiecki, Ronald Fairbanks, Char es Ch.con Mart.r , Rink Davd Buser ^"^P* ^"™ 6 ^ ^ Lewj ^^ Strim|ing/ John Brad|ey , Matthew 



Forbes IV East, M.R.H. 



Flagg House 



Top Row: Robert Mages, Robert Munson, Stanley Lotterman, Michael Hochberg David Moc , e Richard Knox ^^^ figT^, PaT^ 
sen, Howard Wolfman, Roy Lilly, Ronald McCord, Walter Hornberger Rodney g Hamburg Jay ^ Hollo* ay Thorn N em V ^^ ^ ^^ 

Robert Andersen, Harold D'Orazio, Stuart Brostoff Harry Simmons, Richarc I Mack Rona d K °« rner on Ju s 5 au| K , ibra ' now , Ric h ard Holmgren, Samuel Goldberg Mernl Eisen- 
Harris, Peter Duskey, Paul Webb, Raymond Voss, Stanley SPamer Second *°%Denn£ Hurhng^ Murphy Bottom Row: Jeffrey Moy, John litis, Robert Ternen, Arthur 
fasin', ^^^^X^.' tf R^g^llT ^gT J^ph^Salyato.Vordon Mu'holland, Gary Rosenthal 



244 





Top Row: Byron Bekiares, George Hill, James Jeanblanc .Donald Irving, Lloyd Schwanebeck, Robert Drew, Donald Johnson, William Smith, Lowen Berman 
Second Row: Stephen Jones, George Rost, Hilding Carlson, David Stafford, Carmen Pietrafesa, Lawrence Shelton, Donald Fox, John Fzop, Clarence Lake Bottom 
Row: Frederick Driscoll, David Sturgis, John Kurinsky, president; William Holly, Harmon Washington Not in panel: Thomas Linde, Ronald Faulstich, James Wolfe, 
Kenneth Lemke, Roger Sugg, Gery Erwin, Ira Frank, Donald Grazier, Clarence Stein, Leon Keller, Frank Vecera, William Stewart, Jack Spring, Roger Robinson, John 
Ewing, David Ager, Robert Gangala, Byron Grant, Bob Anagnostopoulous, Robert Hutchins, Noah Stewart, Roger Bredek 



Garner I, M.R.H. 



Garner II East, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Harold Fnborg, Kennedy Rhea, Gerald Starybrat, George Svihla, John Shotton, Robert Togtman, Terrence McCormick, Raymond Uecker, John Duff, 
Kwang Tan Third Row: Robert Scarbeck, Richard Bringmann, Ronald Graff, Paul Alexander, Karl Bartelsmeyer, John Stevenson, Jack Schmidt, Roy Freeman, William 
Weseloh, Frank Scherschel, Charles Bischoff Second Row: Jerome Zis, Charles Dukes, James McClintock, David Hunsaker, John Antonson, Richard Kasten, Marc Stick- 
gold, Hary Westfall, William Stach Bottom Row: Philip Deckowitz, James Klus, William Sangerman, James Glavan, Dave Livingston, Tom Fouts, Russell Keune, Richard 
Weiss, John Luxton 




245 




i 



> 



M 




\ f 




Gainer III West, M.R.H. 



Garner Garret, M.R.H. 




Harry' Targ, Larry Taylor, Floyd Tuler, Jerry Van Ness, Robert Zimring 



JA I l^i 







? f rfi \ 



246 




Top Row: William Howell, Charles Wynne, John Tomlinson, Ronald Malcolm, John Rea, Donald Wilson, Robert Hayes, Clayton Haferkamp, Floyd Hayes, 
Walter Kelly, Robert Hacker, Robert S'ater, Kwanshei Chen, John Luse Third Row: Roy Hubert, John Rishling, Robert Mountz, James Klosowski, Thomas Hough, 
Ellis Sanderson, Algis Stankus, Karl Kuhlmann, Richard Birkenbeuel, Roy Kotynek, Robert Cusey, Earl Rericha Second Row: Norman Hintz, Fred Rothenberg, Frank 
Chen, Frederick Zikas, Jules Falzer, Frank Bachenheimer, Harry Levin, Neil Kaplan, Kenneth Jauch Bottom Row: Bernhard Binner, Kenneth Jablinskey, Robert Thomas, 
Casimir Oleszkiewicz, Robert Hurt, Allen S/vans^n, Kenne'h Zwierz, Donald Marszal :k 



Garner III East, Ml.il. 



Garner Suites, M.R.II. 



Top Row: Stuart Neumann, James Judek, William Butler, Merrel Booker, Robert Ward, Jerry Johnson, John Littlemeyer, John Curley, Dennis Conley, Robert 
Stauffer, Dave Mussulman, Kurt Schiecke, Walter Hecht, Larry O'dell, Raymond Lucas Third Row: Edward Leonard, Frederick Blanford, Fred Marcus, Harold Meister- 
ling, Robert Gaston, William Schofield, Richard Betker, Charles Slack, David Mades, Michael Cogurn, Myron Cowill, Neil Richter, Rudolph Bernhard, John Ellingson, 
Daniel Woiwode, Alex Collins, Owen Lee Second Row: Paul Trapp, John Walrath, Stephen Barnett, Russell Chan, William Unverferth, James Dudle, Darrell Rutter, 
president; Ray Hinchman, Robert Fennell, Robert Wolfberg Bottom Row: Andrsw Seacord, James Kashmier, Leonard Dojnid, James Cox, David Shotts, Charles 
Boschek, Bert Sweat, James Boyd, William Walsh, Richard Edwards, Larry Colver Not in panel: John Bicklein, Ronald Bork, Robert Busick, Thomas Chinnock, John 
Davis, Stephen Engberg, George Highsmith, Marvin Johnson, Thomas Kennedy, Ronald Kilngbiel, Konard Schieche, Edwin Smith, Grant Strandberg, Andrew Szady, 
Richard Watson, Ronald Witek, Bernard Wolfe, Duane Wood, Raymond Lukas 




247 



Top Row: Thomas Cotton, Stephen 
Longwell, John Webber, Gary Watt Third 
Kenneth Thompson, Robert Jobst, John Abe 
Jack Warner, Richard Wilkin Bottom Row: 
panel-Edward Lawton, president; Kenneth Ti 




Garner Inn, M.R.H. 



Hopkins I, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Russell Mosny, John Schlafer, Wiles Holt, Walter Huber John Van Brandeghen, James Heil, Wayne :P^^ Eddy ^£™™° n \^ 

Amundsen, "jerry Nix, Francis Neruda, Henry AAerkelo Second Row: Paul Sones Thomas Sherman Joseph £™£ £^*^™™^ Neff. James Wes.ney, Conrad 

K "SISriSJrtSL^ K B urt A D' Z e in?ch de Cha C rt r ' e Watson 99 Lowe,, Groninger, John Marti, George Caddy, W„„am 

Richard, Steven Unger, Francis Neruda 



248 





Top Row: Howard Chapman, Melvin Schnitz, Paul Lee, Kenneth Boris, Roy Dillard, Avery Dee, Murray Krelstein, Robert Datz, Roy Egawa, Robert Kipp, Da!e 
:isenmann, Robert Zeppi, Lester Golbeck Third Row: William Collins, Earl Collymore, Cordell Reed, John Hazen, Richard Zimmerman, Daniel Siblik, Michael Gamble, 
rhomas Jurlga, Charles Stewart, Barry Childress, Donald Dominic, Paul Chamberlain, Paul Sebenik, Ted Kufferschmid, Clint Tilton Second Row: William Chmurny, 
?obert Mason, Harl Ryder, Michael Zissman, Richard Wu, Frank Marousek, president; Robert Pirman, Gerald Arbetman, David Wahlgren, Ronald Benes Bottom Row! 
Robert Mouritsen, Robert Ryan, David Osmundsen, Walter Wendell, Richard Chierico, Jack Mooberry, Ermel McElwee, Gaylord Campbell, Barry Neidorf Not in panel: 
Donald Sherman, Robert Wixom 



Hopkins II East, M.R.H. 



Hopkins II West, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Robert Reints, Thomas Finch, Frederick Pious, David Hembrough, Thomas Miron, David Miller, James Rorah, Lawrence Smalec, Thomas Munns, Lowell 
ioffman, Clyde McLaughlin, Herbert Schmitt, John Winings, Pierre Ruiz, John Zimmer, Jarvis Rich, Richard Prodehl, Earl Townsend Third Row: Donald Everist, 
:harles Howe, Renold Schilke, James Herner, David Garrison, Leroy Baranowski, Edward Stehno, Mark Westerland, John Bolden, Timothy Ter Meer, Marshall Dapin, 
awrence Labudo, Theodore Ehrlich, Maris Roze, Daniel Bozin, Robert Parshall, Robert Daniels, Bill Smaller, Gilbert Simon, Lonnie Frye Second Row: Peter Foster, 
Seorge Millen, Vince Peterson, Dennis Read, John Temple, Joseph Hobbs, Robert Burton, Gordon Taubenheim, president; John Ogden, Kenneth Kelley, Donald Weaver, 
Vinfield Scott, Karl Kelley Bottom Row: George Hart, Jerry Minnear, Mark Basset, Stephen Curry, Gerald Miller, Ira Pritzker, Glen Ludwig, Victor Lill, Robert 
iichter, Marvin Rebuck, Ira DuBrow, George Moy, Agapito Santos 




249 





\ 



M 



/. 



\ 



Inf™ "" 



lm ,. F | orr eich David Marvin, Robert Meek, Frank Strainis, James Mading, Ronald Haedike Allan Etheridge, Richard Johnson, 
Top Row: Roger Montgomery Jam?s I orrelc "; „ av l° n nh „ , Murrav James Plankenhorn Third Row: Charles Smith, Sheldon Copleland, Curcic Slobodan, 
John Kruk, Richard Masur, Richard Miller, Gu,l ermo Menendez R°bert Murray ^ James £'™* e "£°; n , char|es Lacina , Richard vicars , Arthur Price, Paul Parmet, 

Donald Ekstrom, Michael Larkin, Joseph Bores ThomaD hlgren Kenn ^ d h p B °^ Michael Popik, William Kerr, Lee Harvey, Donald Miller, president; William Best, 
Marshall Kerschner, Richard Strain Second Row: He bert Weiss, D°" ald R . he ' d ^ a "; b ™ ,IC w ^ iam Cesser Martin Schachner, Joseph Thracher, Clifford Ruderer, Dennis John- 
Jay Katz, Murray Zimiles, Carl Sigel, James Macdonald Bo. om Row^ Richard Biby WiUiam ^s^er p ^^ ^ ^ ^^ 

A D rthu? e Mfzzi ee E b u g V en n e Ce B n Irg R ;%n; J Fr h e3 H Mll^^^S^%^^^ mX.! Gallagher, Richard Goldberg, Donald Crumback, Milton Murasaki, 
Richard Walsh, William Lundquist, Bruce Bailey, Richard Goddard, Henry Carl, Stephen Emanuel 



Hopkins III East, M.R.H. 



Hopkins Valhalla 



250 





ill;.™ SJltL^l Zebrosk,, Frederick Fox Joseph Krenovsky, Gerald Johnson, Kent Pinter, Manley Keeler, Alfred Christiansen, Dick Williams, Anthony Frigo, 
illidm Kraiec, Arthur Harnmar, Donald Horn, Leo Haberer John Ray, Frank Tse, Richard Gordon Third Row: Thedoroe Vicklund, Vincent Nauseda Thomas Neal 
ev.no Herrera Stephen Mooney, Richard Fenogo Gerald Womeldorff Gordon Wilson, Carl Carlson, George Burdi, Richard Ramsden, Stuart Shafer, Edw?n Reschke 
!L„P,h »t:,K Tr° e r /■ " Y . ou " 9r f n ' LeR °V Plummer Lionel Young Second Row: Robert Witkowski, Donald Magdziasz, Robert Donaldson, Ronald Mason 

■nneth Roberts, Lawrence Kopp, president; James Buncher, Jon Fulfs, William Witt, Marcus Marlin Bottom Row: Kourosh Zaimi, Robert Arndt, Richard Babcock Jerry 
'rTi'r M'rhtl FC.rp°H e n;i» F T ^'"iZ'^a" Fal £. "ward Ol.en, Charles Zeigler, James Laude Not in panel: Donald Magura, Max Beavers, Alan Berger .Ron a d 
irter, Michael Everett, Dale Fogle, Jerald Friedman Charles Godat, Bernard Harrington, Hugh Holland, Roger Jaenke, Thomas Karris, Ronald Katz, Ronald LaPor e Jerry 
ason, Joseph Meyer, Jerry Mosbarger, Meredith Nelson, Sherwin Olken, Manny Price, Steven Rosen, Stuart Stern, Gordon Wine, Larry Woiwode, Willarc I Woodward 



Hopkins IV West, M.R.H. 



Hopkins IV East, M.R.H. 



k . C ° P T. : , Jo " a,han Berkson, William Westall, David Uhring, Maynard Bender, Allan Reisner, Leo Goluba, Richard Spencer, Donald Wood, Lawrence Doty 

:rbert Singer, Mark Jezisek, Dennis Gerz Third Row: Donald Stahnke, Ben Rosenthal, Timothy Smith, Michael Rouille, Richard Terchek, Owen Hein, Charles Standring 

in Beecher Lawrence Knauff, Carl Soneson, Daniel Cornell, Howard Sobezak, James Gilmer, Daniel Hedden Second Row: Terrance HufF, William Rice Stanley 

alczyk, Charles Jones, Hugh Palmer, George Moutsatson, Marion O'Leary, president; Robert Gernant, Kenneth Ev 




251 




' t 

M $, M> .§ 

V V * \ 



ft 





ft 



ry 



i \. 



V 



1^ 4* 



i Walter Chonowski, Perry West, David Law, George Henry, Robert Smdelar, Chester Laskowsk,, James 
Herb James SpudichWniiam Bruce, David Masters, David Leong, John Heneghan, Lyle Espensche.d James 

Kouzmanoff, William Smith, Stephen Cohen, Stephen Cawelti, 

ado Castro Second Row: Gerald Kouzmanoff, 
rry Wiebenga, Gary Fish, Paul Schneider, Bruce 
el Cohen, Victor Bezman, Robert Havice, David 




KNng^Edd^'Youn^rjohn MaVxVri, Clint Magill, Larry Bender 



Lundgren Lodge, M.R.H. 



Lundgren Towers, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Robert Pechinski, Patrick Kenny Roger Jokisch, Richard I Koler, Joseph Sommer R aymonc I Herzer ^^^^,^0^^ 
Joseph Wodarczyk, Richard Wallace, Edmund Ficek, Clyde Baumgardner, Thomas Sazgeber, Gerald Kita Bottom Kow. uavic 
Kenneth Kloss, Samuel Bedrick, president; Donald Freeman, Richard Herbster, John Williams 



252 





Top Row: Terry Roberts, Jerry Catlett, Donald Millman, Thomas Robbins, Carson Culleton, Richard Laxen, William Collins, Richard Thompson, Richard Wright, 

arry Hoffman, Loren Jeter Second Row: Sheldon Hoffenberg, president; James Penny, Roland Pearson, Lynn Gosnell, Alvin Knutson, Lee Zindell, James Rasmussen, 

Ian Varner, Eldon Whittaker Bottom Row: Daniel Dutz, Don Aukemp, Richard Kloubec, Richard Petrowich, Kenneth Meiners, Gerry Nelson, James Messer, Howard 
yden 



Noble I, M.R.H. 



Noble Knights, M.R.H. 



lare Merwin, Fdward Schmidt, Donald Falk, Frank Ahlstrom, George Bezkorovainy, 

Mladen Djuricich, James Ragusa, Roger Franks, August Banknieder, John Nekolny, 

Row: Larry Jensen, Charles Sanders, Milan Beliic, Allen Bollman, Andrew Djerf, Albert 



Top Row: David Miller, John Wilcox, Ronald Kennedy, Peter Rosella, Clare 
eder Finnberg, Jerome Handlon, George Pierce, Thomas Specht Second Row: 

r esident; Kenneth Schoeck, Jon Stemples, Ervin Zander, Mark Archer Bottom Row: Larry Jensen, Charles banders, Milan beljic, Allen bollman, Andrew Djert, Albert 
/icks, Robert Galloway, James Granger, Michael Hanner Not in panel: Patrick Kelly, William Schmadebeck, John DeAno, Ronald Walkington, Stephen Yost, James 
eece, Patrick Rea, James Kalas, Phillip Kupritz, Roger Benson, John Counts, Melvin Meyers, Calvin Wheeler, Allan Munch, Ralph Madden, Ronald Gross, Norman 
lalone, Ronald Bulin, Larry Gross, Gary Haddock, Robert Crownson, Robert Harrison. 




253 







I 





I 



J 



y [\ , ^L 




■ 





t 



ci 



* f 




Top Row: Gienn Young, Paul Eldredge. John Wheatland James K.hle Joseph GJki,on^ 
Stanfel, Charles Pigg, Gary Stahl, Melvin Mann Third Row: Le| a" d p , L °? n ° ls t. ° av 'd Wn<* ^J^ ard s ^ m d an ' R „°7 Donald Coronos, Donald Frederick, Kenneth Neumann, 
man, Norman Schmidt, Thomas Ford, Dale Haan, George Tampa, Philip Ok un Barry Hargis second ko ^ . uo , Dav|d ^ en 

Joseph Spadaro Ronalc I Otto .president; H J^.*^ ; ;* ^^e °M n" "Ser l^t, John Broomfleld, Richard Courtney, Louis Hepner, 
SdX^X'^^ P-V OU R-hlrd Tursman, James Zimmer 



Noble Penthouse, M.R.H. 



Noble Zoo, M.R.H. 



Top Row: Barclay Boirun, Robert Kirkpartick, James Kopycki, Gene O^n Glenn ^H.« fe Thorn.. ^"lJ™™*^*?^ backer, "SSj 

w^^fcoSS 

Sa^ihSrtSJraWai ^cks^n be flarrr^^ be ^^lf 1: Str- Not*- pane,: James ^itani, John Go.ec, 
Hoggins, Earl Johnson, Lawrence Neimark, Sheldon Rudnick, Kenneth Ullemus, Norman Willis 








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254 



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Van Doren, M.R.H. 




Top Row: Thomas Degenhart, Albert Belgrado, Carl Becker, Richard Erikson, William Bunch, Jeffrey Lenz, Walter McElligott, Robert Dziadula, John Bateman, 
Ross Grossman, Arthur Struss, Ronald Laechelt, David Dean Second Row: James Eckman, Keith Robinson, Paul Symanski, Ronald Parsons, Randall Dagis, Charles 
Dutton, president; Vincent Caputo, John Hasemeyer, Gerald Kiein Bottom Row: Leslie Downing, John Lehn. Ronald Dice, David Soo, Edward Barnes, Joseph Brewer, 
Charles Beard, Richard Price, Siham Adra Not in panel: Gary Grohmann, John Konya, Larry Kerkhoff, Earl Hughes, Peter Kari 



255 



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257 




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Ann Ferry, President Marilyn Mann 



Martha Virginia Coombe 
Joan Greenberg 
Suzanne Haines 

Carol Hay 

Esther Hirsch 

Ruth Hoogerwerf 

Betty Jo Hulka 

Ardith Lamps 

Carol Leonard 



Kay McLey 

Bonita Melnick 

Betty Millan 

Margaret Molitor 

Virginia Riser 

Barbara Ropers 

Sally Swanson 

Sarah Wrobke 





Daniel Wilde, President 

Richard Archbold 

Robert Backoff 

Kenneth Branch 

John Clem 
Donald Doherty 
Stanton Dotson 
Bruce Duff 
John Forsyth 



Stuart Goodman 
Albert Herman 
Mannie Jackson 

Alan Jaffe 
Robert Johnston 

George Kerr 

Ronald Kollman 

Richard Kreitling 

David Lindstrom 



Stephan Lucas 

James Lytle 

Russell Martin 

David Millis 

Patrick Sheehan 

Ronald Stein 

Dennis Swanson 

Urban Weidner 

Ronald Winchell 






«■' 








Mae Mirto, President 
Bonita Anderhub 

Lynn Bell 

Nancy Grant Bell 

Sally Blacker 

Linda Bond 

Helen Culkin 

Marylin Daly 

Margaret Dempsey 



Nancy Dixon 

Miriam Donath 

Llyn Forrest 

Carol Green 

Merrill Hahn 

Katherine Hameder 

Barbara Hummer 

Mary Ann Inwood 

Suzanne Jeffries 



Barbara Johns 

Barbara Keough 

Mary Kamlynn Keyes 

Thelma King 

Diana Kramp 

Kay Lash 

Mina Maish 

Elizabeth Michener 

Catherine Miller 



Joy Miller 

Margaret Nelson 

Clotilde Phelps 

Janet Reeves 

Roberta Rosenstein 

Alice Shoger 

Carole Stackhouse 

Jenna Vaught 



Bonita Anderhub, President 

Loretta Alfonsi 

Mary Jo Aller 

Emma Lee Anderson 

Marie Anderson 

Carolyn Babcock 

Melissa Blanke 

Mary Brenda Braun 

Melinda Bresee 

Marianna Brown 

Mary Brown 
Sharon Crowley 
Carolyn Curtis 



Carolyn Daily 
Beth Dohme 
Lesta Elliott 
Carolyn Franks 
June Fritsch 
Julia Gates 
Carole Luehring 
Janet Meadors 
Anida Miller 
Janet Monier 
Marcia Ann Morgan 
Judith Lynn Morley 
Juanita Neal 



Katherine O'Brien 

Karen Person 

Jean Ratcliffe 

Mary Frances Ryan 

Virginia Seiler 

Patricia Sheahen 

Sally Smith 

Martha Solomon 

Dorothy Stark 

Carol Ufkes 

Susan Vaughn 

Kristina Wanberg 

Elissa Weaver 



Mary Geissman 
Martha Gilkerson 
Marcia Glasgow 

Lisa Grable 

Audrey Gronert 

Beverly Kimes 

Carlo Kogan 

Phoebe Kosfeld 

Margaret LaBarre 

Elizabeth Lawler 



1 






v 4 ^ 



WA-NA-SEE 




Conrad Lantz, President 

Thomas Anderson 

Stephen Barnett 

Reginald Bean 

Robert Becker 

David Bender 

Paul Bennett 

George Bossarte 



David Broadbent 
Kenneth Broun 
Lewis Collens 
Adrian Crook 
Dan Dannenfeldt 
Richard Eberhardy 
Joseph Epkins 
Alan Gosnell 




Alan Buckles, President 

Robert Armstrong 

Kenneth Bonnem 

Gary Bronstein 

Robert Brown 

William Brown 

Charles Coane 

Richard Costa 

Richard Curtiss 

Harold D'Orazio 

Lawrence Kuzela 



Arthur Lempke 

Evan Lloyd 

Daniel Mesch 

Michael O'Laughlin 

Forrest Paxton 

Raymond Pitton 

Donald Quest 

David Rademacher 

John Reger 

John Reynolds 

Richard Ruppert 



Edward Griswold 

Terrance Gillinger 

Paul Hardy 

Maurice Jones 

Richard Kemmerer 

Garry Kenworthy 

Douglas Lapp 
Richard McWard 



Joseph Rutgens 

Simon Sheridan 

Daniel Sigband 

James Stein 

Thomas Sykes 

Everett Thomas 

Gary VanWinkle 

Frank Voris 

John Wessels 

John Westover 

John Easterbrook 



Joseph Miller 
John Nelson 
Edward Perry 

Ronald Robbins 
James Ruyle 

David Thomas 

Thomas Trousil 



William Flynn 

Paul Foreman 

Donald Friedman 

Roger Groth 

Donald Hartter 

William Hogate 

Richard Hutchinson 

David Kuhn 

Ernest Kumerow 




: r — •* ■ 




Daniel Wilde 

President, Union 





r«>5 



Carol Leonard 

Associate Business Manager, ILLIO 



WHO'S 

WHO AT 
ILLINOIS 



Jenna Vaught 

Personnel Manager, Theatre 






John Clem 

Business Manager, ILLIO 



Kathy Manning 

Associate Editor, ILLIO 



Albert Herman 

Associate Editor, ILLIO 



I 




^1 



William Burrell 

Football Captain 





Marylin Daly 

Editor, ILLIO 




Dennis Swanson 

Basketball Manager 








David Lindstrom 
President, YMCA 




Ruth Hoogenwerf 

Business Manager, Theatre 



Mannie Jackson 

Basketball Captain 



Photos by Heller's Studio 



■H 




James Bowers 

Track Captain 




Kay Lash 

Student Director, Union 




James Lytle 

Business Manager, DAILY ILLINI 



WHO'S 
WHO AT 
ILLINOIS 









Samuel Skinner 

Treasurer, Union 



Margaret Molitor 

Executive Editor, DAILY ILLINI 



Robert Johnston 

Co-mnn.iger, Star Course 



I 




Alan Jaffe 

President, Interfraternity 










Robert Backoff 

President, Student Senate 



Marilyn Mann 

Student Director, Union 



Richard Arcrtbold 

Editor, DAILY ILLINI 




Alice Shoger 

President, Women's Group System 




Stephan Lucas 

President, MRHA 



Photos by Heller's Studio 



__ 








William Lewis 

Chairman, Armed Forces Council 



Donald Doherty 

Co-manager, Star Course 




WHO'S 

WHO AT 
ILLINOIS 



Mina Maish 

President, Women's Sports Association 





ILLINOIS 
VISITORS 

PENALTY NUM 




David Brown 

Vice President, Student Senate 



Mary Sue Drendel 

Head Cheerleader 




Stuart Goodman 

Director, Campus Chest 




Urban Weidner 

Intramural Manager 





Patrick Sheehan 

President, Men's Glee Club 



Victoria Feit 

Associate Editor, ILLIO 



Kenneth Branch 

President, MIA 











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Carol Green 

Associate Manager, Theatre 








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Robert Hickey 

President, Tribe of lllini 









Photos bv Heller's Studio 




Stanton Dotson 

Football Manager 





Linda Bond 

General Manager, Theatre 



WHO'S 

WHO AT 
ILLINOIS 







John Nelson 

Student Director, Union 



Claudia Joslyn 

President, Women's Glee Club 



John Donohue 

Swimming Captain 







Richard Adams 

Director, WPGU 



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Janet Reeves 

Student Director, Union 



Walter Gilmore 

Photo Chief, lllini Publishing Company 





" 







Helen Dangerfield 

Student Director, Union 







Virginia Riser 

President, Panhellenci 



Kenneth Broun 

News Editor, DAILY ILLINI 




Photos by Heller's Studio 




Union Beehive Buzzes With Student Activity- 



LLYN FORREST, Director 



JOHN NELSON, Director 



MARILYN MANN, Director KAY DANGERFIELD, Director 




270 







The dynamics of University life arc personified in the activi- 
ties and facilities <>l the Illini Union. The familiar colonial style 
structure located at the north-end of the quadrangle offers services 
ranging from a huge efficient cafeteria accommodating thousands 
daily to an obscure lost and found department in the corner of 
the billiards room. 

Through recreation, the Union fulfills that part of a students 
life not satisfied by books. A beehive of student activity, the Union 
provides an opportunity to play cards, chess, ping-pong, checkers, 
and billiards. Those students interested in more active recreation 
find at their disposal a modern eight-lane bowling alley. 

Cultural activities are also available through displays of out- 
standing student art work on the ground floor of the Union. 
Musically-minded students may play the pianos, enjoy record con- 
certs in the Wedgewood Lounge, or check out records from the 
lending library in the Browsing Room. 

Several lounges, some with radio or television provide added 
social relaxation for students, faculty, and guests. Every week a 
full schedule of dances gives students an excellent chance for free 
entertainment. 

The proper functioning and coordinating of the Union's opera- 
tions is a time-consuming task involving many people. Through 
the officers and student directors of the Union, the student activity 
programs are properly balanced with the academic requirements 
of the University. The more than thirty programs of the Illini 
Union provide the University with its varied and spirited social 
calendar. 



The quadrangle view of the Illini Union is more than a daily sight to U. of I. 
students. It is a landmark of campus activities from pep rallies in the fall to 
ping-pong in the spring. Within the Union doors are opportunities for recrea- 
tion and service activities so welcome to students. 



Sponsoring Over Thirty Major Campus Events 



JAN REEVES, Director DAN WILDE, President SAM SKINNER, Director KAY LASH, Director 




271 





VERNON KRETSCHMER, director 



EARL FINDER, associate director 



Staff of Union Advisers Preserve Continuity 



To preserve the continuity of the Union staff, faculty 
service is necessary, for the student leadership is in the 
hands of different students each year. 

The Illini Union Administration, composed of eleven 
members including the director, associate director, social 
director, and three assistants to the director, is charged 



with the responsibility of coordinating and supervising 
daily services and activities of the Union. 

The administration has organized a most adequate 
Union program, where all students can come to rest, 
relax, study, or participate in cultural, recreational, 
social and educational programs. 



Union Staff-Top Row: Kermi, Clark, Robert McNabb, Clarence Leverenz, John Balogna Bo„om Row, Ar, Sawyer, Irene Pierson, Alice Hurt, Charles Wertz 




272 








Advisers: Ettabelle Schwartz, Edgar Barth, Barbara Duncan, Jo Anne Kirk 



IRENE PIERSON, social director 



Help Students to Utilize Leisure Hours Wisely 



The Social Programs Department of the Union helps 
he student make the best use of his leisure time while 
ontributing to his individual personality. 

Programs are set up which aid in leadership and pro- 
vide opportunities for students to develop skills in 
uiinun relations through associations with other students. 



Illini Union Board provides continuity and admin- 
istration for the many activity programs. The Board 
membership consists of eight senior directors, five student 
representatives of University housing groups, three fac- 
ulty members, an alumni representative and the Director 
and Social Director of the Illini Union. 



Union Board — Top Row: Professor Robert Harvey, Kenneth Branch, Samuel Skinner, Stanley Pierce, Gene Vance, John Nelson, Walter Schramm, Lars Larsons, Daniel 
Vilde Bottom Row: Betty Millan, Llyn Forrest, Helen Dangerfield, Irene Pierson, Janet Reeves, Kay Lash, Nancy Swanson 




273 



— 







\j 




V 



JEAN RADCLIFFE, department head 



Block I — Top Row: Leon Lipson, Alvin Reitz, Martin Johanson, Wayne Stephens, Andrew Bonior, 
Richard Coddington Bottom Row: Nancy McKibbin, Rosalind Novak, William Yontz, Helen Rodemer, 
Patricia Bishop Not in panel: Fldon Mattick, Nancy Townsend 



Block I, Stunt Shows Give Spirit to Fall Campus 




Block I, the largest card section in the country, 
is seen in Memorial Stadium at every home foot- 
ball game. The Block I Committee designs 
colorful stunts and puts them into operation. 
The stunts are coordinated with the band and 
with the central theme of the weekend. The 
double Block I sections of 2,200 students on 
both sides of the stadium provide much of the 
spirit and color of football season. 

The Stunt Show Committee handled all the 
publicity, tickets, judges, and arrangements for 
this year's Stunt Show. An orchestra was pro- 
vided for pre-show entertainment and for the 
background music. The final show, a highlight 
of the Homecoming Weekend, was enjoyed by 
all and was climaxed by the awarding of trophies 
to the winning shows. 

The unbelievable noise, color, and spirit of 
the Armory every spring is the result of months 
of preparation for Sheequon by students and the 
Sheequon Committee. The Committee coordi- 
nates the entertainment and arrangements which 
are seen by thousands of University students. 
Proceeds from Sheequon go to charily, and the 
students receive fun and experience. 



Stunt Show — Standing: James Brady, Judith Higgins, Donald Bern- 
stein, Terry Heads, Robert Karton, Jacques Schmoll Seated: Marcia 
Morgan 



Sheequon — Top Row: Leon Reivitz, Wade Carll, Martin Johanson, 
Robert Caughey, Keith Thompson, David Sager Second Row: Nancy 
McKibben, Karl Krauss, Helen Rodemer, Jacques Schmoll, Rosalind 
Novak Bottom Row: Martha Mulliken, William Flynn, Max Schmidt, 
Mary Isel Not in panel: Michael Yates, James Parochetti, Ronald 
Fowler 



274 




International Programs— Mary Jo Florio, Genevieve Gentes, Frances Swartz, David Johnson, Marianne 
Burgbacher, Betty Flamm Not in panel: Bonita Bowron 




CAROL OLIN, department head 



While International Programs Fill Entire Year 



A friendly atmosphere for American and for- 
eign students is created by the International 
Programs Committee. The social programs spon- 
sored by this Committee are highlighted by 
style shows, exchange dinners, and a pen-pal 
program — all designed to form a closer friend- 
ship between foreign and American students. 

The first week in December is International 
Week, filled with an International Fair, ex- 
change dinner, and pageant. It is a week for 
foreign and American students to share in un- 
derstanding and mutual fun. Many people buy 
novelties from foreign countries during the fair 
to use as Christmas gifts. The profit is used to 
set up foreign student loans and individual 
scholarships. 

During the State Basketball Tournament in 
March, the Elite Eight Committee provides en- 
tertainment and activities for the high school 
students visiting our campus. The events in- 
clude a cheerleading contest, a queen contest, 
the tournament dance, a vaudeville show, and 
a concession and information booth. A banquet 
for the cheering squads and queen contestants 
climax the weekend. 



International Week Committee — Top Row: Sheryl Clayton, Martha 
Hanson, Carol Feige, Elizabeth Michener, Carol Crout, Helen Rash, 
Reya Schmiler Bottom Row: Joyce Hale, Jacquelyn Moore, Eugenia 
Smith, Margaret Brown, Deanna Davis, Patricia Gleasner 



Elite Eight Carnival — Top Row: Stanley Browne, Robert Swanson, 
Alvin Reitz, April Mam Bottom Row: June Fritsch, Linda Frank, 
Nancy McKibbin Not in panel: Marcia Hance, Jon Prael 






BRUCE STEGMAN, department head 



Spring Musical— Top Row: Carol Strickland, Robert Philipp, Michael Riley, James Brady, William 
Gray Bottom Row: Mary Hale, Frank Voris, Kenneth Bonnem, Elizabeth Sterret, Linda Joy 



Committees Work to Plan and Produce Activities 



Spring Musical is one of the big attractions of Mother's 
Day weekend. A student cast with professional directors 
combine to produce the spectacular. The Committee 
on Spring Musical makes the physical arrangements, 
selects the musical, casts, costumes, and is responsible 
for publicity and tickets. 

Five times during the school year, the Night Lights 
Committee converts the ballroom of the Union into a 
night club. The ballroom is filled with strains of music 



from a featured band and also serves as a show case 
for campus talent. 

Every weekend, the Dance Committee makes "dance" 
the word at the Union by providing dance facilities 
and music. The Committee also sponsors dance les- 
sons, special hops, and, of course, the big campus Union 
dances. The Campus Talent Committee auditions and 
keeps files of campus entertainers for the use of Union 
Committees and other organizations. 



Night Lights — Top Row: Betty Dyer, Evelyn Brown, Sandra Schwab, 
Sue Fehrenbacher, Carol Carlson Bottom Row: Keith Thompson, 
John Lesak 



Dances and Campus Talent — Top Row: Elaine Anderson, Linda Creamer, Janet Haning, 
Allen Barnett, Margaret Fleming, Susan Olson Bottom Row: Douglas Tonkinson, Carol 
Marvin 





276 




Illini Relations and Pep Rallies — Top Row: Ellen Reimann, Judith Stearns, Wade Carll, Gail Van 
Deventer, Keith Thompson, Marina Lucco, Marcia Hance Bottom Row: Marilyn Pulley, David Sager, 
Krishna Wanberg, Judy St. Clair, Charles Didrickson 




JOHN CONANT, department head 



From Fall Homecoming to Spring Musical Show 



Activity Night, planned by the Illini Relations Com- 
mittee, started off the Union activities this year. The 
Committee plans coffee hours, the 100 Banquet, and 
other events involving Union personnel. 

As Homecoming approaches, house decorations with 
colorful designs and slogans appear on campus. The 
Homecoming Committee organizes a contest for the best 
house decorations and for Miss Illinois and her court. 
It also publicizes the weekend's events and sponsors a 



coffee hour before the Homecoming game. 

Social Forums Committee is designed to help every 
student help himself in making sure he is socially cor- 
rect. The forums, in the form of discussions, are held 
in any organized house on campus. 

Pep Rallies on the quadrangle before every home 
football game bring enthusiastic students. The Com- 
mittee on Pep Rallies arranges for the appearance of 
athletes, cheerleaders, and the band. 



Social Forums — Top Row: John Schrader, Fred Niemi, Stuart Posselt Bottom Row: Carol 
Feige, Judith Stader, Norma Foster, Barbara Mueller Not in panel: Sue Owens, Ted Fried- 
man, Karen Richardson 



Homecoming — Judith Stephenson, Michael Yates, Carla Kogan, 
James Lashbrook Not in panel: Katherine Mueller, Everett Thomas 







WILLIAM YONTZ, department head 



Cinema International and Union Movies — Top Row: Mary Halem, Fred Rose, James Prell, Myron 
Gross, Charles Adams Bottom Row: Elaine Anderson, Joyce Cleaver, Beverly Kimes, Kathenne O'Brien, 
Marilyn Markus, Charlotte Scoville 



Dad's Derbies, Foreign Films, Bridge Games 




Films sponsored by the Cinema International 
Committee make it possible for everyone to 
visit a foreign country via the movies. The 
variety of foreign films shown enrich students' 
experiences and provide many entertaining 
evenings during the school year. 

Every Friday and Saturday night the audi- 
torium is filled with excited students about to 
see a number-one movie brought to campus by 
the Union Movie Committee. The low cost of 
admission is an added inticement for thrifty 
University students. 

One dad becomes King-for-a-Day, but the 
Dad's Day Committee plans a royal treat for 
all the dads. Wearing their derbies, the dads 
attend a pep rally, a pre-game coffee hour and 
a Dad's Association gathering. King Dad is 
crowned during half-time of the football game 
and a banquet is held in his honor. 

The Committee on Games and Tournaments 
arranges for bridge lessons, special co-recreational 
bowling tournaments, and supervises billiard 
and bowling tournaments. Students are given 
the opportunity to improve as well as practice 
their skills in these fields. 



Dad's Day — Top Row: Seymour Melnik, Gretchen Garthe Bottom 
Row: Jean Judge, Martha Mulliken, Linda Creamer Not in panel: 
Christina Shaw, Thomas Eovaldi 



Games and Tournaments — Top Row: Donald Kibble, Bruce Stegman, 
Allan Markle Bottom Row: Nancy Hesclbarth, Juanita Jacobs 



278 




Jazz-U: Charles Mullet, Judith Neal, Kenneth Bonnem, Neal Martin 
Roberta Natker 




Not in panel: Janet Peterson, 



MARCIA MORGAN, department head 



And Jazz-U Are Symbols of Union Versatility 



The Jazz-U-Like-It Committee contracts com- 
bos and special performers for appearances on 
every Thursday evening in the Union Tavern. 
Besides supervision of the jazz programs, the 
Committee also conducts a "Just Jazz" contest 
every March in which combos from many or- 
ganized houses compete in presenting their in- 
strument versatility. 

Putting good art before the students, faculty, 
and townspeople, is the objective of the Fine 
Arts Committee. Art appreciation is promoted 
by the use of coffee hours, lectures, and a com- 
plete lending-library system. Many students pass 
through the Union Gallery in the basement and 
stop to admire the types of art work displayed 
ihere throughout the year. 

Classics to contemporary is the order of music 
played from 3:00 to 5:00 in the Wedgewood 
Lounge of the Union. A lending library of 
music is also available to University students, 
and several special programs highlight the school 
year. Every Christmas special programs, several 
of which feature nationally known artists, are 
presented for the enjoyment of campus music 
lovers. 



F,ne Ar » s : Susanne Oehler, Bruce Kriviskey, Sharon Thompson, 
:nzabeth Fieder, Lynn Temple 



Music Hours: Richard Ruppel, Shirley Hill, Betty Zinser, Virginia 
-handler Not in panel: Anita Affolter, Phi 1 1 is Muhlemburch, Karen 
>mith 




IJ M !LI 





LARRY KUZELA, department head 



ADA JONES, department head 



Frequent Evaluation of Finances and Publicity 




Advising the Union committees on good pub- 
licity is one of the big tasks of the Internal Pub- 
licity Committee. It holds publicity workshops 
for all Union Committees and also publishes 
a yearly publicity handbook. 

The Public Information Committee, in charge 
of external publicity for Union events, advertises! 
through newspapers, TV, and radio. The Com- 
mittee publishes a Union newspaper called thei 
"Blue Dial," takes pictures of all campus activi- 
ties, and prepares the Union display for the Illio. 

Two very important phases of Union activi- 
ties are the workshop and orientation program! 
conducted by the Personnel Training Committee. 
After an activity is finished, the committees then 
have an evaluation program to seek improve- 
ment for the coming years. 

The Personnel Committee has the response 
bility of keeping the Union's Committees sup 
plied with members. The Committee develops;] 
enthusiasm and interest in the Union by spoil 
soring an activity night each fall, particular 
aimed to interest incoming freshmen. 



Publicity and Public Information— Top Row: Mary Ann Buchei 
George Sellers, John Frank, Sandra Grassi Bottom Row: Jane 
Peterson, Walter Hopkins, Mary Kay Fitzgerald Not in panel: Bruo 
Wheeler, James Clark, Robert Ashbrook 



Personnel Training and Personnel Recruitment— Top Row: Elizabet 
Frank April Marn, Alexandra Crane, Suzanne Roche Bottom Row 
Joyce' Hale, Janet Meadors, Gail Pierce, Ellen Reimann Not i 
panel: Katherine Mueller 



280 







MARILYN STEPHENSON, department head 



Leads to Improvements 



The newest and smallest committee in the Union is the 
combined committee of Sales and Finance. Finance con- 
ducts a watchdog position over the Union's monetary 
affairs. It also takes inventory and does research into 
financial matters in hope of finding methods for greater 
economy in Union activities. 

The Sales Committee is charged with supervision and 
records of all Union activities' purchases and sales through- 
out the year. The committee sells Homecoming badges, 
Dad's Day derbies, and has the concessions at the Elite 
Eight Tournament. 

Illini Union, operating financially in the realm of a 
large business enterprise, has a definite need for the advice 
to be gained from such a committee. 



Sales and Finance: Jack Wildholm, Dave Boerner 





Laurie coyly flirts with Jud Fry in an attempt to make Curly jealous 
in the early part of the musical, "Oklahoma," presented by an all stu- 
dent cast. 



281 






Student Senate Emphasizes Academic Attitude 




ROBERT BACKOFF, president 



Student Senate is the undergraduate student govern- 
ing body at the University. Its sixty members, serving 
staggered terms, represent all phases of campus life. 
Senate's program is similar to that of the United States 
National Student Association, of which it is a member. 

Senate's work this year has been primarily directed 
at raising the students' academic attitude and develop- 
ing a sincere interest in political and international 
affairs. To initiate this program, Senate president 
Robert Backoff addressed student leaders and academic 
personnel on "The University in Perspective." This 
"State of the University" report outlined problems in 
student-faculty relations, academic standards and 
achievements, and student obligations in college policy 
formation. 

Supplementing this address, student senators who 
had attended the USNSA National Congress partici- 
pated in a speaker's program which brought this 
academic emphasis to the various housing groups 
and organizations. 



Student Senate— Top Row. James Shonkwiler, Leonard Gelstein, Kenneth Spangler, David Rademacher, James Wright Howard Berline Charles Daigh Allen 
Mardis, Norman Kelin, Ronald Link, Gary Mowder, Donald Simborg, Richard Hutchison Joseph Podelsy, S.mon Shendan Third Row: " Fr »"^ M ' eh e ^' '^ 
Bernard Bishup Michael Hamblet, Walter Schramm, John Nelson, Leonard Pierce, Peter Duskey, James Clark, Lee Harvey John McEnroe William Rosing, Carl Zon, Jona- 
than Borus Donald DoheVty Howard Walker, Stuart Goodman Second Row: Hugh Tyndall, Patricia Billings, M.chael NefF Marcia Morgan Nancy Dmnella David 
Brown Robert Backoff Sha on German, Gar^ Bronstein, Lewis Collens, Prof. Valentine Jobst, Prof. Thomas Hastings, Prof. Robert Scott Bottom Row: Ahce Shoge , 
FlorrVogenMimiMaish Judith Osborn, Jean Goodmon, Betty Millar.. Marian Eggers, Judith Waitzman, Sandra Thornton, Clot.lde Phelps, Barbara Gaul, Sandra Poll, 
Karen Bunde Not in panel: Kenneth Jauch, Judith Lemma, Ronald Winchell 




282 






Pushes Bond Issue and New Student Programs 




a . Exe L U ''u e ^mT'" 66- " S,andin 9 : Hu 9" Tyndall, Lewis Collens Seated: Marcia Morgan, Sharon Garman, Nancy Dinnella, David Brown, Robert Backoff, Gary 

Brownsrem, Michael Nett 7 



The newly organized Political Al- 
lans Committee initiated a program 
to arouse student concern on the 
Illinois State School Bond Issue to 
be considered by the voters in the 
I a II. Students were encouraged to ac- 
quaint themselves with the specifics 
of the issue, and to persuade voters to 
pass the referendum. 

"Fair Play All the Way" was the 
slogan adopted by Senate in its at- 
tempt to prevent discrimination 
among local merchants. 

One significant accomplishment was 
the development of a new student 
week program which was initiated 
in the February Orientation Week. 
Alter hearing an address by Provost 
Gordon Ray, the new students as- 
sembled in groups to discuss the chal- 
lenges ol the speech. 



The Senators listen attentively to the 
presentation of a bill by one of the members. 
During the weekly Wednesday night meet- 
ings, Senate attempts to follow the decorum 
of the United States Senate in the formality 
of procedure. 




283 




P„„„U link Huah Tvndall Michael Hamblet, Donald Simborg, Sandra Thornton, Barbara Gaul, Leonard Pierce, Karen Bunde, 
Howard ^S^tSSTX^S^. K^SLXtf^A EU* Richard Hu.chison, Simon Sheridan 



Freshmen Seminar and Committees Investigate 



A modern record was established, with over 5,000 votes 
cast in the tall Senate elections. Election Committee 
efforts and a voters guide prepared by the public rela- 
tions start projected campaign issues and candidate 
opinion throughout the campus. 

The ROTC Investigation Committee conducted a stu- 
dent opinion poll. Male students were asked to state 
i heir views on the ROTC program at Illinois. The 
results were incorporated into a committee report with 
other University ROTC programs. The report will be 
used in considering the possibility of replacing the pres 
cut two-year compulsory program with a voluntary one. 
The newly formed Student Research Bureau helped 
studeni travel reach a new peak. The bureau arranged 
three student flights to Europe and stressed USNSA 
sponsored studeni touts. 



Student senators, faculty and administrative officed 
discussed matters of University concern at the annual 
Allerton Conference. Another conference in the fall 
consisting of student senators and representatives of the 
five housing groups, formulated and coordinated the 
year's program. The conference off campus included 
the "Challenge" programs sponsored by Yale University 
and the Foreign Student Leadership Project's evaluation 
conference held at Trenton State Teachers College. 

Freshman Council has been completely reorganized. 
Now under the name of Freshman Seminar, the group 
is a committee of Student Senate and meets in seminal 
session once a week to discuss the problems ol higher 
education. With their own constitution and business 
meetings, the group acquires practical experience 1 
organization development. 



284 







Freshman Seminar— Top Row: Robert Hatch, Thomas Clark, Patrick Rea, John Jacoby Third Row: Dennis Ryan, John Frost, Alan Metz, Lawrence Hansen 
5econd Row: Leanne Bauman, Kathleen Edler, Linda Turner, Evelyn Ebbert Bottom Row: Barbara Stanley, Earl Brown, Nicholas Bosen, Joan Agrella Not in panel: 
Robert Perkins, William Allison 



Proposed Bills and Execute Senate Programs 



Much of the research work of Student Senate cannot be done by the group as a whole, but investigation must be left to committees. 
Here the Senate is seen in discussion groups, attempting to organize subject matter which will appear later on the Senate floor. 




285 






"Code on Student Affairs" Governed by CSA 




Composed of members from Student Senate, the 
housing groups, and faculty members, the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs forms a representative 
legislative body. The committee establishes poli- 
cies for the supervision and guidance of extra- 
curricular activities and the affairs of undergradu- 
ate students. 

In coordination with Student Senate, CSA pro- 
poses and adopts changes to the "Code on Student 
Affairs," the regulations and standards governing 
the extracurricular activities of undergraduate 
students. 

All Student Senate legislation is considered and 
voted on by the CSA before it is presented to the 
Dean of Students. 

Difficulties encountered in maintenance of proper 
balance between campus activities and academic 
life also come under the jurisdiction of the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs. 



PROFESSOR J. THOMAS HASTINGS, chairman 



Standing- Van Miller, Robert Bohl, John Nelson, David Rademacher, Joseph Podolsky, Hugh Tyndall, David Brown, Carl Knox Seated: Frances Van Du 
Nancy Dinnella, Betty Millan, Miriam Shelden, Alice Shogar, Robert Backoff, Thomas Hastings, Robert Scott, Walter Johnson Not in panel: Lloyd Phipps, Au 



Seated: Frances Van Duyne, 
relio 



Florio 




286 



Coordinations Reviews Queen Contest Procedure 



Qualifications for complimentary ticket lists and 
the specifics of the queen contest policy were two 
areas in which Coordinations expressed initiative 
this year. 

This committee planned the campus calendar 
and prevented near calamity when Military Ball 
and St. Pat's Ball sought conflicting dates. 

The Coordinations Committee establishes and 
enforces the regulations that govern the many 
campus events that arc sponsored by the recog- 
ni/cd student organizations and boards. 

Coordinations is an important sub-committee of 
Student Senate; its chairman is selected from among 
the members of Senate. 

Advised by the Dean of Student Activities, repre- 
sentatives from the five housing groups and the 
Union plan and grant permission for dances, stu- 
dent-sponsored musicals, and sports car shows. 



HUGH TYNDALL, chairman 







Standing: Robert Bohl, Walter Schramm, Howard Berline, James Wright Seated: Hugh Tyndall, Judith Waitzmsn, Jean Goodmon, John Nelson Not in panel: 
Dean Vern Hampton, Vernon Zimmerman, Robert Johnston, Ronald Winchell 




287 




ALAN JAFFE, president 



Scholarship improvement in both the active and pledge 
areas of fraternity life was emphasized by the 1959-1960 
Interfraternity Council. 

The Interfraternity Council is the governing and super- 
visory body of all fifty-seven social fraternities at the Uni- 
versity. Largest and oldest in the nation, the Illinois 
Council holds an important position as a leader in fra- 
ternity government. 

The president and a junior representative from each 
fraternity compose the IF Council. They serve as legis- 
lators and members of the various committees such as 
pledge training, scholarship, Greek Week, intramurals, 
rushing, and public relations. 

Greek Week was again sponsored this year with Pan- 
hellenic for the purpose of promoting sorority and fra- 
ternity life. A monthly newspaper, the IlUgreek also 
calls for cooperation between Panhellenic and I. F. 

Interfraternity Council also planned the fall Pajama 
Races again this year and arranged for Christmas parties 
for underprivileged children in the Champaign-Urbana 
area. Speakers were sent to high schools throughout the i 
state to explain the Greek system to incoming freshmen. 



Scholarship Emphasized for Actives and Pledges 



Executive Committee — Top Row: Donald Metzger, Gregory Liptak, Robert Schmidt, Dennis Stehlik, Richard Dandurand Bottom Row: William Gray, Frank Voris, 
Conrad Lantz, Alan Jaffe, president; Daniel Sigband, David Rademacher, Walter Schramm 




288 




IF Council Representatives— Top Row: Ronald Buck, Russell Dawson, Richard Diedrich, Donald McSorley, Bill Burke, Jerry Manley, John Dodson, Jerry Lang- 
kammerer Dennis Rosen, Bob Reis, Tom McK night, William Lawrence, Les Bell Second Row: Greg Liptak, Walt Schramm, Joe Oberto, Roy Fonda, Arthur Bower, 
Rollie Earley Bob Pokorny, Paul Fagerman Gary Devme, Peter Buckeley, Gerald Weinberg, Don Metzger Bottom Row: Dennis Stehlik, Frank Voris, Dave Rademacher, 
Danny Sigband, Dean Eldon Park, Alan Jaffe, Connie Lantz, Bill Gray, Bob Schmidt, Dick Dandurand 



With IF Council Supervising Fraternity Life 



_, u Council Representatives— Top Row: John Forsyth, Ronald Johnson, Carl Sinder, Thomas Hecht, Gaylon Lathrop, Julian Oettinger, Richard Schwarzlose, James 

-lolden, Jerry Manion, Steven Sample, Raymond Levin, Lawrence Kuzela, Max Schmidt Third Row: Bruce Anderson, Terry Romack, Allen Larson, Donald Bernstein, 
-eo Castlein Carl Al ison, Walter Crowley, Mark Buch, Glen Thorson, Joseph Atkinson, Kendall Fugate, Reginald Yeatman, Charles Marshall Second Row: John Steven- 



on, John McClory, James Huck, Simon Sheridan, Carl Marrone, Albert Till, Richard Button, Robert Young, Robert Aten', Paul 
iobert Pfeiffer, James Bowers, Gerald Vermeulen, Allen Barnett, Fred Guyton, John Schelkorf, Thomas Rowley, Jimmy Keller 



Malven Bottom Row: William leuter, 




289 






Alumni and Student Board Aim to Improve IF 




Top Row: Daniel Sigband, Alan Jaffe, Frank Voris, David Rademacher, Conrad Lantz Bottom Row: Oskar Kubitz, Alvin Lang, Professor William Ferguson, Dean 
Eldon Park, William Julian, T. C. Mooney 




Basic policies of the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil are formulated by the Board of Fra- 
ternity Affairs. The aim of actions taken 
by this group is to develop each and every 
fraternity so this system may take its proper 
place in all phases of the University. In 
addition to acting in an advisory capacity 
to Interfraternity Executive Council, this 
body also serves as the board of appeals 
for Judicial Committee decisions and is 
final authority on violations of interlra- 
ternity rulings. 

The Board is made up of three faculty 
members who are alumni of Fraternities on 
campus, three local alumni, the five elected 
officers ol Interfraternity Executive Council 
and Dean ol Fraternity Men. 



Left: An example of fraternities competing to- 
gether in friendly rivalry is the lllini Grand Prix. 
Sponsored by Delta Upsilon, the event is held an- 
nually in M^y and attracts many spectators to wit- 
ness the grueling four-hour race. 



290 






Junior Interfraternity Council has Eol- 
lowed the goal set by Interfraternity 
Council in aiming for higher scholar- 
ship in all fraternity pledge classes dur- 
ing 1959-1960. Stimulating and main- 
taining high social standards and cul- 
tivating freshman interest in interfra- 
ternity and University activities were 
also objectives of the organization this 
year. 

A newly formed Public Relations 
Committee was largely responsible lor 
publicizing the various projects and en- 
deavors of the group. 

January again witnessed the annual 
"Pin and Paddle" Ball, sponsored by 
Junior Interfraternity Council. 

Junior Interfraternity Council is train- 
ing not only for the Interfraternity 
Council, but also for other positions of 
student responsibility. 




LAWRENCE HANSEN, president 



Junior IF Trains Leaders for Campus Work 



Goff, Gary Yo R u ng; Robirt &*' }T^o!&^^ U ^J^.^..?™h. ml L'™ Dunn, K_enneth _Lindgren, _Ralph Gruenewald, John Monson, Julius Zschau, James 




291 








Standing: Virginia Pagels, Karl Grieter, Rita Levey Seated: Barbara Keough, Gregory 
Liptak 



Left: William Lawrence, Janice Johnson, Vivian McMullen, Carol Palmer 



Monthly "Illigreek" Paper Publishes Greek News 




House meetings are slightly disrupted during 
one meeting each month by voices discussing 
the latest copy of Illigreek. 

Written and distributed by Panhellenic and 
Intertraternity Council members, the paper con- 
tains news items and feature stories ol interest 
to both groups. Subscriptions are sold at the 
beginning ol each year tor this monthly Greek 
newspaper. 

Each tall the first issue of the Illigreek is de- 
voted to pictures of all the sorority pledge classes 
on campus. Male students scan its pages in 
search of faces and phone numbers for future 
weekend dates. 

Giving added publicity to such Greek events 
as Panhellenic Ball Intertraternity Ball, and 
Greek Week is a necessary job of the paper. In 
addition, Illigreek states the Greek stand on cur- 
rent campus issues and gives credit to outstand- 
ing Greek students. "Views from Mt. Olympus" 
is a popular informal column presenting the 
viewpoint of Illinois students. 



Above left— standing: Ronald Norton, Rita Lauterbach, Tom lantf 
Seated: Theodore DeRousee, Mary Potts 



Left: Elizabeth Hendrick, Linda Hibbott, Robert Uard, Judith 
Jacobson, Gerald Wolin 



292 






Greek Week Features Illiolympies, Open Houses 



Filled with activities, Greek Week opened 
fraternity and sorority doors to give the public 
a view of campus life through open houses and 
exchange dinners. On Sunday a kick-oil ban 
quet was held lor representatives ol all Greek 
houses, various student executives, and faculty 
advisers to the Greek system. 

The week included meetings for officers as 
well as activities on the lighter side, such as the 
Illiolympies and the MEBOC contest. An addi- 
tion this year was the selection of Outstanding 
Greeks, based on superior achievement in scholar- 
ship, activities and athletics. 

In an attempt to acquaint all with the Greek 
organization, the committees strove to incorpor- 
ate all campus functions into the variety ol 
events. They demonstrated ways in which Greeks 
are actively trying to achieve their goals of 
furthering scholarship, developing leadership, 
promoting social awareness and supporting phil- 
anthropic projects. 



Above right: Getting into shape for the tug-of-war, 
these girls practice for the 1 1 liolympic games. 



Right: Exchange dinners are one of the most popular 
features of the week, as Greeks eat at other houses. 




. Committee — Standing: Judith Miller, Barbara Conant, Richard Brown, Stuart Cohn, Ronald Viemont, David Voelpel, Michael Ratner, Marianne Burgbacher 

Manna Lucco Seated: Stanley Rosenthal, Julie Olds, Robert Schmidt, Margaret Belsey, Robert Bitter, Katherine Wagnum 




293 




Activities Committee— Top Row: Sanford Jaffe, Philip Siegart, Dennis Stehlik, Stuart Bloom, Dennis Anderson 
Bottom Row: Fredrick Koester, Thomas Welch, Larry Banker 



During the evening couples danced around a centra! billboard portraying the queen candidates. 
Dance music was by Richard Maltby's Orchestra and intermission music was by the "Eight Balls." 



IF Ball in Early Spring Takes Marlboro Theme 




"A Lot to Like" was the name of the 1959 
Interfraternity Ball held on April 11, in Huft 
Gymnasium. Contest posters of the "Marlboro 
Man" decorated the gym. 

Pat Boughton was chosen IF Ball queen from 
among the nominees selected by each fraternity. 
The candidates were interviewed by a panel of 
judges and the other finalists made up the 
queen's court. Colorful posters appeared on 
campus during the week previous to the dance, 
advertising the queen candidates. Voting was 
done by tickets at the ball. 

Nominated by Sigma Phi Epsilon, Pat was 
crowned with the traditional purple velvet 
crown, which contains the pins of all the fra- 
ternities in the Interfraternity Council. 

Winner of the title of "Marlboro Man" was 
David Livingston, who received recognition dur- 
ing the evening. 

Richard Maltby and his orchestra furnished 
the music for the widely-attended occasion. The 
"Eight Halls" of Delta Upsilon fraternity sang 
several modern numbers during the intermission 
ol the dame. 



Pat Boughton was crowned queen with the traditional 
crown of velvet and fraternity pins. 



294 







Right: Balcony observers peered down at ths Panhellenic Ball through a white false ceiling 
A Halloween spirit was created by the black magic theme. 



Mystical Halloween Mood Felt at Panhel Ball 



For that mystical Halloween mood, the 1959 Pan- 
hellenic Ball, "That Old Black Magic," was decorated 
in abstract designs of silver, black, bine, and purple. Don 
Jeris and his orchestra contributed to the atmosphere of 
the dance with his sentimental music. During the inter- 
missions, the Coachmen sang popular tune selections. 

The highlight of the evening was the presentation of 
the twenty-seven Ideal Sorority Girls. Each Ideal Girl 
was chosen by the members of her house as the girl most 



representative of the high ideals, standards and goals set 
forth by her sorority. The girls were introduced by Alan 
Jafte, President of Interfraternity Council. 

The Ideal Girls were honored at a banquet at which 
Miss Joan Cochran, Dean of Sorority Women, addressed 
the group. Each Ideal Girl received a silver bracelet to 
remind her of this honor. 

All profit received from Panhellenic Ball goes toward 
scholarships for undergraduate women. 



BuentP Lnjpir in V c.'" a L n u' Car °' Leonard, ->^i h Moss Margaret Kriege. Ida Bartlestein, Joan Edmonds, Marilyn Stephenson, Shirley Hill, B^rbar 

£ R „ d a c 0m ! 5 ar ?' e S ' ackhous e. , K ,arol Porter, Margery Hamilton, Deanna Africk, Theresa Leonard, Therese Perri, Diana Kramp Reva Stone M°l' 

More Bottom Row: Ann Ferry, Judy Ent, Barbara Golden, La Verne Young, Nathalia Payne, Linda Bond, Julia Jenkins 







Panhel Activities Varied, Unify Sorority Girls 




Panhellenic's activities this year included the annual All- 
Pledge Welcome held during Fall Registration Week and Pan- 
hellenic Ball in October. Profits of $900 from the Ball were used 
lor the Panhellenic Scholarship land. Panhellenic participated 
again in the international Foster-Parent Plan by supporting an 
underprivileged child in Greece. 

Panhellenic is the governing and policy-making body for 
the twenty-seven sororities and the two Panhellenic Dorms at 
Illinois. Activities of the Junior and Senior levels of Panhellenic 
are coordinated by the Executive Committee which is composed 
of lour elected officers, senior chairmen, senior pledge advisers 
of the five departments, Shi-Ai President, public relations chair- 
man, and Senate representative. The Executive Committee also 
makes policy recommendations to President's Council. Presi- 
dent's Council, consisting of all the house presidents, is the 
legislative body of Panhellenic. 

All sorority pledges belong to Junior Panhellenic which is 
sub-divided into lour Junior Departments. Purpose of Junior 
Panhellenic is to make the pledges aware of their responsibilities 
as campus citizens and members of Panhellenic. 



VIRGINIA RISER, president 



Blanke, Mary Braun 




296 



Junior Panhellenic executive committee — Standing: 
Terry Davis Seated: Rita Brandt, Barbara Elder, Judith 
Berg 




Top Row: Karen Yeager, Susan Thomas, Suzanne Haines, Carolyn Peterson, Diana Kramp, Nancy Wilson, Carol Peterson, Margaret Molitor, Carla Kogan 
Third Row: Laverne Young, Shirley Hill, Molly Moore, Judith Moss, Betty Martin, Ann Ferry, Ida Bartelstein, Sarah Wrobke, Barbara Keough Second Row: Julia 
Jenkins, Merle Kuyrkendall, Ardith Lamps, Virginia Riser, Miss Joan Cochran, Betty Millan, Anna Leimbach, Carol Olin Bottom Row: Joan Edmonds, Carole Stack- 
house, Theresa Leonard, Clotilde Phelps, Reva Stone, Barbara Golden, Maris Freed, Carlotta Kaiser 




297 







Freshmen Spirits Lifted 
By an Advisory Program 



Officers — Standing: Judith Roudez, Mary Braun 
Rothholtz, Sandra Curtis 



Seated: Deborah 



That "lost" feeling common to freshman women is curbed 
by the work of the Freshman Advisers. These "big sisters" 
are concerned with assisting freshmen women in making a 
satisfactory adjustment to the University by familiarizing them 
with campus standards and customs. 

Selected or elected from their respective houses, the ad- 
visers are prepared for their position through workshops held 
at the beginning of each semester. The workshops are planned 
by the Freshman Advisers Executive Committee and its ad- 
viser, the Assistant Dean of Freshman Women. 

Through this group, including both members of Panhel- 
lenic and Women's Group System, information tables are 
maintained on campus during New Student Week. The 
Freshman Advisers also serve as hostesses for the President's 
reception and sponsor the All Freshman Exchange. 



Top Row: Marilyn Wolf, Patricia Murphy, Mary Alice Poag, Barbara Rowe, Iris Charvat, Janice Gangwer Judy _ Lynch Jane, J;«^ ^yllis ^Jaffe Barbara 
Hamm, JudTth Leonard., Phyllis Dannells,, Sylvia Hardin, Evalynn Bryartf . /^J™ r ^ K Thft 




Shive,' Diane Malmberg, Sally Williamson, Anna Leimbach, Judith Morley, Loretta Alfons 




298 






"If We Could" was the imaginative theme chosen for 
Dad's Day Revue this year. Four shows, complete with 
elaborate costuming, lights, and scenery were presented 
to the dads by Men's Residence Halls Association and 
Women's Group System. The final lour shows actually 
staged were the result of eliminations during try-outs 
in October. 

After the last performance on Saturday night, trophies 
were awarded to the first and second place shows. Win- 
ners were determined by the total number of points 
awarded each show by the judges on both Friday and 
Saturday nights. 





Directors: Louise Weisberg, Judith Braun, Lyle Rosenthal 



A strange combination of characters joined voices for the finale 
cf the 1959 winning show. 



"If We Could" Presented by Dad's Day Revue 



Stops and starts of dress re- 
hearsals are agonies well-known 
to this group of determined stu- 
dents. Final revisions by show di- 
rectors and orchestra produced 
polished stunts. 




299 




ALICE SHOGER, president 



Working to promote leadership, fellowship, 
high scholarship, and interest in campus activi- 
ties, the 1959-1960 Women's Group System con- 
tinued many of its past programs. The activities 
and functions engaged in by independent under 
graduate women are supervised by the self 
governing WGS Council. 

The Executive Council is made up of the 
officers of WGS, the major chairmen, and Dean 
Harrison, faculty adviser. This Council handles 
scholastic inquiries, assists in the planning of 
various activities, and acts as an advisory board 
for freshman programs. 

An organizational newspaper was published 
again this year by WGS to keep the girls in- 
formed on important events and to stimulate 
interest in controversial issues. Teas were given 
for the presentation of scholarship and activity 
awards. Other functions initiated by the or- 
ganization were an adoptive tutoring system, 
coffee hours, and mixer dances. Freshman Board 
was set up for the purpose of voicing the prob- 
lems of freshmen girls and encouraging them to 
become active in WGS. 

Dad's Day Revue and Sno-Ball were sponsored 
this year with Men's Independent Association. 



WGS Urges Scholarship and Leadership . . . 



Seated: Judith Hildenbrand, Judith Roudez, Judith Waitzman, Lynore Rossetti, Alice Shoger, Gail Emlund, Barbara Hodan, 
Standing: Dean Mary E. Harrison, Linda Evans, Marlene Forland, Sandra Jones, Bomta Melmck 



Sandra Curtis, Linda Kahn 




300 







Freshman Board— Top Row: Judith Augustine, Patricia Moller, Jane Burnham, Roberta Gross, Sandra Jones, Janette Johnson, Judith Carlson, Helen Johnson, 
Eloise Romano, Anah Higgs, Karen Goodall, Roberta Taub, Joy Rickert, Brenda Yolles Second Row: Judith Roudez, Patricia Scott, Susan Miller, Lorena Divan, Carol 
Harris, Joan Rasmussen, Sue Clotkin, Diane Goldstein, Sharon Sneed, Marie Renz, Judith Labow Bottom Row: Evelyn Siegel, Pamela Tracy, JoAnn Zuinlan, Margo P-idg- 
way, Nancy Babbitt, Rachel Diamond, June Kruger, Judith Abrams, Patricia Verklan, Laurel Sandberg, Carol Lopay, Marilyn Turck 



Coordinates Activities of Independent Women 



Second Council — Top Row: Barbara Kumler, Nancy Lanier, Patricia Goodman, Suzanne Campbell, Diana Chiles, Karen Person, Georgia Allen, Marlene Goembel, 
Janet Abell, Anna Price, Donna Reed, Carole Kosvick Third Row: Sandra Seegren, Carolyn Fleming, Irys Kogen, Jennie Boston, Sara Ulrich, Judith Ki I Man, Ann 
Rankin, Shirley Kroenke, Carol Smith, Lynn Mailer, Evelyn Brown, Marilee Mommsen, Phyllis Dannells, Jane Jones Second Row: Carole Chanock, Zoanne Lum, Vide 
Jucas, Corinne Epstein, Mary Kassube, Janice Gangwer, Judy Wyatt, Eileen Goldman, Rita Stackhouse, Lucia Thomas, Sandra Foster Bottom Row: Peggy Scott, 
Keladence Gardner, Mary Beauchamp, Noreen Crane, Patricia Harris, Rosalynn Jenkins, Barbara Schubert, Clara McGinnis, Janet Evans, Elaine Coorens, Judith Schliesmann 




301 








KENNETH BRANCH, president 



DEAN RICHARD O'LEARY, adviser 



MIA Government Convenes in Monday Council 



Starting off a year of improvement and progress, the 
Men's Independent Association used as a basis the Spring 
'59 Evaluation Conference to correct several aspects of 
its operation and to strengthen its internal structure. The 
representative body of the organized men's independent 
houses on campus now feels that it can do a better job 
of working for the interests of the men not living in 
MRH. Dean Richard O'Leary was appointed the new 
adviser to MIA. 



Monday Council, the governing power of the group, 
changed its construction from a board of directors to that 
of having eight vice presidents. This was done in order 
to form a more closely knit group. Each vice president 
now has charge of a certain area such as personnel, ex- 
ternal affairs, and public relations. To stimulate par- 
ticipation in Monday Council, MIA began awarding a 
one-hundred dollar scholarship to the best representa- 
tive each semester. 



Executive Council— Clockwise from Bottom: Stuart Hawbaker, James Wright, Roger Higgs, Kenneth Branch, Roger Gusloff, Robert Roger, Joseph Podolsky, 
James Schoonaert, Earl Neumann 




302 







Monday Council turns out in full force to discuss an important matter demanding action which has come under its jurisdiction. 



lo Discuss, Plan Activities and Exchange Ideas 



Attempting to give the independent male student a 
solid background in all aspects of campus life, MIA is 
active in promoting scholarship, athletics, and social 
events. One ol the most important functions of MIA is 
that membership provides the students with a direct 
channel for having their opinions heard in those im- 
portant organizations on campus, such as Illini Union 
Board, CSA, and Student Senate, which do not have 
immediate contact with the living units. 



Sno-Ball, co-sponsored with Women's Group System, 
remained one of the top social events of the campus 
year as indicated by its first-day sellout of tickets. Dad's 
Day Revue, also presented with WGS, was a special 
highlight of Dad's Day Weekend. In addition to these 
social events, coffee hours and mixers are held in con- 
junction with other organizations. 

MIA has received outstanding national recognition for 
its efforts on the behalf of independent students. 



Faculty Advisory Board: Dean Clyde Jones, Dean Gibbon Butler, Dean David Opperman, Dean Robert Culp, Thomas Morgan, Gaylord Hatch Not in panel: 

Duane Branigan 




303 






Year-old MRHA Evaluates, Then Enacts Change 





STEPHEN LUCAS, president 



After each meeting of the Presidents' Council, the individual house 
presidents pick up printed material, supplementing what they have dis- 
cussed in their meeting, to be taken to the members of their houses. 



Executive Council — Standing: Lars Larson, Howard Berline, Ronald Otto, James Young, Allen Mardis, Robert Burnett Seated: Kent Smith, Michael Coburn, 
Harold D'Orazio, Stephen Lucas, James Trefil, Donald Brumlik, Ronald Fritsch 




304 



For Residence Hall Progress and Improvement 



Only in existence tor one year, MRHA, the 
youngster of the five housing groups has gone 
far toward reaching its goal of making better 
facilities and opportunities for the individuals 
residing in the men's dorms, and representing 
them to the residence hall management. Ex- 
emplifying their progress is the new literary 
magazine, Insight, and the creation of the 
Calvin S. Sifferd scholarships. Men's Resi- 
dence Hall Association also formed the MRH 
Glee Club and compiled an officers' hand- 
book for more efficient house government. 

The group through which MRHA operates 
is the Presidents' Council meeting every Mon- 
day. The MRHA constitution has been com- 
pletely rewritten to create a unicameral 
government, with the Judicial Code evaluated 
and changed. Another structural change was 
the formation of a secretariat to better dis- 
seminate information to the large member 
body of MRHA. 

A Residence Halls Council, composed of 
representatives from MRHA Executive Coun- 
cil and the presidents of the Women's Resi- 
dence Halls acts for the coordination of both 
programs. 



Members of MRHA Presidents' Council listen to a 
question being debated during their weekly meeting. 




Presidents' Council — Top Row: Donald Miller, Robert Burnett, Kent Smith, Thomas Murley, Martin Chasen, Roger Vossler, Robert Martin, Virgil Reed, David 
Ahlberg, John Nekolny, Thomas Mansfield, David Gale, John Becker, Albert Wanninger, Leroy Hasselbring Second Row: James Muskal, Lawrence Kopp, Ronald' Fritsch, 
Alden Mardis, Robert Philipp, Kurt Dzinich, Franklin Bachenheimer, James Young, Stuart Posselt, Marion O'Leary, Howard Berline, Lars Larson, John Antonson, Ronald 
Otto, Sheldon Hoffenberg, Darrell Rutter, Stephen Morse, Gordon Taubenheim Bottom Row: Sam Narkinsky, Hilding Carlson, Donald Brumlik, James Trefil, 'Stephen 
Lucas, Harold D'Orazio, Michael Coburn, William Schuyler, Samuel Bedrick Not in panel: Kenneth Burch, Harvey Shepard, John Dent 




305 






Bright Future Seen for Newest Housing Group 




Secretariat: Philip Okun, Martin Lewin, Kent Smith, Donald Coroneos 



Plans to take effect soon in MRHA 
include a re-emphasis of the freshmen 
advisers and speakers programs so they 
will better serve the residents in the days 
they spend here getting an education. 
Soon, too, there will be music hours in 
the Clark House Lounge, and a booklet 
for orientation of freshmen. 

The MRH newspaper, The Rez Her- 
ald, this year took on a new format as 
part of the improvements in existing pro- 
grams of this year-old housing group. 

For the first time, MRHA residents 
will have an official pin. The design 
for this accessory was approved by the 
group's Presidents' Council recently. 

It is busy in the Noble House base- 
ment where the offices of the Association 
are located and the many impending 
plans for the improvement and better- 
ment of the men's dorms are put into 
action for continued progress of MRHA. 



Judicial Board— Standing: Philip Martin, Gerald Hoff, Robert Martin, Robert Burnett Seated: William Strasser, Arthur Fournier, Harold D'Orazio, Karl Lindberg 




306 



1 







Elizabeth's regal, composed appearance during this scene from Mary Stuart is deceiving to her court, for she is faced with a difficult 
decision concerning her prisoner, Mary Stuart. If she chooses to give Mary her freedom, the safety of her throne may be in jeopardy; if she 
decides in favor of Mary's execution, she may face the condemnation of the English people for her inhumane act. 



Acting, Producing, Directing Offered by Theatre 



"Five great plays by five great playrights," stated pre- 
season publicity for the University Theatre. Subscribing 
to the belie! that there is only time to present the best 
plays, the 1959-1960 Theatre group presented Love for 
Love, Mary Stuart, The Hairy Ape, and You Nevei 
Can Tell. 

The organization is divided into two staffs: the stu- 
dent staff and the faculty staff. The faculty staff directs 
and supervises the operations of the Theatre. The 



supervisor and the coordinator of the work of the 
faculty staff with the student staff is the executive 
director, Mr. Joseph W. Scott. 

The Student Staff provides the personnel direction 
and manpower for all Theatre productions. This staff 
is headed by Linda Gail Bond, the general manager. 

The University Theatre provides practical training, 
and educational and recreational experience in the 
theatre for University students. 



JOSEPH SCOTT, executive director 

iiin. 



LINDA GAIL BOND, general manager 




■H 




307 



Faculty and Students Work "Behind the Scene" 



University Theatre Board — Standing: Bernard Hewitt, Turner 
Edge, Joseph Scott Seated: Jenna Vaught, Ronald Winchell, 
Cameron Gullette, Linda Bond, Allan Holaday 



Senior Managers — Standing: Ronald Winchell, Ruth Hooger- 
werf Seated — Top Row: Jenna Vaught, Catherine Miller, 
Linda Bond Second Row: Carol Hay, Carol Green 





— ' 1 






—■■mi 



*50r^ 




As 1959-1960 Theatre Casts Present... 



Faculty and student staffs work together to make 
the University Theatre an activity providing the 
richest theater entertainment for Illinois students. 
Students handle the acting and producing; the faculty 
staff does the directing. 

The direction of the 1959-1960 season of plays was 
handled hy lour faculty members. This year's season 
began with the play Love for Love by William Con- 
greve, directed by Charles H. Shattuck. The second 
production was Mary Stuart by Friedrich Schiller, 
directed by Clara Behringer. The third production 
of the season was The Hairy Ape by Eugene O'Neill, 
directed by Charles H. Shattuck. You Never Can Tell 
by Bernard Shaw, directed by Mary Arbenz, was the 
final production of the playbill. 

The student staff is divided into four major divi- 
sions: the Senior Manager division, the Junior Man- 
ager division, the Sophomore Assistant Manager divi- 
sion, and the division of crew members. Each of 
these staffs is in turn divided into several subdivisions 
and minor committees. 



Above Right: Junior Managers — Carole Luehring, Loretta Alfonsi, Sharon 
Crowley, Ruth Ann Hoogerwerf, Nancy Schaudt Not in panel: Karol Porter 



Right: Personnel Staff — Carolyn Franks, Jenna Vaught, Melissa Blanke, 
Susan Vaughn 



Below: Faculty Staff — Bernard Works, Genevieve Richardson, Mary Arbenz, 
Shirley Davidson, Barnard Hewitt, Clara Behringer, Joseph Scott, Charles 
Shattuck 





309 




Production staff: Elissa Weaver, Carol Towner, Mary 3rown, Patricia McKinney, Barbara Schubert, 
Catherine Miller, Saundra Youmans, Raymond Pitton Not in panel: John Reynolds 



Dramatic Playbill Including 




Stage Management staff: Carol Hay, Rachelle Warschaw, William Kubitz Not in panel: 

Elizabeth Roberts 

A maze of love affairs and counter love affairs, complicated by a town go:sip, 
combined to form the involved plot for the comedy, "Love for Love." 



310 







Sophomore Assistant Managers — Top Row: Mary Lee Hale, Marilee Mommsen, Evelyn 
Brown, Kenneth Smith Second Row: Ellen Reimann, Lois Rose, Linda Joy, Elizabeth 
Harryman Bottom Row: Dorrell Turley, Mary Lou Caughron Not in panel: Wads- 
worth Giller, Mary Bulfin, Beverly Scherer, Arnold Naiman 



Sophomore Assistant Managers — Top Row: Marykay O'Grady, Joyce 
Bozarth, Louise Darby Second Row: Michael Welge, Mary Ehler, Carolyn 
Wilson Bottom Row: Barbara Sternaman, Karen Kobes, Terry Heads Not 
in panel: Mitchell Rhodes. Larry Schafer, Irene Amos, Cheryl Potter 



"Love for Love," "Matchmaker," and "Condition III" 



A ladies' hat shop at the turn of the century 
was the colorful stage setting for The Match- 
maker, a rollicking comedy presented by the 
Theatre in the spring of 1959. 



311 




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in progress 



A familv of "Six Characters" descended upon the stage of another play and provided an eerie interruption to the practice sessii 
Pirandello, the playwright, used new innovations in stagecraft to produce this play m the early Twentieth Century. 



Enthusiastic Drama Students Write, Act, Direct 



Graduate assistants: Jean Cutler, Norman Newberg, Raoul Johnson, Carolyn Griffith, Roger 
Meersman, Ronnie Trent, Robert Whitlatch 




Four plays rounded out the spring and 
summer season of 1959 productions. 

Six Characters in Search of an Author 
was directed by Charles H. Shattuck. Piran- 
dello's "play within a play" proved to be 
a highly stimulating performance for Uni-i 
versity Theatre goers. 

Webster Smalley directed one of the 
1959 summer productions, The Cave Dwell- 
ers, by William Saroyan. Humor and 
pathos blended in displaying a rich pano- 
rama of delightful Saroyan characters. 

Bernard Hewitt directed Condition 111, 
Peter Bowman's prize winning play, for 
the 1959 Festival of Contemporary Arts. 
This play is one in a series of original 
scripts which have been given their prcinici 
performance bv the Theatre. 

Thornton Wilder's rollicking farce, Tfn 
Matchmaker, gave a colorful climax to the 
1958-1959 season. Man Arben/ was tin 
director of the play. 



312 




Workshop Managers — Beverly Kimes, Judith Lyman, Mary Divan, Carol Green 



The laughter of this humorless clown was accompanied by electronic 
music. Professor Lajaren Hiller of the School of Music wrote the score 
especially for the Theatre Workshop production, Blue Is the Antecedent 
of It. The effect of this play was totally theatrical in showing the plight 
of modern man who appears to be losing his religion. 




Six Workshop Theatre Productions Per Year 



The Cave Dwellers, a realistic fantasy about people who find themselves on the stage of a New York theatre which is about to be 
razed, was a summer production of University Theatre. The lives of these people gain new meaning through this strange experience. 




313 




Canadian-born prodigy Glen Gould has dedicated his life to perfection of his musical talent. His mother began his formal musisi 
education by instructing him in piano when he was three years old. At the age of ten, he began to study under Alberto Guerro of the Royal 
Conservatory of Music in Toronto. After four years of study under Guerro, Gould made his formal debut in a concert with the Toronto 
Symphony Orchestra. Since his first American appearance in a Washington, D. C. recital, January, 1955, his career gained momentum. 
An internationally acclaimed artist, Gould displayed his versatility and depth of talent when he appeared as piano soloist at the Stratford, 
Ontario Music Festival in 1956 and heard the first concert performance of his string quartet at that festival. 

Glen Gould and Robert Shaw Chorale Featured 



Concert and Entertainment Board: Morris Carter, Murray Krieger, Donald Doherty, Suzanne Haines, Peter Yankwich, Duane Branigan, Paul Bennett, Douglas Lapp, 
Robert Johnston, Charles DeLong Not in panel: Thomas Johnston, Harold Lancour 




314 








DONALD DOHERTY, personnel manager 



ROBERT JOHNSTON, finance manager 



In Star Course Panorama of Prominent Artists 



For sixty-nine years Star Course has brought to campus a 
varied program of popular and classical concerts in the fields 
of music, dance, and drama. This year's series concerts in- 
cluded Inbal, Dance Theatre of Israel; William Primrose, 
violist; Robert Shaw Chorale; Glenn Gould, pianist, and the 
Cleveland Symphony Orchestra. Featured in the extra con- 
certs were the Alfred Deller Trio; Stan Kenton, June Christy 
and the Four Freshmen; Michel Senechal; Hal Holbrook; 
Erroll Garner; Martha Schlamme; Ahmad Jahmal; and the 
Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. 

Student Managers handle Star Course activities with two 
senior managers serving as the over-all directors. Aside from 
working with the board to formulate general policies, they 
work out the plans and budgets which provide a working 
pattern for the entire organization. 



The Robert Shaw Chorale, now in its twelfth year of uninterrupted 
activity, has received world acclaim through its concert tours, radio ap- 
pearances, and recordings. It has appeared in twenty countries of Europe 
and the Middle East, and conducts yearly tours in the United States. 
Through the originality and brilliance of its founder and choral director, 
Robert Shaw, it has become one of th? brighte;t attractions in the mu- 
sical world. 



315 




Arrangement for Tickets, Advertising, Personnel 




c ■.!..._.... M=m=>oor«_Ton Row Rona'd Koertae Stanley Weber, George Montgomery, Thcmss Eovaldi Third Row: Jerry Manley, Jeanne Ikins, Donna 
Johnston Genevieve Glas^ RoTe WdJln Michael °ffil.? " sVcond Row: Joh'n Lunds.en, Joann Tresselt, Charlotte Scoville, Judith Miller, Charles Henness BoHon, 
Row: Mark Jurgensmeyer, Alice Gregory, Diane Courtright, Barbara Brown, Harriet House, Jerome Taverna 




Left: Sophomore and freshman managers work industriously on details for a coming concert. 



No person has done more than William Primrose to re-establish the eminence of the viola 
as a solo instrument. Glasgow-born, he began his career as a child prodigy on the violin, for- 
bidden to touch his father's viola. He had well established himself as a violinist before he was 
allowed to change to the viola and work to the unparalleled position he holds with that instru- 
ment today. In his concert for Star Course, as soloist for the University Symphony Orchestra, 
Mr. Primrose played superbly the famous "Harold in Italy," by Berlioz. 



316 




Are Varied Jobs of Student Star Course Staff 




James Stein, physical plant; Lisa Grable, public relations 



Right: Martha Soloman, publicity; Thomas Roos, advertising 



The Yemenites migrated to Israel from the Southwestern corner of the 
Arabian peninsula 2500 years ago. Isolated from the Jewish world, they pre- 
served their traditions. After Israel became independent, Miss Levi-Tanai 
organized Inbal, Dance Theatre of Israel, resulting in a unique blend of 
ancient Yemenite dance form and aspirations of modern Israel. 






001 or „ llt 



OCT. K TR K> 
LECTURE - 
' 0PE \* J? DRAMA 



■7 21 8PM , 

•°R»L CLINIC 
22 23 24 

rm STUDENTS 




THURSDAYS 1 1 A' 
RATION WITH 
IL CHORAL CLINIC 




Carolyn Curtis, personnel ; Alan Lopatka, concert arrangements 



Left: Donald Quest, tickets; Karen Person, staff secretary 



Cleveland Symphony, June Christy, Stan Kenton 




A student-operated activity, Star Course is 
conducted on a non-profit basis. All finances 
are controlled by the University Concert and 
Entertainment Board, a group comprised of six 
faculty members and six students. The board 
is responsible for such matters as policy, selection 
of programs, and financial budgets. 

After the board has handled the contract- 
signing procedure, the managers have eight 
duties to perform for each concert: publicity, 
advertising, ticket sales, public relations, con- 
cert arrangements, personnel, physical plain ar 
rangements, and office management. Each ol 
these divisions is handled by a Junior Manager 
who in turn is responsible for directing the work 
ol the sophomore staff. 



Artistic devotion and technical precision of the mem- 
bers of the Orchestra coupled with the musical brilliance 
of conductor George Szell have resulted in the Cleveland 
Orchestra becoming one of the world's greatest symphony 
orchestras. Illinois students who attended its Star Course 
performance were just as delighted with the Orchestra's 
music as were those who heard it in the musical capital; 
of the world. 



318 



June Christy, top-flight vocalist, recording star, and 
nightclub attraction, began her career in the Stan Kenton 
band. Kenton, one of the most popular and talented 
band leaders, has traveled to the Continent several times 
for a widely-heralded series of engagements. He has 
given many young artists a start in show business. The 
Four Freshman, now firmly established as one of the top 
ccts in show business, ware assisted by him in their early 
career. All of these artists combined to give a top Star 
Course performance. 



Forty sophomore managers work on the var- 
ious committees, under the direction of the 
junior managers. Every week one member ol 
each committee rotates to another one. The 
sophomores also usher at all Star Course con- 
certs. 

The 120 freshmen managers are divided into 
ten groups of twelve. Two of these groups work 
in the office while the other groups work on 
research projects under the direction of the soph- 
omores. These projects give Star Course informa- 
tion such as which media of advertising are most 
effective and how the local ticket prices compare 
with those of the concert series at other schools. 
Every month these groups rotate to give each 
freshman the opportunity to meet all the per- 
sonnel, to work on each committee, and to be- 
come acquainted with all phases of Star Course. 




Arrive Due to the Work of Nearly 200 Students 



Sophomore Managers — Top Row: Klaus Weinmann, Michael Dykstra, Carl Allison, Steven Sample, Jonathon Borus, Cass Apple Second Row: Mary Theobald, 
Sally Johnson, Carol Oyster, Sandra Schwab, Barbara Sternaman Bottom Row: Judith Stader, Joan Aikin, Susan Sterrett, Beverly Hall, Susan Olson Not in panel: 
'Penny Greenwood, Herbert Abelson, Worth Giller, Robert Jacobsen 




» 





FRANK SCHOOLEY, chairman 



PAUL McMICHAEL, general manager 



IPC Oversees Production oi Campus Publications 



Chartered by the state as a non-profit corporation, the 
Illini Publishing Company carries out its purpose of 
printing, publishing, and distributing student publica- 
tions. Operating from the basement of Illini Hall, IPC 
uses its own modern printing plant to do a variety of 
commercial printing for student and University con- 



nected organizations. The company operates under a 
board of control composed of four students and four 
faculty members. 

Besides printing The Daily Illini and Illinois Tech- 
nograph, the IPC Board is also responsible for admin- 
istering the Illio and radio station WPGU. 



Berline 



sard— Standing: Arthur Wyatt, Joe Sutton Seated: David Brown, Larry Leiken, Frank Schooley, Jesse Heathman Not in panel: David Rademacher, Howard 






WALTER GILMORE, photo chief 



Staff photographers — Top Row: Sheldon Becker, Martha Brieser, Louis Aronson, 
Barry Coomber, Michael Pisterzi, Peter Wohld Bottom Row: Kenneth Viste, Lynnette 
Forbes 



Photo Staff Pictures Campus for Illio and DI 



Serving both the Daily Illini and 
the Illio, the photo staff is under its 
own organization as part of the Illini 
Publishing Company. Throughout 
the year the photo staff works to take 
pictures for the DI and the Illio. 
While the bulk of the Illio pictures 
are taken in the fall, there are still 
spring shots that must be taken for 
the following year's book as well as 
pictures taken every day for the Daily 
Ilimi. 

Working under the direction of a 
photo chief, two assistant chiefs, and 
live night editors, the staff works many 
long hours walking from one end of 
| the campus to the other carrying out 
the whims and pleadings of the Illio 
and /)/ editors as to the pictures that 
they want taken. Besides the battle 
with uncooperative subjects and other 
adverse conditions there are always 
the eternal jobs of developing and 
printing. 



Above right: DONALD HUiZINGA and 

HAROLD ALFORD, assistant photo chiefs 



Staff Photographers: Ronald Brown, Richard Osborn, 
Margaret Smith, Harold Alford, Thomas Osborn 




321 





MARYLIN DALY, editor-in-chief 



JOHN CLEM, business manager 




FRANK WYDRA and MARY GEISSMAN, sports 



It was late at night on March 12, I960 when it finally 
happened— the last page of the Illio was completed in 
form for the printer. 

Work on the 1960 Illio began before the end of the 
spring semester of 1959, with workshops and retreats by 
the business and editorial staffs in order to train new 
personnel. Fall was the time for taking photographs, 
collecting questionnaires, and selling yearbooks. Soon 
it was Christmas, but the "holidays" were spent by the 
stall in many hours of writing copy. With the new 
semester, came headlines to write and more pictures 
to crop. A final all-out effort was still necessary to get 
the Illio to press on time. 



1960 Illio Goes to Press at March 12th Deadline 



VICTORIA FEIT, copy editor 



KATHY MANNING, personnel director 





322 








CAROL LEONARD, associate business manager 



AL HERMAN, picture editor 



An attempt to record campus life in all of its phases 
was the motivating force behind the Illio staff. Photog- 
raphers were assigned to cover all events, and conversa- 
tion and news were absorbed for the presentation of a 
complete campus picture. 

Although the business and editorial staffs held separate 
meetings, the two staffs worked together in production 
of the book. Weekly meetings sometimes took the in- 
formal form of a pizza party. 

Perhaps the 1960 Illio will mean just a little more to 
members of the staff, for they alone realize the worry 
and sweat that are part of the makeup of every section 
of the book. 




GINNY BATTLES and MARIANNA BROWN, personnel 
Not in panel: MARCIA GLASGOW 



When Story of Illini Year Is Completed by Staff 



CAROLE LUEHRING and SUSIE VAUGHN 

Seniors 



EDDIE GARNER and CLIFF HIGGERSON 

organizations 



MARGIE ALLEN and BOB 
ASHBROOK university life 





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Editorial staff — Sophomores — Top Row: David Win- 
klemann, Dale Pearson, James Levy, Richard Blatt, 
Eleanor Beauchamp Second Row: Kathryn Elfrink, 
Edith McCarty, Mary Ann McGuire, Judith Orndorff, 
Florence Gegel Bottom Row: Diane Dowdall, Anne- 
marie Klink, Joyce Bozarth, Linda Hunter, Virginia 
Pagels 



GARY VAN WINKLE, JANET MONIER 
and TOM SYKES, sales 



Yearbook Is Discussed During Weekly Meetings 



SALLY WILLIAMSON and BOB TELLEEN, activities 



BOB BROWN, JULIE GATES and JIM RILEY, advertising 





324 




Judith M 



m^TTfc^ Man^AW/ Ginny £'.,1™* S,6Ven ^'^ '^^ ^'^ ^ ^^ Wn ^ " M C '°" ^ B °»° m «— Sue PCs, 




TOSHI UTAGAWA, artist; PROF. KENNEDY, art adviser 
JACK BLEDSOE, artist 




BUNNY LaBARRE and JUDIE NEAL, residences 



Coordinating Problems and Work of Two Staffs 



F „„, pk m T A ^r P r- c W' a ? * ,c > Wi liam Aiken, John Brubaker, Stephen Schneider, Brooks McNebb, Daniel Melling, Jack Rudy, Marc Dilatush, Kenneth 

Evans, Ph.ll.p W.lken Gary Sather, Earl Copk, Lucius D.fferson, Patrick Elks, Clarence Mack Fourth Row: Joan Sanders, Ellie Nedsmith, Cynthia Stocks, Clara Burt 
hart, Janet Shuman, Bessie Dukeson, Nancylee Smorgson, Nancy Owen Third Row: Joan Christopher, Diane Althoff, Ann Hyde, Judith Hood, Linda Peterson Janette 
Johnson, Betsy Buttermann, Susan Arnold Judy Schremer Barbara Hermling Second Row: Clara Sturies, Jane Fuesting, Sara Dammerman, Carolyn Beaty', Nancy 
?,^1 w^ f 9e p ? S,e ^ m D e ' e L / , J ! 1 ne A H °r a ; d ' Elen . Li eb°vi<:h, Sally Frye Bottom Row: Brenda Vines, Lynda Middendorf, Nancy Mees, Kathleen Stoeckel, 

Macia Woods, Sue Reissman, Janet Burkland, April King, Louise Bellem, Laurel Cappa 




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A fire breaks oul in two Champaign lumber 
companies; University students begin throwing 
water; Bill Burrell leads Illini defense; Khrus- 
chev comes to the United States. 

These are examples oi stories that made 
The Daily Illini headlines in the past year. 
Serving the University for almost a century, the 
publication has attained the level of a business 
rather than an activity. 

Long hours go into the careful preparation 
of news for the 12 to 32 page paper appearing 
five times a week. Deadlines must be met, ad- 
vertisers satisfied, and the news brought to the 
campus. Supplementing the work of the student 
staff is the Associated Press Wire Service, na- 
tional columnists, and the Chicago Daily News 
Foreign Service. 

The Daily Illini is supervised by Illini Pub- 
lishing Co., but the editorial policy is determined 
by the student staff. 



"The Daily Illini" Staff Works Night and Day 




RICHARD ARCHBOLD, editor-in-chief 



JAMES LYTLE, business manager 



WILLIAM STEPHANS, city editor 



PHOEBE KOSFELD, activities editor 



WILLIAM WHITE, sports editor 






JOY MILLER, Copy Editor 



Activities staff — Standing: Joan Schmidt, Charles Kerchner, Dana Kellerman, Susan 
Williams, Joyce Garbe, Natalie Lewin Seated: Phoebe Kosfield, Barbara Brown, Judy 
Johnson, Linda Turner Not in panel: Michael Schepke, Ellen Hagelow 



Brings Latest News to Campus Each Morning 





JANICE WRIGHT, Associate Business Manager 



DONALD FRIEDMAN, Campus Editor 
MARGARET MOLITOR, News Editor KENNETH BROUN, Executive Editor 





AUDREY SHAW, Circulation Manager 
JOAN DILATUSH, Classified Manager 



327 





Copy staff: Susan Galbraith, Ruth Jones, Joy Miller, Charlene Flack, Christine Czurylo, Ruth Schoenbeck 



DI Quality Scores High in National Competition! 





Sports staff— Standing: Glenn Chertkow, Taylor Bell, Richard Stahler, James Rys Saated: Edward 
Lewis, William White Not in panel: Ray Cohen, David Young, William Tunilla 



City staff — Top Row: Marie Martin, Melvin Runge 
Third Row: William Stephens, Donna Shapiro Second 
Row: Norman Bezane, Howard Smulevitz Bottom Row: 
Sharon Creamer, Michael Whalen 



Campus staff: Anna Overton, Karen Lucas, Mary Conour, Myrna Baker, Nancy Kolenberger, Thomas Shilgalis, Donald Freidman, Joan Koza, Bonnie Byrns, Robert 
Adams, Ann Meek, Sylvia Simbsrg, Penelope Nichols Not in panel: Wade Freeman, Eugene Bryerton 





Advertising staff— Top Row: Kurt Kazmierski, George Bossarte, Ann Rank:n, Martha Molitor, James Lytle, Donald Passaglia, Steve Forester Bottom Row: 
Ralph Quartetti, Janice Wright, Elaine Coorens 



Through Smooth Division of Staff Responsibility 



Divisions of staff responsibility enable The Daily Illini 
to fulfill its daily obligations efficiently. 

Where the academic side is concerned, the Campus Staff 
takes over by reporting on classes, curricula, enrollment, 
and administrative actions. Big Ten championships, Elite 
Eight tournaments and intramurals are covered by the 
staff of sports writers. 

The City Staff covers the happenings of the local cities 
of Champaign and Urbana, and the state, giving the Df 
more than just a campus-wide coverage. With soft pencils 
in hand, copyreaders provide the official check for errors 
in spelling, punctuation, fact and general content of each 
news story. As a morning newspaper, The Daily Illini is 
"put to bed" in the late hours by a special night staff. 

The Daily Illini, scoring high in national competitions, 
is rated among the finest college dailies. 




Classified staff — Top Row: Susan Gelfand, Carolyn Parkhurst Bottom 
Row: Joan Dilatush, Suzanne Schuettner 



Circulation staff — Standing: Nina Eastman, Barbara Burchfield Seated: Marian Issen, Audrey Shaw, Antonia Risk 



)• 




Tech, Engineers Magazine, Enjoyed on Campus 




STEPHEN EYER, circulation manager 



ROGER HARRISON, business manager 



Standing: Marilyn Day, James Printer, George Carruthers Seated-Top Row: William Andrews Dav.d Yates, Gene Lindsey Fourth Row: George Venorsky 
John Dough, Maryl.n Daly, Catherine Zakas Third Row: Gary Waffle, Judith Ondrla, Jeffrey Golin, Robert Fulton, Jeralyn Jewett Second Row: Paul Cliff, Barbara 
Polin Grenville King, Samuel Saexy, Stephen Dilts Bottom Row: Theodore Mole, John Kurtz, Joseph Weidemann, Charles Adams, Charles Jones 




330 



And Throughout the State 

Constantly striving to improve the quality of the magazine, 
members of The Illinois Technograph's stall attempt to present 
the engineers on campus with a publication which is both in- 
formative and entertaining. Besides technical articles that deal 
with the various phases of the engineering field and engineering 
at the University, The Technograph employs lighter related 
articles, editorials, and some fiction pieces. The staff also uses 
supplementary pictures and diagrams to illustrate stories. Regular 
features in the magazine are the monthly Techno-cutie; "In- 
dustrial Skimming," which presents the latest developments in 
industry; "Brainteasers"; the joke page, and "Begged, Borrowed, 
And 

The Technograph, founded in 1885, is a charter member of 
the Engineering College Magazines Association, a national organi- 
zation for engineering magazines on many campuses. ECMA is 
designed to elevate the standards of college engineering publi- 
cations so that they may be helpful to engineering students. 
ECMA gives awards for the best publications and for the best 
articles that appear during the school year. Each month, a 
qualified critic reviews the magazine and sends a marked issue 
back to the staff. 

Published monthly from October through May, The Techno- 
graph offers staff members valuable practical experience in the 
fields of editing, business, photography, and art. 




ROBERT BOHL, adviser 



DAVID PENNIMAN, editor 



Editorial staff: Barbara Polan, Charles Adams, Stephen Dilts, Judith Ondrla, Marilyn Da 





331 




Board — Standing: James Buncher, Edward Harris Seated: Richard Biby, Richard Adams, 
Patrick Kenny 



In its sixth year of continuous service to U. of I. students, 
WPGU has again improved its programing and extension of 
coverage to encompass over 6,000 students in the residence halls. 
Featuring a full program of music, news and sports, WPGU this 
year inaugurated a series of taped features of interviews with 
celebrities in Chicago. In newcasting, the announcers have at- 
tempted to bring their listeners a wider coverage of campus 
events. While soundproofing and redecorating have improved 
existing facilities, WPGU is looking forward to its new studios. 




Record librarians Diane Zalants and Forrest Tel I is check 
over WPGU's large assortment of records. 



Working Hard to Provide the Best Radio Listening, 

Staff — Top Row: Fredrick Pious, Michael tarkin, Howard Wolfman, Frank Gaides, Robert Auler, Robert Pernau, Robert Fndres, Gregory Paradowicz, Roy Ander- 
son, Walter Heimerdinger, Marc McMannis, Arnold Goldstein, Richard Schiffman, Patrick Coburn, James MacDonald, Marvin Melton Third Row: Paul Anderson, Myron 
Shapiro, James Bond, Dennis Linsley, Martin Minow, Irwin Rosen, John McCann, George Dixon, Edwin Steinam, Lawrence Radley, Howard Pattis, John Dyben, Dennis 
McCann, Paul Symanski, James Klus Second Row: Patrick Kenney, Leonard Sendroff, Richard Royster, Philip Greene, Gary Olson, Gary Waffle, Ira Frank, Philip 
Deckowitz, Marvin Rushing, Larry Urich, Charles Breitweiser, Phillip Brown, Smith Toulson, Forrest Tel lis, Jeffrey McFadyen, William Abel, John DeLong, William Tran- 
quilli, James Buncher Bottom Row: Edward Harris, Marilyn Wagner, Sylvia Ruble, Rhoda Boros, Georgia Broadrick, Sharon Scott, Diane Zalants, Joan Rasmussen, 
Gloria Laner, Barbara Gruner, Barbara Tripp, Marvin Kasten, Beverly Armstrong, Judith Lutzhoff, Judy Schaeffer, Richard Biby, Richard Adams 




332 




Supervisor — Top Row: Fredrick Pious, Paul Symanski, 
Robert Pernau, Michael Larkin, Richard Schiffman, Howard 
Pattis, James Klus Bottom Row: Forrest Tel I is, Leonard 
Sendroff, Barbara Tripp, Martin Minow, Marvin Rushing 



Engineer Harvey Whitfield takes care of ths 
controls during a program of mood music. 




WPGU Eagerly Anticipates Move to New Studio 



Two staff members pause on the steps of the well-worn entrance 
to "1241 Euclid" before entering and starting to work. 



On the other side of the glass wall, disk jockey Paul Johnson 
describes the background of the music about to be played. 





333 



Playing and Singing at Their Best, The Marching 




Although seen at rest during the playing of this number, the kettle drum- 
mers always provide numerous highlights to each show as they race around 
the field in order to be in their proper place for each number. 



Again Illinois' marching band, the oldest 
and one of the largest in the nation, thrilled 
football enthusiasts with its pre-game and 
halftime shows. Long recognized as one of the 
finest marching, playing and singing groups 
of its kind, the "Marching Illini" capitalized 
on long hours of hard practice and behind the 
scenes planning to present a new show for 
each of the five home games. 

Composed of men students from the Con-i 
cert Band, the First Regimental Band, and 
the most qualified members of the Second' 
Regimental Band, the marching band, di- 
rected by Everett Kisinger, backs up its regular 
marching formation and instrumentation of 
over 175 with a reserve squad of fifteen extra 
band members. 

Led onto the field by drum major Rick 
Jarrard and spirited by Chief Illiniwick John 
Forsyth, the band builds up Illini spirit and 
keeps it going throughout the game by play- 
ing during timeouts and after touchdowns. 
At each of the five home games the band per- 
forms a new show of intricate marching for- 
mations and smooth playing. Featured during 
every performance is one semi-classical or 
classical number that has become a unique l 
tradition for Illini band lovers. 

In addition to their heavy schedule of 
home games, the band this year traveled to 
Cleveland, Ohio lor the Penn State game. 



Feet, horns, and hats line up in the front row as the band presents one of the traditional parts of its half-time show. The playing of 
one classical or semi-classical number has come to be a very popular feature and is sufficient proof of the bands' concert-band tone. 




Illini Topped Great Season by Saluting Ray Eliot 



At the last home game, the Marching Illini were privileged 
to honor Coach Ray Eliot on his retirement as one of Illinois' 
most inspirational coaches. The band iollowed Coach Eliot's 
career from a star football player through to winning three 
Big Ten titles, two Rose Bowl games, and completed the 
salute with Eliot spelled in the form of a football. Another 
of the best shows was the first one of the year when the "March- 
ing Illini" welcomed the Army "Kaydets" to the Illini cam- 
pus and helped set the tone for the first Illini upset of the year. 





Always a thrill to Illini fans, students and 
alumni alike, is the performance of Chief Illini- 
wick. As the thirteenth chief to represent the 
"Spirit of Illinois" on the gridiron as part of the 
band show, John Forsyth portrayed the chief in 
traditional Indian costume. 







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'.•*- "; •.-., 



■- ' ' - *,* 



335 



First and Second Regimental Bands Work Many 




EVERETT KISINGER, director 



Organized as a concert group with a membership 
of around one hundred members, the First Regimental 
Band carries out its purpose to study serious concert 
band literature, both traditional and contemporary, 
and to perform good band music on various occasions 
throughout the year. As vacancies occur in the Con- 
cert Band, musicians who have spent a year or two in 
the First Regimental Band are promoted on the basis 
of ability. 

Highlighting the year, the band, conducted by 
Fverett Kisinger, performed at the Sixth Annual 
Festival of Concert Band Music on January 9. Other 
concerts of the year were a formal Spring Concert on 
April 7, and a Twilight Concert on May 11. Besides 
these many concert activities and playing at several 
ROTC reviews in the spring and at the Veterans Day 
service on November 11, the First Reg Band forms 
the nucleus of the Marching Illini. 

Several of the concert programs are re-broadcast 
over the radio on station WILL for the listening 
pleasure of local residents. 



First Regimental Band — Flutes: Margaret Dempsy, Donna Lambird, Phyllis Hansen, Carolyn Beaty, Sara Wold, Marie Going, Mary Elliott, Jerome Bacchetti, Carole 
Jezek, Marjorie Dodd, Barbara Elder Oboes: Robert Ward, Janet Thebaud English Horn: Sandra Rayburn Bassoons: Philip Corlew, Karen Fredrikson, Harry 
Simmons, Sarah Whiting Clarinets: Wayne Chilcote, Lloyd Scott, James Boyd, Wesley Schumacher, Laurence Svab, Michael Gamble, Donna Jorstad, Morton Oberlander, 
Lois Steban, David Anderson, William Rogers, Kenneth Christian, Ronald Weber, Earl Salsman, Laurel Conrad, Larry McGinnis, Charles Smith, Charles Rhodes, Gary 
Haddock, Peter Pappas, Ronald Van Mynen, Ronald Larner, Charles Boschek Bass Clarinets: Fonda Wilson, Carol Harris, Alan Berger, Don Lockhart Alto Saxophones: 
Harold Jepsen, Earl Walters, James Colleen, William Outhouse Tenor Saxophones: Thomas Scannell, Martin Grose Baritone Saxophone: Ronald Durrett Cornets: 

Jerry Williams, James Reedy, David Kuntzi, Lester Johnson, Richard Jarrard, Larry Neeman, John Randolph, Norbert Cieslewicz, David Metzler, Jerry Nofsinger, Brian 
Pennington, Robert Warfield Trumpets: Dale Hopper, Edward Kroll, Joe Gaylord, Carl Reiners French Horns: Kirby Johnson, Norah Gernand, Ernest Lenzi, Robert 
Kirkpatrik, Lewis Simon Trombones: David Dyroff, Loren Dietrich, Robert Hopewell, Donald Gubser, Homer Tice, Allan Loek, Milton Janosky, James Felts Baritones: 
Robert Behnke, Michael Myers, James Fry, Delbert Disselhorst Tubas: Richard Haines, Bruce Keck, Allen Edwards, Leslie Lemon, Frank Mynard Percussion: Sharon 
McCauley, Alan Lopatka, James Stutsman, Dean Wade, Tommy Ward!ow 




Hours Providing Band Music at Campus Events 



Willi a membership of 160, the Second Regimental 
Band is a concert organization which has grown this 
year to have one of its best instrumentations. (Ion- 
ducted by Everett Kisinger, with the assistance oi 
Jan bach, the group is divided into two divisions oi 
between sixty and one hundred members in each 
division to facilitate practicing. Providing a varied 
musical experience for its members in the composi- 
tions played each year, this group, like the other 
bands, studies standard band literature. 

The Second Regimental Band, in conjunction with 
the other university bands, presents several concerts 
including the Festival Concert on January 9 and a 
Spring Twilight Concert in April. Each fall the 
Second Reg Band provides music for the pep rallies 
held before each home game and also participates in 
the Mother's Day program in the spring. 

Another important function of this band is to sup- 
ply some of the personnel for the marching band 
besides playing for military reviews held in the spring 
for drill display. 




Mr. Everett Kininger conducts a Second Reg practice session. 



Second Regimental Band — Flutes: Marvin Rogers, Margaret Coogan, Stanley Glazer, Betty Kuykendall, Maurice Borasky, Susan Smalla, Barton Lipofsky 
Oboes: Linda Matheson, Janis Henkle Bassoons: Joan Anderson, Nancy Gobert Clarinets: John Christie, Allen Whited, Michael Stoddard, Jeannette Johnston, James 

Wormley, David Norberg, James Kashmier, Otto Gaus, Gerald Epstein, David Olson, Kenneth Mills, Jonathan Thomas, David Perkins, Everett Triefenbach, George 
Henrv, Arthur Schechtman, Ronald Grant, Jermoe Zis, Marvin Levin, Edward Snyder, Virginia Hubert, Ralph Hoffman, Raymond Sergo, Wayne Peterson, Robert Picket, 
Robert Endres, Melvin Borg, Peter Bulkeley, Jerry Wiatrowsky, James Ellinger, Reid Lewis, Edgar Folkers, Dwight Heckert, Chris Sarlas Bass Clarinets: Rodger 
Bennett, Martin Schachner Alto Saxophones: Kenneth Konecnik, Barry Doan, Stephen Morse, Joseph Wunar, David Garison Tenor Saxophones: Larry Hodash, Terry 

Klaus, Ronald Ward Baritone Saxophones: Alan Kessie, Henry Hegener Cornets: Larry McCoy, Harold Hixenbaugh, James Tira, Janetta Johnson, Dale Hicks, Kent 
Mowe, Norman Browning, James Heisler, Ronald Mizer, William Gibbens, Charles Standring, Amos Chenoweth, Joseph Furstenberg, Royce Lorentz, Paul Burkhard, James 
Ellis, Paul Clark, Alan Varner Trumpets: Jon Winston, Robert Stauffer, Jeffrey Golin, Harold Schroth, Wayne Peterson, Edward Hines French Horns: Robert Stehman, 
Jeff Foote, Ruth Duesterhaus, Lee Bobert, William Clark, Marjorie Sullins, Andrew Seacord, David Levin Trombones: Michael Carroll, Stephen Madden, David Giffen, 
! Howard Beyer, David Lembke, Stephen Berry, Ryland Koets, Brady Hancock, Fred Hubbard, Harvey Pastko Tubas: Wayne Mara, James Carson, Robert Dahl, Donald 
Colwell, Chester Goodrich, John Kirk, Peter Van Dyck, William Zahrobsky Percussion: Barclay Boirun, John Eddy, Richard Huston, Lloyd Jones, Gary Pope, Robert 
Seyler, Allen Sypherd, Roger Thryselius, Robert Weihl Baritones: Gilbert Singer, Dale Walsten, Jon Fulfs, John Leman, Constance Ashmore, David Macomber, Larry 
Gillingham, William Gleason 




337 




The 1959-60 Concert Band season was high- 
lighted by the return of Director Hindsley to 
the podium alter a semester's leave of absence 
spent in European travel and research work 
here in the States. The band's one hundred 
fourteen select wind and percussion players can 
look back with satisfaction on a highly success- 
lul season of delightful music and stimulating 
educational musical activity. 

Band directors and music lovers from all over 
Illinois arrived on campus to attend the January 
Festival of Concert Band Music and the spring 
semester's Seventieth Anniversary Concerts. The 
annual Twilight Concert Series attracted many 
appreciative listeners to the lawn of the quad- 
rangle. The band also participated in the Com- 
mencement Exercises this spring and presented 
The President's Concert on Commencement eve. 

The Band again made long-play records from 
some of their practice tapes. 



MARK HINDSLEY, director 



Hindsley Returns, Directs Concert Band Season 




338 



An active concert schedule both on the campus and 
throughout the state has been maintained by the University 
of Illinois Symphony Orchestra, which had almost ninety 
players this year. Six campus concerts (lining the school 
year included the annual appearance of the Orchestra on 
the Star Course series, featuring the renowned viola virtuoso 
William Primrose. A three-day tour of the northern pari 
of the state in February brought music to hundreds of high 
school students, as well as to adult audiences. 

This year's outstanding guest conductor was Julius Her- 
ford. A noted Bach authority, he supervised in the prepara- 
tion of "The St. Matthew Passion," presented in the spring 
by the Oratorio Society and the Orchestra. 

Bernard Goodman, the Orchestra's regular conductor was 
selected this year by Dr. George Szell, Conductor of the 
Cleveland Orchestra, for one of the two Fellowships of the 
Kulas Foundation, awarded to young American conductors 
of unusual promise. 



BERNARD GOODMAN, conductor 




Spring Tour Takes Orchestra to High Schools 



First violin — Ronald Stoffel, Donna Tredrea, Virginia Kellogg, John Bielenberg, Alice Krentzman, Betty Zinzer, Susan Sterrett, David Preeves, John Whelan, 
William Mullen, Martha Wendt, Joseph Giewartowski Second violin- -David Moskovitz, Lawrence Smith, Collette Sroka, Paul Gorski, Li la Fairchild, John Williams, 
Amaryllis Fletcher, Paula Roth, Eleanor Tarrasch, Grace Beckett Viola — David Ulfeng, Nancy McCandless, William Zartman, Gerald Levey, Jane Binkele, Elizabeth 
Hubbard, Susan Tiegler, Toby Goodman, Dennis Murphy Cello — Peter Brown, Melissa Brown, Dorthea Jump, William Skidmore, Roger Drinkall, Judith Green, Abbie 
Israelow, Lynn Nail, Lawrence Tarson Bass- Oily Wilson, Timothy Byrne, Rosemary Fagan, John Brahms, Wesley Reeder, David Ward-Steinman, William Brahms, Gary 
Zwicky, William Douglas Flute — Frank Bowen, Patricia Bell, Dorothy Hubbard, Judith Tracy Oboe — Carl Ellis, Janice Irick, John Lundsten Clarinet — George 
Townsend, William Huntington, Albert Kavanaugh, Eddie Allen Bassoon — Robert Brown, Connie Barcus, Jane Myrick Horn — Richard Ely, Alfred Blatter, Susan Staun- 
ton, Martin Tiersky, Judith Hill, Kathryn Dieterich Trumpet — Richard Vandament, Stephanie Dieterich, George Geis, Thomas Knox Trombone — Liborrio Arcuri, 
Richard Bilderback, Gerald Gross Tuba — Ronald Bishop Harp — Kathrine Corbin Piano — John McCauley Percussion — George Frock, Roy Andreotti, Dorcas New- 
ton, Thomas Siwe, Juanita Randall, James Vandament 




339 





Patrick Sheehan, president; Robert Johnston, senior manager 



• __ • ♦• 



'Singing Illini 



PROFESSOR HAROLD DECKER, director 



The traditional Dad's Day Concert of the Varsity 
Men's Glee Club assumed even greater proportions 
this year through the guest appearance of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan Men's Glee Club. The "Singing 
Illini," under the direction of Professor Harold 
Decker, and the Michigan Glee Club, directed by 
Professor Philip Duey, combined to thrill a capacity 
Huff Gym crowd of students and dads. 

During their stay, the Michigan Club were guests 
at an informal reception and attended the Illinois- 
Michigan football game. 



Top Row: Norman Mayer, Paul Lindstrom, Wayne Madsen, David Doering, John Schlafer, Rona'd Page, Ronald Larson, Kenneth He, neman Robert Telleen Larry 
Lewis, Franklin Bachenheimer, William Stephenson, David Kuhn, John Hocking, Gary McClung, Lonny McClung, William Ayton Fourth Row: Melaniusz G.enko, Phillip 
Cartwright, Robert Robinson, Gerald Langkammer, Lloyd Burling, Richard Jarrard, David Shaul, Franklin Stroud, Stanley Eden, George Novy, Joseph Dowell Wil ham 
Colby, Stephen Weiser, Dean Wilson, George Patterson Third Row: Robert Young, Jerry Latta, James Ray, Richard Pease, Ronald Burkey, Edwin Gaylord Arthur 
Bower, Joe Hill, Charles Sprowl, Peter Aikman, Thomas Goettsche, Richard Haines, William Payne, John Winings Second Row: Terry Klaus James King, John Reynolds 
Donald Hartter, Clifford Wilderman, Stephen Farish, Kent Smith, David Metzler, Dale Fahnstrom, James Holder Willard Ice, James McDonald Bottom Row: Patrick 
Sheehan, Leigh Beube, Myron Gross, Kirby Johnson, Gerald Shriver, Dennis Stoller, Myron Reaman, Jan Munch, Gary Krauss, John Lundsten, Ryland Koets, Robert 
Wertheim, Anthony Petullo 





A few members of the Michigan and Illinois glee clubs recall 
some delightful experiences from their concert tours in Europe. 



Over a cup of coffee, the directors of the two singing groups dis- 
cussed the concert which was to be enjoyed by lllini Dads. 



Joined by Michigan Glee for Dad's Day Sing 



Spring breezes found the Glee Club heading south to enjoy 
the weather and sing for the Civic Music Organization in 
Lexington, Kentucky. The spring tour included additional 
concerts given along the way in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and 
Kentucky. 

Among other Glee Club activities were a social exchange 
program, an orientation period for new members, the an- 
nual Christmas and Spring Concerts, and numerous perform- 
i ances for business and civic groups in the Champaign-Urbana 
I area and throughout the state. 

New Blazer outfits, purchased for morning and afternoon 
concerts, enhanced the appearance of the Glee Club. 



Officers — Standing: David Kuhn, Norman Mayer Seated: Lonny McClung, Donald 
Hartter, Richard Bayley 



The two clubs joined forces and climaxed the concert by 
singing together spirited songs of both schools. 





341 



Women's Glee Pleases Audiences With Variety 




Heard and seen many times nationally over 
radio and television, the Women's Glee Club 
has become well-known throughout the coun- 
try. Their tours this year included visits to 
Davenport, Moline, Rock Island, and Bradley 
University in Peoria and other cities in North- 
western Illinois and eastern Iowa. They per- 
formed for the Governor and local Chambers 
of Commerce, in addition to their campus 
concerts. 

Aware of the saying, "Variety is the spice 
of life," the women choose numbers to please 
every listener. Their music varies from the 
spiritual and classical to the contemporary 
types. This variety maintains quality through 
the versatility of the group director, Russell 
Ma this. 

Besides entertaining their audiences, the 
Glee Club offered special enjoyment to its 
members at this year's annual Christmas 
Party and the Honors Banquet. 



Officers— Top Row: Martha Gilkerson, tour manager; Marlene Washington, treasurer Bottom 
: Margaret Dempsey, vice president; Claudia Joslyn, president; Mary Jo Tews, secretary 



Row: Marg 



mmm£mmMmmmm 

Judith Yanetta 






HAROLD DECKER, director 



Standing: Bruce Bueschel, Grace Habben, Judith Braun, Mary Morrison Seated: Maurice 
Jones 



University Choir Is Honored Twice in Chicago 



University Concert Choir began its special activities 
this year with a concert tour to Chicago sponsored by 
the Illinois Branch of the Music Teacher's National 
Association. 

Later in the semester, during the holiday season, 
a Christmas concert and television broadcast on 
WILL-TV provided entertainment lor audiences in 
the Champaign-Urbana area. 

The Choir is the most advanced of all campus 



choral organizations. The sixty-five members, pri- 
marily students of the School of Music, are under 
the direction of Harold Decker. 

The Choir made a second trip to Chicago during 
the spring semester, when the Chicago Alumnae Club 
represented them in a concert downtown. The five- 
day singing tour gave an opportunity for the Choir 
to present several concerts in the area, climaxing 
another successful season. 



Top Row: Maurice Jones, Don Edson, John Duitsman, John Leman, Kenneth Modesitt, John Reinhardt, Kenneth Marshall, Robert Piper, Robert Kuzminski 
Richard Bielawa, Thomas Reeder, Robert Fulmer, William Schmidt, David Lantz Third Row: Corwin Holmss, Lawrence Rickert, Bruce Govich, Richard Clark Keith 
Johnson, Thomas Walters, Ronald Remhart, Stephen Emanuel, Lawrence Weller, Bruce Bueschel, John Williams, John Walker, John Kramer, Ronald Pritchard Second 
Row: Ru'h Riddle, Beverly Davis, Nancy Odum, Karen Crane, Jewel Jones, Barbara Baker, Joyce Loofbourrow, Grace Habben, Penny Eichen, Margaret Decker Beverly 
Armstrong, Martha Rotter, Arlene Verbeski, Virginia White, Doris Pogue, Judith Roudez First Row: Sharon Neemann, Judith McGlade, Mary Morrison, Georgie Swartz 
Myra Rubnitz, Barbara Meyers, Janice Kuykendall, Judith Braun, Terry Shull, Linda Wall, Rebecca Cassity, Donna Johnston, Haven Palmquist, Ruth Cortright Margaret 
Liddicoat, Susan Ent Not in panel: Richard Coddington, Judith Kramp, Ronald Ward, Susan Chamberlain 





Chorus Concert Featured on Nationwide Radio 



Nationwide radio audiences heard the 1959 Christmas 
Concert given by the University Chorus. The concert, 
featuring "Lauda Sion Salvatorem" by Dietrick Buxte- 
hude, was presented in conjunction with the University 
Oratorio Society. 



The Chorus, composed of nearly two hundred mem 
bers selected by Dr. Russell Mathis, director, after audi 
tioning, included students from almost every college 01 
the campus. These students meet for rehearsal on Mon 
day and Tuesday nights. 



Top Row: 

Steven Hughes, Joh 



Myrna Loring, Franca Rowland. Lenore K°wa,c Zy k Tom W, • ^ 

'"v£ ?a e t Taw RU fe: er H y avl 0r Snr p &? $S25"c$X S^X™? A^ato, Henry, Lawrence .^obert^E Iwain, W AAou, 
..=.... .... p._,i c.li.:- D„k — , u;u. n K Mr n Hiannp Law er. Nancv Cjrant In 



Steven Hughes, John l-isner, George rugge, ->e.iy i»»iii»iv 'J:"'""" £}XZZT 'cZ£,'m> Robert Hovice Samuel Armato, Henry Lawrence, Robert McElwain, Joseph Moun 
Marlene Schenberg, Virginia Latshaw, William Hays Philip Sharp I Richard Cochran Robert Hov.ce bamue • ^ Williams, Marylee Chval, Myrna Bake: 

,oy, Mike Esselstrom, William Uhlman, Stephen Schlem, Robert Hilge nburg J"^™e , Jacobso Margaret John, Elinore Neeleson, Judith Wingfield, Gloria Senfeu, 

^r-cX^^^^ Monroe - p ^ ia R - ds - Eii - be,h Br °- Linda E " 





Committee — Standing: Heston Wesson, Mary Peter, Paul Malven, Karen Bossert, Walter Griffith Jeanine 
Sanquist, James Buzz Seated: Donald Smallwood, Elennor Masters, Leonard Higgs, Jo Ellen Putt, J m=s 
Guy, Savilla Anderson 



Donald Smallwood places the flowered 
crown on Ruth Watt, queen of Plowboy Prom. 



Plowboy Prom 



Career Conference 



L Sponsored jointly by the Agriculture Council and the 
ome Economics Clubs, Plowboy Prom is one of the 
highlights of the year for the students of the Agriculture 
ujllege. This year's dance, held in April, featured the 
ilieme, "Moonlight Trail." Johnny Bruce and his or- 
chestra furnished the music. 

During the evening, Miss Ruth Watt was crowned 
tpieen of the Plowboy Prom. 



After a promotional contest to name their new mascot, 
Career Conference chairman planned a program in which 
over 60 fields of endeavor were represented. Spokesmen 
for the various industries, professions, and other occupa- 
tions converged on the campus in early March to spend 
two full days explaining their careers to prospective 
employees. 



Committee — Standing: Dean Gerald Peck, Dennis Fox, Leo Obrecht Seated: Maris Freed, Myrna Rudman, Barbara Rashbaum, Karen Van Doren, Rachelle 
/Varshaw, Patricia Rollins 




"Holidays Around the World" is Doll Show Theme 




Cabinet— Top Row: Carol Herman, Marie Anderson, Martha Coombe, Joyc? Bozarth, Joan Neet, Mildred Hudgins Bottom Row: Peggy Parks, Sharon Thomp- 
son, Nancy McMillen, Karen Arentsen, Julia Bodman, Barbara Hutchens 

"Holidays Around the World" was chosen 
as the theme for the fifty-fourth annual 
YWCA Doll Show. Many organized houses 
competed in the event which sent originally- 
dressed dolls to orphanages and children's 
homes in the Champaign-Urbana area. 

A study of existentialism was chosen by 
YWCA cabinet for discussion during the past- 
year. This topic was suggested at the Y Con- 
ference held in Decatur. The cabinet is com- 
posed of the various area chairmen, the execu- 
tive committee, and the directors. These 
people meet weekly for business and discus- 
sion periods. 

The Little United Nations was sponsored 
again this year by the YWCA and YMCA.' 
This model assembly is held once a month 
and is patterned after the UN General Assem- 
bly. People from various countries attended 
the sessions and discussed such topics as "Re- 
solved: The People's Republic of China 
should be admit ted to the UN." These assem- 
blies are unique to the U. of 1. campus. 



Upper left: One of tha issues regarding Red China's 
recognition by the UN is discussed by the Little UN. 




Lower left: Many hours of committee preparation 
are involved in making the Doll Show a yearly hit. 



346 




Cabinet — Top Row: Steven Sample, Alan Buckles, Davis Hess, James Ellern, Edward Nestingen Second Row: John Price, Donald Leak, Philip Reinhear, David 
Lindstrom, Gerald Miller, Richard Curtiss, Frederick Miller Bottom Row: Harry Smith, Jon Winston, Daniel Bures, Richard Hutchinson, Thomas Scannell, Akkihebbal 
Nagaraj, Donald Young 



YMCA Serves As a Meeting Place on Campus 



It is Freshman Camp; it is International Suppers; it is 
reading the hometown newspaper in the lounge; it is 
forums on the Cold War today; it is coke and music in 
the Kaeser Room; it is a seminar on existentialism; it is 
a ping-pong tournament; it is the Little United Nations. 
Through its many and varied programs, the campus 
YMCA endeavors to emphasize all phases of campus life 



and help individuals gain a better understanding of 
national and international issues. 

The YMCA is divided into eighteen specific activity 
areas which work from a central core. All students are 
welcome to serve on the various committees or participate 
in the Y's activities. 



Board of Directors — Top Row: John Price, Howard Jackson, Frank Mi!lspaugh, Donald Leak, Thornton Price, Robert Sutton, Edward Nestingen Second Row- 
Walter McMahon, Edward Griswold, Bruce Keck, Robert Backoff, Robert Lenz, David Lindstrom, David Lindtsrom, Arthur Scott, John Cribbet, William McPherson 
King Broadnck, Ralph Hay Bottom Row: Phillip Ross, Richard Hutchison, Frederick Miller, Dean W. L. Everitt, Hobarf Mowrer, Upson Garrigus, William Oliver Gerald 
Brighton Not in panel: Herbert Farber, Prof. Robbin Fleming, Prof. Halbert Gulley, Tom Hamilton, Thomas Hastings, Prof. Chester Jackson, Walter Johnson,' Harlow 
Mills, Thomas Page, Harry Tiebout, James Byrne, Richard Curtiss, Robert Liverman 





Staff-Top Row: Brenda Fisher, Kendal, Cole, Katharine Hunley, Jim ^^^ "wa? J^-d, H-ien Gross ^^^^"^'jX'piSS 

Inskeep tela Potter, Lyndell Guthrie, Phyllis Regnier Th.rd Row: Carles Alt Joan Ton jkmson jame Adams Lany ' e ™Nancy Turner, Walter Griffith, Carol Ufkes, 

R^o^Ca^yn^^on! ^Wt^^^^ ^' *-'- "" N " * 

panel: Glenna Blunier Richard Almquist 

SNIB Publicizes Activities of the Ag Students 




News releases concerning the students of the College of Agriculture 
were sent to hometown newspapers, radio stations, and television stations 
this year by the Student News and Information Bureau. 

The Bureau, commonly called SNIB, sights news releases as only 
one of its main functions. SNIB provides a training center for students 
interested in the field of communications, with facilities available in 
radio, press, television, photography, and exhibits. 



Above: Richard Almquist, Eldric Sechrest, John Woods 



Directors: Robert Coffman; Donald Meyer; Nancy 

h, ,,,,.,; |,.-.li.- I I. ill, ( .in, I I J f I- • ••■ , W.ill.i Griffith; < 'mlyn 
Peterson; Richard Almquist; Owen Glissendorf, adviser 




348 



Annual Campus Drive Gives Funds to Charities 




Allocations Board and Major Chairmen — Standing: Mary Harrison, Anna Leimbach, Robert Schuiteman, Marilyn Mann, Frank Vorris, Roger Higgs, Judy Miller, 
Linda Evans, Julia Bodman, Boyd Jackson Saated: Donald Sommerville, Margaret Sloas, Jane Allison, Stuart Goodman, Martha Shane, Barbara Rashbaum 



To avoid many small charity 
drives throughout the school 
year, Campus Chest focuses its 
attention on one annual fund- 
raising campaign held every 
spring. The contributions, made 
by every person connected with 
the University, are put into one 
fund which is allocated to num- 
erous charities of local, national, 
and international scope. Two 
charities which share half the 
total donations are the World 
University Service and the Uni- 
versity Scholarship Fund. 

Stuart Goodman, director, and 
Jane Allison, associate director, 
coordinated the committees this 
year. They were assisted by stu- 
dent representatives who served 
in positions of major chairmen, 
sub-chairmen, and committee 
numbers. The faculty members 
also willingly supported work 
of all Campus Chest activities. 



Sub-Chairmen — Top Row: Noel Workman, Michael Neff, Myron Sidon, James Clark, James Cunningham, 
Lee Duran, Hugh Folger Bottom Row: Marilyn Pulley, Margaret Fleming, Nedra Thomson, Merle Miller, Julie 
Willizms, Barbara Conant, Rosalind Novak, Marion Banish 




349 





Top Row: James Gay, Roger Higgs, Glen Broom, Heston Wesson Bottom Row: Anita Affolter, 
David Christopherson, Helen Gall, Arlene Cribb 

New dancing slippers and freshly-pressed tuxedos made their way 
to the 1959 Sno-Ball on November 21. The lack of snow did not 
dampen the spirits of the crowd of students which filled the Illini 
Union Ballroom to dance to Johnny Rinaldo's Orchestra. The crown- 
ing of Bobbie Kozub as the 1959 Sno-Ball queen was the highlight 
of the evening. 

Sno-Ball is co-sponsored annually by the Men's Independent Asso- 
ciation and the Women's Group System. 

Club Sno-Ball, held in a separate room, provided a change of 
pace for dancing feet, a place to sit down and relax, enjoy a soft 
drink, and listen to Joe Dean and his combo. 



Sno-Ball Thrills Dance Crowd 



^J^J 




BARBARA KOZUB, Sno-Ball Queen 



Presentation of the court — Patricia Brockman, Anne Price, Diane Lesinski, Barbara Kozub, Helen Gall, David Christopherson, Patricia 
McKinney, Linda Evans. 




350 




An enthusiastic engineer jokingly places the traditional 
green hat on his date's head. 



St. Patrick, the patron saint of student en- 
gineers, is honored at the St. Pat's Ball. A 
highlight of this dance is the induction of fifteen 
top engineers into the honorary "Knights of St. 
Pat" society. Professor C. Dale Greffe appears 
with top hat, cane and whiskers to knight the 
men in a fitting ceremony before the crowd in 
Huff Gym. 




MARY SUE DRENDEL, St. Pat's Ball Queen 



"Knights of St. Pat" Tapped at Colorful Dance 



Dance Committee — Standing: Thomas McGlenn Seated: Robert Persak, Philip Weibler, Lyle Martin, James Cooper, Brendan Nelligan, John Nemsick 
Thomas Reeder 




351 



ATHLETICS 




352 




INTRAMURAL 

SPORTS 
VARSITY 

SPORTS 



353 



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Sports ... a Part of Student Life 



Athletics play an exciting and important role in the life of the Univer- 
sity ot Illinois . . . they provide thrilling entertainment lor students, bring 
national recognition to the University, give a sense of pride to the student 
body and alums, and unite the University community behind a common 
interest. Nothing can surpass the thrill of watching the football team score 
a last second touchdown for a victory . . . the excitement of a double over- 
time basketball game . . . the pride of the student body in having an 
Ail-American athlete . . . or the spirit of all the Fighting Illini teams, those 
teams that never quit fighting no matter how unsurmountable the odds 
may be. 

The year between February, 1959, and February, I960, produced its 
share of thrilling athletic contests and exciting triumphs lor the Illini. At 
the end of the 1958-1959 school year it was announced the Illinois teams 
had been the most successful in the Big Ten that year by winning two 
conference titles and finishing second four times. 

The gymnastics team was the most successful as it won an unprece- 
dented tenth straight conference crown and finished second in the NCAA. 
Other winter sports also fared well . . . the indoor track team placed second 
in the Big Ten . . . the fencers also finished in the runner-up spot in the 
conference and added a fourth place in the NCAA . . . the wrestling team 
took fifth in the Big Ten meet . . . and the swimmers placed sixth in the 
conference championships. 

With the arrival of spring came more exciting victories for Illini teams. 
The track team received national acclaim by setting a world's record for 
the sprint medley relay while competing at the Drake Relays. An exciting 
upset victory in the Big Ten meet and a ninth place finish in the NCAA 
were other accomplishments of Coach Leo Johnson's team. After starting 
off the season with sixteen straight wins, the baseball team finished with a 
9-6 conference record, good for a second place tie. Finishing second in the 
conference championships was the tennis team while the golfers ran into a 
little hard luck and finished last. 

The 1959 football season meant something extra to the Illini ... it 
marked the end of the successful eighteen year coaching career of Ray Eliot 
. . . and the team produced many exciting moments. An upset victory over 
Army after a dismal opening game loss to Indiana ... a great defensive 
game against Ohio State that produced the first victory over the Buckeyes in 
many years ... a last second touchdown to defeat Wisconsin, the conference 
champions . . . and a resounding 28-0 triumph over Northwestern in the 
game which ended Eliot's career . . . all these showed the true spirit of the 
Fighting Illini. The player who was largely responsible for these victories, 
All-American guard Bill Burrell, became a campus hero . . . whether making 
a crushing tackle or an appearance at a pep rally, he received a tremendous 
ovation from the students. 

To round out the year, the 1959-1960 basketball team added its share 
of thrills. Althtough they lacked the big men that other teams had, the 
cagers made up for this with a strong bench and sheer determination. Few 
who saw it will ever forget the excitement of the Illini's double overtime 
win over Purdue . . . this game typified the spirit of the team and its ability 
to come from behind when the game appeared to be lost. 



355 




Md -r&»^^^^^ 



Eliot Looks Toward '59 Season With Optimism 



Day after day the interior linemen pound each other in prac- 
tice- reflexes and power are ground to perfection Weeks of 
this kind of work are responsible for the powerful lllim line. 




Coach Ray Eliot in his final year as head coach of 
the Fighting Illini looked toward the 1959 season 
with a great deal of optimism. This outlook called 
for an abundant use of sophomores and juniors. 

The immediate problems that faced Eliot were the 
weaknesses at the end and quarterback positions. 
The opening of the latter position was sure to create 
a rugged battle among sophomore Mel Meyers, letter- 
men Johnny Easterbrook, Bob Hickey, and Rus> 
Martin. 

The 1959 season could find Illinois with one of 
the strongest front lines in its history. Heading this 
list of talented linemen was. of course, captain and 
All-American candidate Bill Burrell. Names like Joe 
Rutgcns, Cliff Roberts. Darrell DeDecker and Don 
Yeazel were expected to appear often in the 1959 
season. 

The Illinois coaches looked forward to the back 
licld with optimistic views also. Speedsters like Mar- 
shall Starks. Dejustice Coleman and sophomores 
Johnny Counts and Ethan Blackab) were expected to 
give the Illini a swill running attack during the sea 
son. To round out this hopeful outlook. Ra\ f hot 
had the scrvi.es ol Jim and Hill brown, both posses 
sing greal potential ai the [ullba< k spot. 



356 



Hoosiers Defeat Mini 20-0 in Season's Opener 



It was a bad day for the Illini at Bloomington, 
Indiana, both in terms of weather and oi football. 
Thirteen Illinois fumbles, five recovered by Indiana, 
were all that were needed to turn the game into a 
20-0 victory for the Hoosiers. 

In the first half, the Illini tumbled eight times and 
never managed to get into Indiana territory. The 
Hoosiers took advantage of Illinois mistakes to score 
two touchdowns lor a 13-0 hall time lead. 

Early in the second hall, the Illini made their first 
strong offensive move. Under the guidance of sopho- 
more quarterback Mel Meyers they moved down the 
field from the kickoff to Indiana's 16 yard line. A 15 
yard penalty and an interception killed the drive. 

Minutes later the Illini were knocking on the door 
again when Marshall Starks fumbled into the hands 
of an Indiana player. A iumble in the fourth quarter 
stopped another opportunity. Following this, a 
Hoosier end picked off Bob Hickey's attempted screen 
pass on the 36 yard line. Three plays later the Indiana 
tailback threw a 18 yard touchdown pass. The point 
after the touchdown was made and the final score 



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20-0. 



Sharp tackling and hard running characterize a scrimmage be- 
tween the Blues and Whites at Memorial Stadium. Scrimmages like 
this one help to determine the starting eleven for the Illini. 



Filled with a capacity crowd of loyal Illinois fans, Memorial Stadium is the scene of an exciting football game between the fighting 
Mini and Northwestern. The beautiful bright weather added to a perfect afternoon zs the Illini scored a smashing 28-0 victory. 








mm. 





Halfback Johnny Counts (48) carries the ball for the lllini 

against Army. Waiting for Counts is Army back Glen Blumhardt. 



Visiting dignitaries from the United States Military Academy 
attentively watch the game between Army and Illinois. 



lllini Upset Cadets, 20-14, in First Home Game 



Halfback Deiustice Coleman (dark jersey > is brought down by an unidentified Army defender after successfullycatching a pass. Other 
players in the picture are Army guard Charles Butzer (601, Army end Otto Everbach (82), and lllini halfback 



;Tuny carcning a pass, umtr 
ack Ethan Blackaby (41). 




358 



*s **» 




The cadets from West Point stand for the opening kickoff of the Illinois-Army game. The academy's entire senior class arrived on the 
ampus early in the day, then marched in formation to the stadium, and entertained fans with a military drill before the game. 



Army's left end Don Usry (89) receives a jarring tackle from an 
Illinois defender after quarterback Joe Caldwell completed a pass to 
him. Number 44 for Army is reserve halfback Glen Adams. 



Illinois, in its first home appearance, looked like 
an entirely different team. A three touchdown under- 
dog, the Illini upset the highly regarded Cadets of 
West Point, 20-14. 

Sophomore Mel Meyers led the early attack by 
completing his first six passes and finished the game 
with eight completions in ten attempts for 115 yards. 
One of these was a sparkling 41 yard pass to halfback, 
Johnny Counts, for the Illini's first touchdown of the 
afternoon. Gerry Wood's kick was good and Illinois 
led by an upsetting score of 7-0. 

The Illini weren't through scoring in the first 
quarter. Their second touchdown was set up by one 
of the lour recovered Cadet fumbles. A bone-crushing 
tackle by captain, Bill Burrell, caused Army hallback 
bob Anderson to fumble, the recovery being made 
by Doug Wallace on Army's 16. Jim Brown carried 
the ball over from the one yard line. Wood's con- 
version again was good and the score was 14-0. 

In the second quarter, the Cadets shortened die 
lead by scoring on a 74 yard drive. 

The Fighting Illini concluded their outstanding 
offensive performance in the third quarter by march- 
ing 45 yards in 13 plays for their third touchdown. 
The score was made by Bill Brown on a one yard 
plunge. In the fourth quarter Army tallied once 
again to make the final score 20-14. 




359 



Illini Defeat Buckeyes With 75 Yard Touchdown 




Illinois' center, Tony Parrilli (50), drives across the Ohio State 
line as he tries to block a punt. Rough, hard, and determined play 
was instrumental in the Illini victory over the Buckeyes. 



The Illini made it two consecutive wins tor the 
season by downing the Buckeyes of Ohio State be- 
fore a crowd ot 83,001) in Columbus. Midway in the 
first quarter, quarterback Mel Meyers went back tc 
pass and appeared to be trapped deep in his owi 
territory; however, he managed to get rid ot the ball 
Alter being deflected by two Buckeye deienders, the 
ball was caught by Johnny Counts who sped across 
the goal line tor the only touchdown of the game. 
In all, the play covered 75 yards and gave the Illini 
a 6-0 lead which they never relinquished. 

Illinois rolled up an unbelievable total oi 369 yards, 
while the highly respected offense of Ohio State was 
held to a mere 79 yards on the ground, the fewest it 
has been held to in five years. The greatest defensive 
stand came just after the second half got underway, 
when the Illini stopped the Buckeyes after they inter- 
cepted a pass on Illinois' 14 yard line. 

Late in the final quarter, Don Yeazel added some 
insurance to the Illini lead with a field goal, making 
the final score 9-0, and giving the Illini their first 
victory over the Buckeyes since 1952. 



t I * * * * m 









Joe Rutgens (79), versatile Illini tackle, show:, his 
tremendous power ^s he continually crashes through ths 
Buckeye line to harass the Ohio State quarterback. 




The Buckeyes pounce on Illinois' halfback, Marshall Starks (22), 
as tackle Don Yeazel (78) tries to come to his rescue. Cooperation 
of this type sparked the Illini to victory throughout the season. 



360 







Halfback Ethan Blackaby (41) speeds towards the Minnesota goal line after a 15 yard run as he scores the [ Mini's first touchdown 
m their 14-6 homecoming victory over the Gophers. Running interference for Blackaby is Illinois' All-American guard Bill Burrell (68). 



Outstanding Mini Defense Defeats Gophers 14-6 



The Illini, before a near capacity Homecoming 
crowd, defeated the Golden Gophers of Minnesota 
14-6 for their third consecutive victory this year. 

Illinois' first score came on a well executed play 
with Ethan Blackaby carrying the ball over from the 
fifteen. The conversion was made and the Illini led 
7-0 until the fourth quarter. 

The game was dominated by outstanding defensive 
play by both teams. Minnesota was held to a meager 
82 yards rushing while the Illini could only pick up 
121 yards against the rugged Gopher line. The 
Illini pass defense was also very good, holding the 
Ciophers to seven completions in 29 attempts. Illinois' 
secondary came up with five interceptions to cut off 
Gopher scoring threats. 

In the fourth quarter both offenses began to open 
up. A determined Minnesota team moved the ball 
down the field for a touchdown. However, they 
missed the conversion and the Illini's lead was pro- 
tected. On the last play of the game, a very deter- 
mined Jim Brown smashed over the goal line. The 
point after the touchdown was good and the Fighting 
Illini, with this 14-6 victory, made this year's Home- 
coming another wonderful success. 



361 



Unable to pass, Illinois quarterback Johnny Easterbrook 
tries to run around end to pick up some yardage. Attempt- 
ing to bring Easterbrook down is Minnesota guard Jerry Shetler. 








Block I members display the traditional Indian head during the halftims of the homecoming game. The two 
Block I sections, composed of 1 1 00 students each, perform during the halftime of every home football game. 



Powerful Nittany Lions Hand Illini 20-9 Defeat 



Illinois' Ail-American guard Bill Burrell graciously accepts the 
Big Ten's most valuable player award, a silver football, from 
Wilfrid Smith, the sports editor of the Chicago Tribune. 




Illinois took time out from its rugged Big Ten 
schedule to play the nationally rated Penn State 
Nittany Lions at Cleveland, Ohio. However, the 
Illini weren't "up" for this assignment and lost to 
the Eastern team 20-9. 

The Illini took an early lead as Bill Burrell re- 
covered a fumble on Penn State's 12 yard line. After 
the Illini lost two yards in three plays, Cliff Roberts 
kicked a field goal for a 3-0 lead. However, the Nit- 
tany Lions, led by All-American quarterback Richie 
Lucas, bounced back with two quick touchdowns 
and led 14-3 midway in the second quarter. Just 
before the half ended the Illini got their only touch- 
down. Halfback Ethan Blackaby intercepted one ol 
Lucas' passes on Penn State's 22, and plays later Bill 
Brown plunged over from the one. The try lor the 
extra point tailed, and the half ended with the Illini 
trailing 14-9. 

In the third quarter, Illini halfback, Gary Kolb, 
intercepted a pass on his own two yard line. Brown 
then fumbled on the first play; Penn State scored 
on the next play to lake a 20-9 lead. This proved to 
be too great lor die Illini to overcome as they were 
unable to score in the rest ol the game. 



362 



Purdue Holds Illini to 7-7 Tie in "Must" Game 



The Fighting Illini were held to a 7-7 tie by a 
powerful Purdue team. This was the game Illinois 
needed; a victory would have given the Illini a share 
of the Big Ten Title. 

Purdue drew first blood by taking an early 7-0 
lead. Illinois came back strong. Halfback John 
Counts led the drive picking up fifty-two yards in 
six carriers including a twenty-one yard touchdown 
run. With the score 7-6 in favor of Purdue, quarter- 
back Meyers decided to play safe and kick the extra 
point. Wood made the point and the game was tied. 
The determined Boilermakers time after time in- 
vaded the Illini twenty yard line. Each time the in- 
spired Illinois' defense, led by All-American Bill 
Burrell who made twenty-six tackles in the game, held 
them scoreless. Twice Purdue tried for field goals, 
and twice the Illini line crashed through to block or 
deflect the kick. 

The Boilermakers took revenge on Illinois in the 
last quarter. With seconds remaining in the game, 
Illinois had advanced to the Purdue twenty. A field 
goal was in order, but the Illini didn't have a kicker 
on the field. No more time outs were left so Illinois 
took a penalty to get the needed man on the field, 
and Wood had to kick from the thirty-two. The ball 
fell short of the goal post by six inches, leaving the 
final score 7-7. 





The Reamers, a Purdue honorary, explode the Boilermaker Spe- 
cial. Members of Illinois' Tomahawk honorary and the Reamers 
have an annual exchange for the Illinois-Purdue football game. 




The weather was dark and dreary as the Illini played Purdue 
to a 7-7 deadlock. In the above picture an Illini ball carrier 
falls forward after being hit by a Purdue defender. 



The referee raises his arm to signal that Illini halfback Johnny 
Counts (48) has stepped out of bounds. On the ground is Purdue 
halfback Clyde Washington, who side-tracked Counts. 



363 




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Title Hopes Vanish in 20-15 Loss to Michigan 



The Wolverines of Michigan threw a wrench into 
the machinery of the Illini title hopes by defeating 
the Eliotmen, 20-15. 

Illinois got off to a flying start by picking up nine 
points in the first nine minutes of play. A field goal 
and a follow-up touchdown started the Illini on what 
looked like a scoring holiday. 

Michigan, however, had other ideas on how this 
battle would turn out. The Wolves, toward the end 
of the second half, drove the ball down to the Illini 
thirteen yard line. For three plays the Illini held. On 
the last down, Michigan faked a field goal and passed 
the pig over for six points. 

Early in the third quarter the Wolves intercepted 
a pass on the Illini twenty-six. This set up their 
second touchdown, and gave the Wolverines the lead, 
13-9. Michigan now saw a chance for victory; fighting 
hard, they scored again in the third quarter and 
lengthened their lead by seven points. 

Willi the fourth quarter under way, the Illini 
showed their lighting spirit. Meyers engineered a 
scoring (hive for Illinois and the gap was shortened 
to 20-15. Witli time running out, the Fighting Illini 
tried to take the had, but it was all in vain. 




Hitting Michigan's left halfback Benjamin McRae (43) and 
causing him to drop the ball is Illini defensive halfback Dejustice 
Coleman. Prepared to help Coleman is halfback Marshall Starks. 



364 



Final Second Touchdown Upsets Badgers, 9-6 



Illinois produced one of the season's biggest up- 
sets by defeating the Wisconsin Badgers, Big Ten 
football champions, 9-fi. 

Early in the first quarter, the Illini were stopped 
on the Wisconsin six inch line. However, on Wiscon- 
sin's first play the Illinois defense trapped a Badger 
behind the goal line for a 2-0 lead. Wisconsin came 
back to score a touchdown, but the Illini line stopped 
the try for a two-point conversion, and the score was 
6-2 until the end of the game. 

With five minutes to go, Illinois took over the ball 
on their own twenty-two. Yard by yard, quarterback 
Mel Meyers and fullback Bill Brown moved the ball 
toward the Wisconsin goal line; with only seconds 
left, the Illini reached the Badger one yard line. The 
Wisconsin defense dug in; Illinois hit their line once 
and it held. Time remained for one more play. 
Meyers gave the ball to Brown and as the gun sounded 
the big fullback went over for the winning touch- 
down. The extra point was good, and the Fighting 
Illini recorded one of their truly great victories. 




An Illinois lineman blocks out Wisconsin's All Big Ten guard 
Jerry Stalcup (60) to prepare the way for another of the frequent 
Illini gains through the center of the rugged Badger defense. 



Fullback Bill Brown (39) plunges forward to give the Illini valuable yardage in their last minute touchdown drive against Wisconsin. 
This drive was culminated by a last second touchdown by Brown to give the Illini a 9-7 upset victory over the favored Badgers. 




365 





"Smelling roses" are lllini stars (from left to right) Bill Brown. 
Bill Burrell, Johnny Counts, and Gerry Patrick. However, their 
hopes vanished when Wisconsin clinched the Rose Bowl bid. 



Right halfback Ethan Blackaby (41 ) attempts to cut loose from 
the arms of a Northwestern tackier while halfback Johnny Counts 
of the lllini and tackle Gene Gossage of the Wildcats look on. 



Team Pays Tribute to Eliot With 28-0 Victory 



The Fighting lllini closed the 1959 season with 
their most impressive showing of the year, and brought 
Ray Eliot's eighteen year career as head coach to a 
finish with a smashing 28-0 victory over Northwestern. 

It was evident from the start that the lllini were 
not going to be stopped on the sunny November 
afternoon. After Illinois fumbled twice deep in Wild- 
cat territory, halfback Dejustice Coleman returned a 
punt to the Northwestern nine yard line. Bill Brown 
plunged over from the one yard line two plays later. 
Early in the second quarter the lllini covered 45 yards 
in nine plays to give them a 14-0 half time lead. 



In the third quarter, Johnny Counts climaxed a 42 
yard drive by scoring on a brilliant cut back run from 
the 17. The final score came in the fourth quarter 
when Bill Brown romped 69 yards from scrimmage 
for a touchdown. In all, Brown gained 164 yards in 
19 carries to highlight the powerful Illini's offensive 
attack. On the other hand, Northwestern's vaunted 
offense never got started as the lllini line held the 
swift rushing attack to a total of only 36 yards. 

This game was a fitting tribute to the end of Eliot's 
career. In fact, after the game most experts agreed 
that Illinois had the strongest team in the Big Ten. 



Johnny Counts scores after a brilliant cut back run from the seventeen yard line to give the lllini a 21-0 lead in the third quarter of 
their 28-0 victory over Northwestern. Wildcat halfback Ray Purdin (46) attempts to catch Counts but his efforts are wasted. 




Coach Eliot's Last Day . . . Prayer, Conferences, 
Anxieties, Victory . . . Ends an Eighteen Year Era 




D 



D MEN 




"As we gather here today — 

we take a moment, lord, to pray- 
that You will guide us in our play — 
and show us how to go Thy way. 
Make us honest, fair and true- 
in this game and all we do." 

— Written by Ray Eliot 



367 





Line coach Chuck Studley and Ray Eliot discuss the team 
strategy long in advance of the approaching football game. 



Before going out to challenge the Northwestern Wildcats, 
players are given a last-minute strategy lecture by their coach. 




The coach offers a few words of advice to junior quarterback 
John Easterbrook before he goes in for the Fighting I Mini team. 



The finish of the 1959 football season marks the 
end of a great coaching career. It marks the end of 
an eighteen year era. It marks the end of Ray Eliot's 
tenure as head coach of the "Fighting Illini." But 
it does not mark the end of the respect that the hun- 
dreds of thousands of Illini hold for the determined 
leader of the Illinois football team. This respect 
will not fade; it will grow into a legend, a legend 
that will be supported by the Big Ten championships 
of 1946, 1951, and 1953, by the Rose Bowl victories 
of 1946, and 1951, by the eight Ail-Americans that 
were tutored by the Dean of Big Ten Football, and 
by the remembrance of the many major upsets that 
Ray Eliot has produced. It can certainly be said 
of Coach Eliot that whatever he has done, he has done 
very well. True, his efforts did not always result 
in victories, but the record he has made is a good 
one. Ray Eliot's inspired teams have won eighty- 
three games, lost seventy-two, and tied eleven for a 
.533 percentage. When the time span of eighteen 
years is considered, this record becomes not only good 
but outstanding. 

Although Ray will be leaving the bench, he will 
still be on the team. Coach Eliot will be taking 
over the position of Assistant Athletic Director here 
at the University of Illinois. From past performances 
alone, we know that Ray Eliot will do a fine job in 
his new position. 



368 





During the high tension of a Big Ten game, Ray Eliot talks to two outstanding 
members of his Illinois football team, seniors Bob Hickey and Don Yeazel. 



Coach Eliot tensely watches the action in a pose 
familiar to all of the Big Ten football fans. 



Ray Eliot has had a great career at the University 
of Illinois. He has had his ups and downs, but he 
always came out first in the hearts of the team and fans. 
In 1942 when Ray became head coach he was determined 
to produce fine men and through them fine teams. He 
has succeeded admirably by producing such greats as 
Agase, Young, Vohaska, Tate, Brodsky, Karass, Caroline, 
and Burrell. He has tutored these Ail-Americans and 
other nationally prominent players such as Mitchell, 
Woodson, and Krietling. These men and all others that 
played with them profited from their association with 
the "Coach." Through these men the Dean of Big Ten 



Football has produced winning teams: teams such as the 
1946 eleven which tromped UCLA in the Rose Bowl 
45-14, and the 1951 gridmen who rolled over Stanford 
40-7 in the post season classic. 

In 1951 Coach Ray Eliot was chosen "Coach of the 
Year" in the national polls. Ray came close to captur- 
ing the title again this year. He was named "Midwest 
Coach of the Year" and placed third in the national 
voting. The final season of Ray Eliot's career as a 
coach has been a fitting one. He captured the third 
place slot in the Big Ten Conference; the team was 
ranked eleventh in the nation. 



For the final time Eliot paces the ground on which he spent many anxious moments during his eighteen year career with the lllini. 



j$ &&* 



■ — - - • ■ ' - - ■ ■ 



1 

I If 




Triumphant team members carry their coach off the field after they made his final game a big success with a glorious 28-0 victory. 



Eliot hugs his fullback Bill Brown (39) in appreciation for his tremendous 
play as Marshall Starks 122) and other I Mini celebrate in the locker room. 



Eliot's familiar portrait is complete with sun 
glasses and his trademark, a well-worn brown hat. 




370 



Pete Elliott Succeeds Ray Eliot as Head Coach 



The Fighting Illini received many post-season honors 
after their successful 1959 campaign. By finishing up 
with successive wins over Wisconsin and Northwestern, 
the team tied Purdue for third place in the Big Ten. 
In addition, they were rated fourteenth in the national 
polls and finished eighth in the country in total de- 
fense. Many individual honors were also awarded to the 
Illini. Ray Eliot, in his last season, was named "Midwest 
Coach of the Year," and took third place in the na- 
tional "Coach of the Year" selections. Guard Bill Bur- 
p-ell received 29 individual honors; he was named to nine 
All-American teams, received the Big Ten's Most Valu- 
able Player Award, was named United Press "Lineman 
•of the Year," and played in three post-season games. Joe 
Rutgens and Bill Brown made the first and second 
All Big Ten teams, respectively. 

Shortly after the season ended, Pete Elliott was named 
to succeed Ray Eliot as head coach of the Illini. Elliott, 
;i native of Bloomington, Illinois, was the only twelve 
letterman in the history of the University of Michigan. 
He starred as both a halfback and quarterback from 
1945 to 1948 and helped lead the Wolverines to two 
undefeated seasons and a Rose Bowl victory. After 
laduation, Elliott served as an assistant coach at Oregon 
md Oklahoma, and then was head coach at Nebraska 
:or a year and at California for three years before coming 
lo Illinois. 



The prospects for Elliott's first season at Illinois are 
very good as there are 26 lettermen returning from the 
1959 team. The entire backfield will return and will be 
led by captain-elect Bill Brown and his brother, Jim, at 
fullback, quarterback Mel Meyers, and halfbacks johnny 
Counts, Marshall Starks, and Ethan Blackaby. Although 
the line will suffer heavily from the loss of Burrell, it 
will be bolstered by the return of two big tackles, Joe 
Rutgens and Cliff Roberts. 



Big Ten Football Standings 

w 

Wisconsin 5 

Michigan State 4 

ILLINOIS 4 

Purdue 4 

Northwestern 4 

Iowa 3 

Michigan 3 

Indiana 2 

Ohio State 2 

Minnesota 1 



L 


T 


2 





2 





2 


1 


2 


1 


3 





3 





4 





4 


1 


4 


1 


6 






Top Row: Coaches Burton Ingwersen, Steve Suck, Ralph Fletcher, Charles Studley, Melvin Brewer, Jim Valek, William Tate; Head Coach Ray Eliot Seventh 
low: Marshall Starks, Donald Bush, Gerald Rosengren, John Lennon, John Easterbrook, John Austin, Richard Wooley, James Beckmann, Lou Amsberg, Edward O'Brado- 
'ich Sixth Row: Roland Pearson, Richard Newell, Gerald Oberndorfer, Stanley Yukevich, William Brown, Larry Lavery, Gary Hembrough, Melvin Meyers, Jerry Parola 
iruce Aronld Fifth Row: Darrell DeDecker, Jerry Cripe, Bruce Cacciapaglia, Robert Creviston, Clifford Roberts, James Brown, Gary Kolb, John Rizek, James DiGirolamo' 
-I oY i a u n ' 1° l LuSe Four,n Row: Kenneth Chalcraft, Dennison Staub, Dick Cast, Gerald Wood, Russell Martin, Paul Golaszewski, Robert Mountz, Melvin Romani, 
:than Blackaby, Stephen Thomas Third Row: Joseph Geraci, John Kruze, Joseph Wendryhoski, Gary Brown, Anthony Zeppetella, Richard Nietupski, Calvin Wheeler 
ohn Counts, Robert Young, James Entwistle Second Row: Howard Plautz, Edward Reed, Patrick Murphy, Joseph Rutgens, Anthony Parrilli, Douglas Wallace Joseph 
^rakoski, Joseph Mota, Robert Salata, Robert Lanzotti, Bruce Beckman Front Row: Donald Yeazel, Kenneth Gehler, David Ash, Gerald Patrick, Deiustice Coleman 
Vilnam Burrell, Robert Hickey, John Gremer, Ernest McMillan, John Stapleton, Lindell Lovellette 




371 



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Center John Wessels, who specializes in hook shots, barely 
eludes the determined defense of Michigan State ace, Lance Olson. 
Dave Scott (13) and Horace Walker (15) are hoping for a rebound. 



Inconsistent free throwing spelled disaster for Illinois more than 
once this season. Here Al Gosnell is readying himself for a bonus 
toss, under the watchfulness of teammate Ed Searcy (42). 



Veteran Basketball Squad Captures 11 ol First 14 



The biggest headache facing Coach Harry Combes as 
he began his 13th season as Illini cage mentor was that 
of finding a replacement for last season's play-making 
guard, Roger Taylor. In general, though, the Illini future 
looked bright as back into the lineup came eight letter- 
men. Three seasoned starters were Govoner Vaughn, a 
senior; this year's captain, Mannie Jackson; and John 
Wessels, a junior destined to fall scholastically by the 
wayside. Other familiar faces were Ed Perry, Vern Alte- 
meyer, Bruce Bunkenburg, Lee Frandsen, Lou Landt, 
and Al Gosnell. 



Govoner Vaughn makes it apparent just who is controlling the 
"boards" on this particular shot. In fact, the Govoner made a habit 
of snatching onto rebounds as he led the team in this field. 



The cagers started the season in typical Illini fashion 
by winning the first six nonconference games and then 
dropping one to California, paced by its All- American 
center Darrel Imhoff, in the first Pacific Coast Tourna- 
ment played by the Illini. Of the three midwestern 
schools that went West for the tournament, Northwestern, 
Michigan, and Illinois, all were soundly beaten by the 
host teams. Coming back under Big Ten nets, the Illini 
lost two consecutive starts, to top-ranked Ohio State led 
by their sophomore All-American Jerry Lucas, and, in an 
upset to Minnesota's Gophers. Then, seemingly, the 
Illini got their feet back on the court and won three 
impressive victories over Purdue, Michigan State, and, 
in a return match, the Golden Gophers of Minnesota. 



373 






Ed Perry finds himself all alone and takes advantage of the situ- 
ation in typical lllini fashion. The speed and drive of the team gave 
them many chances for pass stealing or fast-breaking. 




lllini Produce Thrills 



As happened last season, mid-semester break left 
Coach Combes with a lew grey hairs. The lllini five 
came back to defeat a strong Notre Dame team, but 
after the game, it was learned that starting center 
John Wessels had become ineligible. Alternating Ed 
Searcy and Vern Altemeyer at the post, the cagers 
came up with a key win over Michigan to give them 
second place in the conference. Then against Michigan 
State, Illinois lost a heartbreaker. Trailing by eleven 
points, they came within one point of the Spartans 
when the clock ran out. Coach Combes rarely used 
the same starting five in any game, but relied heavily 
on his powerful bench. Jackson and Vaughn were the 
only two who saw continuous action. Lee Frandsen 
and Lou Landt were the heroes of an exciting 93-89 
double overtime win over Purdue. Throughout the 
last ten minutes of the game, they sparked the team 
and scored the two final baskets. Next on the agenda 
was an encounter with the Ohio State five. The lllini 
might as well have stayed home as the Buckeyes 
romped to a 109-81 victory. 



Strategy . . . strategy . . . and more strategy. The next 
but the bench, rated one of the strongest in the conference, 




374 



Let Downs After Break 



John Wessels, a man who won't take no for an answer, tangles 
with an equally determined M.S.U. player. The referee appears 
to be firmly decided as his thumbs-up gesture says "jump ball." 



The trip to Wisconsin proved to be disasterous, as 
the cellar dwelling Badgers upset the Illini in a 75-63 
win. In playing host to Indiana, Illinois stood by as 
Hoosier center Walt Bellamy pumped in 43 points 
to set a new Huff Gym scoring record in a 92-78 
Indiana victory. The Illini came back from these three 
defeats to produce victories over Iowa, Michigan, and 
Northwestern in the last games of the season. In the 
Iowa victory, Mannie Jackson's star shone brighter 
than at any other time in his Illinois cage career. He 
set the season's scoring mark with 32 points before 
fouling out late in the game. Govoner Vaughn hit his 
three year high by scoring 30 points against Michigan. 
The Illini Big Ten standing had been dangling be- 
tween second and sixth place during the season, but 
the final tally put the team in a third place tie. The 
end of the season was also the end of the careers of 
the majority of the 1960 team. With only John Wessels 
returning from the starting five, Coach Combes is 
relying on next year's crop of sophomores and juniors. 



few seconds could very possibly tell the tale of the game 
seems to be pondering the latest jokes or last night's date. 





Mannie Jackson, sharpshooting Illini team captain, catches the 
defense flatfooted with a quick leap for two points. He set the in- 
vidual season's scoring record with 32 points against Iowa. 




375 




Lee Frandsen, often a team spark plug, lays in two points against Ohio State, 
while the O.S.U. great, Jerry Lucas, watches from the free throw lane. 




Forward Ed Perry (22), battling for a loose ball, typifies the spirited and 
aggressive style of basketball coach Harry Combes' men are famous for. 



376 




Al Gosnell looks back, seeking a "friend,' 
scoreboard glows a healthy nine point lead. 




Govoner Vaughn gets just enough of his fingers 
on the ball to spoil O.S.U. 's Dave Furry's shot. 




Sophomore standout, Jerry Co 
ball from a wide-mouthed and 



angelo, calmly steals the 
isbelieving opponent. 



Cagers Capture Third Place, Post 16-7 Record 



Season's 

ILLINOIS 83 

ILLINOIS 93 

ILLINOIS 89 

ILLINOIS 85 

ILLINOIS 60 

California 62 

ILLINOIS 92 

ILLINOIS 74 

Ohio State 97 

ILLINOIS 90 

ILLINOIS 81 

ILLINOIS 96 

Minnesota 77 

ILLINOIS 71 

ILLINOIS 75 

Michigan State 78 

ILLINOIS 93 



Record 

Butler 75 

Western Kentucky .... 80 

Marquette 77 

Ohio University 79 

Oklahoma 57 

ILLINOIS 48 

Northwestern 79 

Stanford 62 

ILLINOIS 73 

Minnesota 82 

Purdue 75 

Michigan State 88 

ILLINOIS 70 

Notre Dame 67 

Michigan 61 

ILLINOIS 77 

Purdue 89 



Ohio State 109 

Wisconsin 75 

Indiana 92 

ILLINOIS 85 

ILLINOIS 90 

ILLINOIS 84 



ILLINOIS 81 

ILLINOIS 63 

ILLINOIS 78 

Iowa 70 

Michigan 61 

Northwestern 77 



1960 Big Ten Standings 



Ohio State 13 

Indiana 1 1 

ILLINOIS 8 

Minnesota 8 

Northwestern 8 

Iowa 6 

Purdue 6 

Michigan State 5 

Wisconsin 4 

Michigan 1 



1 

3 
6 
6 
6 
8 
8 
9 
10 
13 



Top Row: Coach Harry Combes Manager Dennis Swanson, Robert Schmidt, Robert Starnes, Lavern Altemeyer, John Wessels, Alan Gosnell, Assistant Coach 
Howard Braun Second Row: Govoner Vaughn, Louis Landt, Edward Perry, Captain Mannie Jackson, Bruce Bunkenburg, Lee Frandsen Bottom Row: Gerald Colangelo 
Jerry Curless, Douglas Mills, Sam Leeper, William Mohlenbrock B °' 






fJL, 



m 



v..- 







George Kerr breaks the tape ahesd of Tony Seth of Michigan as the lllini defeat the powerful Wolverine quartet in the mile relay. 

Indoor Track Squad Loses Conference Crown 



The lllini capture another first place finish as they edge the fa- 
vored Michigan Wolverines 64 V 2 to 58 V2 in an indoor dual meet 




The star of Illinois' outstanding 1959 track team was middle- 
distance runner George Kerr (opposite page I who won the 880-yard 
run in the NCAA and set a Big Ten Meet record in the same event. 



The 1959 lllini track season was highlighted by an 
upset win in the Big Ten outdoor meet, a ninth place 
finish in the NCAA, a world record shattering per- 
formance by the sprint medley relay team, and an 
outstanding individual performance by George Kerr. 

The indoor squad started successfully with an im- 
pressive showing of seven first place finishes in the 
AAU Open Meet. They then won three straight dual 
meets without a loss, defeating Purdue, Michigan and 
Ohio State. In the Big Ten Meet held at Wisconsin, 
the lllini finishing second to Michigan took only two 
firsts, therefore failing to retain their title. Ernie 
Haisley and Ron Mitchell tied for first in the high 
jump while Larry Stewart won the shot put. Other 
lllini who placed high were George Kerr, second in 
the 410 and 880 yard runs, Ken Brown, second in the 
mile and fourth in the two mile, Paul Foreman, sec- 
ond in the broad jump. The lllini failed to place in 
six events, while Michigan placed in all but one 
to score 71 points. 

Following the Big Ten Meet, several members of 
the team came up with outstanding performances in 
national meets. Ken Brown won the college mile and 
Ernie Haisley the high jump in the Milwaukee Journal 
Relays. Brown also won the two mile in the Central 
AAU Meet in Chicago, while Haisley finished fust 
in the high jump in the Chicago Daily News Relays. 



379 




Del Coleman (left) passes the baton to teammate Ted Beastal 
as the lllini run ahead of their opponents in the mile relay. 




Big Ten Indoor Standings 

Michigan 71 

ILLINOIS 48 

Ohio State 25% 

Indiana 25i/ 2 

Wisconsin 16i/ 2 

Michigan State 13% 

Minnesota 13V4 

Purdue - 10% 

Iowa - 4 

Northwestern 2i/ 2 



Crossing the finish line of the two mile run is sophomore Ken 
Brown, who placed second in this event in the conference meet. 




Running neck and neck with an opponent, Georg< 
I right) makes a desperate attempt to be first to break the tape. 



380 




Lee Frandsen leaps over the high hurdles a fraction of a step ahead of his opponent from Ohio State. Frandsen, who is better known 
as a valuable reserve on the '59-'60 basketball team, helped the lllini in several meets by picking up points in the hurdles. 



Sprint Medley Relay Team Sets World Record 



The lllini opened the outdoor season by winning 
a dual meet against Missouri and then taking 11 out 
of 14 events in quadrangular meet with Iowa, Wis- 
consin, and Northwestern. 

At the Drake Relays, April 24, the lllini made 
track history as the sprint medley team, consisting of 
Del Coleman, John Lattimore, Ward Miller, and 
George Kerr, set a world record of 3:17.8. Kerr ran 
the final half mile in a blazing 1:46.5, well under 
the world record for that distance. Kerr also ran a 
terrific anchor lap in the mile relay to give the lllini 
a second place finish. Other lllini to place were 
Ernie Haisley and Ron Mitchell, second and third 
respectively in the high jump, Bill Brown, fourth in 
the shot put, and Jim Bowers, fifth in the mile. After 
the Drake Relays, the lllini defeated Purdue and Ohio 
State to extend their unbeaten streak to 13 straight 
dual meets. 

In the NCAA championships, Kerr won the 880 in 
!:47.8, only .6 second over the meet record. In addi- 
tion, Paul Foreman finished fourth in the hop, step, 
and jump, Miller placed sixth in the 100 yard dash, 
and Mitchell tied for sixth in the high jump to help 
the lllini finish ninth in the NCAA. 



Posing with the baton are (from left to right) Del Coleman, 
John Lattimore, and George Kerr, members of Illinois' outstanding 
medley relay team. These three, along with Ward Miller, set a 
world's record of 3:17.8 in the medley relay last April. 




381 




Starting the mile relay for Illinois is sprint star Del Coleman. 
Coleman placed in both the 100 yard dash and the 220 yard dash 
in the Big Ten Meet in addition to running in the relay. 



Harold Harris appears exhausted as he approaches the finish of 
the two mile run. Harris was a consistent point winner for the 
lllini and placed third in the two mile in the conference. 





Courtesy of the Chicago Sun Times 

Hitting the tape is Illinois track star George Kerr as he fin- 
shes first in the 400 meter run in the Pan American Games, in 
vhich he competed for his home nation, the West Indies. 



Big Ten Outdoor Standings 

ILLINOIS 6514 

Michigan 45 

Indiana 19 

Iowa 1' 

Ohio Slate Ki'/o 

Minnesota '•"' ' '' 

Northwestern '-' :i 

Michigan State l - 1 s 

Wisconsin ^ 

Purdue ~ •"' I 



382 



Illini Successfully Defend Big Ten Outdoor Title 



The Illini successfully defended their Big Ten Out- 
door title by scoring 65i/ 2 points to second place 
Michigan's 45 points. Ward Miller finished first in 
the 100 and 220 yard dashes; George Kerr set a con- 
ference record while winning the 880 yard run; Ernie 
Haisley defended his high jump title and John Latti- 
more, Ted Beastall, Del Coleman, and Kerr won the 
mile relay. 

In addition to helping the Illini in their meets, 
Kerr turned in some outstanding performances in 
national meets. He won the 880 in 1:49.4 in the Los 
Angeles Coliseum Relays and won the 440 in :46.3 in 
the Midwest AAU Open. Kerr represented his home 
nation, the West Indies, in the Pan American Games 
which were held in Chicago last summer. He finished 
first in the 400 meter run and a close second in the 
800 meter run. In addition, he anchored the West 
Indies' 1600 meter relay team which set a new record. 

The future for Coach Leo Johnson's team is very 
bright as Ron Mitchell and Larry Stewart were the 
only seniors on the '59 team. The other 19 lettermen 
will return in 1960 to help the Illini defend their 
Big Ten title and aim for a higher NCAA finish. 




Illini track star George Kerr takes time out to relax in the center 
of the Memorial Stadium track. On the same afternoon Kerr set a 
stadium record of I :49.9 while winning the half-mile. 



Top Row: Trainer Donald Arseneau, Harold Harris, John Brown, William Nichelson, Edward Schmidt, George Nitscr 
Row: Richard Mason, Captain Ronald Mitchell, Erwin Adderley, Armand LeCrone, Charles LeCrone, Norman Ehlers Joseph Kr 
Leo Johnson, William Brown, Vernon Miller, James Bowers, Theodore Beastall, Einle Hais'ey, George Kerr, John Lattimor 
Stewart, Lee F'andsen 



he, Roger Derby, Donald Tjarksen Second 
rakoski, Paul Foreman Bottom Row: Coach 
e, Delbert Coleman Not in panel: David 




383 



Sixteen Game Winning Streak Begins Campaign 




Sophomore Dave Gantt gave the lllini unexpected help in the 
pitching department as he compiled a 2-1 record for the 1959 sea- 
son. Gantt also struck out 31 batters in 29 innings pitched. 



Strong pitching and brilliant defensive play com- 
piled a 22-9 season record for Coach Lee Eilbracht's 
baseball team. The lllini tied Wisconsin for second 
in the Big Ten with a 9-6 record, their best since 1947. 

The lllini held spring training in Florida while 
competing in the Florida State Tournament in March. 
They won the first game, but then lost to Florida 
State 16-9. However, the lllini won the remaining 
four tournament games to take the unofficial title. 
After returning home, the lllini won seven straight 
non-conference games and opened the Big Ten season 
by defeating Wisconsin, taking a double-header from 
Northwestern, and two games from Purdue before 
finally losing 8-2 to the Boilermakers. This game 
ended the Illini's 16 game winning streak. The lllini 
remained in contention for the Big Ten title during 
the rest of the season due to a sparkling defensive 
team, which led the Big Ten in fielding percentages. 
However, they could not compete with Minnesota's 
championship team because of weak hitting, which 
placed them eighth in the Big Ten hitting statistics. 
The lllini lost all hopes of a title by losing a double- 
header to Indiana on the final day of the season and 
had to settle for a second place tie. 



Pitcher Jack Delveaux fires over to first baseman Bill Offenbecher in an attempt to pick an opponent runner off base. Delveaux was 
dependable moundsman for the lllini while Offenbecher shared first base with Lou Ryniec and compiled a .304 batting average. 




384 





Second only to Terry Gellinger was sophomore pitcher Paul Ameson. 
He won five and lost three, ranked second in innings pitched with 57 1/3, 
was also second in strikeouts, and a creditable 3.16 earned run average. 



Lou Ryniec shared the first base position with Bill 
Offenbecher while posting a .232 batting average for 
the season. Only a sophomore, Ryniec will probably 
be a regular in 1960. 



Highlighting the season was the splendid job turned 
in by Bob Klaus at shortstop and at the plate. He 
batted .364 and finished second in the Big Ten. He 
was unanimously named as the Most Valuable Player 
by the Illini, as he led them in almost every batting 
statistic. Klaus was also named to the NCAA district 
all-star team, the first Ail-American team, and was 
selected for the third year to the Big Ten all-star 
team. At the end of the season, Klaus was signed to 
a major league contract by the Cincinnati Redlegs. 

Terry Gellinger led a sturdy Illini pitching staff 
with a 9-0 record. He also had a 5-0 record in Big 
Ten competition to tie for the top pitching record in 
the conference. He led the team with 64 strike-outs 
and pitched a one-hitter against Wisconsin to open 
the Big Ten season. 

The Illini have been hard hit by graduation, but 
it is predicted that the 1960 season will be a good one, 
for there is a fast developing group of sophomores 
and juniors to take over the positions vacated by 
graduation. A couple returning regulars will be Cap- 
tain-elect John Jurasevich, who led the 1959 team in 
runs batted in, and Terry Gellinger, the Illini's num- 
ber one pitcher. 




Junior Bob Madix was a valuable utility man for the 
Illini as he played both second base and all outfield posi- 
tions. Madix had a creditable .270 batting average for 
the season. 



385 





The lllini's leading pitcher was Terry Gellinger, who had a 
9-0 won-lost record and who won five games in the Big Ten. 



Senior Don Harvey turned in an outstanding defensive performance 
as the lllini's regular second baseman during the 1959 campaign. 



Illini Diamondmen Place Second in Conference 




Final Big Ten Standings 



Minnesota 

ILLINOIS 

Wisconsin 

Indiana 

Michigan State 
Northwestern . 

Michigan 

Purdue 

Iowa 

Ohio Stale 



w 


L 


10 


2 


!) 


6 


9 


6 


8 


7 


8 


7 





8 


5 


7 


5 


8 


5 


9 


5 


10 



Captain of the 1959 team, Casey Barszcz (left I, is shown 
with Coach Eilbracht. Barszcz was the regular third baseman. 



386 





Regular left fielder for Coach Lee Eilbracht's 1959 team was 
senior Jim Vermette who aided the lllini by batting in ten runs. 



Pitcher Jack Delveaux, also captain of the 1958 football 
team, won three and lost three as both a starter and reliever. 



T °P Ro ™ : Coach Lee Eilbracht, Paul Arneson, Lynn Palmer, Stephen Molaro, John Delveaux, Ernest Kumerow, Louis Ryniec, Russell Martin, Manager David 
Bolmg Second Row: Terrence Gellinger Freddie Crotser, Daniel Vittum, John Jurasevich, Casimir Barszcz, James Cvik, William Offenbecher Bottom Row: Harold 
Tokuio, Philip Catalano, David Gantt, Robert Madix, Richsrd Harvey, Robert Klaus, Richard Eberhardy 





Patrick Bird demonstrates his skill on the still rings. Bird took 
third place in this event at the Big Ten Championship Meet. 



Tom Ruppert displays his flowing grace of movement to per- 
fection as he executes the back somersault on the trampoline. 



Gymnasts lake Tenth Straight Big Ten Crown 




Patrick Bird, 1960 Captain, displays his versatility by perform- 
ing on the side horse. Bird also competes on the parallel bars and 
rings. He scored at the Big Ten Meet in these events. 



The 1959 gymnastic season saw Coach Charles 
Pond's team compile a 9-1 season record, take their 
tenth consecutive Big Ten title, and place second in 
the NCAA finals. 

Alter suffering their lone dual meet setback, a 58-54 
loss to Michigan late in the season, the gymnasts 
bounced back in the Big Ten meet to score 143 points 
for a strong first place finish, while Michigan tallied 
1041/2 for a distant second place. 

In search of their second straight NCAA title; how- 
ever, the Pondmen fell short of their goal when ;i 
strong Penn State team swept the meet with a 152 
point total to the Illini's second place 87i/ 2 points. 

Lack of manpower was the Illini's big drawback 
again this year, but the lack was in part made up l>\ 
the exceptional versatility and talent of the team 
members. Abe Grosslcld, team captain, and Don 
Tonry, both national title holders, led the team in 
scoring throughout the year with brilliant all-around 
performances. A host of specialty performers, Alan 
Harvey, Pat Bird, Jim Blazek, Gordon Claycomb, Tom 
Ruppert, and Ed Combos, rounded out the team's 
lisi of consistent scorers. 

For Coach Charlie Pond, whose teams have \u\vv 
lost die conference title, it marked another successful 
season, but the loss of main top-flight men cotdd put 
Coach Pond in a tough spot in I960. 



388 



Big Ten Gymnastic Standings 

ILLINOIS 143 

Michigan I04i^ 

Michigan State 79 

Iowa 571^ 

Minnesota 441/ 

Indiana 22y 9 

Ohio State 4 

Wisconsin 




Performing on the parallel bars is Jim Blazek. Blazek 
placed second on the side horse in the Big Ten Meet. 



feld 



Patrick B°d, : LyrTn Wilson' ^^ G ° mb ° S ' D ° nald TtWy ' AMen Harvey ' James B,azek Bot,om Row: Coach Charl « Pond, Gordon Claycomb, Abraham Gr 




Illini Swim Team Has Successful 1959 Season 




Illinois diver Dick Eberhardy executes one of the compulsory 
dives in a dual swimming meet. The judges, seated at the tables, 
attentively study Eberhardy's dive and award him points for it. 



Once again Coach Al Klingle came up with a power 
iul tank team; but once again Big Ten competition 
stiffened to unprecedented heights and when the final 
tally sheets were in, the Illini tankers were sixth in 
the conference. However, the swimmers finished the 
season with a good 7-2 duel meet and tied for twelfth 
in the NCAA meet. 

During the regular season the Illini won five dual 
meets against Big Ten competition and two against 
non-conference foes, while losing only to Ohio State 
and Indiana. In the Big Ten meet the Illini scored 
I61/2 points. Their performances would have ranked 
higher in other years, but the Big Ten, led by power- 
iul Michigan, put up the best competition in history. 
Joe Hunsaker placed second in the 200 yard individual 
medley and fourth in the 200 yard breaststroke to lead 
the Illini scorers. Owen Ackerman and Rock Sharer 
added points with sixth place finishes. The 400 yard 
medley relay team, composed of Ackerman, Sharer, 
John Donohue, captain-elect for 1960, and Hunsaker, 
placed fourth. 

In the NCAA meet, Hunsaker failed to defend his 
title by finishing third in the individual medley. He 
also accounted for another point by finishing sixth in 
the 200 yard breaststroke. Ackerman's sixth place 
finish in the 200 yard backstroke accounted for the 
Illini's other point. 



While relaxing between their events, members of the Illinois swimming team closely watch as other swimmers compete in the butterfly. 




390 




Row Donald PurhalskT'nenL^SL 7 ^ 5 ^'^'^? 6 ^" HaMerud ', ? av ' d "»""*?; L ? ri " Whittaker, Owen Ackerman, Assistant Coach Donald Sammons Second 
B^hard Donald Drever John Rx S °R?cha°d Eberh^dy 89erman ' J ° Hn D ° nahU6 ' Bela Sand0r B °"° m R ° W: J ° Seph Huyler ' Patrick ^errnott, Dale McDyer, Michael 



Pacing this year's team were Captain Dick Whit- 
taker, Joe Hunsaker and Owen Ackerman. Through- 
out the season, the Illini depended on Whittaker for 
those all important points in the 220 yard free style 
and the 150 meter free style. Perhaps the most out- 
standing member of the squad was Joe Hunsaker. 
Joe had an exceptionally fine season by bettering the 
Big Ten and N.C.A.A. mark in the 200 yard individual 
medley with a time of 2:06.9. Ackerman finished the 
season with two records to his credit, setting meet 
records against Loyola and Northwestern. 

A bright future for the Illini tankmen is promised 
by the underclassmen. The sophomores are paced by 
Bela Sandor, breaststroke and individual medley, and 
Joe Huyler, diver. The most encouragement is found 
in the freshman class in the personage of Larry Mich- 
elson and Peter Stelton. In the 221) yard free style, 
Michelson shattered the old record of 2:18.8 with a 
clocking of 2:15.3. Right on his heels was Stelton, 
hitting the poolside in 2:18.6. These underclassmen 
should help the Illini build a stronger team in future 
years. 



391 



Churning the water in the backstroke event is a Purdue swim- 
mer. Despite his efforts, the Illini defeated the Boilermakers 



— « 









Upper left: Attempting to pin an opponent is I llini wrestler Mike 
O'Laughlin (on top) , who placed third in the Big Ten Championships. 

Lower left: Tom Trousil (top) demonstrates one of his holds on Ken 
Kraml while the wrestling team practices in the Men s Old bym. 



The Illinois wrestling squad, although hit hard 
by injuries, succeeded in capturing fifth place in the 
Big Ten Championships. Coach B. R. "Pat" Patter- 
son's matsmen won lour, lost seven, and tied one ir 
dual meet competition. The Illini grapplers scorec 
26 points in the Big Ten Championship matches on 
March 6-7 at Iowa City to make their position secure. 

The biggest blow to the Illini was a shoulder in- 
jury suffered by Captain Werner Holzer in mid- 
January. As a result, Holzer missed all but four dual 
meets, and he was unable to successfully defend his 
Big Ten 147-pound championship. After winning 
three straight in the preliminaries, he was beaten 
in the finals by Wisconsin's Jim Innis. 

With a 7-4-2 record, sophomore Tom Trousil was 
the leading wrestler in regular competition. Coacr 
Patterson also got an assist from heavyweight Bot 
Salata, who pinned opponents in three of his last 
four dual meets. 

Captain-elect of the 1960 team is Rex Whitlatcl 
and Tom Gabbard was chosen most valuable squads- 
man by his teammates. The Illini hope to improve 
in the 1960 season, as Trousil, Salata, and several 
other lettermen will return. 



Illini Grapplers Place Fifth in Big Ten Meet 



stead, 



^r^;^',^^^^ 



Bottom Row: William Hemp- 




Coach Max Garret's fencers had another successful 
season in 1959, winning eight of their twelve dual 
meets, placing second in the Big Ten standings, and 
tieing for fourth in the NCAA finals. Illinois, with 
Dave Kennedy winning the epee title, totaled thirty- 
one points in the conference finals but was nosed out 
by Wisconsin's thirty-seven. The Illini fencers ac- 
cumulated fifty-six points in NCAA competition to 
rank behind Navy, New York, and Columbia. 

Illinois' regular season found the fencing Illini 
victorious in eight dual meets. The Illini defeated 
Kansas 25-2, Chicago 21-6, Michigan State 20-7, and 
Notre Dame 14-13. The four losses, all on the road, 
were to the Air Force Academy, Buffalo, Wayne, and 
Wisconsin. 

Leading the Illini were Abbey Silvertone, 1960 
captain-elect, and Kennedy, the team's most valuable 
player, both of whom were named to the second All- 
American Team. Kennedy also won the Big Ten epee 
title and finished fourth in NCAA meet. Silverstone 
finished fourth in Big Ten epee and in NCAA foil 
competition. Both of these fencers will be returning 
in '60 to give the Illini a good nucleus. 




Top Row: Duane Lempke, Charles Campbell, David Kennedy, Robert Tripp, 
David Harris, Ronald Shipka Second Row: Coach "Max" Garret, Robert Becker, 
Capt. James Williamson, Abbey Silverstone, Ronald Wright Bottom Row: Fred 
Guyton, Warren Danzer, Martin Kramer 



Fencing Team Compiles Outstanding '59 Record 



Coach "Max" Garret takes time out to demonstrate and make 
corrections in the positions, movements and uses of the foil, 
while members of the fencing team observe the lesson. 



Practice makes perfect. The members of the Illinois fencing 
team know this, and they devote long hours of practice that will 
pay off when the National and Big Ten meets roll around. 





393 




Top Row: George Gilmore, Robert Bronson, Robert Lansford Bottom Row: Robert Breckenridge, 
Alphonse Holtmann, Joseph Epkins, Daniel Mesch, Coach Howie Braun 



Named to captain the 1960 team was Joe 
Epkins who had a fine 10-3 record in 1959. 



Tennis Team Places Second in Big Ten Meet 




1959 captain Al Holtmann filled the number one singles spot for 
the lllini and had a 10-5 season record. Holtmann teamed up with 
Bob Breckenridge to win 1 1 and lose two doubles matches. 



Illinois' netmen finished the '59 season with a 12-3 
record in dual meets and finished second in the Big 
Ten Meet for the second year in a row. 

Captain Al Holtmann filled the number one singles 
position and finished the season with a 10-5 record. 
The first doubles spot, filled by Holtmann and Bob 
Brechenridge, had an 11-2 record. Breckenridge and 
Danny Mesch, the only newcomer on the experienced 
team, tied for the honor of high man on the team 
with 13-2 records. 

The only match Coach Howie Braun's powerful 
team lost in Big Ten competition was the last match 
of the season against Michigan. This was a real dis- 
appointment after a season highlighted by lour shut- 
out meets against midwestern teams. 

Illinois finished second behind Mighigan in the 
Big Ten Championships. Breckenridge, Joe Epkins. 
and Mesch all lost in the single finals, while the 
doubles teams of George Gilmore and Epkins, and 
Mesch and Bob Lansford also placed second. The 
formidable Michigan team compiled a perfect scon 
of 87. 

Next season's team will be captained b\ Epkins, 
a junior who compiled a 10-3 record lot last season. 
Also returning will be Gilmore, who had a 9-6 record, 
Mesch, and Lansford, who had a 105 record. 



394 



Golfers Win Four And Lose Eight Dual Meets 



Illinois' golf team, headed by Tom Orsi with a 7-4-1 
record, compiled a 4-8 season record in dual meet 
competition, but slipped to last place in the Big Ten 
championships at the University of Michigan. The 
Illini were successful against Wabash, 31i/ 9 to 4\/ 2 , 
twice against Washington of St. Louis, 34 to 8 and 
13i/ 2 to H/ 2 , and against Bradley, 17 to 1. Captain 
Tom Orsi, in addition to having the best won-lost 
record, led the team with a total of 37 points to his 
opponents' 29. Other Illini golfers who compiled 
winning records were Ron Cwik with 7 wins and 5 
losses and George Niva with a 6-5-1 record. 

At the Big Ten Championship Meet the low man 
on Coach Ralph Fletcher's team was Bob Almquist 
with a score of 328 for 72 holes. Almquist was elected 
captain of the 1960 team. Letters were awarded to 
Orsi, Almquist, Cwik, Niva, and Clem Georlett. 
Almquist and Georlett will form the nucleus of the 
1960 team. 



Left: While winning his third varsity letter, George Niva had 
a 6-5-1 record and outscored his opponents 33'/2 to 32'/2. 



Far left: Captain of the '59 team Tom Orsi posted the best 
dual meet record, as he won seven, lost four, and tied one. 




Top Row: George Niva, Benjamin Waldie, Robert Almquist Bottom Row: Clem Georlett, Joseph Cwik, Thomas Orsi, Coach Ralph Fletcher 




New Pom-Pom Section Adds Spirit to Cheers 




Enthusiastically leading the fans in a cheer during a time-out of 
an lllini basketball game is cheerleader Lesley Simmonds. 




Wearing their lllini Indian headbands, Pat Sheahen (left) and 
Joy Lauterborn cheer the Illinois basketball team on to victory. 




After a two week process of elimination, eleven 
regular and lour alternate cheerleaders were chosen 
for the varsity squad from a try-out group of approxi- 
mately 300. This squad then practiced three hours 
a week in order to improve their cheers and to devise 
new ones. 

The cheerleaders enjoyed the privilege of being 
able to fly in a University Chartered Plane to the 
away football games. In addition, they led the parades 
to the pep rallies, as well as the cheers at the rallies 
and at the games. 

Highlighting the cheering group at home football 
games was the new pom-pom section. The section, 
consisting of sixty students, was selected by process 
of elimination, from a group of hundreds. This sec- 
tion served various purposes — it instilled spirit in the 
crowds by cheering, added color to the grandstand 
by waving blue and orange pom-poms, and most im- 
portant of all, the members learned the cheers with 
the accompanying motions so that they would be well 
acquainted with them for spring tryouts. 

Assisting the cheerleaders were two tumblers. Alvin 
Barasch and Harold Holmes, a Pan-American tum- 
bling champion, performed various stunts during the 
games. At the beginning of each game, they led the 
football team into the stadium while performing their 
amazing feats. 



Elissa Weaver leaps high in the air to climax a cheer in an 
effort to spark the lllini to a victory over Ohio State. 



Watching tense football action with an Army cheerleader are 
Ifrom left to right) lllini cheerleaders Elissa Weaver, Camille 
Flores, Jo Frechill, Mary Sue Drendel, and Mary Jane Callahan. 




396 



The Tribe of Illini is a social organization com- 
posed of all men on campus who have earned a major 
"1" in varsity athlcties. The Tribe has as its purpose 
the aim of fostering relations between "i" men and 
the rest of the student body. This fostering of rela- 
tionships was shown last spring when the members 
of the Tribe aided the University officials in breaking 
ii]) the annual campus water riot. 

The plans of the I-men for the coming year include 
their annual picnic, the selling of Illini pillows, and 
once again stopping over-zealous student outbursts 
concerning water. 

In addition, the Tribe presents a trophy each 
month to the Illini athlete who has turned in the 
most outstanding performances that month. 




Robert Hickey, presidenr; Jim Bowers, treasurer; Cliff Roberts, 
vice president Not in panel: Donald Yeazel, secretary 



Tribe of Illini Members Break up Water Riot 



James Brown, Bruce Bunkenburg, Edward Perry, 



Top Row: Dennis Swanson, Allan Gosnell, Norman Ehlers, John Bandson, Bruce Beckman, Vern Altemeyer 
Louis Landt, Robert Lansford, Russ Martin Second Row: Dave McDyer, William Burrell, Richard Mason, Robert Hickey, Joseph Rutgens, Cliff Roberts, Richard Tripp' 
Ernest Kumerow, Paul Ameson, Ward Miller Dave Boling, James Vermette Bottom Row: Stan Dodson, William Brown, Fred Guyton, Richard Eberhardy, Joseph Epkins 
Paul Jenkins, Tom Nolan, James Bowers, Del Coleman 




397 




Abe Grossfeld Named 



Gymnastics star Abe Grossfeld was voted Illini 
Athlete of the Year in 1959 by a poll of students and 
faculty, and he received the Lion Gardiner Memorial 
Award for this honor. It was the first time that a 
gymnast has ever won the award. Grossfeld also re- 
ceived the 1959 Illinois Conference Honor Medal 
which is awarded for proficiency in scholarship and 
athletics. As captain of the gymnastics team, Gross- 
feld led the team to their tenth straight Big Ten title 
and second place in the NCAA. He repeated as all- 
around champion and won the still ring title in the 
conference meet, and finished fourth on the parallel 
bars in the NCAA. Grossfeld was also named most 
valuable member of the team. 



One of the best linemen in Illinois football history- 
is guard Bill Burrell, captain of the 1959 team. Burrell 
received 29 awards for his outstanding work as defensive 
center linebacker and offensive guard. By being named 
to nine major All-American teams, including AP, UPI, 
and Football Writers of America, he became the eight- 
eenth consensus All-American from Illinois. The Big 
Ten coaches selected him as the most valuable player in 
the conference, for which he received a silver football 
from the Chicago Tribune. In addition, Burrell was 
named "Lineman of the Year" by the United Press, and 
he tied with Dale Hackbart of Wisconsin for the "Mid- 
west Player of the Year" award. Burrell competed in 
three post-season bowl games and was named most valu- 
able player in the Copper Bowl. 





Runner-up to Grossfeld in the Illini Athlete of the 
Year voting was track star George Kerr, one of the 
best runners in the country. Kerr anchored the 
Illinois medley relay team which set a world's record, 
and ran the last half mile of this race in a blazing 
1:46.5, well under the world's record for that distance. 
In the conference meet Ken won the 880 yard run in a 
Big Ten record time of 1:50.1. He led the Illini to a 
ninth place finish in the NCAA In winning the 880 in 
1 :47.6. During the summer Ken represented his home 
nation, the West Indies, in the Pan American Games 
and Avon the 100 meter run and finished second in 
the 800 meter run. 



398 



Athlete of The Year 



Govoner Vaughn (upper right) was chosen as the 
most valuable player for the past basketball season. 
Vaughn took the Ralf Woods memorial trophy for the 
best free throw percentage at .875, and he had a 
shooting average of .459. For this season, Vaughn 
had 111 points and a total of 1,001 points in 66 games. 
This makes him the third highest scorer in Illinois 
basketball history. 

The baseball team was well represented in honors 
due to Bob Klaus, senior shortstop. Klaus (center) 
was on the Big Ten all-star team for the third year, 
the NCAA district all-star team, and the first team 
All-American. In Big Ten competition Klaus batted 
.364 and finished second. He was unanimously chosen 
as the most valuable player by his teammates. 

Joe Hunsaker (lower right) was chosen as the most 
valuable player by his teammates. In the 1959 season 
Hunsaker set several varsity records: 100-yard free 
style, 51.0; 200-yard individual medley, 2:06.8; and 
as part of the 400-yard medley relay which finished in 
3:54.4. In the NCAA Championships Hunsaker fin- 
ished third in the individual medley and took sixth 
in the 200-yard breast stroke. 

Basketball captain Mannie Jackson (lower left) 
totaled 32 points against Iowa to lead the Fighting 
Illinois team for the most points in a single game. 
Jackson compiled a .413 shooting average for the 
season. He totaled 378 points this season and has 
922 points for his career total. In the 79.6 points per 
game Illinois scoring average, Jackson and Govoner 
Vaughn provided 34.5. 





399 



Intramurals— An Integral Part of Student Life 




Th P intramural track meet offers to all amateur trackmen a chance to test their prowess. All those who compete in pole vaulting, 
broad fand h!gh7ump< a- pui to ° a severe test of their skills. Every track sport except the shot put and d.scus are engaged ,n by students. 



The backbone of the Intramural and Recreational 
Sports program consists of the IMREC Board and the 
sophomore and junior managers. The three groups are 
responsible for the well organized, smooth running, suc- 
cessful organization that is synonymous with the I-M 
program today. 

The competitive spirit and never-say-die attitude of 
the Illini make every game a thrill to watch. I-M and 
recreational sports draw hundreds of spectators who give 
their undivided support to their favorite team. Next to 
varsity competition, I-M and recreational sports are the 
most popular activities on campus. 



Co-Recreational sports offer men and women a chance 
to combine their talents in producing a well rounded 
team. Through the combination of these efforts, Co-Rec 
sports can be the most interesting activity found on the 
Illinois campus. The Co-Rec sports program provides 
an opportunity for the coeds to reveal their athletic 
prowess and for men to try to defend theirs. 

Faculty and staff members also are given an oppor- 
tunity to show their athletic ability. Through faculty 
sports, they can compete with athletes of their own 
caliber and endurance. Here is where the faculty and 
staff pursue the sport they favored in college. 




A short pass over center sparks the drive in a hard fought intramural football game. Often the only way to move the ball ,s .by pass- 
ing. A few yards on a short pass or a well-executed long pass may bring the offensive team closer to a touchdown and perhaps victory. 



400 





Because of the touch tackle rules, intramural football is mainly 
a passing game. Pass defense becomes one of the major goals of 
competing teams; a team with a good pass defense can go far. 



Moving in for that all important shot brings anxiety to the face 
of this player. He is being well guarded, and who knows what dif- 
ference a couple of points will make? It may mean the game. 



Phi Delts And Evans Scholars Are I-M Champs 



Phi Delta Theta 298 

Sigma Pi 200 

Phi Epsilon Pi 184 

Phi Gamma Delta 179 

Alpha Tau Omega 172 

Sigma Chi 171 

Tau Epsilon Phi 166 

Phi Kappa Sigma 163 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 153 

Kappa Sigma 152 



Evans Scholars 173 

Newman Hall ]21 

Armory House 1 15 

Praetorians 1 10 

Media Lodge 85 

Granada Club 65 

Knight Club 45 

Exmoor Hall 45 

1001 Club 40 

College Hall 40 



Off the floor and up in the air for two good points. Rough, rugg°d. hard fought play characterizes most intramural basketball games. 






In I.M.'s it takes an effort to keep the defense out. Without 
protection a quarterback, no matter how good he may be, is useless. 



A score! This is the thing that makes a player feel good. Often 
that extra point is the difference between victory and defeat. 



Hard Work Pays off for Individual Champions 



Golf.... Evans Scholars 

Wrestling Alpha Tau Omega 

Water Polo Alpha Tau Omega 

Football - Phi Epsilon Pi 

Jr. Bar Association 
Tennis 

Singles - Phi Delta Theta 

Doubles Sigma Chi 

Swimming Newman Hall 

Badminton 

Singles Barton Heights 

Doubles Phi Delta Theta 



Volley Ball Sigma Pi 

1001 Club 

Gymnastics Sigma Chi 

Track 

Indoor Sigma Pi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Outdoor... Beta Theta Pi 

Basketball Phi Delta Theta 

Handball 

Singles Phi Kappa Psi 

Doubles Tau Epsilon Phi 



Table Tennis 

Singles -Phi Delta Theta 

Doubles ...Armory House 

Bowling Tau Delta Phi 

Pi Gamma Beta 
Softball 

12".... ....Delta Chi 

Jr. Bar Association 

10" Tau Epsilon Phi 

Forbes III, West 
Horseshoes 

Singles College Hall 

Doubles Evans Scholars 



As in all sports, there are grim moments as well as happy ones. Here a player is injured; the game is stopped while the referees do all 
they can for him. It is easy to see that even though I.M. sports are played fairly, they are, nevertheless, played aggressively. 





>t~'' 



'•t*te 



•4 

■ U T f 




At the intramural outdoor track meet, held every spring, the participants put forth their mightiest efforts. To win in track is a 
double honor; the championship honors the individual and his house. Along with the honor goes the more tangible reward of all— a trophy. 



The intramural program at the University of Illinois 
is one of the broadest in the Big Ten. The program is 
divided into three main categories; intramurals, recrea- 
tion, and faculty staff. This provides all members of 
the student body and staff with an organized, competi- 
tive program to enjoy during their time of relaxation. 
All three categories are coordinated by the IMREC 
staff headed by Al Klingle. 

The intramural division encompasses major sports 
which are based on an annual point competition basis. 
Most organized male houses, Independent and Greek, 
are active in the program. Competition is tough; the 
house compiling the most points gains possession of the 
traveling intramural trophy; all houses strive to attain 
this honor. Last year Phi Delta Theta received the 
trophy in the "Greek" division; Evans Scholars captured 



the Independent crown. 

A competitive non-point program for students is pro- 
vided by the recreation category. Organized houses, 
both male and female, compete in sports such as volley- 
ball, bowling and baseball. Trophies are given to the 
champion in each sport. The Co-Rec program provides 
an excellent opportunity for socializing; what better 
time to ask for a date, than after an afternoon of 
baseball? 

The faculty and staff are given a chance to work off 
their extra steam by playing organized sports. Sports, 
ranging from tennis to basketball, comprise the faculty- 
staff category. What better way is there to spend a 
Saturday evening than bowling with the team? All 
members of the faculty and staff are invited to par- 
ticipate in the program. 





A good handball match provides for fun, relaxation, and the 
knowledge that you are playing in a competition for first on campus. 



Moments of tension build up rapidly at intramural football 
*ames. The faces of the spectators reflect the tide of the battle. 



403 



ORGANIZAT 



404 




'. 




it r "< - 









)NS 




405 



HONORARY ORGANIZATIONS 



Each University of Illinois student is outstanding 
in some individual way; honorary organizations are 
a means of recognizing some of the individual strong 
points that all of us possess. The prime emphasis of 
honoraries is upon scholarship — a choice which seems 
reasonable since we are here at the University of 
Illinois primarily in order to gain knowledge. 

On the surface, honorary organizations may seem 
to be an end in themselves, that the recognition of 
outstanding abilities and personal traits is their sole 
purpose, that once a student is elected to member- 
ship his work is finished. However, the opposite is 
true; honorary organizations are a means to an end 
rather than an end in themselves. The student who 
is a member of an honorary group feels that in return 



for being honored by election, he owes something 
to the University community. Therefore, most hon- 
orary organizations perform outstanding service proj- 
ects. For example, Alpha Lambda Delta, sophomore 
scholarship honorary, in connection with the office 
of the Dean of Women, provides a free tutoring serv- 
ice for freshman women. These women are recom- 
mended by the Dean of Women for this service. Phi 
Eta Sigma, which is the men's sophomore scholarship 
honorary, performs a similar tutoring service which is 
made available to all freshman men who are recom- 
mended for it. Several honoraries direct their service 
projects toward deserving non-University agencies. 
Theta Sigma Phi, for example, collected used books 
to send to children in other countries this year. 



Alpha Chron 



Watcheka Sing presented on Mother's Day weekend 
was the big activity sponsored by this organization. 
Proceeds of this program were used to finance a num- 
ber of scholarships for women of above freshman 



standing. Exchanges with other honorary groups 
provided many interesting parties for the members. 
Members of this sophomore activity honorary are 
selected by residences which are members of WGS. 



Top Row, Marlena Baldridge treasurer; Carol Elson, Linda Passer,. Donna Johnstor .Linda t™™^*™?™^ SSSX'ymX W'&SKJ 

£ff Ernt'd" R °S W eco S n a d" y Ro F W ! Z 'Ba^a y ra H Hoda°:: $Z? Ro^ttt VnA^^ B °»- R ™ «« C ^ ^ 

Higgins, Jo Putt, Esther Greene 





Top Row: Laura Quinn, Virginia Seiler, Lindley Crouch, Sarah Wrobke Bottom Row: Frances Stemmel. Ada R 



This organization is designed to honor the most out- 
standing women from Orchesis, Women's Sports Asso- 
ciation and Terrapin. Junior and senior women who 
have maintained an outstanding scholastic record, 



demonstrated leadership and given outstanding service 
to their respective organizations are eligible for mem- 
bership. Also, they must have shown outstanding 
service to the Sports and Dance Council. 



Alpha Sigma Nu 



Alpha Tau Alpha 



Activities of this group included a chicken barbecue, 
the annual banquet, and a square dance for agricul- 
ture students. The group also sent delegates to the 
national convention. Men in all branches of the agri- 



cultural curriculum are eligible for membership in 
this honorary. Members learn to become rural leaders 
with a good professional spirit through participation 
in the activities of this group. 



Brazle, RonTldXrs^Tot,™ "ro^: fence le^VX'd ^00^^°^, I^M "r ^Z* ,"? W! ^," , lt m Uhl ™ n ' "*' M Evans " Ri ^rd Petrowich, Vernon 
Fechtig, Bert Fringer, Bruce Fryman, Robert HeavneT * PP ' '' ^ McCowan < Neal Setchell < Thomas Sorrells Not in panel: Lloyd Ackland, Norman 








_ , ' u ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ L 




Top Row: Donna Johnston, Carol Ostrom Dorothy ^jrd, Sharry Simer^ Mar^ 

Sheryl Fiester, Janice Johnson, Helen Rash, Kara Pf ,er8 T on ,„/ a,! *7 da m S vTqinta Chamy Patricia Edw rds, Virginia Harker, Barbara Evers, Ger, Harnish Bomta 
Pearson, Bernadette Londak, Vesta Schwarm Marilyn Taylor - *!'« A^ms V.rgm a ^namy a Wagner, Dean Ann McNamara, adviser; Shirley Livesay, 

BTusatori Second Row: Glenda Lane, Joann Tresselt, Diane Abt, Bonn e B y r " s 'l!J,R w. Sandra Fee Julia Finley, Dale Wagenheim, Sherry Endliss, Joyce Singerman, 
Nancy Townsend, Lois Nestle, Susan Wade, Charlotte Tate ; J^'*^* "™ n *™ ^jjdith Laird Jeanetl; Aagard, Barbara Hodam Renny Greenwood No! 
Kathleen Healy, Jacquelyn Moore, Ann Jones, Janine Lawrence, Carla Wa bo g «"" ma |X'. JU D ° b ; h ' Janet Eng | er , Linda Evans, Betty Flamm, Diana Fogler, Sharon 
in pane"- Julia Bodrnan.Geraldine Berman, Dorothy Coburn Diane Cook, .Lou'« Da by. bylv '" W»VS "tf"^ a h y Sanson, Marsha Hearst, Elizabeth Himes, Emily 

Garman Gai Garvey, Sharon Ginsburg, Jane Goldenberg, Adr.enne Gordon, Beverly Hall Barbara ™ m ™'^ h N Lan ' g h am , Elinor Lerner, Marina Lucco, Sarah 

Howald'. Carolyn Hughes. Barbara Hu.chens, Barbara Jones Lynd= ^P^.^^^^oroyhy Ostem.. Carol Oyster* Linda Passent. .Rev. Pollack, Patricia Put, ford, 

sssrij?&^^ judi,h s,ephenson ' sharon Sweeney ' ior,e pper ' 

Grubb 



Alpha lambda Delta Provides Tutoring Service for Freshman Women 



Officers-Top Row: Nancy Townsend, treasurer Bottom Row: Shirley Livesay, 
ice president. Bonnie Byrns, Secretary; Marilyn Wagner, president; Karen R.chardson, 



vice pre: 

freshman assistance chairman 



This year "Alpha Lams" continued their 
freshman assistance program. Girls with schol- 
arship problems were recommended to the or- 
ganization through the Dean ol Women. The 
'Alpha Lam" assistance chairman then looked 
through her files to see which member of the 
group would be best qualified to help the girl 
in the particular course in which she had had 
difficulty. The "Alpha Lam" member then con- 
laded the girl to arrange tutoring times. 

To help chapters at other colleges to benefit 
from their experiences, members of the Illinois 
chapter sent a newsletter to these chapters in the 
fall. In return, they received many letters con- 
taining ideas for programs that have been used 
by the othei < hapters. 

This scholasti< organization invited all fresh 
man women with a 1.5 average to become mem 
bers. Initiation ceremonies were preceded by a 
banquel with Phi Eta Sigma. 




408 




Seco 



Top Row: Betty Burch Lynn Kreuzberger, Marilyn Wagner, Sally Blair, June Wagner, Sandra Thornton, Penny Peterson, Patricia Bubeck Helen Korenchan 
nd Row: Ellen Brockway, Janaan Olson, Emihe G.llespie, Valerie Downes, Norma Jones, Barbara Calloway, Becca Hosford, Sharon Sweeney Kor enchan 



In late spring of 1959, a new campus organization 
was born; Angel Flight was formed in order to serve 
as a sponsor corps to Arnold Air Society. Charter 
members soon began their active program which in- 



cluded acting as hostesses at Honors Day, forming a 
drill team and helping to hold the "Blue Yonder 
Workshop," a program designed to help future Air 
Force wives in adjusting to their new roles. 



Angel Flight 



Alpha Zeta 



Alpha Zeta is an honorary fraternity which is com- 

1 posed of the most outstanding students in the College 

of Agriculture. Selection of the outstanding instructor 

and freshman student in the College of Agriculture 



was the most important project of the year for the 
members of this organization. On the social side, the 
pledges planned for the actives an exchange party 
with a home economics honorary. 



\,r\, wm!"\ R °r' , Hest ?. n Wesson Robert Reiners, David Christopherson, Donald Meyer, James Bugg Second Row: Donald Smallwood, Tilford Cline, Richard Vatthauer 
Jack Widholm, Gordon Sissmg, Richard Huston Bottom Row: Dr. Albert, adviser; Walter Griffith, Paul Malven, James Melton, James Gay, Dr. Mueller, adviser 





t n„„ = M RarW lorrv lohnson Delbert Post Jerry McCannon, Howard Kravetz, Richard Wellek, Edward Wahl, Dennis McCann, John Dyben, Sam Jones, 

Top Row: Donald Bader, Jerry ' ^-^ j^b ert Hos jej^ ^ ^^ ^^^ Gay|and Sc . clark. Charles Miller W.ll.am Ingram Terry 

° n Philio Field Robert Gibson, Edwin Holzhauer, William Hunsicker, Michael Kirtley Third Row: Francs Bowers, Phillip Gritten, 

a ' 1 ' ' H ' . ' _ ... . . ... ■ . _i r,:-l I /-. r\~„^l,J \A/ n l„ C rtn^ Daw AnrJorcnn Inhn I n upr Second Row 



William Millis, Bruce Strangeland, J 
Schaede, Bruce Creamer, Edward Geg 




Officer Loses Skirmish With Life Raft at Arnold Air Society Meeting 



Officers— Standing: Donald Wolverton, I. S. O. officer; George Rich, personnel officer; 
Ray Anderson, comptroller; John Culver, chaplain; Phillip Gritten, operationS j officer; 
Francis Bowers, special projects; John Weisenberger, executive officer 
Williams, sponsor; Paul Hasz, commander; Lt. Col. Paul Imig, adviser 



Seated: Joyce 



Meetings of Arnold Air Society this year were 
all very thought-provoking. Especially so was 
the meeting at which the flying safety officer 
from Chanute Field demonstrated safety equip- 
ment. He tried, with no success, several times 
to inflate a supposedly self-inflatable life raft. 
At last, quite discouraged, he looked at his 
eager audience and concluded that he would not 
make another attempt, for a pilot trying to in- 
Hale such a raft would certainly be drowned 
after such a delay. At other meetings Col. Bagby 
spoke about "Mobile Foxtrot," and U. of I. 
physic isi Cline Wittenbury discussed aerodynam- 
ics and the reentry <>l missile nose cones into the 
earth's atmosphere. 

The co-sponsorship of Angel Flighl and 
Arnold Aii Societ) added "spice" to a dance, 
picnic, hook drive, and llifji School Circus dis- 
play. In addition, this society presented air edu- 
cation speeches to liifjji school students. 




410 




Top Row: Bernard Grace, Leslie Buhrmesier, Ro 
Kurtz, Howard Crom' 



bip'non.ld'N^I ' e | h mTf 1 "' R ? V M, %"i R 5V m ° nd Bas/en, Robert Anderson, Frank /Worrell, Leroy Baranowski, W 
bie, Donald Nagel, John Blakslee, James Schrader, Richard Miller, Gilbert Nicoll, Richard Brugger. Allen McCowan 



alter Lenz Bottom Row: Donald 



National Conclave of Chi Gamma Iota Held on the U. of I. Campus 



Officers: Donald Nagel, corresponding secretary; John Blakslee, secretary James 
Schrader, president; Richard Miller, vice president; Gilbert Nicoll, treasurer 




The busy program of Chi Gamma Iota this 
year included the sponsorship of several teams 
in intramural sports and support of civic and 
campus welfare projects. In addition, the organi- 
zation was host to the national conclave which 
was attended by delegates from the chapters of 
Chi Gamma Iota which are located at colleges 
throughout the United States. 

Three achievement awards were presented by 
the organization. They were awarded to the 
outstanding member, veteran and advanced 
ROTC student enrolled here at the University. 

Founded in 1947 at the University of Illinois, 
this national organization encourages scholastic 
achievements of servicemen on the campus and 
assists them in keeping abreast of their privi- 
leges and duties as veterans. Membership is re- 
stricted to armed forces personnel, veterans, and 
advanced ROTC cadets who have obtained at 
least a 4.0 scholastic average. 



411 




. ..;,„ „ro t !rlont. PnnalH Ward James Cox Achilles Filios, Arnold Allen, Ronald Mraz, Curtiss Floyd, Chris Sarlas, 

Top Row: Donald Blum, James £™/™« ; ^ Ehrlich, Gerald S.onecipher, Brady Hancock, David Arehart, 

J «f We Vth U 7 e ||pr S ' Second°Row. AAelv in &£. Larry Minendorf Richard Mar.ino, president; Dr. G. F. Kolar, adviser; Myron Sidon, treasurer; Eugene Boros, secretary 
SoV.om Row 6 Donald 6 H e n fl d in RO Sheiron Tl.scU Ronald Mueller No. in panel: Robert Pokorny 



For this group, the outstanding event of the year 
was a field trip to the University of Illinois College 
of Dentistry at Chicago. At the regular meetings, the 
group presented a series of guests in the dental pro- 



fession. With this type of program, the organization 
hoped to create fellowship among the undergraduate 
members and provide them with a better understand- 
ing of the dental profession. 



Delta Delta Sigma 



Gargoyle 



Membership in Gargoyle is restricted to students in 
architecture who have shown excellence in scholar- 
ship, character, and architectural ability. To advance 
the profession of architecture and to promote an in- 



terchange of ideas are Gargoyle's purposes. A unique 
event of the group during the past year was the senior 
breakfast held at the end of the year to honor its 
graduating seniors. 



Fielde Bottom Row: Anthony Marchess, Robert Hotvedt, Ronald Bork, Valdman Heitur. R.chard Diedr.ch 





Top Row: Zven Vytanovych, Nancy Kircher, Mary Ehrlicher, Linda Timmel, Marylin Daly, Rita Levey, Cheryl Clark, Marikay Fitzgerald, Cyrelda Tarter, Alexandra 
Alaupovic, Arlene Brumlik, Georgia Allen Second Row: Karen Branch, Shirley Hill, Ellen Powers, Doris Siegal, Linda McGrath, Nancy Kohner, Claire Johnson, Helen 
Semianczuk, Dora Lee Bottom Row: Diane Leaf, Ann Rominger, Barbara Burdon, Sara Ferris Not in panel: Britt Liljeros, Barbara Ropers, Karol Porter, Deonna For- 
man, Karen Bunde, Susan Teegarden, Prof. L W. McClure, adviser 



This year Gamma Alpha Chi members who are 
either majors in advertising or who have had at least 
one advertising course, attended Champaign-Urbana 
Advertising Club meetings. Through their national 



office, the organization aided seniors in rinding em- 
ployment in the advertising field. Outstanding events 
of the year included the formal rushing tea and the 
field trips to advertising agencies. 



Gamma Alpha Chi 



Mu Phi Epsilon 



A convocation program held at the Smith Music 
Hall was one of the several special musical programs 
presented throughout the year by Mu Phi Epsilon, an 
organization which seeks to advance music in America 



and to promote high standards of musicianship and 
scholarship. The election to membership in this na- 
tional music sorority is based upon scholarship, 
musicianship, character, and personality. 



Top Row: Carol Knosher, Helen Gloyd, Virginia Shive, Deloris Maulding Second Row: Deanna Africk, Elaine Holmes, Mary Carloye Bottom Row: Nancy 
Knosher, Lois Doniger, Devorah Rabnick 





.Id.. Terry Villwock, Richard Ellis, Terry Harper, Robert Pfeiffer, Joseph Som- 



M ? P ?r^*°^\TtoM£ n £mlZ'l£bb& S D Arafo, D j r rh"'K J a e u W, A Ro"ber'» White "Fourth Row: John Helledy, LeRoy Gurd, Jack Thornton William 

Adamf a Ri'c n hard Udock ° Charles Weber Xhard Ash^orth'Tames Sprei.zer, Brian Bert'ha, David Rawcliffe, Thomas Nelson, Nils Soneson Douglas White Third Row: 

i MV.kl„ plr S^lon Donald Sammons Alvin Voelkner, Dennis Anderson, Richard Eberhardy, David Hunsaker, Dale McDyer, Lawrence Gahan Robert Hunt 

eco'nd "row ■ Ll'oyc I MeCu!re?Lar^rimith"G^y Burton, Jacques Bollier, David Irish, Robert Eiermann, Brian Heath, Ronald Fowler, Bruce Harnson Bottom Row: 

Philip Sieger't, John Fornof, Richard Dooley, Edward Krai, Brian Ruchalski, Ernest Schalk, Van Austin 



"Middle of an Island" was the title of the Dolphin 
aquatic show this year; the Polynesian theme was 
reflected in the decorations and in the swimming 
itself. The building of sets and decorations and prac- 



ticing for this show, which was presented on Home- 
coming and Dad's Day weekends, are the main activi- 
ties of this group which was founded for the sole pur- 
pose of promoting aquatic activities. 



Dolphin Fraternity 
Guppies 



Since Guppies is an apprentice group of Terrapin, 
synchronized swimming group, the ultimate goal for 
which each Guppies' member is striving is member- 
ship in Terrapin. This year members worked hard to 



improve their synchronized swimming skills. In the 
spring, the group displayed these skills by performing 
a routine in the annual Terrapin Swimming Show 
which was held on Mother's Day week end. 



Andrea Blanda, Beverly Wilson, adviser; Carol Sandstrom, Alice Adams, Betty Rothacker, Mary 



Top Row: Carolyn Bookey, Andrea Biere, Joyce Burkhardt, Andrea Blanda, Beverly Wilson adviser; Carol Sandstrom, Alice Adams, Betty Konac r ,™ 
Mead, Barbara Conant, Sara Bourque, Yvonne Lansky, Barbara Rowe, Helen Hewitt, Diana Dittmann, Judith Klepp.nger Second Row: Sharon iTraynor Marg t ^Ohr i. Lou, e 
Wolf Sylvia Fisher, Judith Edlund, Diane Kontos, Frieda Durkin, Karen Kraabel, Dawn Anderson, Marie Heineken, Susan McMullen Bottom Row: Diane Dowdall, 
Karen Cremieux, Maureen Murrin, Lynn Rotter, Susan Gelfand, Theodora Andros, Jo Qumlan Not in panel: Joyce Opalicky 





Top Row: Prof. J. Harlan Shores, adviser; Terry Denny, president Bottom Row: Hope Labisky, secretary; Mary McDougle, treasurer; Suzanne Collins, 

historian Not in panel: Richard Salzer, vice president 



Preparation is being made by the Kappa Delta Pi 
members for the celebration of its Golden Anniver- 
sary in 1960. Alpha chapter is especially proud of 
the event and is planning to obtain a William C. 



Bagley Memorial lecturer. This service organization 
boasted a six point program for the year, which 
featured speakers and informative panels on matters 
of concern to all those in the teaching profession. 



Kappa Delta Pi 



Mask and Bauble 



Membership in Mask and Bauble is determined 
by the amount of work done in University Theatre, 
either as a cast member or as a crew worker; selection 
is done on the basis of a point system, which recog- 



nizes both quality and quantity of work done. The 
purpose of the organization is to recognize outstand- 
ing students in theatre work and to promote friend- 
ship among students interested in the theater. 



Top Row: Dr. Joseph Scott, Catherine Miller, Jenna Vaught, Linda Bond, Carol Green, Ruth Hoogerwerf, Carol Hay, Ronald Winchell Third Row: Mary 
Arbenz, Melissa Blanke, Beverly Kimes, Mary Brown, John Reynolds, Raymond Pitton Second Row: Sharon Crowley, Carol Towner, Carolyn Franks, Barbara Schubert, 
Saundra Youmans, Loretta Alfonsi, Michael Filerman, Elizabeth Harriman Bottom Row: Stephen Barnett, Elissa Weaver, Patricia McKinney, Mary Divan, Carol 
Robison, Carol Luehring, Elsie Robison, Judith Lyman Not in panel: Dr. Genevieve Richardson, Elizabeth Roberts, Adrienne Zahler, Margaret McDonald, Dr. Clara 
Behringer, Prof. J. Wesley Swanson, Dr. Charles Shattuck, Dr. Barnard Hewitt 





Top 

DeHass, Steph 
Chen, treasi 



d d- u = „j d,,„,,oI Pnhsrt Dormer vice president- Michael Pagones, Robert Erickson, corresponding secretary; Erwin Lawson, Reginald Bean, James 

P phe°n W Luca ^ ohr 'Teeter Jor. Gealow " eSng secretary; Kenneth Jones, president; Edward Ernst, adviser; Albert Longnecker Bottom Row: Joseph 

urer; Eugene Kalley, William Kunz, Roger Pyatt, John Huttenhoff, Donald Habing, James Degenford 



Eta Kappa Nu was organized to honor electrical 
engineers who have maintained a 4.0 average their 
senior year and to honor graduate students who main- 
tained three units of 5.0 or four units of 4.5. 



This year the society established an information 
center for new electrical engineering students who are 
interested in gaining information about engineering 
courses and possible careers in this field. 



Eta Kappa Nu 



National Collegiate Players 



Recognition is given to students for outstanding 
participation in University Theatre and for achieve- 
ment in theatre courses by selection for membership 
in National Collegiate Players; selection is based upon 



an honor point system. The Alpha chapter, estab- 
lished here at the University of Illinois in 1922, heads 
the list of fifty-two other such organizations located in 
colleges throughout America. 



Top Row: Dr. Clara Behringer, Joseph Scott, Mary Arbenz Second Row: Robert Wh.tlatch Lmda Bond secretary-treasurer; Raoul Johnson, P^'dent; Ru.h 
Hoogerwerf vice president; Ronald Winchell Bottom Row: John Reynolds, Jenna Vaught, Carol Green, Catherine MMIer Michael FHermar Not ,„ panel. D. 
Genevieve Richardson, adviser; John Ewing, Diane Burke, Dr. Richard Wallace, Prof. J. Wesley Swanson, Dr. Charles Shattuck, Webster Smalley, Scott Craig, Dr. 
Walter Draper, Bernhard Works, Dr. Karl Windesheim 





James Bre^/s^ph^^e^'^ird'tw: ^pifen' l^ng 'M&Xrl^&rfc^r?- ^t M ~,D ona , d Simb ° r9 ' J ° h " W — Michael Ch ^ «' Le °" L ™ 
Abelson, James Krotzer, Stephen Gold, Ronalc I Teller Second rIw- Brllu ? V' ^TAr Sn ° w . Wilham Rogers, John Ey, Jack Bourland, Carl Bailey, Herber 
McCloskey, president; Jane Dugdale, treasurer Harvey Whitfield v?ce' presi^nt Ge air ' Z '"""l ^ P Ja " Gray publicity chairman; Nancy Wertheim, secretary- Kefth 
Mary Glenney, Iris Cooper, Judith Higgins, Jane Kinser Robin Ruth Vermeulen, Ira Frank Bottom Row: Marianne Burke, Judith Lang, Judy Wyatt 



The highlight of the year for members of Omega 
Beta Pi was the field trip to the University of Illinois 
Medical School. Other meetings featured doctors 
and professors who spoke on recent developments in 



the medical world, and films of operations and births. 
In order to aid its members in their academic work, 
the organization made available to them laboratory 
animals and extra laboratory sessions. 



Omega Beta Pi 
Phi Chi Eta 



In order to weld the advanced corps cadets of the 
Army Quartermaster Corps into a more compact 
and consolidated group, Phi Chi Eta was founded at 
the University of Illinois. This national military 



fraternity held its regular meetings once a month and 
at these times presented guest speakers of military 
status who spoke on different informative subjects 
concerning military techniques and standards. 





Ron 

Dy 

Wad 

Nil 

Fra 

Mi. 

Mi 

Port. . 

Schafer. Stanley Schaumburg 



Spielman, Bruce Stafford, Bruce Strangeland, Carl 



Robert Ward, Jack Warner, Richard Wenglarz, Charles Wha.en, 



t^;r^^^n^?j ^-^^z r r^ h ^^ 



!fof wXn^ jXT W=er, ^encV Wo^ Gerald Wolin, Manuel Xanthakis, Michael Yates 



Phi Eta Sigma Mid -semester Smoker Promotes Freshman Scholarship 



Officers— Standing: John Williams, treasurer; 



Charles Liang, secretary; Ronald Link 



During the tall, Phi Eta Sigma members spon- 
sored a smoker for all freshman men whose 
scholastic averages at mid-semester reached at 
least 4.0. By means of the smoker, the organiza- 
tion hoped to encourage these men to obtain 
the degree of scholastic excellence which is re- 
quired for their initiation into its membership. 
At the end of their freshman year, men who had 
earned at least a 1.5 scholastic average were in- 
vited to join the fraternity. 

()u October twenty-third and twenty-fourth, 
1959, the Phi Eta Sigma chapter at (he University 
was host lo the annual regional conference of 
this nation, il si holastic fraternity. 

During this year, Phi Eta Sigma conducted a 
successful tutoring program which was available 
i., .ill freshman men enrolled in the University. 
I furthei tins Freshman assistant- program, the 
fraternity published a booklei giving helpful 
-,iikI\ hints lot new students. 



adviser Seated: Robert Helfinstine, historian; Larry 
Gary Mowder, vice president 



Schafer, president Not in panel: 




418 




Rosalynn 'jTnkinT Ma^ B^^U^r^^rndra^^b^TaTol ^on^Bo,^' ^ J^'V" ^son. , *"%" ^s Second Row: Manan Vreeland, 
Eckland, Margaret Allen KayDurn, Carol Robison Bottom Row. Myrna Rea, Carol Ufkes, Anida Miller, Nancy Turner, Bobette 



This year members of Phi Upsilon Omicron acted 
as official saleswomen of Bevier Hall stationery; pro- 
ceeds from sales provided a scholarship for the sopho- 
more home economics student with the highest 



scholastic average. An important event of the year 
for the Phi U's was the Founder's Day Banquet, at 
which active and alumnae members met for a com- 
mon purpose — to honor the founders of this group. 



Phi Upsilon Omicron 



Pi Tau Sigma 



This group, whose purpose is to honor outstanding 
mechanical engineering students, provided a vital 
link between students and faculty. An important 
project was the selection of an outstanding instructor 



each month in the Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ment. For Engineering Open House, the group pre- 
pared an exhibit to inform the campus of the develop- 
ments that have occurred in the field of engineering. 








Field Trips to Defense Works Highlight Year for Phalanx Members 



Officers-Top Row: John Sweetman, John Herrmann, James Carney, John Kong 
>m Row. Michael Maquire, Virginia Hommel, John Hocking 



Bottom Row 



Members of Phalanx saw first-hand the work- 
ings of our national defense system when they 
visited nearby military installations; one such 
field trip was made to the Ordnance Ammuni- 
tion Command near Joliet, Illinois. 

This military honorary formed a rifle team 
tli is year. The team invited rifle squads of other 
military organizations to compete in rifle 
matches. To Eurther social interests, the group 
held a dinner before the Military Ball for mem- 
bers and their dates. 

Phalanx tried this year to prepare its mem- 
bers lot their years ol military service. Many 
ol the meetings of the group featured speeches 
In military personnel. Topics ol these speeches 
ranged from purel) military subjects to topics 
aboul everyday life .is related to military themes. 
At Military Honors Da) in May, Phalanx gave 
several awards which recognized outstanding 
KO I C students. 




420 




Top Rov 



Bartuska, Richard DiedriX ^Guy^ John Benson Brian Wittenkeller, Beniamin Car. Third Re 

Williams, Prof.. Gabriel Guevrekian, Prof. Jack Baker,' PrT^Zn'd 'loth, ^o? V bZ\^t^%7or^\^e\ H a y^ -^ ^""^ - S «°" d Row: Prof. R 

>k, Paul Kupferberg ' ' 



Row: Tom 



Rauen, Fred Moyer, Max Schmidt, William Cook 



nond Cain Bottom Row: Wayne Ottoson, Larry 



Participation with the Fine and Applied Arts 
Council in sponsorship of the annual Beaux Arts Ball 
and an annual spring sketch hike were the two major 
events of the Scarab fraternity this year. Regular 



meetings featuring discussions concerning current 
problems of architecture and related fields were held 
for the members who are all selected on the basis of 
probable future success in these careers. 



Scarab 



Scabbard and Blade 



In seeking to develop in its members the qualities 
that will make them efficient military officers, Scab- 
bard and Blade provided programs on military topics 
at its meetings which varied from movies to speakers. 



In addition, members took part in the sabre arch for 
Military Ball, Honors Day, and banquets. Selection 
of members is from the top one-third of the Air Force, 
Navy, and Army classes. 



Richard £0^1,°^ Lloyd Lehn Richard Kammann, Dennis Hall Third Row: 

bolt, Richard Sanders, second lieutenant- David Johnson fir, l,V,,5Tnf„? ^' ercks < Carl Baumann Roy Buckner Joseph Atkinson, Robert Lewis Second Row Jerry Rain 
fir., ser 9 ean, Bert, Larsson Bottom R^'i^rJ^^ C^raT '^nTo'^^ ^ 





This year Sigma Alpha lota held its annual alumni 
breakfast during Homecoming weekend. Other activi- 
ties included a convocation at Smith Music Hall, a 
welcome for freshmen music students which was held 



with the other music honoraries, and musical pro- 
grams presented every Thursday over WILL. This 
group is part of the national music sorority which 
works for the advancement of music in America. 



Sigma Alpha Iota 



Skull and Crescent 



The annual fall pajama race was the biggest event 
of Skull and Crescent's year. Each of the twenty-five 
oldest fraternities on the campus, who select members 
for this sophomore men's activity honorary, partici- 



pated in the race. This year Kappa Sigma won the 
race and the trophy. In the spring, the organization 
held a dinner-dance to round off its activities. At the 
dance a queen was chosen. 



Top Row: Renard Bollier, Douglas 
irce, Donald Ramey Third 
ith Asher Second Row: Sid 
nald Linden, Ronald Mizer, James Barker, Car 



Nichols, Duane Haning, Ed 



Row: AAichae Yale / Alan 'Davidson,' Kenneth Kreutziger, Kenneth Macrnorr.n Rich 
Inev Frisch William Johnson, David Dandurand, Arthur Hasse, David Johnson, R 
'? ey hr 'S cn ,'.. V "..i Turnquist' Michael Rinney, Thomas Boatman, Ned Tyler 



r, Gresham. Brebach, Neil Anderson, ^rl^ Bateson, Ws^CoKvell, L^nard 

David Sager, 



chard Kerby, Larry Shelby Bottom Rov 





Shi-Ai Combines With Sachem for Annual Mother's Day Weekend Sing 



holrz 0f Bi C th r Vo T h° m P e ROW: BeVeHy Kim6S ' Me ' i5Sa Blanke Bo ""» R »»^ Deborah Roth- 




For the first time since their foundings, Shi-Ai 
and Sachem combined their efforts for the pres- 
entation of a Mother's Day weekend sing. Each 
group selected a chairman to direct the plans 
lor the very successful event. 

Members of Shi-Ai are chosen by the campus 
sororities; this year each sorority selected the 
two members of its sophomore class who were 
most outstanding in activities. In previous years, 
the two members from a sorority worked to- 
gether to present a skit as a part of their pledg- 
ing duties. This year, two sororities were paired 
for giving the skits. The groups of four girls 
then presented their skits at one of the meetings 
ol the group, where they were judged. The 
winning skits from the east and west sides of 
the campus were chosen and trophies awarded 
to the participants. The dinner hours of all 
campus sororities were then livened by the 
presentation of these winning skits. 



423 




James Lytle 



• ^AK^^^^A -- Si ™' L "'" J '""" 



Second Row: Robert Wilcox, Irene Lange, Ronald Nelson, 



Illinois Chapter of Sigma Iota Epsilon Installs Chapter at Wayne State 



Officers— Standing: James Lytle, treasurer; 
Ronald Nelson, president; Irene Lange, secretary 



Robert Wilcox, vice president Seated: 



Early this year Alpha chapter of Sigma Iota 
Epsilon, which is located on this campus, was 
asked by the national organization to travel to 
Wayne State University to install a chapter there. 
The new chapter is the ninth branch of the 
organization to be created. 

Membership in this honorary and professional 
management fraternity is limited to students 
who have at least a junior standing in any 
college, a 4.0 scholastic average, and an active 
interest in the field of management. 

The Illinois chapter of SIE was chosen during 
the arst semester to publish "The Manager's 
Key," a magazine containing articles written by 
prominent businessmen and scholars. This pub- 
lication studies problems in the field of man- 
agement and offers solutions lor them. 

Meetings ol the organization were highlighted 
by speeches by several men who are known 
nationally l<>i their work in management. 




424 




Sigma Tau Recognizes Outstanding Students in All Engineering Fields 



Officers — Standing: Louis Lanzerotti, Pyramid correspondent; Charles Case, treasurer 
Seated: Bill Langford, secretary; Darrell Gieseking, president; Prof. Robert Bohl, ad- 
viser; Francis Greeley, historian Not in panel: John Meece, vice president 




Sigma Tau was founded at the University of 
Nebraska in 1904 with the purpose of honoring 
outstanding students in all fields of engineering. 
The Illinois chapter was established in 1914, 
and since its founding has offered an oppor- 
tunity for the development of professional con- 
tacts and friendships. Sigma Tau on our campus 
has over one hundred active members. 

The active members of this fraternity were 
selected on the basis of scholarship, leadership, 
and character. Sigma Tau recognized the per- 
sonal attainments of engineering students, en- 
couraged fellowship among the students and the 
faculty in the engineering department, and ad- 
vanced the interests of engineering. 

In order to recognize outstanding under- 
graduate work and service to the engineering 
department, the group presented fellowships to 
on islanding students which may be used for 
post-graduate study at recognized universities. 



425 




Tod Row Barbara Tripp, Carol Palmer, Mrs. Glenn Hanson, Arlene Brumlik, Valerie Neville, Beverly Kimes Margaret Smith Carolyn Daily Virginia Temple, 
Margaret Molitor Sara Ferris Second Row: Linda Craig, Vernalie Moberg, vice president; Unnea_ Pearsoji, president^ Eleanor Blum, adviser; Gay le__ H aglund, secretary; 
Helen Semianczuk, treasurer; Gloria Clin 



Botton Row: Barbara Ropers, Janet LaChance, Doris Siegal, Edelgard Eichholz, activities chairman; Cynthia Brown 



Collecting children's books for the children's homes 
in the area was the major project of Theta Sigma Phi, 
women's professional journalistic organization. Those 
women enrolled in journalism, extra-curricular journ- 



alistic activities or those planning to make journalism 
a career are eligible for membership. Joint meetings 
were sometimes held with Sigma Delta Chi, men's 
professional fraternity. 



Theta Sigma Phi 



Tomahawk 



As a result of the 1958 victory of the Purdue football 
team over the Illinois team, the Illinois chapter of 
Tomahawk presented the Purdue chapter with a 
cannon at this year's Illinois-Purdue game. Other 



activities of this sophomore independent men's activity 
honorary included providing hosts for several Univer- 
sity functions and carrying out a work project at the 
Cunningham Home early this spring. 



Second Row: John Fullerton, Larry Gillingham, Robert Martin, 

Gerald Rocke, secretary; Jerry Weibel, 

Thomas Hecht, Niles Holt, Michael 




■t: 




Mary AAeaWa'i^le^^^^ ^n^Row ^Tnc^' Penn V Luckado Marjorie Harris, adviser; Louise Volkstorf, 

Harris, Diane Teeter, Roberta Abell, Sandra Olson Barbara Beina V^rll „ a Lj " ■ t u r I Au V Th 2 mson < Barbara Baker, Virginia Kucera, Janet Ellis, Barbara 



Mothers Day Swimming Show Highlights Year for Terrapin Members 



Officers — Top Row: Janet Greenberg, vice president Second Row: Barbara Harris 
secretary; Patricia Sheahan, president; Darlene Clever, treasurer Bottom Row Janet 
Ellis, historian 




Members of Terrapin Swim Club saw their 
year long efforts climaxed by the presentation 
of their annual aquatic show on Mother's Day 
weekend. The theme of this year — "motion"— 
was well represented in synchronized swimming 
routines performed by Terrapin members. 

In October, the organization sent three girls 
and an adviser to a swimming conference in 
Massachusetts. Prior to the trip, the girls re- 
ceived a phonograph record from officials of the 
conference and were told to prepare a swimming 
routine to suit the record. Swimming groups on 
two other campuses received similar instructions. 
At the conference, the three routines were judged 
and critically analyzed. 

Terrapin members took part in symposiums 
held at several nearby colleges. Members were 
often so busy that several times they called upon 
their apprentice group, Guppies, for assistance 
in carrying out their projects. 



427 






"»I» 



-. . lift 









s r < ■■■' -"'-* ', 




In February, Trident held its annual All-Navy 
Dance, an event which all members of this naval 
honorary organization anticipated anxiously. Through 
its regular meetings, which consisted of movies and 



speakers on naval tactics and officers' duties, the 
group felt that it accomplished its purpose by helping 
cadets of the NROTC program to prepare to become 
better officers after their graduation. 



Trident 



Zeta Phi Eta 



Members of Zeta Phi Eta were in charge of "Poke 
and Tote," the rummage sale at the International 
Fair this year. The Illinois campus was the scene of 
the midwest conclave of Zeta Phi Eta at which the 



Illinois chapter acted as hostess. Members of this 
professional speech sorority are chosen from speech, 
speech correction, and theatre students who have at 
least an average of 4.0 in speech courses. 



corresponding secretary BoVtom Row: Lois Rose, Carol Green, Patricia McKinney, Mary Divan, Linnea Swanson Not ,n panel: June Raymond, Eleanor Grogg 



; 




ORGANIZATIONS 



There is an organization to suit the interest of 
every student. These varied organizations are a major 
factor in making our University the great institution 
that it is today. The campus emphasis upon organi- 
zations is second only to the emphasis upon academics. 
There are good reasons for this emphasis upon par- 
ticipation in organizations. 

An organization gives the student training in his 
chosen field of study that the classroom cannot always 
give. Through an organization, the student has an 
opportunity to apply his academic knowledge. For 
example, almost all of the engineering organizations 
put their education to practical use by building ex- 
hibits for Engineering Open House this year. 

In an organization, the student has opportunities 



to hear men speak on the most recent developments 
in his field of study — developments not likely to be 
covered in a textbook. As a result, employers often 
prefer to hire the college graduate who has had a 
background in organizations. 

The value of participation in an organization does 
not lie wholly in personal gain. Organizations often 
perform service projects which benefit the University 
or worthwhile local organizations. Alpha Phi Omega, 
for example, works primarily through the local Boy 
Scout Council. In addition, many organizations help 
to sponsor university events such as Farm and Home 
Festival. 

Participation in organizations is an integral part 
of the life of the well-rounded student. 



Agricultural Economics Club 



An informal student-faculty barbecue began the 
activity-filled year for the Agricultural Economics 
Club. Outstanding speakers presented such topics as 
livestock marketing, farm management, farm credit 



and job opportunities to round out this year's pro- 
gram. Through these programs and participation in 
various student activities, interest was promoted in 
agricultural economics and related fields. 



„ Top Row: Richard Bais Richard McWard Kenneth Riecks, Howard Pratt, Ronald Junker, Terence Jacobs, Max Shabe, LaMarr Evans Third Row: Roger 

Bottrell, Mengesha Workeneh, John Gesell, Lovell Green, John Brucker, Dale Walsten, Robert Clark. Neal Wright, Clarence Davis Second Row: William Uhlman John 
Goodrich, James Hart, Thomas Melton secretary-treasurer; Milton Hallberg, vice president; William Condon, Myron Reaman Bottom Row: David Yeager, Kenneth 
Wyatt, Leonard Higgs, James Munton, Addis Anteneh Not in panel: James Meltoi, Lawrence Duewer "eager. 





^1 




J I 




, 




| 



A < 






Top Row: Lo 

Hubert Staff, Harold E 
Sinclair, Charles Dyson, 
William McMurtry 



uis Waqner Lawrence Duewer, Burton Swanson, Harry Bourn, Merl Holt, Larry Clark, Allen McCowan Th.rd Row: John Boyer Will, am Uhlman, 
"vans Richard P*row%h, Vernon Brazle, Robert Fay Second Row: William Gengenbach, James Balzer Dr. A. H Krebs Edward Turner, WH Nam 
i Ne'al Setchell Jesse Heischmidt Bottom Row: Thomas Sorrells, Curtis Kiddoo, Rodney Doyle, Ronald Myers, Donald Morr.ssey, Richard Treat, 



Several panel discussions highlighted the programs 
presented at meetings of the Agricultural Education 
Club this year. One panel consisted of members who 
had recently completed their student teaching period; 



another panel discussed the highlights of the FAA 
convention. Throughout the year at various times, 
this organization held several combined meetings with 
members of Alpha Tau Alpha. 



Agricultural Education Club 



Agriculture Cooperative Extension Club 



Professional extension workers "extended" speeches 
to the Cooperative Extension Club, agriculture and 
home economics students, so members could become 
acquainted with the organization and the objectives 



Top Row: Ernest Anderson, Donald Meyer, John Gesell, Lamarr Fesser, Jame: 
Wesoloski, Leonard Higgs 



of the Illinois Agriculture and Home Economics Ex- 
tension Service. As preparation for the extension 
field, members conducted training sessions through- 
out the state for 4-H and rural youth groups. 

Melton Bottom Row: Robert Coffman, Barbara Strunk, Glenna Blunier, Virginia 





Top Row: Robert Wilson 
William Sinclair, Lyle Martin, Jam_ . 
Griffeth, John Gesell, David Christoph 



' L «Tif nCe P Ue ^ r '.. Lyle Funkh °^ser, Paul Malven, Roger Steiger, Richard Snodgrass, Roger Gallup, Thomas Sor 
les Wiltier, Donald Mornssey Bottom Row: Ernest Anderson, adviser; Donald Meyer, Floyd Roberts, Donalc 
topherson 



rells, Robert Coffman, 
Id Smallwood, Walter 



Climaxing the year's program was the annual Plow- 
boy Prom sponsored by the organization. The purpose 
of the Agriculture Council is to serve as a coordi- 
nating and governing body representing students who 



are enrolled in the College of Agriculture. By coordi- 
nating the various professional activities in this college, 
students were able to gain the maximum value pos- 
sible from their year on campus. 



Agriculture Council 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



During the semester, several speakers were engaged 
by Alpha Kappa Psi to educate and interest its mem- 
bers in the various phases of business. Student- 
faculty luncheons held bi-weekly were provided to pro- 



mote better understanding between these two groups. 
A dance and a hay ride were among the special social 
activities. Members of the group provided guided 
tours for businessmen visiting the campus. 



flifWI J£w», i i i «/' ^ i"tT L ay ° r ' i° h "^ R ° zln . sky ' WiMiam Lieber, Donald McSorley, Julius Zschau, William Smithing, Charles Sommer, Thomas Smith, 

Clifford Wilderman, Juel Lee, Wendell Thackeray David Buyher Third Row: James Kunkel, Norman Lawrence, William Stauter, Mac Churchill, Ronald Nickel James 

K a T: ■ J H° h r„ Reyer ' R \ cha : d H M r S ' w ha L d M rk f r L- S avi . d . E '° W A°u n ' R ° bert Wi ' COX ' Tom Brink erhoff Second Row: Donald Hall, treasurer; William Ure, Pro . Lloyd 
Morey Dav.d Allen, president; Herbert Wright, Neal Fulk, Martin Chasen, secretary; Stuart Brostoff, vice president Bottom Row: Gordon Rosenberger Chester Stewart 

Ph lllta £ "eh r l« he L y -wk 0n n ^l^ 6 ^ RCha /t Dandura S d ' , C p har ! eS T l r ° Wn ' S'iffo'd B°99S No. in panel: Brack Duker, Paul Gaecke, Donald Gibbs WaTter GinVhe ! 
Orville Wiseman Nadzieia, Paul Pirtle, Thomas Roley, Laurence Rubens, Robert Scharlach, Joel Segall, Ted Smith, Matthew Vigliocco! 





Tod Row Vernon Miller William Wheeler, Ronald Winchell, George Bossarte, Robert Isackson Myron Berman Richard Carlson, Vahan Tatoian, Glen Waltrip, 
c i, Rh! %„lr I Rabbs Alan Sandler Miles Kaplan David Biba Second Row: Ralph Quartetti, Thomas Noggle, Robert Ashbrook, Gordon Malstrom, Dale Smith, 

LeBianc, John Bledsoe, Leonard SendrofF, Clifford Helrich, Gordon DeCook, William Holman 



Alpha Delta Sigma Wins National Recognition at California Convention 



Officers- Robert Ashbrook, public relations; Charles Keller, vice president; Dale 
Smith, president; Gordon Malstrom, secretary; William Tushaus, treasurer 



The high point of the Alpha Delta Sigma's 
year was the national convention held this year 
at California. At the convention Dale Smith, 
the president of the chapter, was elected na- 
tional vice president. Also, at the convention 
the chapter was voted runner-up for the national 
chapter proficiency award; and the chapter news- 
letter, "The ADScribe," was selected the top 
publication of its class. 

The initiation fees of Alpha Delta Sigma 
pledges were paid not in money this year, but 
rather in time spent carrying sandwich boards 
on which advertising space had been sold to 
local merchants. This year all lllini awaited 
anxiously the publishing of ea< h issue ol Tumot , 
a humor magazine published 1>\ the Eraternit) 
as an additional source ol income. 

Through its projects Alpha Delia Sigma Eelt 
that it succeeded in presenting to its members 
advertising in practice, not in theory alone. 




432 



* ST: 




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m 


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/■ 1 ' »' Mr™*- 1 F^ I 1 



* «* 



*% 4P * 



Kenneth rhnJi^' Fr^H H ,hh^ p h ♦ P' Y l IT "o' J^L P ?u hl ' 9 ' An,hon y Bliss, Charles Orr, Milton Forsberg, Edward Cox, David Matlock, John Kirk, Ralph Clemente, 
McGuTre Bruce J hn, n ^rlt'Jf ' r ' Rob f, rt , Wolf berg Second Row: Michael Bays, Leslie Sussman, Jonathan Berkson, Evar Miller, Paul Piovesan, Craig 

David RevesGuerra anW ^ &hL u fl V ' 5°rw,n Holmes Charles Pemn, Wendel1 Win,ers ' Timm Smi,h < Phili P Deckowitz Bottom Row: James Loblaw, Ken Gunji, 
Dav,d Reyes-Guerra, adv.ser; R.chard Hull, adv.ser; Charles Walters, adviser; Norman Nester, adviser; James Seybold, Warren Danzer, William Banta, Richard Duesterhaus 



Alpha Phi Omega opened its year by welcoming a 
new group of pledges at the pledge banquet. Candi- 
dates for initiation were required to observe a pledging 
period. Once initiated they were fully included in 



the activities of the group, which included a steak fry 
and various service projects on the campus, in local 
hospitals, and in connection with the local council 
of Boy Scouts of America. 



Alpha Phi Omega 



American Foundrymen's Society 



The arts and sciences relating to the manufacture 
and utilization of metal castings are advanced through 
this society. The group took field trips to foundries, 
had programs to help members obtain summer jobs 



in foundries, and heard speakers who hold important 
positions in the foundry industry. At several meet- 
ings, members saw movies which showed the latest 
developments in the foundry industry. 



Charles Frederkkwn^Cha^ ^f "'"l? JJ n, !* d R ?T, Char ' eS PhippS < Dalson ^agnani, Dennis Novak, Lynn Palmer, Morris Dent, 

Bottom Row Hugo Paz Ronald rrnnk' P Li f lo ^ « W: aS 96 ' ? udd u J° se P h Us,ew,cz, Charles Schafer, Jim N-wcomb, L. D. Shotts Gary Stahl, Paul Evan 

onald Crook, Gerald Jones, secretary; Max Adamski, chairman; Stanley Danek, treasurer; John Henry, Charles Ernst, Gerald Rocke 





Top Row Richard Wu, Gerald Orr, Friedoon Hakimian, William Lindsey, William Fosse, Patrick Landi Bohdan Gerulak, Jonathon Rehnberg Warren Bauer 
Herbert GoClc I. David Isaacson Harold Schatz, Nick Honcharuk, Carl Skilbred, Ralph Shaw, Robert Kumlin, Charles D.lle, Jerry Sheenn, on Von Achen .Frederick 
Setter. Raymond Chocholek, John Nekolny Fourth Row: George Mangan, Kestutis Vaicius, James Grisolano Rodney Coenen -Warren Edmmster, Wilham Schacht Julian 
White Joel Scheckerman, Richard Michael, Harold Hoyer, Paul McKim, James McClintock Everett Conway George Albers, William Davis, Harolc ' Peckham, F ed Fiala 
Bruce Harrison, Bernhard Binner Third Row: Janet Gronberg, Elfa Ozolins, Wayne Shaw, George /Wills, James Carberry Gerald Grethen his on an; Pau I Kaefer 
treasurer! Robert Glaser, vice president; Thomas Tully, Seymour Frolichstein, president; Sherwin Braun secretary; Raymond Matulionis Vy autas Reklaitis, Prof. Raymond 
D f Pasquale, adviser Second Row: Louis Stankaitis, Russel Keune, Kenneth NorNng, Jack Stephens Edwin Cosek, Peter Setaer, Jerrold Brim Carl Co^mbc .Sam 
Swanson Melvin Kantor, Kenneth Neumann, Valdmar Heitur, Richard Bonslett Bottom Row: Hamad Lingawi, Roy Yamachi, John Brum, George Bloome, Richard 
Brzazicki, William Miller, Phillip Gold, Lawrence Lundy, Charles Lundy, Charles Kelly, Gary Sweatman, Arthur Schwartz 



During the year, this group maintained an active 
program of lectures and discussions concerning prob- 
lems related to architecture by presenting a series of 
guest speakers at the regular semi-monthly meetings. 



With this wide variety of speakers, the organization 
was able to provide its members with interesting and 
informative reports on questions which are currently 
important to the field of architecture. 



American Institute of Architects 



Institute of Chemical Engineers 



All students who are enrolled in chemical en- 
gineering can obtain membership in this organization. 
Included in this year's program were five guest speak- 
ers who discussed the latest developments in theory 



and equipment of the chemical industry. In ordei 
to acquaint other students and faculty with the club's 
activities, these chemical engineers sponsored an ex- 
hibit at the Engineering Open House. 



Top Row: Jerome Bacchetti, Bert Barickman, Heino Tamm, Malcolm Ameter, Robert Hall Jimmy Keller, Frederick Thayer Ernest Uebler Robert Madix Donald 
Johnson Gene Kibler Third Row- Philip Gresho, Sidney Goodman, Gerald Schurtz, John Ward, James Loblaw, James Friednchs Kenneth Valentas, George Lappin 
James^ Tohn Dale. George Nassos, Eugene Snger ^Second Row: Sheldon Kramer Darshanla, Wasan Robert Pe™ Thomas > TrousM recordmg sectary; Ronald 
Van Mynen, corresponding secretary; Ronald Fickel, president; Bruce Angelo, vice president; Anton Carol o, treasurer; Istok Leban 
Irvine Thorn, Michael O'Laughlin, William Gallagher, Robert Sinclair, Samuel Bedrick, David Lee, Herbert Jesse 



U9II, I CI.WI Ull iy o*_>.i»«!u. J/ atwuw 

Bottom Row: Seymour Brown, 



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Dallman Pstrfr^r'Knrtk^n 7 r?,L • r ^ ' ? S,ac , khou ^' , J x ud '' h R °V e , r - Courtney Read, Carol Spears, John White, Deborah Cummings, Sondra Sapora, Bonnie 
hi/ioL «■! n P ' Catherine Gaden, Jacqueline Wolf, Edward Heath, Dr. Howard Weaver Third Row: Charles Brightbill, Janet Langley, WiHiam Adams, 

Dr All™ s/nnr ?»ZV. T ' rf" a ^f "' C EU96 1* S^' B ?, nda K ,° enig ' Henry Chapman, Cynthia Crose, Judith Terp, Webbs Norman, adviser Second Row 
Gossld tr P a P s?,reV tdith w,r? e CI | v f r /. Ma . rth a Forsyth, Marilyn Alexander, Allen Sigoloff, vice president; Jerry McDonald, president; Barbara Gilby, secretary; David 
Gossard, treasurer; Judith Warren, Astnda Drullis Bottom Row: Andrew White, Marvin Heffington, Barbara Goeke, Richard Fletemeyer, Nils Fagerman 



Highlighting the meetings of the American Rec- 
reation Society this year were lectures by outstand- 
ing field workers in recreation. This organization 
acted as a medium through which students in the 



recreation curriculum became acquainted with their 
instructors on an informal basis and were able, 
through informal discussions, to learn more about the 
problems and rewards of their chosen field. 



American Recreation Society 



American Society of Agricultural Engineers 



The campus Christmas tree salesmen this year were 
members of the American Society of Agricultural 
Engineers; revenue gained from sales was used to bin 
wood so that the group could build work-benches 



for agricultural engineering classrooms. In addition, 
the group published a yearbook, entered the com- 
petition for the Farm Equipment Institute awards, 
and had an exhibit in Engineering Open House. 




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Randell Van Dykes, Stanley Bennett, John Healy 



American Society of Civil Engineers Holds Senior Refresher Course 



During the past spring, the American Society of 
Civil Engineers held a refresher course for its gradu- 
ating members; through this course, the members 
prepared themselves for the professional engineering 
examination which the State of Illinois requires that 
all engineering graduates take. 

In seeking to bring the faculty and the students 
into closer contact, the organization sponsored facul- 
ty-student athletic competitions. At the regular month- 



ly meetings, both students and faculty of the civil 
engineering department heard professional engineers 
discuss topics of current concern in the field. Through 
field trips to nearby industries and construction sites, 
members saw first-hand what their future profession 
will involve. 

The purpose of this organization is to acquaint 
future engineers with the problem and the responsi- 
bilities they may face in their life's work. 



Top Row: Arthur Horkay, Christian Andreasen Abdul T.lukd., - DjrrjH lohjjyi.r Rich.rc HE*.^ri'IMvi«rr, Robert ^Harold ^rarnowsk^ Third 
&„ E „ U T.U°&^^^ »™ GreTo^yLockhart, vice president,- Georo, Ro 9 an, secretary; Prof. Eu 9 en f 

Chesson,' Marshall Thompson, president; Barry Dempsey, treasurer 





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American Society of Mechanical Engineers Publishes Student Papers 



Several members of the Illinois chapter of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers attended 
the regional convention of the organization this year. 
Prior to the convention, the members wrote technical 
papers concerning matters which had been discussed 
in engineering seminars or work done in research. 
The members of the chapter chose the best two of 
these papers; these two were then presented in com- 
petition for cash awards at the convention. 



The national chapter of A.S.M.E. this year pre- 
sented a scholarship to one of the members of the 
Illinois organization. Applicants for such a scholar- 
ship must meet very high standards of scholarship 
and character before considered for such an award. 

This organization attempted this year to advance 
knowledge of the theory and practice of mechanical 
engineering by presenting several technical lectures, 
one of which concerned casting of metals. 



Kowieski Richard Ohon S^.J w n ?1l £ ♦' R al P h . Ka "™erme,er, Edward Wu, Harold Bermingham, Donald Schlueter, Robert Geiser, Richard Van Pelt Daniel 
Week' BBtEL P-l rh T IT'- Cha , r L*?,- H ' att £. C ?, Jy Castlno < John Larson < Bradle V Horton, Robert Buser, Egon Babler, Bruce Stafford Fernando Caballero iLo 
b.rzelecki Bottom Row: Charles Reh ,ng, William Biallas, Thomas Mosillo, Dona d Carlson, Theodore Abell, Rona'd Weber Rober, Wolf berg <-aballero, Leo 






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37 




Third Row: Lora Barker, Margaret Morton, Sandra Padgett, Judith White, 



Top Row Phillip Brown Ronald Lamer, James Kunkel, James Carney, Louis Audi Third Row: Lora Barker, Margaret Morton, Sandra Padgett, Judith wnite 
Marlene Koester Judith Kannmac'her, Marcia Crosby Second Row: Joyce Johnson, Nancy Brown, Barbara Engquist, Nancy Lantz, Nancy Wood, Harnett Scheldt 
'eona Pedigo, Beverly Gardner, Jeanne Elder, Donna Isted Bottom Row: Barbara Elder, Kathleen Timmerman, Eleanor Burstein, Audree Cassens, Carol Leonard 
Salvatore Disp'ensa, Carol Enrico, Lorna Klorflne, Revonda Archer, Harriet Albin 



Faculty and students in the commercial field en- 
joyed the group's Christmas party. Other activities 
of the club were panel discussions on problems in the 
business field, a talk by Dr. Arnold C. Condon on the 



importance of shorthand, and reports by field repre- 
sentatives on business education. People interested 
in commercial leaching or in secretarial training are 
invited to join this group. 



Business Education Club 



Beta Alpha Psi 



Members of Beta Alpha Psi are selected from stu- 
dents in the accounting curriculum who have achieved 
high scholastic and professional attainments in the 
field of accounting. This year new members were 



initiated at two invitational banquets during the fall 
and spring semesters. This national honorary and 
professional fraternity recognized high moral and 
scholastic achievements in accounting. 



Top Row: Joe DeMaris, Ronald Nickel, Philip Fess, Harl Ryder, Bernard Coda, Vernon Zimmerman, Herschel Anderson Second Row: Gerald Brighton Nicholas 
Dopuch, James Vickrey, Norton Bedford, Mervyn Wingfield, Christopher Moye, Nancy Shipp, James Giese, Cecil Worrells Bottom Row: William Ferrara, Charles I 



Thomas Williams 




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Throughout this year, the group presented Latin 
American dances, provided free weekly Spanish les- 
sons, and was in charge of the entertainment at the 
Copacabana Club at the International Fair. In the 



spring, members of the club sponsored a Colombian 
dinner at the Y.M.C.A. With their program, the 
group attempted to show the American students the 
different aspects of Colombian culture. 



Colombian Student's Association 



Commerce Council 



Commerce students, on the basis of scholastic aver- 
age, activities and interest, may become members of 
the Commerce Council. During this year, industries 
sent representatives and displays to the campus to 



acquaint the members with the various fields of com- 
merce. The purpose of the organization is the for- 
warding of student views to the administration and 
promoting better student-faculty relations. 





•,4„„ t r„^» Pankin ronorter- David Macomber Paul Malven, David Sager, secretary; William Palm, Marvin Schlomer Bo"?"* 
Top Row: KevmJ-yons, president,- ^'g^'^ J^Scph^ n treasurer; Richard Wissell, David Doering, Donald Beitz. Franklin Kenyon, Gerald Palm, 



D rRictrd r W T owr SO Not G i „ r p:nef:' S DXrr C D e ah7;H 



The Dairy Production Club sponsored University 
of Illinois Dairy Judging Teams at the International 
Collegiate Dairy Judging in Waterloo, Iowa and at 
the International' Dairy Show in Chicago. The club, 



an affiliate chapter of the American Dairy Science 
Association, staged a banquet in February at which 
dairy judging awards were presented and an out- 
standing freshman and senior were honored. 



Dairy Production Club 



Dairy Technology Society 



On October 5, in competition with twenty-three 
collegiate teams at Miami, Florida, the University of 
Illinois Dairy Judging Team was chosen "National 
Champions." In addition, sponsoring luncheons for 



dairy technology alumni, encouraging scholarship and 
fostering good relations between students and faculty 
promoted an interest in the dairy industry for students 
in the dairy technology curriculum. 



Top Row: Kolar Ramachandran, Ashok Ganguly KageakiAibara Francis Earl, Geo, -ge M uck G £j, Fli ckinge,, ^^^ 
5^= Rafph B A u Z r a 'D J a°vd n K'n'n. P ££. tt?SL&SL!?Z«lffi. "K Judith V 6sborn, Kenneth Roberts, Harold Schroth, Dennis Gordon 
Sherman, ^'P^^^ Ve p h To i, ias , S cott Seibert, Joseph Merriell, Edward Lawton, 



Bottom Row: 



Robert Schwarberg 



Leon Langhauser 



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ALL PRODUCTS 

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ILLINOIS 

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Top Row: Dr. E. D. Pepper, Rudy Frank, Lind 



Linda Ellis, Anita Alter, Elizabeth Brown, Virginia Harrell, William Richard, Wayne Prigge, John Konya 
Gibbons, Joyce McCurley, Bette Henlein, Joan Woltzen, T. J. Nugent, Dean Trembly, Kenneth Clarke Thir 

P. Danipl Warhtpl Fli7akoth Fncc D n k a ,t E..» /~U-,-l«,. \A/U:*_ C* I I li-l__ n I ■ .. . n i 



Patrick 
•d Rov 



m ' "r- «"»«;r«< maropyn mnier, Gloria Gibbons, Joyce McCurley, Bette Henlein, Joan „ 

Margaret Csicvara Miriam Pemburn Shirley Radle, Daniel Wachtel, Elizabeth Fuss, Robert Fuss, Charles Whitman, Stephen Jones, Helen Byard Janece Burke Lowell 
Hale n v ng El?zabeth er MoV e ?Wne S rh 0n f R ° W: , Ru ' h Webb, Thomas Sherman, Kenneth Viste, Marlys Sternberg, Sharon Hovey, George Rost! Dean Ridenou, wS 
JaneT'Lit p nlJ Ts!ffJn S I n ,e . ns en, Lynda Koopman, Kathenne Niemeyer, Jack Spring Bottom Row: Donald Zimmerman, Katherine Mario, Ralph Gauwit 
Janet Little. David Stafford, Sylvia Bellows, Thomas Linde, James Seybold, Roberta Edwards, Marshall Wall, Clarence Lake, Mary Berger, Kathryn Grise 



Wheelchair Basketball Team Spotlights Year for Delta Sigma Omicron 



Officers: Roberta Fdwards, member-at-large; James Seybold, vice president- Thon 
Linde, president; Sylvia Bellows, secretary; William Richard, treasurer 




This year Delta Sigma Omicron, the disabled 
students' organization, sponsored a broad range 
of activities both on and off the campus. These 
activities included the nationally known Gizz 
Kids wheelchair basketball team, intramural 
football, baseball, square dancing and bowling. 
A high point of the year for members of the 
organization was the annual Harold Scharper 
Awards Banquet which was held in October. 
At this banquet outstanding members of Delta 
Sigma Omicron were honored for their achieve- 
ments and for their services to the organization 
and to the University. 

Delta Sigma Omicron's men and women are 
enrolled in almost every curriculum of the Uni- 
versity; its alumni have made notable contribu- 
tions to all fields of both the professions and 
the arts. Each member gives vitality to the 
feeling that it is one's ability that is most im- 
portant, not one's disability. 



441 



1 n y n pm* 






Too Row Leslie Bell Thomas Doudera, Cecil Neal, Albert Smith, John Mount, David Gotch, Donald Passaglia, James McGuire, Henry Sachrison Third Row: 
Clvde Jones a!sT Dean Leon Reiv itz. Peter Hess, David Sullivan, William Allison, Norman Jones, Jon Brodd, William Peterson Raymond Wallen, Robert Wallis, Prof. 
Emerson Cammack adviser Second Row: Carol Hamilton, Richard Eicksteadt, historian; Jack Marcacci, secretary Donald Brumhk, vice president; Ronald Brown presi- 
de^t7 DaniirKintneo vice president; Norman Gustafson, treasurer; Alan Gibbs, Alvin Martin Bottom Row: Salvatore D.spensa, James Ranallo, Phillip Brown, Robert 
Firebaugh, John Johnson, Robert Piskie, Floyd Hallberg 



A professional fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi restricts 
membership to male students enrolled in the school of 
Commerce who have a 3.5 all-university scholastic 
average. This year, meetings were held with repre- 



sentatives of the business world who explained their 
company's plans and ideas. During the year, members 
saw commerce first hand by visiting the Peoria Journal 
Star and Keystone Wire Co. 



Delta Sigma Pi 



Engineering Council 



Members of this council, composed of representa- 
tives from the different engineering societies, coordi- 
nate the student's and faculty's activities and efforts. 
In the spring semester, the council presented the 



annual Engineering Open House featuring exhibits 
that demonstrated scientific concepts in simple terms. 
Socially, the group sponsored the annual St. Pats Ball 
during the spring semester. 



Too Row Louis Lanzerotti, Gerald Cohen, Dale Brinkmann, Brendan Nelligan, William Westerman, Heino Tamrn, Ronald Sprague Kenneth Valentas Philip 
James Cooper, Wayne Gruen, Joseph Usiewicz, John Nemsick 



6 



ft 



•"' f i 




Murley. vicT cha?™ of K"' B~ Rot "ptl," wl!b^ """^ Haky ' f^™" ° f physkal arrangement,; Thomas 

departmental representatives P We,bler ' chaiman of art and Photography; Louis Lanzerort,, general chairman; John Raflfil, vice chairman of 



The Central Coordinating Committee publicized 
and coordinated all Engineering Department plans for 
the annual Open House which was held this spring. 
Visitors attended from many high schools and com- 



munities throughout the state and from other univer- 
sities. The purpose of the Open House was to give 
students and the public a chance to observe tangible 
results of engineering principles being taught. 



Engineering Open House 



Field and Furrow Club 



This year the club sponsored a crop judging contest, 
soil judging and evaluation contest, speech contest and 
a faculty-student volleyball game. In the spring, mem- 
bers had an exchange tour with the Purdue Agronomy 



Club. Members are selected on the basis of interest in 
crops, soils, and other branches of agronomy. In 
monthly meetings, members learned about the work 
being done in this field. 



s Melton, Larry Lewis Fourth Row: Jack Cavanah, 
iggs, Robert Greive, Wayne Blunier, John White 
Row: Gordon Sissing, secretary; Richard Snodgrass, 



443 





RoberT Arms^ong Merle Krause, Eugene 7 Eckebrecht, Frank Nudge, Max Allison, Donald Selmger, Joseph Leshyn 



Last fall the Floriculture Club promoted National 
Flower Week by setting up a store window display, 
sending articles to local newspapers and staging flower 
shows on the campus. During Mother's Day weekend 



in May, members entered their own arrangements for 
judging in the spring flower show. Members assisted 
in a short course which the University offered last fall 
for florists of Illinois. 



Floriculture Club 



Illi-Sota 



This occupational therapy organization participated 
in the campus Christmas whirl this year by sponsoring 
a party for orphans in the community. During the 
year, the group took a field trip to the University of 



Illinois Research Hospital and presented films and 
speakers at their regular meetings. By working with 
the handicapped, the members gained a realistic in- 
terest in their future occupations. 



K^l^SHSS^^^ 





Gouwens RirhanH Ha „l„ Ih V . ■ WcWhmney Ph,ll,p Do ahon Lamar Fesser, Kenneth Sauers, Robert Baker, Michael Lippincott, James Schoonaert, Dan 

l2?Wn n H In Pr hl'Jn- r? e ' Ck h ^T , C ?^ e '' William Flynn, Robert Sipp, John Fisher Third Row: James AAunton Gary Cooper, Gordon Gullakson 
ChTrles Beckerhal? wJ™ ll '', am GleaS ° n ' M ? X p Web t', y Va,, ?T £ U u nk ?. r ;.,F° r T Y^" "' Gera ' d Palm ' J ° hn Daly ' Robert C ^ h ^- David Inskeep, Robert Brackebusch 
H Dr W Ah'«,r V R„H n B | eC .°u d AA ROW: ^ a " er ? r ',f ith ', Wl " lam Bee ' er ' John Burrus ' Richard Vatthauer, Roger Steiger, John Wilson, Heston Wesson, Mile 

John Land ^XrH mL N !™ 1^ ? h ^° n ' Cur, ' SS G '" er ' Lawrence Drew ^ Donald McAtee, Robert Hatch, Gary Starwalt, Edward Stokes, Donald Livingston, 

John Land, Kichard Kenn Not in panel: Max Whitney 



Hoof and Horn Club Holds 34th Annual Little International Horse Show 



Officers: jonn Burrus, historian; Heston Wesson, reporter; John Wilson, secretary; 
Richard Vatthauer, vice president; Dr. Waco Albert, adviser; Roger Steiger, president 
Not in panel: Richard Freitag, treasurer 




The major understanding of the Hoof and 
Horn Club this year was the presentation of its 
annual Little International Horse Show. This 
show featured three gaited, five gaited, and 
pleasure horse classes. During the intermission, 
the queen, Heather Hansen, was crowned; and 
her court was presented. 

During the spring semester the members of 
this organization sponsored a fatstock judging 
contest and a meats judging contest which all 
students in the College of Agriculture are 
eligible to enter. 

Hoof and Horn Club ended its year with a 
large barbecue. At this barbecue, the names of 
the outstanding senior member of the organiza- 
tion and the outstanding alumnus were an- 
nounced. Also revealed at the barbecue was the 
name of an honorary Hoof and Horn member. 
Members of judging teams were also honored for 
outstanding records at judging meets. 



445 




Top Row Ronald Boyer Lynn Holmes, Paul Lederer, llmar Waldner, Brack Duker, Gordon Honegger, Charles Goldstein Second Row: Viyian Beeler Mary 
Theobald, Judy Bell, Patricia Edwards, Janet Dubisky, Joseph Cicero Bottom Row: Gary Haddock, Norman Sobiesk, Jerry Carson, Arnold Perl, James Ellern, Frank Gaides 



To encourage interest in current political, social 
and moral problems and controversies, the Illini 
Forensic Association sponsored weekly programs on 
WILL-Radio and co-sponsored with the University 



YMCA a series of parliamentary debates. The club 
provided training experiences in debate, discussion 
and public speaking for its members through par- 
ticipation in debate tournaments, and meets. 



Illini Forensic Association 



Illinois Secretarial Club 



The requirement for membership in the Illinois 
Secretarial Club is participation in a campus office 
position at least twenty hours weekly. Members of 
this organization are work trainees of the Business 



Education Department of the College of Commerce 
and Business Administration. This year the organiza- 
tion devoted one meeting to a job supervisor's dis- 
cussions of the rewards of his particular field. 



Top Row Ralph Mason, adviser; Karen Meyers, Georgia Brown, Mary Gabbert, Kathleen Timmerman, Barbara Hardy, Martha Welch, Margaret Wilfong, Nancy 
Tetzlaff, Sharon Kilpatrick Second Row: Leona Pedigo, Harriett Scheldt, Lora Barker, secretary; Marjorie Dodd, treasurer; Linda Kannmacher president; Mada Beau- 
champ, vice president; Janice Kessler Bottom Row: Maureen Buck, Sandra Swiatoweic, Fleanor Burstein, Marcia Crosby, Sandra Padgett, Judith Kannmacher, Carolyn 
Karthan Not in panel: Barbara Lapington, Jolene Marcacci, Carol Veihman, Irene Amos, Marlene Carlson, Jack Marcacci, Glenna Powers, Janet Schleper, Karen Strack 





Top Row: Robert Kelly, Bonnie Anslow, Kay Oltmanns, Carolyn Tillema, Annette Haskett, Richard Storer, Lee Fisher Fourth Row: William Stewart, Richard 
Makarski, Barbara Horton, Vivian McMullin, Arthur Fournier, William Krueger, John Littlemeyer Third Row: Horst Seyferth, Paul Flynn, Barry Gage, Robert Ferguson, 
James Tatnall, John Pazdera, William Schmiegelt Second Row: Donald Huizinga, Gordon Phillips, John Drennen, Alice Shoger, Stephen Lucas, Don Mueller, Ron Fritsch 
Bottom Row: Ted Smith, Roger Sugg, Stephen Sward, James Nowlan, Lita Hornstein, Thomas Sykes, John Tascher, Robert McAdams, Dr. Edwin Dale Not in panel: 
Alan Cutler, Floyd Dierzen, Mary Kleis, James Kline, John Michela, Madelein Marti, Timm Smith, Wesley Wooley 



Illini Young Republicans Help Bring Voters to Polls in Local Primaries 



Top Row: Horst Seyferth, publicity chairman; Donald Huizinga, treasurer; Ted Smith, 
state president; Arthur Fournier, membership chairman Bottom Row: Alice Shoger, 
secretary; Robert Scott, president; Robert McAdams, vice president 




As one of the most physically active organiza- 
tions on the campus, the Illini Young Republi- 
cans made numerous contacts with members of 
the Champaign-Urbana community this year. 
Before each primary election, members did a 
great deal of "footwork" in conducting extensive 
campaigns to get voters out to the polls. Members 
also conducted polls on campus concerning cur- 
rent political topics. 

Activities of the group were not confined 
wholly to the immediate vicinity of the campus 
as was evidenced by the number of members who 
attended the Midwest Convention, Illinois Con- 
vention, and National Convention. A few mem- 
bers were privileged to attend the Youth Political 
Conference in Washington, D. C. 

Meetings of the Illini Young Republicans were 
often in the form of political rallies which fea- 
tured Republican office-holders or party workers 
as speakers. 



447 




Top Row Ronald Placek, adviser; Prof. Wayne Shick, Harrison Streeter, adviser; Prof. Jerry Dobrovo ny Fourth Row: Gorden Martin, adviser; Kenneth Mac- 
Morran Prof Robert Jewett, Claude Johnson, Kent AAowe, Richard Wilen, Donald Kibler, Gerald Peters, Ronald Woiewoda Third Row: Gordon Mulholland, Douglas 
Pihl William Keefer Thomas Prickett, Kenneth Burch, James Bruen, Robert O'Leary, Harold Andrykowski, John Wadhams, Melvin Jager Second Row: Francis 
Saliamona Dean Jackson, Wayne Ch senhall, Lyle Gerdes, John Punzack, Max Quigley, William Littmann, William Tuttle, James O'Toole Bottom Row: Davis Reyes- 
Guer^a adviser Marvin Mrnka, vice president; Ronald Zachary, treasurer; Thomas Hartley; adviser; Russell Hurliman, secretary; Jack Diedench, Harold Trout, president 



Highlights of this group's year were a bowling 
tournament between the members and the faculty in 
the month of February and participation in the En- 
gineering Open House, which is held for high school 



students. Also, the group held seven meetings and 
toured an industrial plant. Improvement of industrial 
knowledge and faculty-student relationships are the 
aims of this general engineering society. 



Illinois Society of General Engineers 



Isabel Bevier Home Economics Club 



Engaging in a variety of activities, the group spon- 
sored a Christmas party for the foreign students and 
helped to sponsor Plowboy Prom. Another project for 
the year was the Honors Dessert where outstanding 



home economics seniors were honored. One of the 
high points of the year for the members of the Home 
Economics Club was a field trip to the Illinois Power 
Company's demonstration laboratories. 



Fi 



Top Row: Norma Strube, Deloris Gregory, Judith Weeks, Ruth Devries, Eleanor Drake, Karen 
ifth Row: Jeanne Frederick, Kolleeta Moyes, Bonnie Swanson, Roberta Ackerman, Pauline Seefeldt, Ann 
hamn Wilrnypn Rrenria Fisher. Carla Kunkel. Rita Lauterbach, Marjorie Erickson, Bonnie Van Buskirk. I 

econd Row: Barbara Strunk, Marilyn Higgs, Glenna Blunier, Cheryl Mathre, Jo fun, margaret 
I, Florence Gegel, Mary Blair, Mary Babler, Mary Mather, adviser; Mary Watson, Coena Blair, 



Cremieux, Mary Knuppel, Marjorie Swanson, Joanne Spaide 
i Montgomery, Beverly Gallup Fourth Row: Beverly Folkers, 
Nina Eastman Third Row: Karen Bossert, Martha Bliss, Nancy 
ia~..:i. — u; n n« r.l a n n5 Rl.inmr <"hor\,l AAsthr*. In Pi ilt . Maraaret 



nun row: jcannc iicucum, ™i»™ ...«,_.,, ~unine owdmun, ivuljcico <-».i\ci man, iau....>- .«-'-■•'"•''., 

Sharon Wilcoxen, Brenda Fisher, Carla Kunkel, Rita Lauterbach, Marjorie Erickson, Bonnie Van Buskirk. iNina casrman .mm RB „ : .«.c.i ""«<=". "" ,, I " , ^," , T1 ' . 
Mason, Rebecca Van Deventer, Carol Dick, Kathlene Gooch, Jean Eaton Second Row: ^Barbara Strunk, Marilyn Higgs, Glenna^Blumer, ^heryl Mathre, Jo /utt^Ntarga 
Williams, Patricia Long, Linda Mooberry Bottom Row: Rosamund Ash 
Judith Heffelfinger, Rosalynn Jenkins 





i 



**C*' *>m*\ 



* •♦ 



Top Row: George Vytanovych, Dean Rogeness, Dennis Read, Joseph Salvato, Myron Gr 




This organization consists of both faculty and stu- 
dents who arc engaged in metallurgical, mining, and 
petroleum engineering. Members propose to foster 
better relations between students and faculty and to 



identify themselves with the outstanding professional 
society in their field. This year the regular monthly 
meetings featuring semi-technical lectures helped to 
promote this fellowship. 



Mineral Industries Society 



Omega Tau Sigma 



At each meeting of Omega Tau Sigma, speeches 
were given pertaining to the field of veterinary medi- 
cine. Such topics as "Small Animal Practice," "Veteri- 
nary Research," and "Space Medicine" provided a 



rounded program for the members of this organization. 
A series of social events such as picnics, exchange 
dinners and a dinner dance made up a full year of 
education and fun for the club members. 



msM^^^^^mmmmmsmmmmm 



149 






r^i 



II, Roberta Coburn, Rosemary Elsasser, Ruth Riddle, Terry Davis, , I na Gaines, 
Judy Bau ^oann'Mose.ich Ins Lederfme, Sandy Schultz Thi^Row: Eugene Anderson Ivan Sch.hr Robert Shannon, Lynne Powell, Sandra, Kopp, ClanceWelge, ^rene 
r.i.i_. i:iji_„ r u i,„ u„.«, n„„„;<> Vanau Ro™;» Ma lovA/^k I Virninia links. William Lanaudoe. Lahuqh Russell, Jack I 



Top Rov 



Ann Ward, Toni Zieff, Pat Bethel, Sue Manley, Mary Bulfln, Diane Dowdal 

a »:~u i~:« i ^«f; n a <^=,r*A\, <irhiilt7 ThirH Row: Eugene Anderson, lv_ 

ski, Virginia Jinks, Wi Ilia 



Juay Daus, joann /viosencn, nis lcuc c, oanvjy _. 

Pilafas, Lindley Crouch, Jan Harter, Bonnie Vanata, Bonnie Male 
adviser; Nancy Zaharke, ^ad : " 
Donath, pres' 

Judy Krubl, \amc iiuv«oiu, jun t inwidwui ~«.... 

Marilyn Rank, publicity chairman; Barbara Auble 



dley Crouch, Jan Harter, Bonnie Vanata, Bonnie maiewski, Virginia jinKs, nnnsm 
ncy Zaharke, adviser; Willis Ward, adviser; Mira Rodwan, art consultant; Margaret 
sident; Rick Szwiec, treasurer; Bonnie Auble, secretary; Violette Georgas, Marlene 
Kathe Howard, June Thorson, Camille Kearns, Marilyn Ross, Gloria McCormick, Mi 

L ^nkli^iti, chairman- Rarhara Auhle 



jcheier, Robert Shannon, Lynne Powell, ianara Nopp, fiance vveige, irene 

Langudge, Lahugh Russell, Jack Tapp Second Row: Alan Thomas, music 

■ Sprehe, workshop coordinator; Laura Quinn, vice president; Miriam 

ie Cooly, Connie Barcus, Eija Urpalainen Bottom Row: Frances Stremmel, 

Maria Powcar, Martha Turner, Beverly Dennen, Sandra Marlin Not in panel: 



Orchesis offers to men and women of the University 
of Illinois the opportunity for creative dance study, 
composition, and performance. This year members 
met weekly in two workshops where they practiced 



for the May 12th Spring Concert. The proceeds from 
the concert were given in the form of a scholarship 
which allowed one of its most talented members to 
study dance during the vacation months. 



Orchesis 



Pershing Rifles 



On March 12, our campus was the scene of the 
largest college drill meet of its kind in the country. 
The meet and the banquet which followed were the 
biggest projects of the Pershing Rifles organization. 



Approximately fifty-five teams competed this year in 
exhibition, regulation and individual events. Also, 
Pershing Rifles sponsored a bivouac in May and con- 
cerned itself with military movies at meetings. 



Too Row Merrel Booker Martin Reese Timothy Kraft, William Bradfield, John Drennan, John Biederman, John Bellmar, James Law, Bruce Johnson David Hi 1st, 
William Hodgsln D^[d Henning; Harry Smith ' Thomas ^Brown,' William Welch Fifth Row: Ned. Bacheldor, Larry Thomas, Lynn Gosnell, ,_ Robert ^-e^Ly^nn __Swee._, 





Second Row^ U~y J |^™ J r^^ Jame, Vandament, Norber, Cieslewicz, Arthur Bower, Rona!d Worstell 

treasurer Michael EsslrsTrom c Resident Carlvle L„" ' J ° h " Lun , ds, ^ n ' . K/by Johnson, Gerald Grose, William Gallo Bottom Row: Eddie Allen, Robert Hindsley, 
Not in pane,: KLWffl^£Bi S^K ^Z^^tf^™^^ R^Z^T" "*'"""• ^ ^ 



This national professional music fraternity, founded 
in 1898, worked to advance appreciation of music in 
America. This year it provided a one hundred dollar 
scholarship to a deserving freshman. Members of Phi 



Mu Alpha-Sinfonia presented a series of fifteen-minute 
radio programs over WILL featuring solos and en- 
sembles. Also, the fraternity gave two convocation 
programs at Smith Hall. 



Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia 



Poultry Science Club 



Noted speakers were presented at the Poultry Sci- 
ence Club programs to create interest and enlighten 
the members on the many different aspects of poultry 
raising, marketing and other phases of this field. High- 



lighting the year were several chicken barbecues. 
During the spring, the club took a trip to a large 
poultry farm. Membership in the club is open to 
those majoring in poultry science. 



Mark ZimmermXs^a! R^ldS™ "^ "^ ^^ D °" M M ° rriSSey ' Kenne,h B °' en B ° ,,0m R ° W: D °" M B -V, adviser; Alvin Wire, John Gesell, 



451 





i i*- 




I 






I 



Top Row Gene Gunsalus, Donald Hamre, Maynard Suhre, John Barnett, Harprit Sandhu, Timothy Termeer Thomas Kennedy vice president; Thomas Ross, 
Edward Simonis ' Third Row: Rickard Blomgren, Charles Boschek, Herman Becker, David Duncan, James Perrm, William Alborg, Terry Burke, Henry Chapman, Eugene 
Kirbv Second Row Nekete Mlade, Andrew Cox, Gerald Leszczywski, Robert Damerow, Harry Westfall, secretary; Martin Ignazito, Steve Sanderson, Dennis Keck, 
Arthur Rissman, Raymond Berg In sports car: Fred Fiala, president; Sally Trinkle, sports car queen Not ,n panel: Ronald Pass, treasurer 



Scuderia lllro provided a common meeting place 
for Illini sports car enthusiasts. Such events as the 
testing of the skill and accuracy of the sports car 
driver were included in this year's program. A queen 



was chosen in conjunction with their concours, which 
was a display of antique automobiles in almost per- 
fect condition. This event attracted 8,000 Midwest- 
erners to the U of I campus this year. 



Scuderia lllro 



Senior Class, College of Law 



The Law School Recognition Banquet was one of 
the highlights of the year. At this banquet the out- 
standing students in the College of Law were honored. 
The group also sponsored weekly a series of out- 



standing speakers engaged in the field of law to 
acquaint the students with some of the problems in 
their profession. In the field of athletic endeavor, 
the group won the I.M. football championship. 





One project of this professional journalism frater- 
nity is known campus wide: the annual publication of 
"The College Tumor," a campus humor newspaper. 
The 1959 Sigma Delta Chi District Convention held 



on our campus highlighted the year's activities for 
the fraternity. Members also attended the national 
convention in Indiana during the fall and presented 
the Gridiron Banquet in the spring. 



Sigma Delta Chi 



Society for Advancement of Management 



Highlighting the events of the Society for Advance- 
ment of Management was the field trip to Chicago 
where various types of businesses were observed. The 
purpose of the group is to promote the study and 



understanding of the principles of governing manage- 
ment through research, discussion and publications. 
This year the organization also published a bi-weekly 
management newsletter for its members. 










f 

1 **' 1§'~ 


v-S 


M"?. rv nt m^ 


9L) 



k. ™» y# 






3rs, Willard Stanley, Leon Zeter Second Row: Norman Reinbold, Richard Stone, Robert Neth, 



George MH^Ta^ ^ing^ald' Robin" SSI^^"JSri«cS,k:''P»T Pay ne7'secr^ry7 Stephen Davis, adviser; David Fresco,,, president; Linn Peterson, 
treasurer; Dale Brinkmann 



The annual competition with Bradley University 
for the best technical paper award highlighted the 
year for the Society of Automotive Engineers. This 
organization seeks to stimulate the professional de- 



velopment of engineering students interested in the 
many facets of automotive technical work. During 
Engineering Open House they operated all displays 
in the Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory. 



Society of Automotive Engineers 
Student Branch American Ceramic Society 



The big social event of the Society's year was its 
unique Pig Roast. Members of the group also par- 
ticipated in the Engineering Open House, helped with 
the annual St. Pat's Ball and maintained an S.B.A.C.S. 



basketball team. Meetings of this organization pre- 
sented the top men in the ceramic industry as fea- 
tured lecturers. Another project of the group was the 
publication of "The Illini Ceramist." 



Top Row AAedford Parks, Clifford Ruderer, Gary Paulson, Geoffrey Davis, David Slaw, Valentine Patarini, Chester Connors, Dewayne Seets, Robert Parkison John 
Willi Robe?, Radt'ke Steven Colburn Frederick Reven Third Row: James Laird, Dr. James Nelson, William Whitman William Muhlstad, James Spachman, Richard 
"row'n .Do I I Chow, Tarry Fehrenbacher, William Long, James Blome, David Carter Edward Clausen, George Pecoraro Arlm Doennc, ^"^^ToslTs^rT 
Tennery, Betty Shinkevich, Dr. Ralph Cook, Dr. Andrew Andrews, Robert Baker, Dale Giesek.ng, Leone Murphy, Gad Fldred Bottom Row. Howard Hill, David Sturgis, 
William'walker, Robert Vernetti, Cecil Van Dyke, Allan Brink, James Davis 




V 



i 




T\ 



ley 
Len 
son 
Joh 



Top Row: Dr. Nelson Harris, guest speaker; Judith Gabel, Judith Weitz, Elizabeth Fiedler 
Marcia Smith Betty W.Ik Carolyn Smith, treasurer Third Row: Lauris Goff, Mary Hen 

° re Bon m d Row h R 6en S Ft <? e , COnC, u R S W: Je | nne Case *' J *™< Walberg, Florence Clauson 
, M,r M ^ n 6 , Kallas - Sylvia Huffman, Sandra Gilbert, Lynn Bell, Joan Wilkinson 

n McGill, adviser; Dr. James Rybak, adviser; Donna Searing, president 




Alfred Davis Fourth Row: Carol Getz, Evelyn Hammel, Sharon Hart- 
Hennessy^ Shirley Kroencke, Kirby Doyle, Deanna VanKleef, Rebecca Nash 
Reed, Marcia Rubin, Virginia Weibel, Vivian Nogle, Karen Peter- 
Beatrice Millner, Patricia Smith, Jane Stutz, secretary Not in panel: Dr. 



This was the first year that the Student Education 
Association was a separate group from the Future 
Teachers of America, a high school organization. The 
newly separated organization sent members to the 



state convention at Wheaton College on November 20 
where Gretchen Zeigler was elected state president. 
Also, a Christmas party was given for mentally handi- 
capped children in the Champaign area. 



Student Education Association 



Student Industrial Engineering Society 



The members of this organization participated in 
the Engineering Open House by developing displays 
on mathematical statistics, industrial safety, plant lay- 
out, motion and time study, fire protection, and tool 



engineering. The group also sponsored a golf tourna- 
ment and bowling team, and maintained and pub- 
lished a newsletter for alumni which listed addresses 
and present employment of alumni. 



WheeleAa™^ wfvne^loX t^awte 3 ft"'*' D °-'d ^ichman, Joseph Strode, Roger Heath, James 

John Delaney, Philipp Gritten, Robert Colter, James Arend i Richard azar DonTlH Ku t°> y'.Ir ! ' Thomas Slamnka Third Row: Rodger Bogardus, Floyd Miller, 



455 




lF"$' 5; 5 



pf •? ' 



:m 




i ; 



fcM 


•K! JA11 * 







"Mfd Ki^rte Whining- 

James Clayton Second Row: Manrique Echenique, William Cowen, Willard 
Bottom Row- Ashley Owen, Rudolph Dorner, Robert Burton, Joseph Newcomb, 

_ uggen, Jerry Nilsson, Aitrea MerDster, « 

Milton Trummel, Larry Rose, Dale Dufour 



Top Row: Robert Fisher, Robert Foisy, Charles btewart, Kaipn oauman, oiny r. 
lain Carroll Pedersen, Eugene Thomas, Robert Wangerow, Bruce ZumBahlen Third R< 
ton, Andy Djerf, William Luban, Robert Kipp, Lynn Gray, James Carson James Wiltier, 
Bruggen Jerry Nilsson, Alfred Herbster, Allan Mickelson, Frank Morrell, John Dutt 



Publishing a yearbook was the special project of 
the University of Illinois Foresters. One of the 
monthly meetings was highlighted by a talk pre- 
sented by the personnel director for the U. S. Forestry 



Service. A bonfire in the fall, an inter-school conclave, 
and a picnic helped the members to develop their 
professional outlooks and become better acquainted 
with other members of the organization. 



U. of I. Foresters 



Radio-Television Workshop 



Every other Friday evening found members of this 
organization producing a television program in which 
they filled all of the non-technical jobs. Guest speak- 
ers who are active in professional radio and tele- 



vision work appeared at their meetings. Members 
gained experience in radio and television production 
through field trips and by serving as personnel for 
the 9:00 P.M. news program on WILL-TV. 



cz, Harvey Schwartz, Robert Endres, James Haddigan Third Row: David Lange, Cyrelda Tarter, Charles Petti t. Peter Kendall. Harold Blue, 

v: Diane Malmberg, Jerome Modjeski, Eva Thorburn, Michael Filerman, Pat T,ed,e, Stanley Sowers J£ M "™ J^J"^ J^ ' ^ 

Lapin, Steven Barnett, Jesse Barr, Patricia Marttila Not in panel: Richard Adams, Melvin Grant, Thomas Guback, Richard Maginot, uanie 



Top Row: John Bobicz 
James Schroeder Second Row: 
Thompson, Beryl Smith, Emily Lu M . 
Niemeyer, John Ravencroft, Arthur Skwerski, Dennis Swanson, James Vetos, Michael Welsh, Warren Adams 





Fleming, ^n^tt ^dy' F^'n.To^'. t^ ffi H^t ^eY ^^f' R^cf Ad'aiXVn Brinker S-r.h Wrobk., Ada Ross Louise Volkstog, Carolyn 
Barbara Calvert, Linda Grunden, Joyce Wold Judith Kleppinqer Mary Kennev W n F.ir.hU w ' ■ - P r t . T ^ *<>«;, Hope Kunin, lone Cribb, Betty Shriner, 
AAarlene Lance, Bonnie Cravens, Kenlyn Gay, Lois Nestle Ma^fena BaMridae sJond Row AA ' w-T"" ^"i Jud ", h , Edlu " d - . Let ^ Ackerman, Marlene Cramer, 



A camp out held at the beginning of the year 
to welcome all freshmen was one of the unique 
activities of this organization. Other special events 
were the Christmas party and senior party. Informal 



coffee hours were a part of the activities, also. This 
is a professional club providing laboratory experi- 
ences which broaden the understanding of the role 
each must play in the teaching profession. 



Women's P. E. Majors Club 



Zeta Sigma Alpha 



This year Zeta Sigma Alpha prepared armor cadets 
in the ROTC advanced cadet program to accept re- 
sponsibilities after becoming Second Lieutenants in 
the United States Army. Members learned the uses 



of modern armor warfare and the operation and 
maintenance of tanks. They also worked in coopera- 
tion with the Military Ball Committee and displayed 
tanks at University functions whenever possible. 



Mapes, vSn^ch?^ ^ndanner, W. Hall, Joseph Klieber, Dean Hallerud, Robert Rei, 

AAi I f — 



57 




New Women's Sports Association Program Offers House Competitions, 




Officers — Top Row: AAarlena Baldridge, secretary; Ann Brown, extramural council chairman; 
Virginia Seiler, A.R.F.C.W. president-elect; Sue Mittendorf, intramural council chairman Bottom 
Row: Jeraldine Young, treasurer; Mima Maish, president; Alberta Zelinski, vice president; 
Carolyn Fleming, publicity chairman 



As one of the most active organizations 
on the campus, Women's Sports Associa- 
tion has at least one member in almost 
every organized women's house. The task 
or these members this year was twofold. 
They spent a great amount of time and 
effort in preparing for the convention of 
the National Athletic and Recreation Fed- 
eration of College Women. The University 
of Illinois chapter will be hostess for this 
convention which will be held here in the 
spring of 1961. Virginia Seiler is president- 
elect of the national organization. Second- 
ly, members evaluated their present pro- 
gram and then enlarged it. 

Campus women were invited to par- 
ticipate in the new program which offered 
organized activities in many women's sports. 



Ryan, Judith Franzen, Helen Hewitt, Bonita 
athleen Stoeckel, 
Culbertson, Hilde- 




458 



I n I ram lira Is. Extramurals 



The list of extramural sports offered in- 
cluded field hockey, basketball, volleyball, 
and soltball. Basketball, volleyball, bowl- 
ing, tennis, tumbling, apparatus, gymnas- 
tics, trampoline, badminton, ice skating, 
and golf were the intramural activities pro- 
vided. This year the Association also or- 
ganized inter-house competitions in several 
major sports— basketball, volleyball, bowl- 
ing and swimming. 

This year, the Women's Sports Associa- 
tion sponsored both the Inter-house Mara- 
thon Swim and the Inter-house Swimming 
Meet for the first time. All members of 
organized women's houses were invited to 
enter either or both of these events. 

The busy schedule of this group included 
acting as hostess for the Southern Illinois 
District Field Hockey Sports Day. 

In the spring, besides carrying out pro- 
grams in seasonal sports such as golf and 
soltball, the Association presented the an- 
nual WSA Awards and Installation Dessert. 
The high point of the evening was the 
presentation of awards to the houses which 
had previously won the Women's Sports 
Association inter-house tournaments. Other 
awards were given to the houses which had 
participated most regularly in WSA activi- 
ties and inter-house competitions. 

For all extramural, intramural, and in- 
ter-house events, the members of the organi- 
zation chose a chairman and an assistant 
chairman. These two girls did all of the 
organization and paper work that was nec- 
essary for the presentation of a successful 
program in their particular sport. 

Through its extensive program, Women's 
Sports Association fulfills its threefold pur- 
pose. This purpose, as stated in the con- 
stitution of the organization, is "to create, 
promote, and maintain interest in sports by 
providing opportunities for participation 
and instruction in a supervised program of 
team and individual sports; to provide 
opportunities for intramural and extra- 
mural competitive play; to offer opportuni- 
ties for the development of student leader- 
ship in the administration of such a sports 
program." 




Archery enthusiasts "aim for the gold" during a WSA intramural tourn 



ament. 



Up, up and into the basket goes a shot made in a WSA inter-h 



ouse competition. 




459 




Top Row Kenneth Bruhon, Robert Wilcox, Yoshitsugu Yamnda, William Blake, Thomas Sherman, Frank Biba, Hans Schmucky Fourth Row: John Cole Paul 
Neuhauser Frank Clinton, Robert DuFFy, William Stauter, Harold Trout, Lawrence Bergnach, Lee Hill, Elaine Kropp Third Row: Thomas Lackovic William Ure, William 
Smithing 'Richard Marrs, John Kurinsky, Charles Vohs, Allan Carney, Gerald Brodsky, Linda Timmel Second Row: Walter Heintzen, Robert Selvey, Charles Brown, 
Carolyn McMicken, Vahan Tatoian, William Bryant, Edward Lawton, William Lavin, Fred Nadzieja, Harvey Cohen Bottom Row: Christine Chauveau, Christian Chauveau, 
Nancy Telford, Robert Telford, John Mount, James Dodge, George Cameron, Charles Philblad, Roy Thackeray, John Phillips 



Illini Marketing Club Witnesses Indianapolis Business Firms in Action 



Officers — Top Row: Richard Teatherford, William Eadie, Keith Miller, Robert Telford, 
David Buyher, Prof. Richard Hill Bottom Row: Rahcel Leimbach, Rita Levey, Karen 
Strack, Carolyn McMicken 




Members ol the Illini Marketing Club began 
the year by holding a smoker at which all stu- 
dents were welcome. The purpose ol this meet- 
ing was to interest students in membership in 
the organization. 

Programs ol succeeding meetings were devoted 
primarily to activities concerning the marketing 
profession. The November meeting featured a 
panel ol marketing representatives from Carson, 
Pirie, Scott R; Co., Independent Grocers' Asso 
ciation and ]. C. Penney Co. An account execu- 
tive spoke a i the December meeting. 

The most important event of the year was the 
field trip to Indianapolis, Indiana. During the 
trip, members ol the group visited I lie Kroger 
Co., Eli Lilly Co., Stokclv Van Camp, a depart 
menl store and the National Hardware Asso< i.i 
lion where they witnessed marketing in action. 



460 






RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



For the student who is away from his home, re- 
ligious organizations provide something familiar, 
something that is universal — an emphasis upon how 
one ought to live in God's world. 

Some individuals seem to feel that the student 
loses the religious heritage he has previously acquired 
when he comes to college; however, our campus 
religious organizations feel that the opposite is true. 
On the average, the college student thinks more about 
religious and spiritual matters than any younger per- 
son; he begins to think more deeply into such matters 
than ever before. 

The concern of the college student for religious 
matters is demonstrated by the number of active 



participants in the programs of the campus religious 
organizations. Many students each semester enroll 
in credit courses offered by the various foundations. 
However, the concern of the religious organizations 
is not purely academic; weekly supperclubs combine 
the social aspects with the academic aspects of re- 
ligion. Foundations provide activities that on the 
surface may seem purely social. However, activities 
such as square dances are almost as much a part of 
spiritual education as Sabbath Day services; they 
teach the student to apply his religious teachings. 
Religious organizations fulfill well their purpose 
by supplying to the college student what college itself 
may overlook — spiritual education. 



Baptist Student Union 



This branch of the Southern Baptist Church is 
established to give its members a better understand- 
ing of their church. Programs presented by the group 
this year included seminars, discussion groups, and 



worship services. Christmas was celebrated at a party 
held for the children of members. Periodically, 
throughout the year, members sponsored work camps 
and ministries to county nursing homes. 



S°\*™i D°l a ! d M S .': e . l, ^' 1 .u ad . , l ise , r; Jl m ?. s _, H ° l, V J .° hn Stroehlein, Max. Sinkler, Georc 



Woto Bono. Row: Ma ry Gabbe^ jjdith O^ be.oris Mauld'^' C^«[fs, <S Sn^^^d^ ^pa^^fe^' 





Top Row: Margaret Hubbard, Boyd Coats, Rev. Richard Corliss, Bruce Bueschel, Dorothy Hubbard Bottom Row: David Hoover, Rev. W. Haydn Ambrose, 
Robert John, Diana Chiles, Larry Giliingham, Katherine Hunley, Manfred Rorig 



The Baptist Student Foundation, represented in 
this picture by the Student Council, seeks to fulfill 
the spiritual needs of the faculty, the staff, and the 
students in their church home on campus. Through 



fellowship in worship, study, evangelism and mis- 
sionary outreach, it nurtures a Christian faith relevant 
to each individual, to our university community and 
finally to the nation. 



Baptist Student Foundation 



Christian Science Organization 



Through weekly meetings this year, members of 
this group learned to practice the principles taught 
in Christian Science. Main events of the year were 
the autumn and spring receptions and two lectures 



in which the speakers were members of the Board of 
Lectureship. On football weekends, the group was 
host at social events at which visiting Christian Science 
students were entertained. 





ad 



viser- Ilbert°Ash^s S t Sel Second Rnw* Mv"* IS""! Fi 9 enr ^ch, Richard Bradley, John Hocking, John Wood, Myron Cowell, Susan Stover, Paul Hocking, Robert Lenz 



A trip to the national conference at Association 
Camp, Colorado, was the highlight of the year for 
members of the organization. On the way back from 
the conference, the bus on which the members were 



riding broke down, and the students were forced to 
spend the night on the floor of a church parlor in 
Kansas. Other activities included a supper club on 
Sunday evenings and seminars on world religions. 



Disciples Student Fellowship 



Seabury Foundation 



Members of Seabury Foundation were hosts this 
year at the annual spring conference of similar foun- 
dations throughout the state. They also assisted with 
another conference held at Camp Howard. The group 



sponsored two retreats held second semester. By send- 
ing delegates to campus councils such as the Fair Play 
Council, this group sought to concern itself with 
students of all faiths. 



Diana FoJiS. &."$£ *& fiSi D^Ia^,^ ^t^^t^L^^^ M^ S *" """" *"* ^^ *" 



163 





Top Row Virginia Warsaw Carol Rubin, Sheila Greenberg, Warren Wollheim, Martin Chasen, Janet Greenberg, Sabra Goldfme Bottom Rov 
heimer, Lorna Klorfine, Rabbi Hirsch' Cohen, Barbara Rashbaum, Erwin Epstein Not in panel: Ada Sutker, Alan Kessie 



Frank Bachen- 



Members of Hillel Foundation participated actively 
in the religious and cultural events of the Jewish 
year. On Purim, they held a carnival to celebrate 
Queen Esther's triumph over Haman. The group par- 



ticipated in High Holy Day services and, for the Feast 
of Tabernacles, built a sukkoth. Also, the members 
received instruction in the intricacies of the arts 
of Jewish folk singing and dancing. 



Hillel Foundation 



Lutheran Student Association 



Members of the Lutheran Student Association con- 
tributed to the campus activities this year by holding 
coffee hours several days each week and each day 
during final examination week. This year members 



were pleased to see that rooms of the Lutheran Stu- 
dent Center were gradually being furnished. Wednes- 
day morning communion services and vesper services 
provided spiritual guidance for members. 



Herbert 
Ronald Sch 



Top Row William Nelson, Donnell Nantkes, Byron Marks, Orlan Horgen, Jerry Twedt, Paul Swanson, Stewart Hendrickson, Robert VandeVen, Wendell Rh.ne, 
Hardwick Second Row: Edward Wolf, Bonnie Swanson, Linda Krimmel, Donna Jorstad, Marjorie Swanson, Carol Hay Marilyn Pasternock, Aaron Johnson, 
khroeder Bottom Row Shirley Brattland, Bonita Anslow, Byron Jones, Alvin Wire, Vernon Busboom, Rev. Roger Gobbel, Karen Peterson, Virg.ma Latshaw 





^r.K^^^tX'o^^ ^^e^ *$& ^ZSrZ^J^^ If" M* &""""• *?*"• °^ *•**" ««*- Perry, 
Roger Vossler, Robert Gernant, Norma Strube, Dale Smith, Robert Dahl Eve rett Goenech IhuTmtn ferule T, Ku h \ Wa Vne Wolter Herbert Kuehne, Marcia Starvel 
Lorayne Nissen, Robert Biller, treasurer- Peter Duskev virp nr»«,vipn. d d j £' i , , £ B ? rfoiei ' Da| e Renken Second Row: Mary Burnham Ruth Fesser 

Panknen Larry Kerkhoff Carl Stubenrauch * Bon™ Vw* Am'o d WerMng ftnTzell Rich ^d M 1" .^^'h 1 ""'? 6 ^ C ^ le F ? S ' SeCreJy; ^"1^ Mai land June 
Grant, Kay Ol.manns, Judith Schaffenacker, Audrey Mead, Keith Beattv Jame ? Kovil S r ' M I ? eben ' , Be han » Ha9e ' Sandra K °PP. Janet England, Caro'e 

Marv.n Graunke, Beverly Folkers, Kenneth Eockman, Archie Schoenbeck?' Ell!! ? Se.vey Bon°ie Dammerman '" Pa " el: J ° ,eph D ° nin9er ' ChaHeS Poneleit, Mary' Farley, 



Gamma Delta provided Sunday evening fellowship 
meetings and mid-week vespers for the students of the 
Lutheran Church. The service project for the year 
was reading assignments to blind students. A unique 



activity of Gamma Delta this year was painting the 
University Lutheran Chapel basement. The student 
center provided good library and recreational facili- 
ties for all of its members to enjoy. 



Gamma Delta 



McKinley Foundation Student Council 



This year the McKinley Foundation Student Coun- 
cil, the legislative body of McKinley Presbyterian 
Church, provided a place for students to gather for 
fellowship and a better understanding of the Christian 



faith. Weekly Sunday evening supper clubs, study 
groups, University credit courses in religious subjects, 
and church and community service groups were super- 
vised by the members of the council. 



B?ve ly Hall ChaXne 'Eft k Sa L' v l Sm,, c h k ' Jam " Ru *' e ' Julia Bodman, Jack Patterson 
□eveny 1-1 a 1 1, l-harlene Flack, Evelyn Shouse, Anita Gor 



Hanson, Carol 
Marie Anderson 



Judith Tidd Nst in panel 



r Waldner, Kenneth Harbison, James Bugg 
Bailey, John Wissmiller, Michael Stewart 
Judith Reynolds Bottom Row: Suzanne Fried 
Jean Prachar, Mark Templeton 



Third Row: William 
Second Row: Mark 
mann, Laura HefFley, 



65 





Kemsen Thomas Shilgalis, James Merret, Gloria Gausselin, Shirley Zarzyck,, Mary Schneider, Maureen McKernan Joyce Dee ring, Carl Reine s 

Emil Pischel Shei a Rooney, Lawrence Lundy Fourth Row: Brian Bonne, Chares Oberle Thomas Mizgen, E aine Steimel, Ruth 

Monroe, toilette Sroka, Kathryn Cooper, James Cooper Third Row: Robert Daniels JoRene Steinmann John Lee, 

rzer, Lawrence Smith, Norman Trezek, David Drolet, Louis Wagner Second Row: John 



Top Row: Allan 
Robert Tobey, Raymond Huston. 

Duesterhaus, Carol Elson, Eileen Massallek, Arlene 
Gerald Grethen, Eloise Morris, Diane Lesinski, Ronald Knoe 



Bottom 



Elizabeth Lawler, Thomas Sheehy, Richard Duesterhaus, Arthur Daniels 



Christmas at Newman Club Coordinates the Religious and the Festive 



Top Row: Rev. Edward Duncan, Richard Duesterhaus, treasurer; Adrian Crook, president; 
Arthur Daniels, recording secretary Bottom Row: Elizabeth Lawler, Mary McGuire 



The Christmas party at Newman Club was a 
"never-to-be-forgotten" event. There was music 
for dancing most of the evening, except when 
Santa Claus arrived. The jolly gentleman came 
bringing gifts for the chapel priests. Later every- 
one gathered around Father Duncan at the piano 
to sing carols. 

Newman Club sponsored other social events 
throughout the year; these included hay rides, 
wienei loasis, fish hies and ice skating parties. 
The organization served donuts and coffee each 
S 1 1 1 1 ( I a \ after mass and during the hill after each 
football game. 

Located on seculai campuses, the chapters <>l 
iln's Catholic organization help to mold die re- 
ligious life oi iis members. Members ware in- 
vited io attend lectures on religious themes; 
mi inhci s also published "The Cardinal," a 
monilih newsletter, which is senl to Catholh 
students In ing on the < ampus. 




466 





^»*^s 



V ? 



t IR 



er Bottom 



The University Lutheran Chapel is sponsored by 
the Lutheran Church of the Missouri Synod. It pro- 
vides worship, fellowship and counselling for the 
Lutheran students of the Synodical Conference. It 



also serves as a training parish for lay activity. This 
year both spiritual and recreational activities were 
provided for the students through weekly meetings, 
worship services and social gatherings. 



University Lutheran Chapel Council 



Wesley Foundation Student Council 



The highlight of the year at Wesley Foundation was 
the traditional "Ye Okie English Christmas Banquet" 
which was complete with Yorkshire pudding. The 
foundation serves as the Methodist church on campus 



and as a training ground in churchmanship. This 
year the foundation presented several programs per- 
tinent to current student interest in areas of social 
and moral problems, politics, and religion. 



L : P „„ R ^L J ^ di ! h . La r 9 '.W a y n ?.. Gr y e ."'. Ja y. Mitchell, James Harvey, Roger Whitson, David Lamb Mark 

-ggs, Shirley St. John Bottom Row: Eileen BaumeisTerrMargareTlepsoTT^h G^Tngh^ BaXTa 



, ■ - -"■■»/ <.u)t'pc wiucm, jay fvmcneii. jan 

Davis Nadme Covert, Joseph Miller, Virginia Weibel, Roger H 
Strunk, Martha Huxtable, Ruth Campbell 



Juergensmeyer, Sharry Simerl Second Row: Newell 



467 





Top Row: Everett Thomas, Edward Gieszelmann, Garry Kenworthy, Joseph Watson, John Geisinger Bottom Row: Arden Taube, William Lewis, Lt. Comm. Klinker. 



Armed Forces Council Coordinates Military Branches, Plans Military Ball 



William Lewis, chairman 




The purpose of the Council is to coordinate 
the activities and training programs of the three 
ROTC units. Members of the Council include 
the Army commander and his executive officer, 
the Air Force commander and his executive 
officer, and the Navy commander and his execu- 
tive officer. In addition, to the student officers, 
a commissioned officer is chosen as adviser. The 
adviser is an officer provided by the ROTC unit 
in charge for the current year. 

Some of the activities sponsored by the Coun- 
cil included a military ball and several mili- 
tary functions. Also included in the program 
for litis ROTC unit were parades and reviews 
lor Honors Day and Veterans' Day. 

Other important [unctions oi the Council in- 
cluded maintaining the high standards of the 
ROTC training program and, secondly, keeping 
the ROTC program up-to-date and efficient. 
Since main ol the officers needed lot the Armed 
Forces are drawn from ROTC units, the Conn 
(il served a vital function 1>\ providing quali 
fled, competeni officers to serve as leaders in oui 
militan forces. 



468 




Row: Wima P m ^:ke R Jose r p h S W°a d ,rn SS ' ^^ J ° hn BufnS ' J ° hn Geisin9er ' Mkhael Ma9uire S «°" 



ow: Everett Thomas, George Fischer, Myron Carpenter Bottom 



Capable Cadet Officers Direct Active and Thorough Array ROTC Program 



The Army Reserve Officers Training Corps on 
this campus is divided into seven branches: 
Signal Corps, Infantry Corps, Quartermaster 
Corps, Ordnance Corps, Artillery Corps, Armor 
Corps, and Corps of Engineers. Senior cadets 
from each of the seven groups make up Army 
Council which is the governing body of the 
Army. This board is in charge of all Army 
ROTC affairs on the campus. Among the 2700 
men in the Army ROTC, 375 are in the ad- 
vanced corps. The different corps sponsor two 
military parades in the fall and three in the 
spring. One of the spring parades was the honors 
day event in which men outstanding in the Army 
were awarded for their service. Socially, the 
Army ROTC Corps helped sponsor the annual 
Military Ball with the other armed forces groups. 
The coed sponsor of Army attended all func- 
tions and acted as hostess at the meetings. This 
year, Sally Trinkle was chosen sponsor for this 
branch of ROTC. She also was hostess at their 
weekly coffee hours, which were held each Fri- 
day at the Illini Union. 



Sally Trinkle, sponsor 




469 





Col. Clair M. Worthy 



Cadet Col. John Geisinger 



Army ROTC Leaders Oversee Rounded Military and Social Programs 



Army ROTC cadets take time out from their military training at summer camp to enjoy dancing to tunes provided by a local band. 




470 




Army cadets learn modern survival practices for chemical warfare. 




Members of the engineer corps construct a pontoon bridge. 



Summer Camp Gives Cadets Practical Military Training for Future 



Army ROTC cadets take time out after a grueling session on the rifle range while attendin 



g summer camp at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 




471 





Col. Leonard Rohrs 



Cadet Col. Edward Gieszelmann 



Air Force ROTC Expands Program From Wing to Division level Plan 



June Wagner, sponsor 




The expanded enrollment in the Air 
Force ROTC made feasible their expansion 
from Wing to Division level organization. 
The emphasis upon a flying program for 
advanced corps cadets was carried further 
under the direction of Division Commander 
Edward Gieszelmann and his able staff of 
cadet officers. 

The first two years of the four year Air 
Force ROTC program for prospective Air 
Force officers are devoted to the basic studies 
which survey the role of air power in the 
national defense program. Advanced train- 
ing in theory, leadership and related air 
skills begins with the junior year. 

Under the overhauled training program, 
chances for officer development are offered 
earlier than under the old program in order 
(o enable the AFRO TC to turn OUt Second 
Lieutenants who possess abilities in the 
areas of confidence, poise, military bearing, 
military courtesy, voice and commands and 
who are ready to lake their places in our 
national defense program. 



472 




rfirort„r ^' r „ F ° rC ! Coun S' l: Rol ? erf J^nson, director of personnel, Lawrence Martling, administration officer, Garry Kenworthy, vice d 
director of operations, Roger Jones, director of material, James Zaruba, information services officer. 



ivision commander, Daniel Wilde, 



Cadets Participate Actively 
in All University Activities 




Air Force drill team shows precision during an inter- school meet. 
Air Force ROTC cadets stand at parade rest during the presentation of honors and awards at the Honors Day Review in the spring semester. 





f^»tfci*^lflfi 



473 





At high school circus, the public views a trainer plane. 



Pull the lever and it's takeoff time, almost, in AF demonstration 



High School Circus Displays and Senior Flip Mark High Points of Year 



ini naval ROTC alumni will not soon forget the troop plane which carried them on their senior flight to Texas. 




474 







Row: Don'Td fc^^S^i^S^^^^^in^^i^' £1^ SEX™"'' ^ *»«"» ^ G ^< J °- h A *"™ 



Bottom 



Drill Team Is Product of Program Directed by Naval ROTC Officers 



All of the personnel of the Naval Reserve 
Officer Training Corps, headed by Cadet 
Commander William Lewis, participated in a 
broad and interesting program for this year. 
The men in the Corps were provided a chance 
to participate in various activities connected 
with the program, as well as receive the train- 
ing which is needed for the men to become 
able and competent officers in the United 
States Navy and the United States Marine 
Corps. After graduation, the men received 
commissions and were given immediate as- 
signments to active duty. 

Cadets were given an opportunity to become 
members of the two drill teams sponsored by 
the Naval ROTC. These drill teams com- 
peted with drill teams from other universities 
in a series of meets held throughout the year. 
Another activity sponsored by the Navy pro- 
gram was a rifle team, which competed with 
units from other schools. 

The cadets fielded a basketball team which 
competed in the intramural program. At the 
end of the season, the team played in the an- 
nual cadet basketball tournament. The cadets 
also sponsored a Naval Dance, and co-spon- 
sored the Military Ball. 



Elissa Weaver, 



sponsor 




475 




Naval ROTC units pass in review during the military parade which is held each year on University Honors Day during the spring semester. 




Practice Makes Perfect in Navy 



In cruise uniform, midshipmen view intricacies of a naval plane. 



Midshipmen get ready, aim but never fire this gun in class. 




476 










The climax of the training cruise comes when the men cease to be midshipmen and at last b 



ecome ensigns in an impressive ceremony. 



All Is Not Work for Midshipmen 
On Annual Navy Summer Cruise 




Midshipmen find Nova Scotia's scenic spots well worth photographing. 



A shipboard dance is the best way to relax after days at 



ys at sea. 




477 




478 




o 




(A 



479 




ABBOTT, LAWRENCE ALLEN CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.S.M.E.; Thornton 

Junior College. 

ABELl, JANET KAY ANCHOR; B.S. in Secretarial Training; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (3); Freshman Adviser (2); Honors Day (1). 

ABELL, THEODORE LEE, JR ANCHOR; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S.; A.S.M.E. 



ABRAHAM, EUGENE VICTOR CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; THETA DELTA 

CHI; Skull and Crescent; A.S.M.E. 

ABRAMOWSKI, HAROLD JOSEPH CICERO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Phi Eta Sigma; Chi 

Epsilon; Engineering Council (2); A.S.C.E.; I.T.E.; Honors Day (1). 

ADAMS, JOHN YATES SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Mining Engineering; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; 

M.I.S.; Honors Day (3). 



ADAMS, WARD THOMAS WASHINGTON; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; SIGMA CHI; 

House President (3); Basketball, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Mustering Petty Officer, 
NROTC (3, 4). 

ADES, LEONARD STANFORD CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; PHI EPSILON PI; 

Star and Scroll; Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Freshman Council; H U lei Foundation 
Student Council (2); Freshman Week Committee (3); Freshman Adviser (3); Fine and 
Applied Arts Society; Spanish Club. 

AFRICK, DEANNA LOUISE OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE; B.S. in Music Education; DELTA PHI 

EPSILON; Alpha Lambda Delta; Mu Phi Epsilon; lllini Union Committee (4); House 
President (3); Panhellenic Board of Affairs (3, 4); University Chorus (1, 2); Oratorio 
Society (4); Hillel Foundation (1, 2, 3, 4); Fine and Applied Arts Council (3); Honors 
Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



AIRMAN, JAMES HENRY MATTOOM; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PRICE CLUB; Scabbard and 

Blade (3); Society of American Military Engineers (3); A.S.C.E. 

ALBERTIN, WILHELM ELMWOOD PARK; B.S. in Economics; INTERNATIONAL STUDENT 

CO-OP; Marketing Club; German Club; Spanish Club; Long Beach City College. 

ALBIN, HARRIET AILENE DECATUR; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; WESCOGA; Sno-Ball 

Committee (1); Business Education Club. 



ALDEEN, DONALD ROBERT JOLIET; B.A. in L.A.S., History; Junior Bar Association; Joliet 

Junior College. 

ALDRIDGE, ARTHUR WILLIAM OAK LAWN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; SIGMA PHI 

EPSILON; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

ALEXANDER, BARBARA PARK FOREST; B.S. in Elementary Education; INDECO; lllini Union 

Committee (1, 3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (1). 



ALEXANDER, MARILYN MARIE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Recreation; The lllio (1); American 

Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Scimitar, President (3); Honors Day (3). 

ALEXANDER, SONJA MARIE ST. CHARLES; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHI CHI 

OMEGA; Torch; Star Course Manager (2); Campus Chest (1, 2); lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1). 

ALLEN, DAVID JOSEPH BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Management; Alpha Kappa Psi, President 

(4). 



ALLEN, GEORGIA RACHEL CARMI; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; 4-H HOUSE; Gamma 

Alpha Chi; The Daily lllini (1); lllini Union Committee (1); House President (3, 4); 
S.N.I.B. (1, 2, 3). 

ALLEN, MARGARET DELAVAN; B.S. in Home Economics; SIGMA KAPPA; Shi-Ai; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; The lllio (2, 3); S.N.I.B. (1); Freshman Adviser (2); Greek Week Committee 
(1); Plowboy Prom Committee (1); Home Economics Club. 

ALLEN, ROY LEE LITCHFIELD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; M.R.H.A. (1); A.S.C.E.; Chi Gamma 

lota; Honors Day (3); Florida State University; University of California. 



ALLISON, JANE ELIZABETH KANKAKEE; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA GAMMA 

DELTA; The lllio (1, 2); Campus Chest (1, 2, 3, 4); Campus Chest Allocations and 
Advisory Board (4); Freshman Adviser (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1). 

ALLISON, JOHN RICHARD SUMMIT; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; ALPHA TAU OMEGA; lllini 

Union Committee (1); University Theatre Cast (1, 2); Campus Chest (2); Junior Inter- 
fraternity Council (1); Freshman Adviser (3); Greek Week Committee (2); Interfraternity 
Ball Committee (2); LAS Council (2); Little United Nations; Spanish Club; Young 
Republicans Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ALLISON, THEODORE EDWARD LINCOLN; B.S. in Economics; CHI PHI; Skull and Crescent; 

Trident (4). 



ALLISON, WILLIAM BRUCE LOCKPORT; B.S. in Marketing; Delta Sigma Pi; Marketing Club; 

Joliet Junior College. 

ALMQUIST, RICHARD ALLAN WESTERN SPRINGS; B.S. in Agriculture; THE MANSION; 

S.N.I.B. (1, 2, 3, 4). 

ALPERT, ARTHUR ALAN CHICAGO; B.A. in L A.S., History; SIGMA ALPHA MU; University 

of Miami; Drake University. 



480 




ALT, CHARLES ROBERT CISSNA PARK; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI KAPPA TAU; S.N.I.B. (3). 

ANDERHUB, BONNIE LUCILLE . . . ROCKFORD B.S. in Teaching of Spanish; KAPPA KAPPA 
Dd£ P?'' P.rTfr BOa p d; T t ° rCh 'r PreS '? e ,r 1 3); Shi " Ai; A 'P ha Lambda D ^ l,a -- Sigma 

B^^^r^^ToSTk ' ,; man Counci,; Fre3hmjn rtdv,ser ' s 

ANDERLE, PATRICIA ANNE ... CLARENDON HILLS; B.S. in Home Economics Education; 

KAPPA DELTA; Home Economics Club; Coe College; Northwestern University. 

ANDERSEN, ROBERT THOMAS HIGHLAND PARK; B.S. in Food Technology; FLAGG HOUSE; 

m.K.H.A. (I, 2, i, A); Rifle and Pistol Club. 

ANDERSON, ANITA MARIE MONEE; B.S. in Elementary Education; PALAMAR. 

ANDERSON, BEATRICE : JOY CHICAGO ; B.A. in L.A.S., French; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 

Sn^r^ity^orniin^. ^ "^ ^'^ Unlw,i *' "^ ^ E * ,ensi ° n ° f *° 

ANDERSON, BRUCE COLEMAN . GENEVA; B . s . ,„ E|ectrica , Engineeri TRIANGLE . Junior 

jnterfratern.ty Council (1); House President (4); St. Pat's Ball Committee (3); A.I E E 

ANDERSON, DAVID EARLE DECATUR; B.S. in Agriculture; THETA CHI. 

ANDERSON, DONALD HARRY .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; DELTA PHI- 
Wines Umon Committee (3); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1, 2); St. Pat', Ball Committee (1). 

ANDERSON, EDWARD .LEON I . WAUKEGAN; B.A. in L.A.S., Economics; Finance Cub; Young 

Democrats Club; Lake Forrest College. 

ANDERSON, GENE SCOTT WHEATON; B.A. in LAS Political Science; Junior Bar Asso- 

Exrnsion M ^ k ?nrUn^ity^ 9 MlPn:r ra,S ^ H ° n ° rS °" "' % 3) '' "^ ^' 

ANDERSON, JAMES WILLIAM . . WILMETTE; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; DELTA UPSILON- 

University of Kansas; Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. ' 

ANDERSON, KAREN DAE . CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; DELTA ZETA; WAA 

If the Un y v S ers1ty"Mmn n ois Mai0rS C ' Ub; ^ Dem ° Cra,S C ' Ub; NaVy Pier E * ,ensi °" 

ANDERSON, NANc/jONE^^. .^ ROBINSON; B.A. in L.A.S., French; KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA; 

ANDERSON. PAW "K^^ . WHEATON; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; EBEL HALL; 

ANDERSON, RAY HENRY . CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

M.K.H.A. (I, 2, 3, 4); Illinois Technograph (2); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); A.S.C.E. 

ANDERSON, ROBERT ROY . . PECATONICA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; TRIANGLE- Chi 

Gamma Iota; Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu; lllini Union Committee (12)- AIEE-IRE 
Rockford College. ' "■'■'-• , -- ■ ■*.!:., 

ANDERSON, ^VERNON WAUCONDA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

ANDERSON, SAVILLA WILLIAMS ... ALTON; B.S. in Home Economics; PHI MU; Phi Upsilon 
?Kl!l r,r Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1); W.P.G.U 2) 
S.N.I B. (2); Canterbury Foundation Student Council (3, 4); Home Economics Council 4 ' 
Plowboy Prom Committee Chairman (2, 3); Home Economics Club. '' 

ANDERSON, THOM« RALP. I ^ AURORA; B S. in Accountancy and Management; ALPHA 

rwm i. Wa - Na ; A See -- Sachem; Phi Eta Sigma; Sigma lota Epsilon; Campus 
S es ."i Intramura Manager (2, 3); Senior Intramural Manager (4)- Athlete Council 
Key (3). 6C ^ <3 ' * h H ° n ° rS Day "' 2 ' 3); University 9 of Illinois Scholarship 

ANDO, KENJI GEORGE .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL- 

a.ry/frpS?"^^ 'otihe H u^rs^^^,^r ity ° f " iin ° is s ^- 

ANDRESEN ' Es^tUachers^e^ "" '" *"*»»»« «" ^ E ™<' Northern 

^''^^^A-.l.ig^XTO.n 8 ^^ EdUCa,i0n '' MPHA CHI ° MEGA; Ca — 

ANGELO, NORMAN BRUCE rARMNViiic n c c-l i r- . 

ci(~a/ia e- t" ' ' r,', ■' ^ AK , LI|NJ VILLt; B.S. in Chemical Engineer ng- ALPHA CHI 

SIGMA; Sigma Tau; Ph, Lambda Upsilon; A.I.Ch.E.; Blackburn College 

ANNE, OEORGE PAUL (2) . _ CHICAGO,- JA. m^A,., History; BIRCH HALL; Phi Alpha Theta; 
ANTHONY, ROBERT BRADFORD DOWNERS GROVE; B.S in Marketing,- NEWMAN HALL 

ANTONSON, JOHN ROBERT . CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; GARNER HOUSF- WPGU 

tU, M.K.H.A. (3, 4; House President 3, 4; Freshman Adviser 10 "? a\ a c c c • » 
for the Advancement of Management; Young Republicans Club ' ' '' S "' S ° C ' e,y 




481 






il^n 




APER, CHARLES ROBERT SAN JOSE; B.S.. in Agriculture; ILLINI LODGE. 

APPELl PHYLLIS CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., French; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Phi Delta Phi; Honors Day (2). 

APPLEGATE CHARLES ALLEN NORTHFIELD; B.S. in Marketing and Management; KAPPA 

SIGMA; Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi; Junior Interfraternity Council (1); A.S.M.E.; 
Marketing Club; Honors Day (1). 



ARCHBOLD, RICHARD ANTHONY LOMBARD; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; PHI 

KAPPA SIGMA; Ma-Wan-Da; Sachem; Skull and Crescent; Sigma Delta Chi; The Daily 
lllini (1, 2, 3), Editor (4). 

APPLEMAN JEAN URBANA; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; Junior Bar Association; Little 

' United Nations; Rifle and Pistol Club; Georgetown University; University of Wiscon- 
sin; Laval University; Catholic University. 

ARENDS, ERWIN ONNO SIBLEY; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; Men's Glee Club (3, 4); 

A.S.A.E.; Iowa State College. 



ARGIRES CONSTANCE CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; CEDAR HALL; Uni- 
versity Chorus (4); Student National Education Association; Navy Pier Extension ot 
the University of Illinois. 

ARIEFF ALLEN IVES . WILMETTE; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; PHI SIGMA DELTA; Omega 

Beta Pi; lllini Union Committee (2, 3); llligreek (4); Hillel Foundation Student Council 
(2); University of Michigan. 

ARKIN DAVID MYRON CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

W P.G.U. (3, 4); M.R.H.A. (3, 4); Track, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2), 
Navy Pier; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 



ARKIN, STUART CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; Beta Alpha Psi; Commerce Council (4); 

Accountancy Club; Wright Junior College. 

ARLOFF, WILLIAM ERNEST ST. CHARLES; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; Northwest Missouri 

State College; Chouinard Art Institute. 

ARMSTRONG WILLIAM JOSEPH ST. CHARLES; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; PHI GAMMA 

DELTA. 



ARZT THOMAS LADENDORF CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineernig; FORBES HOUSE; 

Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Student Industrial Engineering Society; 
DePaul University. 

ASATO EDWARD EISHO .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 
M.R.H.A. (4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1). 

ASH DAVID MILTON . . HARRISTOWN; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; ALPHA GAMMA 

RHO- Star and Scroll; Alpha Zeta, President (4); lllini Union Committee (2); Agri- 
culture Committee (3, 4); All-Ag Field Day Committee (1, 2, 3, 4); Plowboy Prom 
Committee (2. 3); A.S.A.E.; Honors Day (1). 



ASH DAVID ROY CHICAGO; B.A. in Architectural Engineering; GRANADA CLUB; A. I. A.; 

Golf (1, 2); Navy Pier Extension ot the University of Illinois. 

ASH, JUDITH GAIL WILMETTE; B.A. in L.A.S., English; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; Law- 
rence College. 

ASHBROOK, ROBERT MICHAEL ROSSVILLE; B.S. in Communications; TAU KAPPA EPS1- 

LON; Alpha Delta Sigma; The lllio (4); lllini Union Committee (2); lllini Union 
Publicity Board (4); Society of American Military Engineers (2). 



ASHMORE, CONSTANCE MARIE PEARL CITY; B.A in >-.AS. History; LOWRY LODGE; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Second Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); I.U.S.A. Barberettes (1); 
Freshman Adviser (2, 4); Honors Day (1). 

ASHWILL ROSAMUND . . . ARTHUR; B.S. in Home Economics; McKINLEY HALL; lllini Union 

' Committee (1, 2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2, 3); S.N.I.B. (2, 3, 4); Freshman Week 
Committee (3); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Plowboy Prom Committee (1, 2, 3); Sno-Ball 
Committee (2); Home Economics Club. 

AUDO CARL PAUL SPRING VALLEY; B.S. in Industrial Education; Alpha Phi Omega; 

Football Marching Band (2, 4); First Regimental Band (2, 4); Industrial Education 
Society; St. Bede College. 

AYRES MAXINE LEE MORO; B.S. in Education of Mentally Handicapped Children; 

PRESBY HALL; lllini Union Committee (1); Sno-Bali Committee (1); Student National 
Education Association. 

BABLER, EGON STEFAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Navy 

Pier Alumni Association. 

BABLER MARY JANE MT. MORRIS; B.S. in Home Economics Education; SIGMA SIGMA 

SIGMA- Phi Upsilon Omicron; lllini Union Committee (3); S.N.I.B. (2); Home 
Economics Council (4); Plowboy Prom Committee (2, 3); Home Economics Club, 
President (4). 

BACCHETTI JEROME ALLEN BELLEVILLE; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; DELTA PHI; Sigma 

' Tau- Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Lambda Upsilon; lllini Union Committee (2); University 
Theatre Cast (3); Y.M.C.A. Cabinet (2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1, 2); Football Marching 
Band (1, 2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Freshman Adviser (2); A.I.Ch.E.; 
Honors Day (2). 

BACHENHEIMER, FRANKLIN S CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; GARNER HOUSE; M.R.H.A. 

(4)- House President (4); University Chorus (3); Men's Glee Club (3, 4); Hillel Founda- 
tion Student Council (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (4); Pershing Rifles (1, 2); Marketing 
Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BACHMAN, JOSEPH REXEL RUPERT, IDAHO, B.F.A. In Industrial Design; DELTA CHI; 

University of Washington. 



482 



backofp. m rwiiUAM Ma .w E s^ A po| . tiea| science 

Sena.Subcommittee SlT&gift ^S^^fl^?^ f „«£ 

BACKUS, LUCIA IRENE . . . EAST PEORIA- R A !„ i a c 

Crew (2); French Clubf GeS Club^onors^ay (ST ' ^ UniVerSi,V ^^ 

BADO, JOHN ERNEST . . CHICAGO- R <; ;„ r ■ i p 

(4); Lieutenant Ar£y ROTC (3 4) So cil^'of" A^r 9 ^^- CLUB p House Presiden ' 
A S.C.E.; United States Natal Academy ^Navy fe em! "7 th^u"" '■?' 4, J 

Illinois. ' extension ot the University of 

BAER, RUSSEIL E„ JR. . DECATUR- R S !„ i a c D 

Texas'state College; AmariMo Col lege? " Psychol °^ Milliki " University; West 

BAILS, ELMER RICHARD HARVEL; B.S. in Agriculture. 

BAKER, DARLENE JANET . . CHICAGO- R S :„ ci 

The lllio (1); lllin Union Committee 1 aTffiKlZ . E t duc ,f on ' D } UA DE L™ DELTA; 

National Education AMH^hS^^'^P'^^^ Theaffe ^ "' 2); Studenf 

BAKER, HAROLD GEORGE . . . CHICAGO- R <! In CI ... ■ > r ■ 

Navy Pier Extension of ^ 'u^sity^f /Lolsf^ I^TeT^^LS^ 

BAKER, LESTER SIDNEY . . . CHICAGO- R <; i„ r ■ -i c ■ 

Daily lllini (3, 4); A.S.C.E. Engineering; SIGMA ALPHA MU; The 

BAKER, ROBERT JETHRO . . . DAYTON OHIO. R <: • r - r - 

Beta Pi; Keramos; Ho^Te^T^ \£&%?^Tffl<^^ ^ 

BALDWIN, MARGARET LYNNE . . WESTERN SPRING n <: • , ac r. ,- , 

University Theatre Manager^U^t^atr^reV^f Co^olfe^ ^ "** 
BAL2ARAS, VYTAUTAS . CHICAGO. R=.k I i « ._• 

Club; Navy P^E^^'^^tJ, ME**' ^ ^^ *^ 
BALZER, JAMES PHILIP i irppty n c • « • , 

President (4);' Honors' Day (1 2). '" Agnculture <- Agricultural Education Club, 

BANASH, JEANNE GANTT CHICAGO- R <; „ pi 

!_MU_At7U; B.S. in Elementary Education 

...«„. -—.jag . ., ■tsstf&tttra&B^'i.r -« 

BANISH, MARION HIGHLAND PARK- R A ;„ i a c d i. i 

BANKNIEDER, AUGUST RONALD CHICAGO R <; ■ \, . ■ .. _,- - 

BANNISTER, ANNIE PEARL . CHICAGO- R <; ;„ pi . CJ 

BARGER, ALLAN RUSSELL CHICAGO. R <; ;_ p ■ 

i • i I x ■••.-• >-rin.«L7(j; B.b. in Engineering Phvs cs- SIGMA PHI i-ipi ta 

of n ,'L!,i s ,erfra,em " y C ° Undl ^ Physi « Society; Navy 9 pier y Ex C te'nsfon^th P e H Un?v E e L r^; 

BARNES, BARBARA^ELIZABETH CARMI; B.A. in L.A.S., English; BUSEY HALL; MacMurray 

BARNETT. STEPHENS. ^. OHCAflO, B.S <^™n^ GARNER HOUSE; Wa-N,See; 

Crew ,2, 3, 4); M.R.H.A. ,2); W,u'(3, T^^T^L^ QSZTSSS, Sri 

BARNSTABLE, BARBARA JOANN DECATUR R <; S„ I a c d l. , 

Foundation Student Council (3). ' Psycholo 9V; VANLIG; Wesley 

BARR, JESSE WILLIAM liTCHFiFin rc ■ r- 

3); W^j/Navy KtK Z^^T^'^ Theatre Cast (2, 

BARRETO. J ^ine P e A rfn l g°PiTau-S^a OT A ' S M^sTe W" h ^'^ ^ '" "•*"»«' 
versify of the Andes- ASM -E.; S.A.E.; Colombian Students' Association; Uni- 

BARTELSTE.N, ,DA da CHICAGO B^^-"^"-^, S,<^ DELTA TAU; A,pha 

Committee (I, 2); Honors Day nil). P'es.dent (3, 4); Greek Week 

BARTSCH, JOHN RICHARD GALENA- R <; \ n PI . • i c • 

St. Course Manager' „ ^^tena^t, ' Arrny^C ^T&X^W^ 

BARTUSKA, THOMAS 'JOSEPH ... . BERWYN;. Bachelor of Architecture; NEWMAN HALL- Gar 

Honor's Da U y (2 a 4);^avy a pie'; Bc=n oMhe" M ^ ¥ f, d; *'*'"• (">, 3 
of Technology- Extension of the University of Illinois; Illinois Institute 




483 




BASEDOW SUSAN ANN PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; 

The Illio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Star Course Manager (1). 

BASTEN RAYMOND FRANCIS WAUKEGAN, B.S. in City Planning; Chi Gamma Iota, 

Forsite (2, 3, 4). 

BATSON, BILLY BOB COVINGTON, KENTUCKY; Bachelor of Architecture; A. I. A.; Western 

State Teachers College; University of Kentucky. 

RAUM DAVID HAROLD CINCINNATI, OHIO; B.S. in Communications; ZETA BETA TAU; 

Sigma Delta Chi; The Dai.y lllini (1, 2); W.P.G.U. (1, 2); Fencing, Freshman Varsity 
Squad- llligreek (3); WILL (3, 4); Hillel Foundation Student Council (3); Freshman 
Week Committee (2); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Greek Week Committee (3); Inter- 
fraternity Ball Committee (2); Journalism Council (4); Military Ball Committee (J); 
Zeta Sigma Alpha (3, 4); Young Republicans Club. 

BAUMAN CARL WILLIAM . . . OAK PARK; B.S. in L.A.S., Geography; THETA XI; Wrestling, 

Freshman Varsity Squad- Maior, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4), 
President (4); Physical Education Majors Club. 

BEARMAN LARRY LINCOLN MT. MORRIS; B.S. in Civil Engineering; TWIN ESTATES; 

Phalanx (1); A.S.C.E.; Luther College. 

BEAUCHAMP, MADA ANN GALESBURG; B.S. in Secretarial Training; McKINLEY HALL; 

Star Course Manager (1). 

EEAUCHAMP, MARY ANN GALESBURG; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; McKINLEY HALL; 

Star Course Manager (1); House President (4); LAS Council (3); Honors Day (1). 

BECK, RICHARD KEITH PEORIA; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; Bradley University. 

BECK ROBERT JAMES CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ILL IN I LODGE; Navy Pier 

Alumni Association; Football, Navy Pier; Lettermen's Club, Navy Pier; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BECKER HAROLD NEIL ... LA MOILLE; B.S. in Veterinary Medicine; ARMORY HOUSE; 

Football Marching Band (2): Second Regimental Band (1, 2); Student Chapter Veter- 
inary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

BECKER JOHN OTTO . . DES PLAINES; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; BARTON PLACE; 

Phi Tau Sigma; M.R.H.A. (4); House President (4); A.F.S.; S.A.E. 

BECKER SHELDON THEODORE SKOKIE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; ARMORY HOUSE; 

The Daily lllini (4); Y.M.C.A. (3); Illinois Technograph (3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

BECKERMAN JOSEPH WILLIAM .... MOUNT CARMEL; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; ALPHA 
GAMMO RHO- Phi Eta Sigma; House President (4); Second Regimental Band U ; 
Men's Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Madrigal Chorus (1); Freshman Adviser (2); St. Pats Ball 
Committee (3); A.S.A.E.; Honors Day (1). 

BELL LYNN ELLEN . OSWEGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Shorter Board; Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); 
University Theatre Manager (3); University Theatre Crew (2); Panhellenic Executive 
Council (3): Freshman Week Committee (3); Freshman Adviser's Executive Council, 
Chairman (3); Society of America AAili'sry Fngineers, Sponsor (2, 3, 4); Honors Day 
(1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

BELL NANCY GRANT . . . WATSEKA; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; Shorter Board; 

Torch- The Illio (1, 2); Major Chairman Dads' Day lllini Union Committee (3); lllini 
Union Committee (1, 2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); Marketing Club; Honors 

Day (1). 

BELL PATRICIA MARIE . . . CRYSTAL LAKE; B.S. in Music Education; SIGMA KAPPA; Shi-Ai; 

Sigma Alpha lota; Panhellenic Executive Council (2, 3); House President (2, 31- Concert 

Band, (2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (1); University Orchestra (3, 4); University 
Chorus (1). 

BELLOWS SYLVIA DEAN .... LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY; B.A. in L.A.S.,. Psychology; LINCOLN 
AVENUE RESIDENCE; Phi Kappa Phi: Phi Beta Kaop=>: Alpha Lambda Delta; Delta 
Sigma Omicron; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

BELSLEY, GLENN WAYNE MORTON; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; Phi 

Epsilon Kappa; Bradley University; University of Wisconsin. 

BELSON JERRY JAY CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications: PI LAMBDA PHI; A'nha Dp'"- 

Sigma; The Daily lllini (2, 3, 4); lllini Union Committee (1); Freshman Adviser (1); 
Marketing Club (3, 4); Honors Day (1); University of Wisconsin. 

BENNETT PAUL GEORGE .... MORTON GROVE; B.S. in Agriculture; ZETA PSI; Wa-Na-S": 
Sachem; Alpha Phi Omega; Star Course Manager (2, 3); Y.M.C.A. Committee (l)i 
Agricultural Economics Club; Honors Day (1). 

BENSON, JAMES WILLIAM WILMINGTON; B.S. in Management; PHI KAPPA PSI; Socie:y 

for the Advancement of Management; St. Joseph's College. 

BENSON JOHN ALBERT STERLING; Bachelor of Architecture; NEWMAN HALL; Scarab; Foot- 
ball Marching Band (I, 2); First Regimental Band (I, 2); Honors Day (1). 

EEREZNIAK JAN PATRICK NORTH RIVERSIDE; B.S. in Management; SIGMA PI; Marketing 

Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Young Republicans Club; Roose- 
velt University. 

BERG C KNUD OTTAR HARWOOD HEIGHTS; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; CLARK HOUSE; 

Pi Tau Sigma; A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Rifle and Pistol Club; Honors Day (3); University ot 
Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BERGNACH, LAWRENCE CALVIN .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; Marketing Club; Navy Pier 
Alumni Association; Navy Pier Baseball Team (1, 2); Navy Pier Letterman s Club (1, 
2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BERGSTROM KAREN LOUISE MORRIS, B.F.A. in Art Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; Thi 

' Illio (1). 



484 



BERK, IVAN PAUL CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; M.R.H.A. (2, 3); A.S C E ■ Wrestlinc, 
Univeriif^f Illinois ' nS,itU ' e ° f Technolo 9y' Na ^ p '* r E*7m sions of the 

BERLINER, FRANCINE LAKE VILLA; B.A. in Teaching of English; CEDAR HALL. 

BERMAN, DAVID IRA . . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics; SIGMA TAU GAMMA; Uni- 

versity Chorus (1); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); lllini Forensic Association! 



BERMAN, NANCY R^ . . CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; DELTA PHI EPSILON; Alpha 

(1) Hono^! Day (l".' " Commlt,ee; llh 9 reek (1); Hillel Foundation Student Council 

BERMINGHAM, ^HAROLD MARTIN THOMASBORO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S; 

BERNAL-J.MENEZ AUGUSTO . BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A I E E- 

I.R.E.; Colombian Students' Association; University of the Andes. 



BERNEY, JOHN PETER ... . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Engineering Physics; NEWMAN HALL- AIEE- 
;h R e E Uni l v l , r n s'ity C ^ P Mfin A o r e,S *" N °" »* PhySi " S °^ N 'W ^ ExVen^n^of 

BERNSTEIN, DONALD HUGH . HIGHLAND PARK; B.S. in Accountancy; ZETA BETA TAU- lllini 

Union Committee (4); Campus Chest (1); House President (4); Accountancy Club 

BERTOLDI, R'CHA^iOHN^. .^.^ CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S, A.S.M.E, 



BETKER, RICHARD CAR \ ... CHICAGO; B.F.A in Landscape Architecture; GARNER HOUSE; 
Forsite (2, 3, 4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BETTS, MARLIN KEITH VERNON; B.S. in Civil Engineering. 

BEX, LESLIE ERNEST, JR BATAVIA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; House President (2). 



BEZANE, NORMAN GILBERT . OAK PARK; B.S. in Communications; GARNER HOUSE- Alpha 

?o n n S n 9ma '' The r| D a'lv 'Mini . (4); Marketing Club; Navy Pier Aluli Association 
o Y f°the 9 Unive^ of ,mn Y o!s U . n9 Repub "— Cl ^ H °"°" ^ (,); Navy Pier Extension 

BIALLAS, WILLIAM CLAUS . CHICAGO; B.S in Mechanical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL- 

A.F.S., A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BIENFANG, DON CARL . ELMHURST; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; BETA SIGMA PSI; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Ph, Beta Kappa; Ph, Eta Sigma; Phi Alpha Mu; lllini Union Committee (4)' 
3? Unive rsftJ h ^ f an | V^3.ty Squad, Varsity Squad (2); Gamma Delta; Honors Day (1 2 
J): University of Illinois Scholarship Key. ' 

BIESTER, GERALD NELSON .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A I E E -I R E ■ lllini 
urv P ersi t y A of V Tl^n P ois S . , N °" ^ ""^ ^°' C°"ege? Navy 9 p'ier Exttsio^f".'.,"* 
BIGGERS, JAMES PAUL OLNEY; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 

BINS, MILTON -CHICAGO; B.S in L A.S Mathematics; Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing 

Rifles (2, 3, 4); German Club; Student National Education Association; I linos Institute^ 
of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. institute 



B.RKEY, HAROLD EUGENE ■..-..WALNUT, B.S. in Civil .Engineering; ACACIA; University Theatre 

<~rew (J); A.S.C.E.; Illinois Wesleyan University. 

BIRKS, BARBARA ANN . ROCKTON; B.A. in Teaching of English; ALLEN HALL- Weslev 

Foundation Student Council (3); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Young Republicans -Club 

B.SSI, M'LL.CENT LORREN . . SKOKIE; B A. in L.A.S., English; CEDAR HALL; W.G.S. Executive 

Council (3); Freshman Adviser (2); Freshman Adviser's Executive Council (3). CXeCUT ' ve 



BITTERMAN, NAOMI YAIDA .... CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; IOTA ALPHA PI- 
II n Union Committee ); University Theatre Crew (3); Indiana University; Illinois 
Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois 

BJICK, RONALD LLOYD . . . ELGIN; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; THETA XI; House President 

ATr r E W L e f l T M r, ge, - ,3); t Fre u Shman Adviser < 3 >'' lllini Traditions Committee 
(J), A.5.C.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BLACK, MARSHALL WILLIAM ..... CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; M.R.H.A. (3); Navy Pier Ex- 
tension of the University of Illinois. 



BLACKER, SALLY LOU MORRIS CITY; B.S. in Elementary Education; PRESBYTERIAN HALL; 

SHORTER BOARD; Torch; lllini Union Committee; Student Senate (1, 2 3)- NSA 
Senate Subcommittee; Freshman Adviser (3). m.o.«. 

BLAIR, COENA BLOSSOM . . . FOOSLAND; B.S. in Home Economics; 4-H HOUSE; S.N.I B (21- 

Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Home Economics Club. 

BLAIR, MARY JEAN . . . OAK PARK; B.S. in Home Economic Education; KAPPA ALPHA THETA- 

Delta Sigma Rho; Home Economics Club; lllini Forensic Association; Albion College 




485 




BLAKE, DANIEL BRYAN WESTERN SPRINGS; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; THE MANSION; 

Honors Day (1, 3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BLAKE, WILLIAM LAWRENCE BUSHNELL; B.S. in Marketing; THETA CHI; The lllio (2); 

lllini Union Committee (2); House President (3); Military Ball Committee (3); Captain, 
Army ROTC (3, 4); Military Council (4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Marketing Club. 

BLANFORD, MYRNA KAYE LINCOLN: B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; Lincoln College; Illinois State Normal University. 

BLAZ, NORMAN YALE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; The Daily lllini (2); Junior Bar 

Association; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Young Democrats Club; Pre-Law Club. 

BLEDSOE JOHN FRANCIS MANHASSETT, NEW YORK; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; 

SIGMA NU; The lllio, Art Director (4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Trident (3, 4); Spring 
Musical. 

BLOME, JAMES CLEMENT BELLEVILLE; B.S. in Ceramic Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Keramos; Illinois Technograph; A.C.S.; llli-Knights; lllini Campus Amvets Post 202; 
Belleville Junior College. 

BLOMGREN, RICKARD MAROLD ROCKFORD; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Flying 

Club; I.A.S. 

BLOMQUIST, JAMES CARL IRON MOUNTAIN, MICHIGAN; Bachelor of Architecture. 

BLOOM, EILEEN RIQUI CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; MAPLE HALL; German Club; 

Social Work Club; Roosevelt University; Wright Junior College; Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

BLOOM, JAMES CIFFORD NOBLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; TWIN ESTATES; House President 

(3); University Chorus (1); Honors Day (2). 

BLUE, EDWARD ALFRED EAST ST. LOUIS; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; Teachers-in- 

Training Club; Young Democrats Club. 

BLUESTONE, HOWARD I CHICAGO; B.S. in Recreation; TAU DELTA PHI; Fencing, Varsity 

Squad (2, 3); Freshman Varsity Squad; Rifle Team, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Freshman 
Varsity Squad; Major, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (2); Zeta Sigma Alpha (3); 
American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Rifle and Pistol Club. 

BOEHM, MARVIN JAY CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; Alpha Delta Sigma. 

BOLDEN, JOHN ROBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; ALPHA PHI ALPHA; A.S.C.E.; 

Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BOLEN, PATSY THREEWITT BENTON; B.S. in Home Economics. 

BOLIN, JOAN SHARON BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Home Economics; THETA UPSILON; The 

Daily lllini (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2). 

BOLLAND, TERRY WILLIAM JOLIET; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PHI SIGMA EPSILON; 

A.S.C.E.; Joliet Junior College. 

BOLTON, RICHARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; SIGMA PHI DELTA; lllini Union 

Committee (3); University Theatre Crew (3); A.S.C.E.; University of Chicago. 

BOND, LINDA GAIL GENEVA; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA OMICRON PI; Shorter 

Board; Mask and Bauble; National Collegiate Players; University Theatre Manager (2, 3); 
General Manager (4); University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (1); University 
Theatre Board (4). 

BONFIGLIO, ALFRED JOSEPH SKOKIE; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; SIGMA NU; 

lllini Campus Amvets Post 202; M.I.S.; Northwestern University; Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

BOOKER, WALLACE DUANE SULLIVAN; B.S. in Agriculture; S.N.I.B. (1, 4); Agricultural 

Economics Club; Field and Furrow. 

BOONE, DAVE HOWARD NORMAL; B.S. in Finance; PHI KAPPA TAU; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1); lllini Insurance Society. 

BORGRA JOSEPH ANTHONY JOLIET; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

BORNHOEFT BARBARA JANE WESTERN SPRINGS; B.S. in Education of Mentally Handi- 
capped Children; ALPHA DELTA PI; lllini Union Committee (2); Greek Week Com- 
mittee (2); Student National Education Association. 

BOSSARTE, GEORGE PRYOR JACKSONVILLE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; PHI KAPPA 

TAU; Wa-Na-See; Alpha Delta Sigma; The Daily lllini (1, 2, 3, 4); University Theatre 
Crew (I); llligreek (3). 

BOSTON, JANNIA LOU SALEM; B.A. in L.A.S., English; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; 

W.P.G.U. (3); William Woods Junior College. 

BOTTRELL, ROGER KEITH WINDSOR; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club. 



486 



BOWERS, JA ^ E r S o|| SCO " rA -. MORTON; B^ in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Sachem; Star and 
vif^/t'"? { r ): Y ..MC A Committee (2, 3); House President (4); Tribe 
of Mini (2, 3 4); Track, Captain (4); Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Letter (2, 3, 4) Fresh- 
man Varsity Squad; Cross-Country, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Letter (2 3 4)- Freshman 
Varsity Squad; S.N.I.B. (2); All-Ag Field Day Committee' (1 . 2); Field and Furrow; H™f 
ana norn liud. 

BOWMAN. PAUL DEAN . . LA GRANGE PARK; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; SIGMA NU 

Miltarl BM| e r e ''■»" *%"■ '' ru' ■ *' S '?T a: E,a Kappa Nu; House President (3, 4) 
Military Ball Committee Maior Chairman (4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Honors Day (3 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. nunora udy Wi 

BOYD, BILL RAY .... ANNA; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineernig; University Theatre Crew 1, 2, 



BRADSHAW, KA^HELEN . . . .. GRIGGSVILLE; B.S. in Home Economics Education; BUSEY HALL; 

BRAND, ROBERT JAN BERWYN; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; THETA XI- The lllio (3). 

^'rSjWcSGS 1 <3); '" i9reek (4) '' Fre ^man Adviser & M° u% 

BRANDT, THOMAS HARRISON . . . . ATLANTA; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO- 
Junior Interfra.ernity Council (1); Agricultural Economics Club; Hoof and Horn Cub'. 



BRAUN, SH E RW,N e JACK er .. y CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A, Navy Pier Extension 

BRAZLE, VERNON LEE ! . BROWNSTOWN; B.S. in Agricultural Education; NABOR HOUSE; 

A my ROTC (3 41 Ph 9 ?hi ft" A ^ a ' pha; , Fre ? hman Adviser (2); First Lieutenant 

Club Honors Dav H !l M ' ' '/ ^/"jV, tur ?' "nation Club; lllini Sportsman' 

>-iuo, Honors Day (I, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

BREEZE, MARILYN MARGARET DFCATIIP. R e, ;„ i a c □ 

Social Work Club;' Millikin UnSy LA ' S -' Psychol °9V; DEL /A DELTA DELTA; 



BRENNER. BRUCE HARTMAN OAK PARK; B.S. in Accountancy; ALPHA EPSILON PI- House 

President (3); Men's Glee Club (2, 3); Hillel Foundation' Student Council (4), French 

BREWSTER, iOHNMDEN . _ . JOLIET; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; Sociology Cub; Honors Day 

BREZA, MICHAEL JOHN . . AA T OLIVE; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; FORBES HILTON; 

LAS Freshman Adviser (3, 4); First Lieutenant, Air Force ROTC (3, A); 



BRIDGELAND^ WILL,AM f M c a o CGR g EGOR WINNEBAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; 

BRIGHTBIIL, FREDERICK STAMM . CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology BETA -HETA PI- 

Sachem; Omega Beta Pi; lllini Union Committee (2); Franklin College; Ma'shail I CoMegi: 

BRINKER, BARBARA DIXON WESTFRN SPPINiric. n c •„ du ■ i rj 

GAMMA- W A A il ' 3 3 A T nV lu ' " , Ph . y , slcal Edu cat,on; KAPPA KAPPA 

k '™ M ' w.A.A. (I, 2, 3, 4); Terrapin (1); Physical Education Majors Club. 



BRINKER, JOHN ANDERSON . . . EVANSTON- R S in Fl=^,;, = i r. 

i-iA«zr~A ci m j U ' ,MI «iu™, c.3. in tlectrical Engineering- ALPHA TAII 

a nT^de S (2 U ,^rl| C E e E C rR , ':EfT U rldent reSident (3,; EnS ' 9n ' NR ° TC < 3 ' 4 > '*•»*■* 
BRINKERHOFF TOMMY J. .... . REDMON; B.S in Accountancy; SIGMA TAU GAMMA- Aloha 

BRINKMAN, DALE CHARLES . . CARLYLE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering- BETA SIGMA PSI- 

S S^E^'p^s^nf ?3T ; H C onor P s U Da C y h ^,. (2); *«"" S — mX^S^ 



BROCK, CURT.S GILBERT CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Agriculture; Agriculture Club 

BRODD, iONJANDW. . . . . ANDOVER; B.S. in Finance; Phi Eta Sigma; Delta Sigma Pi; Honors 

BRODLIE, JEROME FLAGG FOREST HILLS NEW YORK. RSI i a c r, 

DELTA ( PHI; Cheerleader „, 2^ £sebT £& ^'^nl^g?'^ 



BRODSKY, GERALD JACKIE . .CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Kappa Psi- Marketing 

Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Northwestern University 

BRODSKY, SHELDON BERNARD EVANSTON; B.S. in Accountancy; SIGMA ALPHA MU- 

, Star and Scroll; Alpha Kappa Psi; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); junior Interfratemitv 

Drocra,s C aub erCe COUnC '' (3 ' 4); FreShma " Adviser (3 >' Accountancy Club; S 

BRONSCN. JOHN ARTHUR ... BLUE ISLAND; B.S. in Mechanica Engineering- PHI DELTA 

THETA; P, Tau Sigma; Footbal, Freshman Varsity Squad; Tennis Freshman Varsitv 
Squad; Intramural Manager (3); Second Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4! 



BRONSTEIN, GARY MARTIN STAUNTON; B.S. in LAS Mathematics- FORBFS HniKF 

Sachem; Tomahawk; W.P.G.U (I); M.R.H.A., President 2); S udent Sena'e £ 3V 
N.S.A. Senate Subcommittee (3); Freshman Adviser (3, 4). '' 

BROST, DAVID LEE SPRINGFIELD; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A. 

BROSTOFF, STUART SPENCER . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; FLAGG HOUSE- Alpha 

Kappa Psi; S.gma Iota Epsilon; M.R.H.A. (4); Student Senate (4); Universiw Chorus (3) 
Commerce Council (3 4); Accountancy Club; Marketing Club Navy Pie ■Alumni 
Association; Society for the Advancement of Management; Honors Day (3) nTw 
Pier Extension of the University of Illinois; Football, Varsity Squad (2) NavyPier V 




487 




RROUGHTON CHARLES OMER PEORIA; B.S. in Physical Education; ACACIA; Y.M C.A. 

SROUGHTON CHARLES u Inferfratemit Council (3); House President (3); Foo ball Freshman 
\/™Z Squad Baseball, Freshman Varsity Squad; University Chorus (1 2); Oratorio 
So y (3); McKinley Foundation Student Council (2 3); lllmi Sportsmen s Club; 
Physical Education Majors Club; Rifle and Pistol Club; Young Democrats Club. 

BROUK CLIFFORD OTTO BARRINGTON; B.S. in Civil Engineering; DELTA PHI; lllini 

Union Committee (1); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); A.S.C.E. 

BROUN KENNETH STANLEY CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA ALPHA MU; 

BROUN, KEN ^ a | ee . Sachem . The Dai|y „„„. (]/ 2/ 3), Executive Editor (4); Jun.or Interfra- 

ternity Council (1). 

BROWN CHARLES PATRICK CHEBANSE; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Kappa Psi; lllini Campus 

Amvets Post No. 202; Marketing Club. 

BROWN DAVID FREDERICK CARBONDALE; B.A. in LAS., English; ALPHA DELTA PHI; 

BROWN, ^ d crescenf; Jhe Da||y |||ini interfraternity Counc.l ); 

Student Senate (1 2, 3, 41; Committee on Studsnt Affairs (4*; N.S.A. Senate Sub- 
committee (2, 3, 4); lllini Board of Control (2, 3); L.A.S. Council (2). 

RRCWN KATHRYN VIRGINIA BARRINGTON; B.S. in Industrial Administration; ALPHA 

XI DELTA; Delta Sigma Rho; Gamma Delta; Young Republicans Club; Freshman Steer- 
ing Committee (1); University of Wyoming. 

BROWN PHILLIP WILLIAM RANTOUL; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; Delta Sigma Pi, 

President (3); Accountancy Cub; Business Education Club. 

BROWN, SEYMOUR AARON CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; Navy Pier Exten- 
sion of the University of Illinois. 

BROWN STEPHEN RALPH WEBSTER GROVES, MISSOURI; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA 

CHI; W.P.G.U. (4); Vanderbilt University. 

BROWN, VIVIAN NAN URBANA; B.S. in Secretarial Training; DELTA ZETA; Alpha Lambda 

Delta. 

BROWN WILLIAM ALBERT . . COAL CITY; B.S. in Agriculture; THETA CHI; lllini Union 

BROWN, WimAIW^ALbtK Un . versity Thea(re Crew (3); Basketba ,| Manager (2); All-Ag Field 

Day Committee (1); Ensign, NROIC (3, 4); Agricultural Economics Club; Agriculture 
Club; A.S.A.E.; Field and Furrow; Young Democrats Club; Trident. 

BROWNE CYNTHIA . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; GAMMA HOUSE; Theta Sigma 

Phi; House President (4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BROWNLEE DAVID ALLEN SKOKIE; B.S. in General Engineering; SIGMA ALPHA EPSI- 

LON; A.S.M.E.; S.A.E. 
BRUBECK, SALLY JEAN SPRINGFIELD; B.A. in L.A.S., English; ALLEN HALL; Springfield 

Junior College. 

BRUEN JAMES PATRICK CHICAGO; B.S. in General Engineering; SIGMA PHI DELTA; 

Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Honors Day (3, 4); Baylor University; University of Cali- 
fornia. 

BRUGGER, RICHARD MICHAEL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; NEWMAN HALL; 

Chi Gamma lota; German Club; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Navy Pier Alumni 
Association; Honors Day (1, 2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BRUMLIK ARLENE ELLEN . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 

DENCE; Gamma Alpha Chi; Theta Sigma Phi; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

BRUMLIK DONALD JULIAN . . . LINCOLNWOOD; B.S. in Accountancy; CLARK HOUSE; Delta 

Sigma Pi- M R H.A. (4); House President (3); Accountancy Club; lllini Insurance 
Society; junior Bar Association; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Young Democrats 
Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BRUMMER, JEAN CAROL PARK RIDGE; B.F.A. in Art Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; 

Torch; Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (2); Campus Chest 
(2, 3); Honors Day (1, 2). 

BRUNTON WARREN RICHARD WEST FRANKFORT; B.S. in Veterinary Medicine; FLAGG 

HOUSE; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; S'udent Vetennarv Medical Association; Omega 
Tau Sigma; Honors Day (1,2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

BUCHANAN, BOTETTE ANN URBANA; B.S. in Recreation; Y.W.C.A. Committee (1. 2); All- 
Ag Field Day Committee (1); American Recreation Society U. of I. Student Chapter. 



BUCANAN MARGARET LAWRENCE BLUE ISLAND: B.S. in Elementary Education; SHER- 
WOOD LODGE; Alpha Chron; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1); 
Sno-Ball Committee (1). 

BUCNIS EDWARD HENRY HOMEWOOD; B.S. in Economics; BETA SIGMA PSI; Y.M.C.A. 

Committee (21: Junior Interfraternity Council (2)- Military Ball Committee (3); Major, 
Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Spanish Club. 

BUDDENBAUM, JAMES ALBERT CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; American Acad- 
emy of Art. 

BUDKA, HAROLD GENE CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Navy Pier Exten- 
sion of the University of Illinois. 

BUDKA SONYA CELESTE WINAMAC, INDIANA; B.S. in Speech Correction; ALPHA XI 

DELTA; Purdue University; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

BUENTE, BARBARA ANN GRANITE CITY; B.S. in Home Economics; ZETA TAU ALPHA; 

Alpha Lamba Delta; Honors Day (1). 



488 



BUHRMESTER, LESLIE WAITER NASHVIM F- o <; ;„ :i . • i r • 

Memphis State University.' NA5HVIUE ' BS ' ln Electrical Eng.noer.ng, A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; 

BUHRMESTER, RAY LOREN NIASHVII I F R c a • , 

Sigma Delta; Y.M.C.A. t" tel' ft 3 " 4^ "£ S, N E ? ° NE ^UB; Gamma 
technology Society; lllini Sportsman's Club; Honors' Day "2" ^° n ° m ' CS Club; Dair * 

BURCH, KENNETH WILLIAM IOIIFT- R <; i„ r- 1 r . 

M.R.H.A. (4); Freshman' Adv ser ' (4)f A S G E 'ill ni^rf/^A F ° RBES "OT 
Junior College; Navy P,er Extension of the UnJrsiJy <5 MHinois ASSOC ' at, ° n ' W ^ ht 

BUROON. BARBARA / ANN mma GREEN BAY , W^CONS.N, B F .A in Advertising Design; DELTA 

3 R ) osar T y er c a o P , i , n ege (2,; ^"^ '"**» ^d^'c^c'ii; "JS^^TT ft 

BUROON, SHARON Co . |ege . LOWPOINT; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; DELTA GAMMA; Spanish Cub; 

BURKE, SAR ^ G *rs E ,GMAS,GMA EM s?u S Jen B t S Na't?ona"ld ,i0n t \ Men ' ally Handicapped Children; 
University; Western , Michigan University °" Assocla, ' on <- """™ State Normal 



BURKHART, THOMAS HENRY AURORA- R <;;„»« u , r • 

Honors Day ,3); Na'vy > [extension *% & ^.i^K"* ™ E MANS ' ON; 
BURLEY, MABHA ANN BEARDSTOWN; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathmetics; CEDAR HALL; Honors 



BURRELL, WILLIAM FORD . . CHEBANSE- R< :„ n, • 1 t j 

(3, 4)° Young Republlc/an's Club. ma " VarS " y bqUad; F ' rS ' lie «°™1 Army ROIc" 

BUSH ' ""^^M,; iJ£?JKS .^-Y^^puS^r- MEDEA «»** «- 
BUSBOOM, VERNON EUGENE 
Club. 



GIFFORD; B.S. in Agriculture; Field and Furrow; Spanish 



BUSCH. BARBA^ANCES (3 . . . ^CHAMPAION^B.A. in^A.,, English; ALLEN HALL; University 
BUSSE, JON HENRY ARLINGTON HEIGHTS; Bachelor of Architecture; SIGMA NU 

,u,liR ' A "Vic_;,?|Ts*Ki &ia^?£i'S5SM'cEE w - '--"'- 



BUYHH ' '"BzB&^z&.'sxug; wars ».a 

BUZDYGAN, CHRISTINE ELIZABETH CHICARO- R <; ;„ 1 a q m .u 

Newman Foundation Student' Coun^ (3 4) ACS Germa^ Club"'^ C | DAR A HALU ' 
Association; Navy Pier Extension ot the Urn verity oM™. ' Vy P ' er A ' Umm 

CABALLERO, FERNANDO BOGOTA COIDMRIA. r 5 :_ a* l , - . 

SIGMA PHI; A.F.S.; A^^S.A.E.fu^er'sidVd De L^f Andes'.' ^'^"^ DELTA 



CAIN, RAYMOND FREDERICK SPRINOFIFI r>. rfa ■ i a a l - 

SIRMA- S^r.k u^ ' ' 'c SKK ' N ^ h t LL> ; B.F.A. in Landscape Architecture; PHI KAPPA 

ass^-jsfcijaiT asrui^rSr^ ©,^lS!r■ t - n,,l ' BaM commi,,ee (3); 

CA ^^ c «^ m ^TER os . No . 2 -UET; t B.S. inC.mn.nications; Sigma Delta Chi; ,„ini 
CALVERLEY, ^^ C ^„J™^^^ ^^^ KAPPA LAMBDA; 



CAMPBELL, RUTH ELIZABETH MT. STERLING; B.A. in Teaching of French- McKINLEY 

V V w 1'' c 5 Pa Ph, j P , hi Be ' a Kappa; Alpha Lambda Delta; YWC A Cabinet 
ilfinok S^no l |a y rsh F i p Un K d e a y'. IOn StUden ' C ° UnCi ' W ' "^ °"* "' 2 < 3); ^ersftyol 

CAMERON, SARA DUNCOMBE RIVFP FncF<;T r <: ■ d >■ „.„„ 

v«/ a a ,1 n< >S ••,••• KivtK rUKcol; B.S. in Recreation' KAPPA Al PHA thfta 

L A ng'«yfflr <2 ' 3 ' 4); ° rCheSiS "' 2) ' PhySiCal "d A u P c P a A io AL M^ors TH C E | T u^. 

CAMPBELL, CRAIG STEWART 

tecture; Iowa 



RT . . DETROIT LAKES, MINNESOTA; B.F.A. in Landscape Archi 

State University; Kansas City Junior College. Landscape Arcnr- 



CAMERON, GEORGE ALAN WHEATON; B.S. in Industrial Administration; ALPHA TAU 

ffitlrig »l»fo E r X r Adva^etn,^Ma^m:r fra,ernity ^"^ ™ 

CANNON, ^MES w CALV,N r . _ .BJHHOOO, B.S. in Agriculture; Phi Chi Eta (3, 4, Field and 

CA ' EY ' B ™ -- ®* - -■ - ztt^xi^cs^ 




489 




CARLSON, DALE ELMER CHICAGO; B.S. in Animal Science; EBEL HALL; Wright College; 

Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CARLSON DONALD EARLE TAMPICO; B.S. in Engineering Mechanics; Phi Kappa Phi; 

Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; Pi Tau Sigma; Second Regi- 
mental Band (1, 2); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
Scholarship Key 

CARLSON RICHARD EARL KEWANEE; B.S. in Communications; PHI KAPPA TAU; Wa- 

Na-See; Alpha Delta Sigma; The lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1); Star Course 
Manager (2, 3); llligreek (4); Freshman Adviser (2, 3, 4); Marketing Club. 

CARLSON, WILLIAM ROGER HINSDALE; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA TAU OMEGA; Ensign, 

NROTC (3, 4); Trident, President (4); Flying Club. 

CARNEY ALLAN HERBERT SKOKIE; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA EPSILON PI; W.P.G.U. 

(1, 2); Junior Interfralernity Council (1); Student Senate (3); Hillel Foundation Stu- 
dent Council (1, 2, 3); Commerce Council (2); Freshman Week Committee (4); Fresh- 
man Adviser (4); Pershing Rifles (I); Accountancy Club; Little United Nations; Mar- 
keting Club. 

CARNEY, JAMES CHRISTOPHER ROCKFORD; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; ALPHA SIGMA 

PHI; Alpha Phi Omega (1, 2, 3, 4); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Phalanx (3, 4); 
Phi Chi Eta. 

CAROLLO, ANTON JOHN LOCKPORT; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; EXMOOR HALL; 

A.I.Ch.E.; Joliet Junior College. 

CARPENTER, MYRON ARTHUR PLEASANT HILL; B.S. in Accountancy; DELTA PHI; Phi Eta 

Sigma; Major Chairman Forums and Town Meetings lllini Union Committee (3); lllini 
Union Committee (1, 2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1, 2); Freshman Adviser (2); Major, 
Army ROTC (3, 4); Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1). 

CARR, WILLIAM JOHN, JR DOWNERS GROVE; B.S. in Economics; ARMORY HOUSE; Sigma 

lota Epsilon; Finance Club; Society of the Advancement of Management; Synton; 
Young Republicans Club. 

CARTER, DAVID WILLIAM JOLIET; B.S. in Ceramic Engineering; BARTON HOUSE; Keramos, 

President (4). 

CASE, CHARLES THOMAS OGLESBY; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Sigma Tau; Sigma 

Gamma Tau; I.A.S.; St. Bede Junior College. 

CASEY, JEANNE MARIE BERWYN; B.S. in Elementary Education; Kappa Delta Pi; Student 

National Education Association; Northern Illinois University; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

CASEY, WILLIAM ROBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engneering; I.A.S.; Navy Pier 

Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CASSENS, AUDREE MAE HAMEL; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; ALPHA OMICRON Pl; 

lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (1); Business Education Club; 
Honors Day (1). 

CASTINO, GUY THOMAS CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier 

Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CATALANO, PHILIP CHICAGO; B.S. in LAS., Psychology; 611 CLUB; House President (4); 

Tribe of lllini (4); Baseball, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (3, 4). 

CAVANAH, JACK ALLAN ALEDO; B.S. in Agriculture; FORBES HALL; Field and Furrow; 

University of Missouri. 

CENTANNI JAMES DANIEL CARY; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Newman Foundation 

Student Council (3, 4); A.I.E.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



CERSKUS, VITA ANTANINA EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Management; BUSEY HALL; Lithu- 
anian Students Club. 

CHADEN, RECILLE CHICAGO; B.S. in Speech Correction; LOWRY LODGE; Young Demo- 
crats Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CHAN, PAUL HONG KONG, CHINA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Chinese Students 

Club; Oklahoma Baptist University. 



CHANOCK, CAROLE RAE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALLEN HALL; Honors 

Day (2, 3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CHAPLIK, HARVEY ALLEN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; CAMPUS VIEW LODGE; 

University Chorus (1); Praetorians. 

CHAPMAN HENRY LLEWELLYN PEKIN; B.S. in Recreation; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; Skull and 

Crescent; Alpha Phi Omega; The Daily lllini (1); W.P.G.U. (4); Interfraternity Execu- 
tive Council (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Baseball, Freshman Varsity Squad; 
Baseball Manager (1, 2); WILL (3); Interfraternity Ball Committee, Co-Chairman (3); 
American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Bradley University. 

CHASEN MARTIN MAX CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; GARNER HOUSE; Alpha Kappa Psi 

M R H.A. (3, 4); House President (3, 4); Hillel Foundation Student Councils (3, 4) 
Freshman Adviser (3); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (1, 2), 
Marketing Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Honors Day (3); Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

CHEN FRANK CHING YOU HONG KONG, CHINA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; GARNER 

HOUSE; Phi Eta Sigma; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Chinese Students Club; Honors Day (1). 



CHEN, 



JOSEPH ZUEN-YUEN ... . NORWALK, CONNECTICUT; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; 
BARTON HALL, Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Little United Nations. 



490 



CHILDS, ELIZABETH ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Microbiology ARBOR SUITFS lllini 

Ex.ens^n o e t "°h WS U P <3 ' ^ 7^ C ' Ub; "^ P-e" A!S3'Assoc°?ion"NalV P 2 
txtension ot ihe University of Illinois. ■".■.»? 

CHILES, DIANA KAY SP "INWIELD, B.A. in Teaching of English; STRATFORD HOUSE; 

c w o^i ffi ii"TchrK e &^^^^ Found — s - d - ; 

CHO, AIFRED aVe V- .-PflPING CHina b.S in Elecrncal Engineering; Sigma Tau; Eta Kappa Nu ; 
A.l.t.t.-I.K.t.; Chinese Students Club; Oklahoma Baptist University. 

CHOCHOLEK RAYMOND STANLEY . . CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA RHO CHI- 

Applied Arts SocTeTy Interfraternity Council (3);' A.I.A.; FilS and 

CHOW, HENRY SHUI-CHING HONG KONG CHINA- »c i, Hrf ,. .. ■ „ . ,. 

Commit^ (2); Campus ffi S^.^^^dR^S^^^^^ 

CHR,STENSEN V,*rS^d^ Un iancV-C S .r WICH; BS ' '" A ~" Football, Freshman 

CHRISTENSEN^RONALD^RAN^^.^^SHERRARD; B.S. in Agriculture; Second Lieutenant, Army 

CHUMBLEY, JANET MARIE . PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Accountancy; KAPPA ALPHA THETA- 

Cfct H^"."*yV "' ^ ^""^ <"'' Y ' W ' C - A - C °™ "*• (^ Actum a n^ 

CHUTRAU, NORBERT BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; 

LUNUOKtN HOUSE; Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (1); I.A.S. 

CICERO, JOSEPH BENJAMIN . CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy and Political Science; 

NaTp'f E^e^sion"^ f^n^H' l^nols!' 6 ""^ "^ " ^ ™*> 

CITTI, BARBARA LOU . . . CHICAGO; B.S in Elementary Education; ALPHA PHI; The lllio 

(2, 3); University Theatre Crew (2); Mundelem College. 

CLAMAGE, BARNEY DAVID ... CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; FORBES HOUSE; 
Navy Pier Alumn. Association; Navy Pier txtension of the University of Illinois. 

CLAPPER, PATRICIA^ LEACH MAHOMET; B.S. in Music Education; First Regimental Band 

CLARIDA, HAROID GlENN . GALATIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; EXMOOR HALL; Chi 

tpsilon; A.S.C.E.; Southern Illinois University. 

CLARK, LARRY LYNN I TOLEDO; BS. in Agriculture; COLLEGE HALL; Lieutenant-Colonel, 

and Horn Club ^ ' ' 4) '' A 9 ricul,ural Education Club; Hoof 

CLAUSON, FLORENCE MARIE . . . ROCKFORD; B.S. in Elementary Education; EVANS HALL- 

Student National Education Association; Young Republicans Club; North Park College! 

CLAY, DAVID GEORGE ROCKFORD; B.S in Engineering Physics; FLAGG HOUSE; Phi Eta 

Day ()', 2) Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Physics Society; Honors 

CLAYTON, SHERYL FAE POLO; B.S. in Speech Correction; ALPHA DELTA PI- Alpha Lambda 

Delta^Zeta Ph, Eta; Women's Glee Club (1, 2, 3);' Freshman AdCiser' (2, 3); Honors 

CLEARY, MICHAEL DOUGLAS INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA- R A ;„ I a <: du-i u 

Bar A AL S c C ia H t?o L n ARS; F °° tba " ««" hi "3 Band' (WhA Regnal ^ifft^ 

ClEGG ' JOSE ^ gn rS.A.E.; mJoTlTe^ "" '" *•"""""" ^^'^ ***•*» """ 

CLEM, JOHN RICHARD GURNEE; B.S in Engineering Physics; DELTA UPSILON; Ma-Wan- 

Da; Tomahawk; Phi Kappa Phi; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; The lllio (2 3 • Business 
Manager (4); Football Marching Band (I, 2); First Regimental Band (I 2- Physic 
Society; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

CLEVELAND, EDWARD CRAIG .... WEBSTER GROVES, MISSOURI; B.S. in Electrical Engineering- 
n V o C ! Ca T PUS C ^ S / ^ ); W - P - G - U - (2); University Choir (1); Men's GleTcTub 
2, 3); Oratorio Society (1); Greek Week Committee (3); Military Ball Committee (4) 
Lieutenant NROTC (3, 4); Navy Council (4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Society of 
American Military Engineers (2, 3, 4), President (3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E ; Tr dent (3 4) 
President (4); Honors Day (4). ' maenT l J < A >- 

CLEVER, DARLENE JOANE .... BATAVIA; B.S. in Recreation; SIGMA KAPPA; Terrapin (2 3 
4); American Recreat.onal Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Northern Illinois University! 

CLIFFORD, CANDACE RUTH ... OTTAWA; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; EVANS HALL; First 
Regimental Band (2); Second Regimental Band (1); Illinois Technograph (2). 

CLINE, CHARLES .HENRY . GLEN ELLYN; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA CHI; Basketball 

Manager (2); McKmley Foundation Student Council (4); Pershing Rifles (2); Marketing 

CLINE, KATHERINE HIRT . INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; 

(IV W PC, U (Vi In'' t : t h " A ' : l' ar ,S° UrSe Manager < 2 '' Y.M.C.A. Committee 

(IS 3 P -4); U A }1. 'Honors IVy™?^ ^ ^'"^ F ° Unda,i ° n *»*«" C ° Und ' 

CLINE. TILFORD ROBERT . - -VIRGINIA; B.S in Agriculture; Alpha Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta,- 

Huh HnnAr.'n ;f 9 o ? d ,? a - V Comml , ,,ee 3; Field and Furrow,- Hoof and Horn 
Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 




491 




COGGINS, WILLIAM R MARGARETTSVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA; B.S. in Electrical En- 
gineering. 

COHEN STEPHEN JOEL TARRYTOWN, NEW YORK; B.S. in Accountancy; LUNDGREN 

HOUSE- lllini Union Committee (1, 3); Freshman Week Committee (4); Accountancy 
Club. 

COHEN, TANYA Z CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; PINE HALL; Student National 

Education Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



COLBY WILLIAM ANDREW ATKINSON; B.S. in L.A.S., Chemistry; Second Regimental 

Band (1, 2); Men's Glee Club (2, 3, 4); lllini Christian Fellowship (1, 2, 3, 4); 
A.I.C.E. 

COLEGROVE NORMA LOUISE B.S. in Chemistry; KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA; lota Sigma 

'pi; The lllio (I, 2); Star Course Manager (1, 2); Honors Day (1). 

COLEMAN, MICHAEL GARM PEKIN; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; ZETA PSI; House 

President (3); llinois Technograph (1, 2); Engineering Council (2, 3); M.I.S. 

COLLENS LEWIS MORTON CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; Wa-Na-See; lllini Union Board 

(3); M.I. A. Executive Council (2, 3); Student Senate (2, 3, 4); Committee on Student 
Affairs (3); Coordination Committee (2, 3); N.S.A. Senate Subcommittee (3, 4); Fresh- 
man Week Committee (4); Little United Nations; Praetorians; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

COLOMBO, CARL LEO BARTLETT; Bachelor of Architecture; FORBES HOUSE; A. I. A.; Elgin 

Community College; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

COLVIN, BOBBY JOE WAVERLY; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; Black- 
burn College. 

COMSTOCK, DAVID PRESTON LA GRANGE; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; ALPHA SIGMA 

PHI; Illinois Institute of Technology; Lyons Township Junior College. 

CONANT JOHN CHARLES JACKSONVILLE; B.S. in General Engineering; PHI KAPPA TAU; 

Star and Scroll; The lllio (1); Chairman Homecoming lllini Union Committee (3); 
lllini Union Department Head (4); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Military Ball 
Committee (3); Ensign, NROTC (4); Navy Council (3); Trident (4). 

CONDICT, RUPERT DEWAYNE EVANSVILLE, INDIANA; Bachelor of Architecture; VAN 

DOREN HOUSE; Scarab; A. I. A.; Evansville College. 

CONNOR PATRICIA ANN DOWNERS GROVE; B.S. in Elementary Education; KAPPA 

ALPHA THETA; llligreek (3); Beloit College. 

CONRAD LAUREL ANNE CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA UPSILON; 

lllini Union Committee (3); First Regimental Band (3, 4); Student National Education 
Association; Young Republicans Club; Cornell College. 

COOK, ROBERTA ROBIN NEW YORK, NEW YORK; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PINE HALL; 

lllini Union Committee (2); Sno-Ball Committee (2). 

COOMBE MARTHA VIRGINIA OAK PARK; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; McKINLEY 

HALL- Mortar Board; Phi Alpha Theta; lllini Union Committee (1); Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 
(3, 4); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2); W.G.S. Executive Council (3); Sno-Ball Committee 
(2); Little United Nations; Young Republicans Club. 

COOPER, MARY LINDA BERWYN; B.S. in Elementary Education; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; 

Stevens College. 

COOTS, JERALD WAYNE HAVANA; B.S. in Management; SIGMA PI; Accountancy Club; 

Society for the Advancement of Management. 

COPP, GLORIA MARY WESTCHESTER; B.S. in Elementary Education; LEEMON LODGE; 

Student National Education Association; Illinois State Normal University. 

CORBIN KATHRYN JEANNE MUNCIE, INDIANA; B.S. in Music Education; PINE HALL; 

Sigma Alpha lota; University Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4); Ball State Teacher's College. 

COWMAN, GARY LAVERNE . ... MAQUERL; B.S. in Agricuture; DELTA SIGMA PHI; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Western Illinois University. 



COX DELANO KIMBERLING CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; KAPPA ALPHA PSI; 

House President (4); Men's Glee Club (3); Wilson Junior College; Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

CRAIG, LINDA MILLER HERRIN; B.S. in Elementary Education; Theta Sigma Phi. 

CRAIG, PAUL WILLIAM HERRIN; B.S. in Accountancy; Southern Illinois University. 

CRAIG, RICHARD LYNN GRAYSLAKE; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; Alpha Phi Omega. 

CRAMER, LAUNA RACHELLE CHICAGO, B.A. In Teaching of English; CEDAR HALL; 

Freshman Adviser (3). 

CRAMER SHARON ANNE FREEPORT; B.S. in Communications; LINDEN HALL; The Dally 

lllini (4). 



492 



CRAWFORD, JOHN WICKHAM CLAYTON; Bachelor of Architecture; PHI DELTA THETA- 

Mar Course Manager (1); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4). 

CREMIEUX, FAITH MILDRED HINSDALE; B.F.A. in Art Education; KAPPA DELTA; Society of 

I lustrators- University Theatre Crew (4); Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Little United 
Nations; Honors Day (3); Lawrence College. 

CRILEY, BRUCE BENNER CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; CAMPUS VIEW LODGE; 

Honors Day (2, 3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CROSBY, MARCIA ANN . . . . ROCKFORD; B.S in Business Education; KAPPA DELTA; lllini 
Union Committee (2); Commerce Council (3, 4); Business Education Club; Honors 

CROSS, CYNTHIA ANNE . WILMETTE; B.S. in Recreation; ALPHA XI DELTA; lllini Union 

Committee (1, 2); Terrapin (1); American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter. 

CROUCH, IINDLEY JANE . . . . WESTERN SPRINGS B.A. in L.A.S., History; GAMMA PHI BETA; 
Alpha Sigma Nu; Honors Day (3); Columbia University; Connecticut College School of 

CROWELL, RONALD DENNIS . SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PHI SIGMA EPSILON- 

Second Regimental Band (1, 2); Oratorio Society (I); lllini Christian Fellowship (1, 2); 

CROZIER, WILLIAM ROBERT WAUKEGAN; B.A. in L.A.S., English FLAGG HOUSE. 

CUERDEN, GLENN ALAN . NAUVOO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; PI KAPPA PHI; Star 

and Scroll; House President (4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Chicago Academy 
or nne Art. ' 

CULKIN, HELEN MARY .SHELDON; B.S. in Home Economics; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; Shorter 

Board; lorch; Phi Upsilon Omicron; lllini Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (1, 2, 3). 

CURRAN, THOMAS FRANCIS ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CZARNECKI, LEONARD CHESTER CHICAGO; B.S. in Economics; SIGMA TAU GAMMA- 

Kitle and Pistol Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

CZEKALA, ROSE MARIE ..... ARGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; EVANS HALL; Phi Kappa Phi- 
Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Lambda Delta; Sigma Delta Pi; Spanish Club; Honors Day (1 
2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

DABNEY, ADOIPHUS .... CHICAGO; B.A. in the Teaching of Social Studies; HOPKINS HOUSE- 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

DAHL, MELFORD ARTHUR CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E • Navy Pier Ex- 
tension of the University of Illinois. 

DAHMAN, HOMER MARC ARENZVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics; FORBES HOUSE- Junior 

Bar Association. ' 

DAIGH, CHARLES FRANCIS ... LEBANON; B.S. in Teaching of German; FORBES HOUSE- 
Alpha Phi Omega; Student Senate (3, 4); German Club, President (4); Belleville Junior 
College; Reed College. 

DALLMAN, BONNIE MARIE .... SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Rcreation; PI BETA PHI; lllini Union 
Committee (I); University Theatre Crew (1); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1)- American 
Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter. 

DALY, MARYLIN ANN .... CINCINNATI, OHIO; B.S. in Communications; THETA UPSILON- 
Shorter Board; Gamma Alpha Chi; Theta Sigma Phi; The lllio (1, 2, 3) Editor (4)- 
Mini Union Committee (I, 2, 3); Panhellenic Executive Council (3); Freshman Adviser 
(J); Freshman Advisers Executive Council, Chairman (3); Spanish Club; Honors Dav (11- 
University of Cincinnati. 

DAMERON, ELDON WAYNE . . CHENOA; B.S. in Industrial Education; DELTA PHI; lllini Union 

Committee {]); Alumni Association Board (1); Illinois State Normal University- 
University of Georgia. " 

DAMON, DANIEL ALDEN PEORIA; B.S. in Restaurant Management; PHI GAMMA DELTA- 

lllim Union Committee (1); Y.M.C A. Committee (1); Campus Chest (1); Intramural 
Manager (12, 3); Greek Week Committee (1); IM Rec Board (2, 3); Military Ball 
Committee (1). ' 

DANGERFIELD HELEN KAY . . CHAMPAIGN; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; ALPHA CHI OMEGA- 

lllini Union Board (4); Major Chairman Forums and Town Meetings lllini Union Com- 
mittee (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 3); University Theatre Crew (1, 2 ,3). 

DANIEL, ARTHUR JOHN ..... CALEDONIA; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; NEWMAN HALL- 
Tomahawk; Pi Mu Epsilon; lllini Union Committee (2, 3, 4); House President (3)' 
Newman Foundation Student Council (4); Freshman Adviser (3); Sno-Ball Committee 
(3, 4); German Club; Honors Day (3). 

DANZER, WARREN KEITH . . EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Management; Alpha Phi Omega; Tribe 

?„ li! m l (2 ' 3 ' 4); Fer| c |n 3. Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3 4) Letter 
(2, 3); Scimitar. 

DARNELL, JESSE LEWIS .... GREENVILLE; B.S. in Economics; Commerce Council (3 4)- Ac- 
countancy Club. 

DAVIES, PATRICIA SUE . VANDALIA; B.S. in Music Education; PALAMAR; Sigma Alpha 

lota; Concert Band (2, 3, 4); Honors Day (3); Illinois Wesleyan University. 

DAVIS, ALFRED STEWART . . STREATOR; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; PHI KAPPA 

THETA; I.A.S.j Illinois Campus Amvets Post No 202; Student National Education 
Association; Honors Day (1). 




493 




DAVIS JEROME HOWARD MEMPHIS, TFNNESSEE; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; ZETA BETA 

TAU; Campus Chest (1, 2); American Recreational Society of U. of I. Student Center. 

DAVIS WILLIAM KASE ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA RHO 

CHI; Star and Scroll; Gargoyle; Phi Eta Sigma; Junior Interfraternity Council (1); 
Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Quartermaster, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3); A.I.A.; 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3, 4); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

DECHRISTOPHER, DONALD JOSEPH CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; SIGMA TAU 

GAMMA; Freshman Adviser (4); German Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association,- Rifl - and 
Pistol Club; Baseball, Freshman Varsity Squad, Navy Pier; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 



DEGENFORD, JAMES EDWARD PEORIA; B.S in Electrical Engineering; ACACIA; Sigma 

Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; University Theatre Crew (1); A.I.E.E.- 
I.R.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

DEHASS, JAMES LAWRENCE KEWANFE; B.S in Electrical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

DELANEY, JOHN MICHAEL DAYTON, OHIO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; Newman 

Foundation S'udent Council (3 4); Industrial Engineering Society; llli-Knights; New 
York State Maritime College; University of Dayton. 



DELLENBACK, BARBARA KAY HINCKLEY; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; McKINLEY HALL. 

DELLERT ROBERT CHRISTOPHER DECATUR; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Second 

Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phalanx; A.S.M.E. 

DELP, JUDITH ANN SHABBONA; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; McKINLEY HALL; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Freshman Adviser (3); Honors Day (I, 2). 



DEMPSEY, BARRY JO AVON; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); 

Society of American Military Engineers (4); A.S.C.E.; Honors Day (1). 



DEMPSEY, 



MARGARET ELLEN CARLYLE; B.S. in Music Education; ALPHA DELTA PI; 

Shorter Board: Sigma Alpha lota, President (4); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Stu- 
dent Senate (2, 3); First Regimental Band (2, 3, 4); Second Regimental Band (1); 
Women's Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Madrigal Chorus (3, 4); Oratorio Society (2); Fine 
and Applied Arts Council (3, 4); Honors Day (3). 

DENEEN, KATHY RAY MARENGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPHA XI DELTA; W.A.A. 

(1, 2, 3, 4); Physical Education Majors Club; Young Democrats Club. 



DENT GAIL MARJORIE SKOKIE; B.S. in L.A.S., English; ALPHA DELTA PI; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; The lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Theatre Crew (2); Y.W.C.A. 
Committee (4); llligreek (2); Honors Day (1, 2). 

DESCOUROUEZ JAMES CLARENCE CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; CHI ILLINI; 

Football Manager, Navy Pier (1, 2); Wrestling Manager, Navy Pier (1, 2); Track Man- 
ager, Navy Pier (1); Lettermen's Club, Navy Pier, President (2); Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

DEUEL, JAMES PETER ELGIN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Lewis College 

of Science and Technology. 



DICK CAROL DIA . . . HAMMOND; B.S. in Home Economics Education; SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA; 

lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Concert Band (2); First Regimental Band (1); Home 
Economics Club. 



DIEFENTHALER, JACK LEE 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 



OCONEE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; COSINE CLUB; 



DIERKER MERRILL OTTO FOREST CITY; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Star 

and Scroll; S.N.I.B. (I, 2); Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); 
Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club. 



DIERKES JAMES PAUL QUINCY; B.S. in Architectural Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Gargoyle, President (4); Scarab; Fine and Applied Arts Council (4); Honors Day (1, 2). 

DIESNER WANDA WYLLIE DWIGHT; B.S. in Elementary Education; ZETA TAU ALPHA; 

Shorter Board; Torch; The lllio (1, 2, 3), llligreek (3). 

DILLE CHARLES ERNEST, III CAIRO; Bachelor of Architecture; ROOJAH; House Presi- 
dent (2); A.I.A. 



DINNELLA NANCY MARIE CHICAGO; B.A in the Teaching of English; ALPHA CHI 

OMEGA; Mortar Board; Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (1, 2); Illinois Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2); Campus Chest (1, 2); Student Senate (2, 3, 4); Committee on Student 
Affairs (4); N.S.A. Senate Subcommittee (3, 4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3). 

DISPENSA, SALVATORE ANTHONY CHICAGO; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; Business 

Education Club, President (4). 

DITTRICH, ALFRED RAYMOND DES PLAINES; B.S. in Accountancy; Loyola University; 

Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



DIXON NANCY ELIZABETH DOWNERS GROVE; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA 

GAMMA; Shorter Board; Terrapin (2, 3); Honors Day (3); Western Illinois University. 

DODGE, JAMES URBAN MASON; B.S. in Marketing; GARMEN HOUSE. 

DOHERTY, DONALD PATRICK WEST CHICAGO; B.S. in General Engineering; PHI KAPPA 

TAU; Ma Wan Da; Sachem; Star and Scroll; Phi Eta Sigma (1); lllini Union Committee 
(!)■ Star Course Manaqer (2, 3, 4); Concert and Entertainment Board (4); Student Senate 
(4); Lieutenant, NROTC (3, 4); Navy Council (4); Trident (3, 4); A.F.S.; Honors Day (3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



494 



DOMINIC, PATRICIA STREATOR; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech- KAPPA DELTA- lllini Onion r™ 

mittee (1. 2, 3); University Theatre Crew (1, 2, 3 4) Star Cou e ManZr m" 
Orchesi, (1); Freshman Adviser (4); Panhellenic 'Ball Committee (4); Uttle United 

DOMMERS, MARY VIRGINIA . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education- ZETA TAU ALPHA- 

DONAHUE ' S^iverslty ^^f^Z^^^ &»&* ^ "" 



DONDANV.LLE GERRY LEE WILMINGTON; B.A. in L A.S., Political Science; BETA THETA 

i-l, me Uaily lllini (2); The llho (1); Junior Bar Association; Honors Day (3). 

DONIGER, LOIS IRENE CHICAGO; B.S. in Music Education; PINE HALL- Phi Kappa Phi- 

Pi Kappa Lambda; Alpha Lambda Delta- Mu Phi Ensilon Pro«;A=„» ia\ ,, Pf ? a T'' 
Orchestra (4); Women's Glee Club (3, 4);' O^torio Sode y (3); F £ and'^ppHedTts 

DONOVAN, DEANN KATHERINE GALESBURG; B.A. in L.A.S., English; PI BETA PHI. 

DOTSON, LEWIS STANTON TUSCOLA; B.S. in Agriculture; Bachelor of Laws- PHI DELTA 

fl 3 >\ ^.Wan-pa; Sachem; Skull and Crescent; Tribe of lllini (4); Football Manager 
(1, 2, 3); Senior Football Manager (4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4) mana 9 er 

DOUGHERTY ALLEN LEE .CHICAGO; .B.S in Finance; SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON; Skull and 

Crescent, The llho (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Star Course Manager (1, 2). 

DOUGLAS, JANET LYNN CICERO; B.F.A. in Painting; LEEMAN LODGE. 

DOUGLASS, CHARIES WIIUAM ADAIR; B.S. in Music Education; Concert Band (3, 4); 

(3%)r l Votn r g^ n e 9 m B ocra d ,s (, C,ub 3 ' * h *'* ^'^^ Band ( '< 2); ""'"""V °~ h *^ 

DOUGLASS, KAY WHITLOW . . . GOOD HOPE; B.S. in Elementary Education; Kappa Delta Pi- 

Campus Chest (1); Young Democrats Club. 

DOW, JOSE KAMAl . . IBAGUE, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering- ASAE- 

Colombian Students Club; University of the Andes. engineering, M.a.A.t., 

DOWNS, «OBERT eg WARREN BELLEVILLE; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; Belleville Junior 

DOYLE, DANIEL DEAN ••PEORIA; B.A in L.A.S., Political Science; BALMORAL CLUB; 

W.P.G.U. (1, 2); House President (3); Bradley University. 

DOYLE, KIRBY JOHNSON . SHENANDOAH, IOWA; B.S. in Elementary Education; PALAMAR- 

House President (3); Student National Education Association; Christian College. 

DOYLE, RODNEY RAY . . . MILTON; B.S in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club; Agri- 
cultural Education Club; Delta Sigma Omicron; Western Illinois University. 

DREWS, JA «. u W '|^M bershoppe DANV,UE; s B GSE in Genera, Engineering; BETA SIGMA PS.; 
DR06EMULIER, a RICHARD e ALLEN ELMWOOD PARK; B.S. in Civil Engineering; MOORE 

DRULLIS, ASTRIDA VIJA .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Recreation; BUSEY HALL; Orchesis (1 2); 
American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Physical Education Majors 

DUBBERKE, RICHARD WALTER .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; NOBLE HOUSE; Beta Gamma 
Sigma; Sigma Iota Epsilon; Marketing Club; Honors Day (3); University of Illinois 
bcho.arship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

DUDLE, JAMES ARTHUR . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; GARNER HOUSE; Marketing Club; 

SntXofTlLoir "* 2); TenmS ' NaVy Pier (, < 2,; NaVy Pier Extension^ the 

DUEWER, LAWRENCE ALVIN . . WAVERLY; B.S. in Agriculture; NABOR HOUSE; Alpha Ze.a; 

Alpha Tau Alpha; Y.M.C A. Committee (2, 3); Agricultural Council (3, 4); Freshman 
Adviser (3); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Sno-Ball Committee 3; Agricultural 
Economics Club; Agricultural Education Club; Gamma Delta; Hoof and Horn Club 

DUFF, BRUCE NIXON . . BLUE ISLAND; B.S. in Accountancy; DELTA TAU DELTA; lllini Union 

r?\ in- 4 ) ; , Ma l° r Chairman Sheequon lllini Union Committee (3); lllini Union Council 
3; Mini Union Committee (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Commerce Council 
(2); Interfraternity Ball Committee (2); Accountancy Club. 

DUFFY, ROBERT JAMES ... NORRIDGE; B.S. in Marketing; CAMPUS VIEW LODGE- House 

President (4); Accountancy Club; Marketing Club; Wright lunior College; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. ' 

DUNBAR, DEAN ARTHUR KEWANEE; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; ILLIKNIGHTS. 

DUTTWEILER, RUSSELL EDWIN . CANTON; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; TOWN HOUSE- 

House President (2); Men's Glee Club (1, 2); Military Ball Committee (1, 2); Pershing 
Rifles (1, 2); M.I.S., President (4); Young Republicans Club. 3 

DYNER, HARRY BERNARD .CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; SIMPSON HALL; 

17 T Tau; Ph, Eta Sigma; Sigma Gamma Tau; House President (3); Freshman Advise 
(2, 3); I.A.S.; Praetorians; Honors Day (1, 3). 




495 




DYSON, CHARLES BENTON SAVANNA; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Education Club; 

Western Illinois University. 

EADIE, WILLIAM ROBERT INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA; B.S. in Marketing; WHITE HALL; 

I Mini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of 
Management; Millikin University. 

EASTBURN, ANNE WATSEKA; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL; Kappa Delta 

Pi; The Daily lllini (1); Freshman Adviser (3). 



EASTMAN, ELIZABETH REYNER ROCKFORD; B.S. in Speech Correction; KAPPA ALPHA 

THETA; Zeta Phi Eta; lllini Union Committee (2); Campus Chest (2); University of 
Wisconsin. 

EATON, REAUGH C FLORA; B.S. in General Engineering; SIGMA PI; Junior Interfraternity 

Council (2); Young Republicans Club. 

ECKMAN, CONNIE JOANN WOOD RIVER; B.S. in L.A.S., Dietetics; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1, 2, 3); University 
Theatre Crew (1, 2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2, 3); Campus Chest (1, 2); llligreek (1); 
Home Economics Council (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1, 2); Home Economics 
Club; Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (1). 

EDELMAN, GLORIA JOAN LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALPHA 

EPSILON PHI; The Daily Mini (2); lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre 
Crew (2); Miami University. 

EDEN, STANLEY RAY STOCKTON; B.S. in Agriculture; ARMORY HOUSE; Men's Glee Club 

(2, 3, 4); S.N.I.B. (4). 

EDMINSTER, WARREN GEORGE WYANET; Bachelor of Agricuture; Gargoyle; A. I. A.; Knox 

University; University of Maryland. 

EDWARDS, ROBERT THOMAS PONTIAC; B.S. in Industrial Administration; ALPHA KAPPA 

LAMBDA; Sachem; Alpha Phi Omega, President (2); Interfraternity Executive Com- 
mittee (2, 3); Gymnastics Manager (2); Greek Week Committee (3); Lieutenant, Army 
ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (2, 3, 4); Phalanx (3, 4); Illinois Society of General 
Engineering; Illinois Wesleyan University. 

EGGERS, MARION ESSIE RIVER FOREST; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; THETA UPSILON; lllini 

Union Committee (1); University Theatre Manager (3); University Theatre Crew (2); 
Student Senate (3, 4); N.S.A. Senate Subcommittee (3, 4); WILL (1, 2, 3, 4); Student 
National Education Association; Young Republicans Club. 

EGIZIO, PHILIP JOHN JOLIET; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.S.M.E.; Lewis College; 

Joliet Junior College. 

EHLERS, NORMAN FREDRIC MENDOTA; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Gamma Sigma 

Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; Tribe of lllini (3, 4); Track, Freshman Squad, Varsity Squad 
(2, 3, 4), Letter (2, 3, 4); Agricultural Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Honors Day (I, 2). 

EICHHOLZ, EDELGARD JOLIET; B.S. in Communications; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; 

Theta Sigma Phi; The Daily lllini (3); Rifle and Pistol Club; Joliet Junior College. 

EIGENRAUCH, MARIE ANN CENTRALIA; B.S. in Accountancy; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 
DENCE; Beta Gamma Sigma; Alpha Lambda Delta; Beta Alpha Psi; Sigma lota 
Epsilon; Illinois Disciples Foundation Student Council (2); Accountancy Club; Business 
Education Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key (3). 

EKDAHL, KARIN LOUISE VILLA PARK; B.S. in Home Economics; DELTA ZETA; University 

of Texas. 

ELIAS, CHESTER GEORGE PERU; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; SIGMA CHI; House 

President (4); Freshman Council; Freshman Adviser (2); Greek Week Committee (3); 
L.A.S. Council (3). 

ELLIS, JANET MAXINE ROCKFORD; B.A. in L.A.S. , Spanish; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; Campus 

Chest (3); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordinating Committee (3); Terrapin (3, 4); Purdue 
University. 



EMMERMAN RONALD CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; TAU EPSILON PHI; Accountancy 

Club. 

ENT, JUDY .... CAIRO; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; ALPHA DELTA PI; Torch: Shi-Ai; Sigma 
lota Epsilon; Major Chairman Mothers Day lllini Union Committee (3); lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2); McKinley Foundation Student Council (2); Business Education Club. 

ENTWISTLE, JAMES FRANCIS OGLESBY; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; 

Football, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4). 

EPKINS JOSEPH WAYNE PEKIN, B.S. in Management; PHI DELTA THETA; Wa-Na-See; 

Sachem; Tribe of lllini (2, 3, 4); Tennis, Captain (4), Varsity Squad (1, 2, 3, 4), Letter 
(2, 3, 4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society for me Advancement of Man- 
agement; Association of U. S. Army. 

EPSTEIN, ERWIN HOWARD LINCOLNWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; PI LAMBDA 

PHI; Phi Eta Sigma (1); Hillel Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3, 4); Freshman 
Adviser (2); Junior Bar Association (4); Honors Day (I); Northwestern University; 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ERICKSON, DAVID ALBERT EVANSTON; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; NOBLE HOUSE, 

A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ESPINOZA, RICHARD JEROME GURNEE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; CLUB TOPPER; 

Newman Foundation Student Council (1, 4); St. Pat's Ball Committee (4); A.I.E.E.- 
I.R.E.; Young Democrats Club. 

ESSER, ANNETTE MADELEINE WASHINGTON; Bachelor of Music; CHI OMEGA; Sigma 

Alpha lota; Fine and Applied Arts Council (3); Colorado Woman's College. 

EUBANKS, MARY ANN URBANA; B.A. in L AS., French; The lllio (2). 



496 






EVANS, CHARLES CLARK PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; DELTA PHI; lllini 

Union Committee (I, 4); W.P.G.U. (2, 3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

EVANS, EARL EUGENE MACON; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; WESMEN; Campus 

Chest (4); House President (5); Wesley Foundation Student Council (3); Engineering 
Council (3); St. Pat's Ball Committee (3); A.S.A.E.; Field and Furrow. 

FAGO, DORIS DALE WINTHROP HARBOR; B.S. in Home Economics; Iowa State University. 



FAHNSTROM, JUDITH ANN VICTORIA; B.S. in Home Economics Education; 4-H HOUSE 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, President (4); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordinating Committee (2) 
House President (3); Home Economics Council (4); Plowboy Prom Committee (1, 2) 
Sno-Ball Committee (1); Home Economics Club. 

FAIRCHILD, LYNN KATHLEEN CHAMPAIGN; B.A. in L.A.S., English; The lllio (1, 2); 

lllini Union Committee (2). 

FALZER, JULES DAVID CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; A.F.S.; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Illinois Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 



FALK, ALLAN HERBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; HOPKINS HOUSE; M.R.H A 

(4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

FARR, ORA DONALD SWAN CREEK; B.S. in Agricultural Education; DELTA SIGMA PHI- 

Agricultural Education Club; Western Illinois University. 

FECHTIG, ALLEN D ENFIELD; B.S. in Agriculture; Field and Furrow; Southern Illinois 

University. 



FEDOR, WILLIAM LAWRENCE THAYER; B.S. in Industrial Administration; NEWMAN HALL; 

Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of Management'. 

FEHR, ALLEN EUGENE DAKOTA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Honors Day (1). 

FEINBERG, PAULA CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; CEDAR HALL; Kappa Delta 

Pi; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



FEIT, VICTORIA KAY CHENOA; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA- 

Torch; Phi Upsilon Omicron; The Daily lllini (1, 2); The lllio (1, 2, 3) Associate 
Editor (4); University Theatre Crew (]); Honors Day (1). 

FEITLER, WENOE WALTA CLAUDIA RIVERSIDE; B.S. in Home Economics; LAUREL HOUSE- 

W.A.A. (1, 2); Orchesis (1); Freshman Adviser (3); Home Economics Cub (4)- Phys- 
ical Education Maiors Club; Spring Musical (1, 2, 4). 

FELLHEIMER, RONALD KATZ PONTIAC; B.S. in Finance; ZETA BETA TAU; lllini Union 

Committee (3); Campus Chest (1, 2); Baseball, Varsity Squad (2); Intramural Manager 
(1, 2); Greek Week Committee (2); Finance Club; Marketing Club. 



FENGERS, ANITA CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Social Studies; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 
DENCE; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

FERRY, ANN MACLAY ELMHURST; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA- 

Mortar Board, President; Torch, President; Shi-Ai; Major Chairman Pep Rally lllini 
Union Committee (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Star Course Manager (1 2)- 
House President (4); Committee on Student Discipline (4); Freshman Council. 

FERST, STUART GERALD CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PI LAMBDA PHI- Uni- 
versity Theatre Crew (3); Interfraternity Executive Council (2); Junior Interfraternity 
Council (1); Freshman Council; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



FIALA, FRED WADE BERWYN; Bachelor of Architecture; PI KAPPA PHI; Junior Interfra- 

ternity Council (1); Interfraternity Executive Council (2); A. I. A. 

FICKEL, RONALD GENE .... ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; ACACIA 
Skull and Crescent; Star Course Manager (1),- House President (4)- A I Ch E Presi- 
dent (4). 

FIELDLER, ELIZABETH JEANNE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Elemsntary Education- THFTA UPSI- 
LON; Kappa Delta Pi; lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Oratorio Society (3, 4)- Student 
National Education Association; Honors Day (1, 2). 

FIELD, PHILIP HENRY GLEN ELLYN; B.S. in Marketing; EVANS SCHOLARS- Wa-Na-See- 

Sachem; Tomahawk; M.I.A. Executive Council (3); Freshman Adviser (3, 4)- Lieutenant 
Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3. 4); Air Force Council (4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4). 

FIELDS, ADOLPH, BELDEN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; FORBES HOUSE- 

Navy Pier Alumni Association; Pier lllini (2); International Relations Club; French 
Club; Honors Day (2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

FIELDS, JANICE JEAN ... BUSHNELL; B.S. in Accountancy; Sigma lota Epsilon; Accountancy 

Club; Honors Day (), 3). 

FILERMAN, MICHAEL H . . SKOKIE; B.S. in Communications; GARNER HOUSE; Tomahawk- 

Mask and Bauble; National Collegiate Players; University Theatre Manager (2)- Uni- 
versity Theatre Cast (1, 2, 3, 4); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); MRHA (2)-' WILL 
(2, 3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3). 

FINKELSTEIN, HAROLD NEW YORK, NEW YORK; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club. 

FINLEY, JOHN ALLEN . . . RED BUD; B.S. in Communications; "O" HOUSE; Sigma Delta Chi, 

President (4); House President (3); Second Regimental Band (I, 2); I.A.S. 




497 




FISCHER, DAVID LEWIS KEWANEE; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA; 

lllini Union Committee (2); Campus Chest (1); Student Industrial Engineering Society. 

FISCHER, GEORGE ARTHUR CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; Fencing, Varsity Squad 

(1); Armed Forces Council (1); Phalanx (2). 

FISHBURN, WILLIAM ROBERT FREEPORT; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; Sociology Club. 



FtSHEL, FRANCES JUNE TOLONO; Bachelor of Music; ALPHA OMICRON PI; Shi-Ai (2); 

lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Cast 
(1); University Theatre Crew (1); House President (4); Oratorio Society (1, 2, 3); Honors 
Day (1). 

FISHER, MARTHA ROSE FITHIAN; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA GAMMA DELTA; 

Illinois Wesleyan University. 

FISTEl, MILTON SUMNER WINTHROP, MASSACHUSETTS; B.S. in Civil Engineering; THE 

MANSION; House President (4); Engineering Council (3); A.S.C.E.; I.T.E., President (4). 



FITCH, DONNA JANE WINNETKA; B.A. in L.A.S. in Political Science; SIGMA KAPPA; 

lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Young Republicians Club. 

FITZGERALD, MARIKAY PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Communications; THETA UPSILON; Gamma 

Alpha Chi; The Daily lllini (3); Major Chairman Publicity lllini Union Committee 
(3, 4); lllini Union Council (3, 4); lllini Union Committee (2, 3, 4); Newman Founda- 
tion Student Council (2, 3, 4); St. Mary's College. 

FLANDORFER, MAX CHARLES NEW YORK, NEW YORK; B.S. in Chemistry; A.I.Ch.E.; 

Marketing Club. 



FLATT, LESLIE TERRANCE CARROLLTON; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI SIGMA EPSILON; 

S.N.I.B. (3, 4); Agriculture Education Club; Illinois State Normal University. 

FLERSHEM, JOHN WHITNEY CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; ILLINI LODGE; 

Campus Chest 13V Junior Interfraternity Council (3); St. Mary's College; Illinois 
Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

FLEMING, CAROLYN SUE SULLIVAN; B.S. in Physical Education; McKINLFY HALL; lllini 

Union Committee (3); University Theatre Crew (2); W.S.A. Board (3, 4); W.S.A. (1, 2, 
3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee (3); Physical Education Majors Club. 



FLETEMEYER, RICHARD GEORGE DETROIT, MICHIGAN; B.S. in Recreation; SIGMA CHI; 

Tribe of lllini (2, 3, 4); Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); 
Letter (2, 3 4); Dolphins (1, 2, 3, 4); American Recreational Society U. of I. Student 
Chapter; lllini Sportsman's Club. 

FLEISHER, CAROL SAGETT CHICAGO; B.S. in Speech Correction; SIGMA DELTA TAU; Shi-Ai; 

Campus Chest (1); Freshman Week Committee (2); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Panhellenic 
Ball Committee (1); Northwestern University. 

FLYNN, JOANNE STORER BREMERTON, WASHINGTON; Bachelor of Music; DELTA DELTA 

DELTA; Sigma Alpha lota; University Orchestra (4); University of Puget Sound. 



FOERNER, MISSY EVERGREEN PARK; B.S. in Elementary Education; CEDAR HALL; Campus 

Chest (2); W.A.A. (1); W.P.G.U. (3); Student Senate (2); Student National Education 
Association; Young Democrats Club; St. Xaviers College; Roosevelt University. 

FORD, GEORGIA ANN SPRINGFIELD; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; ALPHA DELTA 

PI; Panhellenic Executive Council (3, 4); Panhellenic W.G.S. Coordinating Committee 
(4); Panhellenic Board of Affairs (2, 3, 4); House President (2); Student Senate (1). 

FORERO, GABRIEL BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Mining Engineering; FORBES; M I.S.; 

University of the Andes. 



FORLAND, MARLENE MARY CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Social Studies; ALLEN HALL; 

W.G.S. Executive Council (4); Douglass College; Rutgers University. 

FORSYTH JOHN WILLARD OLNEY; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; CHI PS I ; Ma-Wan-Da; 

Skull and Crescent; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Star Course Manager (1); House 
President (4); Chief llliniwek (1, 2, 3, 4); Second Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Mc- 
Kinley Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3, 4). 

FORT HAROLD DUANE ARMINGTON; B.S. in Agriculture; THETA CHI; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (2); Campus Chest (2, 3); Football Manager (1, 2); Universty Chorus (2 3); 
Men's Glee Club (1, 2); Dairy Technology Society; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn 
Club; Spring Musical. 



FOSSE, WILLIAM HAROLD OTTAWA; Bachelor of Architecture; TOWANCO CLUB; Platoon 

Commander, NROTC (3, 4); A. LA 

FOSTER NORMA JEAN GIBSON CITY; B.S. in L.A.S. , French; ALPHA GAMMA DELTA; 

Major Chairman, Social Forums lllini Union Committee (4); Secretary, Spring Musical, 
lllini Union Committee (3); Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (3); DePauw University. 

FOURNIER ARTHUR ROBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; LUNDGREN 

HOUSE; lllini Uinon Committee (4); M.R.H.A. (3, 4); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Zeta 
Sigma Alpha (4); Little United Nations; Young Republicans Club; Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 



FOX WILLIAM LYLE WATSEKA; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; PHI GAMMA DELTA; lllini 

Union Committee (1); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military 
Engineers (3, 4); A.S.I.D. 

FRAKER GUY C ... WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., History; PSI UPSILON; 

Phi Alpha Theta; lllini Union Committee (1, 2), House President (3); Junior Bar 
Association. 

FRANCIS DIANA RUTH WHFATON; B.S. in Teaching of Biology; PHI MU; The Daily lllini 

(2); University Theatre Crew (3); Women's Glee Club (I, 2, 3); Canterbury Founda- 
tion Student Council (2, 3, 4); Whcaton Coll.. n 



498 



FRANCIS, KENT RUSSELL QUINCY; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; ACACIA; Captain 

Army ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); A.S.A.E. 

FRANK, MARGUERITE ELLEN NEW BERLIN; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; Zeta Phi Eta; The lllio (1, 2); University Theatre Crew (2, 3, 4). 

FRANKEL, NEIL PAUL RIDGEFIELD PARK, NEW JERSEY; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA 

RHO CHI; Star and Scroll; Scarab; lllini Union Committee (3); W.P.G.U. (2). 

FRANKLIN, SHIRLEY JEAN MORRISONVILLE; B.S. in Home Economics; SIGMA SIGMA 

SIGMA; S.N.I.B. (2); Home Economics Club. 

FRATIA, JANET ANN PAXTON; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; CHI OMEGA; lllini 

Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (2); Campus Chest (1); French Club; 
Little United Nations. 

FREED, MARIS LYNNE PEORIA; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA PHI EPSILON- Star 

Course Manager (1, 2); House President (3). 

FREITAG, RICHARD ROSS MINIER; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO- SNIB 

(2); Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Hoof and Horn Club. 

FREITAG, ROBERT HENRY TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; WHITEHALL; Beta Alpha 

Psi; Accountancy Club; Marketing Club; Honors Day (3). 

FRENCH, JON DALE . SULLIVAN; B.S. in Accountancy; THETA DELTA CHI; Fencing, Varsity 

Squad (3); Commerce Council (3, 4), Accountancy Club; Young Republicans Club. 

FRERICHS, ALMUT KATHARINA EVANSTON; B.S. in Chemistry; PALAMAR; Tufts Univer- 
sity. 

FRIELICH, SHARON ELAINE CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education. 

FRIS, CAROLE JOYCE JOLIET; B.S. in Home Economics; LINDEN HALL; Gamma Delta- 
Home Economics Club; Joliet Junior College 

FROCK, BARBARA CASH URBANA; B.S. in Music Education; KAPPA DELTA; Shi-Ai; Sigma 

Alpha lota; Concert Band (], 2, 3); University Orchestra (2,3,4). 

FROCK, GEORGE . . DANVILLE; B.S. in Music Education; Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia; Concert 

Band (2, 3, 4); Football Marching Band (1, 2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (1); Second 
Regimental Band (1); University Orchestra (I, 2, 3, 4). 

FROLICHSTEIN, SEYMORE REES CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I A President (5)- 

Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois; University of Colorado. 

FRUCHTER, MARVIN CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; FLAGG HOUSE; Hillel Foundation 

Student Council (3); Accountancy Club; Marketing Club; Praetorians; De Paul Univer- 
sity; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

FRULAND, ROBERT MILLS AURORA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; CAMPUS VIEW 

LODGE; A.S.M.E.; Aurora College; Illinois Institute of Technology. 

FUCHS, WILLIAM^CHARL^ BARTONVILLE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; SIGMA NU; 

FUGATE, KENDALL MORGAN .... BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; THETA 
7* \? n ,Vr ,„ C ' n9 Mana 9er (1, 2); Freshman Adviser (4); Captain, Army ROTC 
(3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Young Republicans Club. 

FULMER, MARK THEODORE HOMER, NEW YORK; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology. 

FUNKHOUSER LYLE ELBERT . . . CARMI, B.S. in Agriculture,- B.S. in Agricultural Engineering- 

A.5.A.E.; Honors Day (2). 

FURDERBURG RUSSELL EDWARD . NEW HOLLAND; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; COL- 
LEGE HALL; Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E.; lllini Sportsmsn's Club- SAE- 
Honors Day (3). '' 

GABEL, JUDITH KAY WARSAW; B.S. in Elementary Education; BETA HOUSE- lllini Chris- 

tian Fellowship (1, 2, 3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3); Student National Education 
Association. 

GAECKE, PAUL FREDERICK .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; SIGMA NU; Alpha Kappa 
po'rr '•?' ,V n 7 n . C ° mml,te e H< 2); ^nior IntcrFraternity Council (1); Captain, Army 
ROTC (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha (4); Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of 
Management; University of Michigan 

GAHAN, LAWRENCE WILLARD DANVILLE; B.S. in Physical Education; BETA THETA PI- 

University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (1); Fencing, Freshman Varsit^ 
Squad, Varsity Squad (4); Dolphins (1, 2, 3, 4); Physical Education Majors Club. 

GALE, DAVID MARK ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry,- FORBES HOUSE; Phi Eta Sigma- Phi 
Lambda Upsilon; M.R.H.A. (3, 4); A.C.S.; French Club; Honors Day (1 2 3)- Uni- 
versity of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GALL, LEROY CHARLES ... BELLWOOD; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Baseball, Freshman 
Varsity Squad; First Lieutenant, Army ROTC; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 




499 




GALLAND, STUART BRUCE ROCKY RIVER, OHIO; B.S. in Management; SIGMA CHI; 

Freshman Council; Football, Freshman Varsity Squad; Baseball, Freshman Varsity 
Squad; Commerce Council (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3); Greek Week Committee 
(1, 2); Military Ball Committee (4); Lieutenant-Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold 
Air Society (3, 4). 

GALLINGTON, ROGER WAYNE CARBONDALE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; LES 

MISERABLES; House President (4); Maior, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Pennsylvania State 
University. 

GALLUP, ROGER HOWARD CHILLICOTHE; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Alpha 

Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; Agricultural Council (3, 4); Agricultural 

Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



GAMMILL, CARROLL EDWARD PRINCETON; B.S. in L.A.S., Geography; University of 

Maryland. 

GARDINER, MILTON JAMES HARVEY; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; 

S.A.E. 

GARDNER, BEVERLY JANE WASHBURN; B.S. in Secretarial Training; ALLEN HALL; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Honors Day (1). 



GARDNER, KARL ROBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Engineering Physics; FORBES HOUSE; Sigma 

Tau; Physics Society; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GARDNER, RICHARD EUGENE KEMPTON; B. S. in Aeronautical Engineering; SON'S 

HOME; Sigma Gamma Tau; House President (3); Football Marching Band (2,3,4); 
First Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Second Regimental Band (1); I.A.S.; Honors Day 
(2). 

GARLOVSKY, IRVING SAMUEL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; EVANS SCHOLARS; 

Omega Beta Pi; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



GARONER, JAMES EDWARD ROBINSON; Bachelor of Architecture; M.I. A. Executive 

Council (4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4). 

GARRISON, NICOLE GLENCOE; B.F.A. in Painting; CEDAR HALL; University Theatre 

Crew (2). 

GARTHE, GRETCHEN ROCKFORD; B.S. in L.A.S., Speech Correction; THETA UPSILON; 

lllini Union Council (3, 4); lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Marquette University. 



GAUMER, DAVID ROBERT DANVILLE; B.S. in Communications; PHI GAMMA DELTA; 

Sigma Delta Chi; William Jewell College. 

GAY, JAMES CLARK ROCKPORT; B.S. in Agriculture; ILLI-DELL; Alpha Zeta; Plowboy 

Prom Committee (1, 2, 3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee (1, 2, 3, 4); Field and Furrow; 
Hoof and Horn Club. 

GEBHARDT, ALFRED ERICK BERWYN; B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; Illinois Institute of 

Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



GEER, RICHARD PERLEE TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Chemistry; GARNER HOUSE; Alpha Chi 

Sigma; W.P.G.U. (3); Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4). 

GEHLE, DON EARL CAPRON; B.A. in L.A.S., Zoology; lllini Sportsman's Club; Indiana 

University. 

GEILING, TERRY LEE BERKELEY; B.S. in Agriculture; SIGMA NU; Ensign, NROTC (3, 4). 



GEISER, ROBERT JAMES FREEPORT; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; TRIANGLE; Junior 

Interfraternity Council (2); A.S.M.E.; S.A.E. 

GEISINGER, JOHN LAWRENCE ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO; B.S. in Electrical Engi- 
neering; Sigma Tau; Military Ball Committee (4); Lieutenant-Colonel, Army ROTC 
(3, 4); Armed Forces Council (4); Military Council (4); Pershing Rifles (2, 3, 4), Com- 
mander (4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Honors Day (1, 2); 
Washington University; UCLA. 

GELAZIUS, JURA CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; VANLIG; Lithuanian Students' Club; 

Teachers-in-Training Club; German Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of 
Illinois. 



GELLERMAN JAY MICHAEL MOLINE; B.S. in Marketing; ZETA BETA TAU; Campus Chest 

(1); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Ordnance Club (4); Phalanx (4); Marketing Club. 

GELMAN JUDITH ILENE LINCOLNWOOD; B.S. in Elementary Education; INDECO; Kappa 

Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; The Daily lllini (1); House President (3, 4); Freshman 
Adviser (2); Student National Education Association; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); Univer- 
sity of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

GELSTEIN, SALLY CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; Navy Pier Extension of the 

University of Illinois. 



GENDRICH, RONALD LEE FOX LAKE; B.S. in Chemistry; M.R.H.A. (3); House President 

(3); A.C.S.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GENGENBACH, WILLIAM LA VERNE MT. CARROLL; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Edu- 
cation Club; Western Illinois University. 

GERBER, ZANE BROOKLYN, NEW YORK; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; I.A.S. 



500 



GERCH, EDWARD LESLIE CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA EPSILON PI; Interfraternity 

Executive Council (3, 4); House President (3, 4); Senior Fencing Manager (4); Univer- 
sity Religious Council (3); Athletic Council (4); Freshman Week Committee (4); 
Freshman Adviser (4); Accountancy Club; lllini Forensic Association; Marketing. Club- 
Honors Day (1). 

GERSTMAN, GEORGE HENRY FOREST HILLS, NEW YORK; B.S. in Electrical Engineering- 
Illinois Technograph (3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Praetorians. 

GERULAK, BOHDAN OLEH CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A.; Ukrainian Stu- 
dents' Club; University Orchestra, Navy Pier; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

GESELL, JOHN ANDREW BFLVIDERE; B.S. in Agriculture; ILLI-DELL; Tomahawk; Agricul- 

JV ra ' C ° unci ' ?, 3 ' 4 '; AII " A 9 Fie| d Day Committee (1); Plowboy Prom Committee 
[1, 2); Sno-Ball Committee (I, 2); Dairy Production Club; Field and Furrow Hoof 
and Horn Club. 

GETZ, CAROL JEAN ROANOKE; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL- Illinois 

Wesleyan University. 

GHIGHI, JAMES LEE . . LA SALLE; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; Engineering Council (4); 

S.I.E.S., President (4); La Salle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College. 

GIAMALVA, VINCENT ANTHONY ROCKFORD; B.A. in LAS, Spanish; PHI KAPPA THETA- 

Campus Chest (2); University Choir (2); University Chorus (1); Sociology Club- 
Spanish Club; Teachers-in-Training Club. 

GIARRIZZO, FRANK CARMELO CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL- 

Newman Foundation Student Council (3,4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

GIBBONS, SHARRON EILEEN .... CANTON; B.A. in Teaching of English; ALLEN HALL; lllini 
Christian Fellowship; French Club; Gamma Delta. 

GIBBS, ALAN JOHN LAGRANGE; B.S. in Management; HOPKINS HOUSE- MR HA Ex- 
ecutive Council (3); House President (3); Lyons Township Junior College. 

GIBSON, ROBERT KEENEY CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA. 

GIESEKING, DALE EDWARD .... HARVEL; B.S. in Ceramic Engineering; Tomahawk; Keramos; 
202 9nCU Education Club; Gamma Delta, lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 

GIESEKING, DARRELL LEE HARVEL; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; TRIANGLE- Star and 

Scroll; Sigma Tau, President (4); House President (3); Engineering Council (4)- Maior 
Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Gamma Delta; Honors 
Day (1). 

GIESZELMANN EDWARD LOUIS COLLINSVILLE; B.S. in Engineering Physics; PHI SIGMA 

KAPPA; Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Military Ball Committee (4); Colonel 
Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Air Force Council, President (4); Armed Forces Council (4)' 
Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Physics Society; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
Scholarship Key. 

GILBY, BARBARA ANNE CHICAGO; B.S. in Recreation; ALLFN HALL- Orchesis (1) 

American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Physical Education Majors 
Club. 

GIIKISON, DONALD CHARLES DEKALB; B.S. in Physical Education; SIGMA PI- lllini 

Union Committee (1); Freshman Week Committee (2); Freshman Adviser (2)- Captain 
Army ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Physical Education Majors Club. 

GILKISON, JEAN PIGOTT DEKALB; B.S. in Economics Education; PI BETA PHI- lllini 

Union Committee (1); Freshman Council; Freshman Week Committee (2); Panhellenic 
Ball Committee (1); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Home Economics Club. 

GILLER, SANDRA NADALIN CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; PINE HALL- Navy 

Pier Alumni Association; Student National Education Association. 

GIUESPIE, EMILIE JENNIE URBANA; B.A. in L.A.S., French; KAPPA ALPHA THETA- 

' l ' n ' U . nl °! Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (1, 2); 
Y.W.C.A. Committee (1) ; LAS Council (3, 4) ; Angel Flight (3, 4); lllio Beauty (]). 

GITLER, BARBARA CECILE CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Art Education; INDECO HOUSE- lllini 

Union Committee (2). 

GLASER, ROBERT JOEL .UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, OHIO; Bachelor of Architecture; PHI 

SIGMA DELTA; lllini Union Committee (1); A. I. A. 

GIAUB, GERALD ROBERT WASHBURN; B.S. in Communications; Honors Day (3). 

GLEASON, DONNA JEAN . . DES PLAINES; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA GAMMA 

DELTA; lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (1); Newman Foundation 
Student Council (1, 2); Freshman Week Committee (2); Spanish Club; Honors Day (1). 

GLENN, NORMAN LEONARD .... DIXON; B.S. in Civil Engineering; TAU KAPPA EPSILON- 
Campus Chest (2); Tennis, Freshman Varsity Squad; A.S.C.E.; Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity. 

GLINZ, JOYCE DIANA JOLIET; B.S. in Agriculture; ALLEN HALL; Joliet Junior College. 

GODFREY, CHARLES ERNEST EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; M.I.S.; 

Asbury College. 

GOFF, LAURIS ELIZABETH . PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Elementary Education; CHI OMEGA; 

Kappa Delta Pi; II ,ni Union Committee (2, 3); McKinley Foundation Student Council 
(J); Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Home Economics Club; Student National Educa- 
tion Association; Young Republicans Club; Iowa State College. 




501 




GOLDBERG, ARLENE MYRA CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; CEDAR HALL; University 

Theatre Cast (2); University Theatre Crew (2); Sociology Club; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

GOLDBERG, SANDRA ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (4); Teachers-in-Training 
Club. 

GOLDEN, HERBERT FRED CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; SIGMA ALPHA MU; lllini Union 

Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (3); Accountancy Club. 

GOLDFINE, LEE MITCHELL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; Navy Pier Student Con- 
gress; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GOLDFINE, SABRA CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; ALPHA EPSILON PHI; lllini 

Union Committee (2, 3, 4); Hillel Foundation Studeni Council (1, 2, 3, 4); Social Work 
Club; Sociology Club, President (4); Miami University. 

GOLDMAN, BARRY CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemislry; FORBES HOUSE; Phi Eta Sigma; Omega 

Beta Pi; Phi Lambda Upsilon; University Orchestra (1); A.C.S.; Honors Day (1, 2); 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GOLDMAN, EILEEN CHICAGO; B.S. in Recreation; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; lllini 

Union Committee (2, 3, 4); Hillel Foundation Student Council (2); University of 
Wisconsin. 

GOLDMAN, HERBERT CHARLES B.S. in Accountancy; PRAETORIANS; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2); Hillel Founda.ion Studenr Council (1); Freshman Adviser (3); Account- 
ancy Club; Marketing Club; Praetorians; Society for the Advancement of Management; 
Honors Day (1). 

GOLDMAN, MICHAEL ROBERT CINCINNATI, OHIO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; ZETA BETA 

TAU; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Alpha Mu; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Campus Chest (1); 
Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Freshman Council; Men's Glee Club (1); Freshman 
Week Committee (1, 2); Freshman Adviser (1, 2, 3); Freshman Adviser's Executive 
Council (2); Greek Week Committee (2); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
Scholarship Key. 



GOLDMAN, RICHARD STEWART CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; Campus Chest (3); Navy 

Pier Alumni Association; Praetorians; A.C.S.; German Club; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

GOLDMAN, WILLIAM IRWIN CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; PHI SIGMA DELTA; The 

Daily lllini (4); lllini Union Committee (3); I.P.C. Photography Staff (4); llligreek (2); 
Freshman Adviser (3); Honors Day (1). 

GOLDSTEIN, ARNOLD DAVID CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics; PHI SIGMA DELTA; 

lllini Union Committee (1); Student Senate (1). 



GOLDSTEIN, EARL CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; KING'S ROW; Navy Pier Alumni Asso- 
ciation; Navy Pier Baseball (1, 2, 3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GOLDSTEIN, THEODORE B CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI EPSILON PI; Omega 

Beta Pi; Campus Chest (1); Dolphins (2); Freshman Adviser (2); Interfraternity Ball 
Committee (2, 3); Spanish Club; Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (1). 

GOLTER, SANDRA DAVITTA CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; INDECO; Kappa 

Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; Freshman Adviser (2); Student National Education 
Association; Honors Day (1, 2, 3). 

GOODMAN, FRANK PETER ROCKFORD; B.A. in Teaching of English; NEWMAN HALL. 

GOODMAN, JANE ELLYS CINCINNATI, OHIO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; SIGMA DELTA TAU; 

Campus Chest (3); llligreek (1, 2); Greek Week Committee (1, 2); Panhellenic Ball 
Committee (1); Young Republicans Club. 

GOODMAN, SIDNEY HERBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; A.I.Ch.E.; Navy 

Pier Alumni Association; Student Congress Navy Pier (1, 2); Honors Day (1); Navy 
Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GOODMAN, STUART LAUREN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; ZETA BETA TAU; 

Ma-Wan-Da; Sachem; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Alpha Mu; 
Phi Alpha Theta; lllini Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (1, 2, 3, 4); W.A.A. Board 
(4); Junior Interfraiernity Council (1); Student Senate (3, 4); Basketball Manager (2); 
Campus Chest Al.ocations and Advisory Board (4); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Junior Bar 
Association (3, 4); Spanish Club (1); President's Panel (4); Committee on Student 
Relations (4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

GOODMAN, PATRICIA ELLEN WELDON; B.A. in L.A.S., English; PRESBYTERIAN HALL; 

Alpha Chron; Campus Chest (1, 2, 3); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordination Committee (4); 
House President (3, 4). 

GOODRICH, JOHN IRVING NAPERVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; Tomahawk; Gymnastics, 

Varsity Squad (3, 4); Letter (4); Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (2); Agricultural 
Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Honors Day (1); North Central College. 

GOODWIN, ROBERT IRWIN BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA; B.S. in Industrial Education; In- 
dustrial Education Society; Indiana University; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

GORE, AUDREY SUE SKOKIE; B.S. in Recreation; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; lllini 

Union Committee (3); Campus Chest (3); American Recreational Society U. of I. Stu- 
dent Chapter (2, 3, 4). 

GORE, SAMUEL HOUSTON MT. VERNON; B.A. in L.A.S., English Literature; SIGMA CHI; 

Greek Week Committee (2); Wabash College. 

GORMAN, PATRICIA MARY WILMINGTON; B.S. in Home Economics; ALPHA DELTA PI; 

University Theatre Crew (2); S.N.I.B. (2, 3, 4); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Home 
Economics Club; Mount Mary College. 

GOTHARD, LOUIS JAMES NEW YORK, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; ILLINI 

VILLAGE; Channing Murray Foundation Student Council (3, 4); San Antonio College. 

GRACE, BERNARD WORCESTFR, MASSACHUSETTS; B.F.A. in Landscape Architecture; 

BRIARWOOD; Chi Gamma Iota; Forsite (2, 3); lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; 
Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (3). 



502 



GRAHAM, GERRY ALLEN . . . CASEY; B.S. in Mining Engineering; ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA; 
University Theatre Crew (1); M.I.S.; Honors Day (1). 

GRANT, CAROLE DARLENE . . MAHOMET; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA ZETA. 

Lutheran Foundation Student Council (3); Plowboy Prom Committee (3); Home 
economics Club. 

GRANT, MICHAEL EDWARD . CHARLESTON; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; SIGMA TAU 

(jAMMA; S.A.E.; Eastern Illinois University. 

GRANT, NEIL GEORGE . . . NORTHBROOK; B.S. in U.S., Botany; ROOjAH; House President 
(2); McKinley Foundation Student Council (3, 4); Floriculture Club; Honors Day (1). 

GRAY, »»M«nN.. SYCAMORE; B.S. in Physics; Cyclothem Cub; I.A.S, Marketing 

GRAY, EDWARD RAY . ... LOCKPORT; B.S. in Engineering Physics; CAMPUS VIEW LODGE- 
ci'e 9 ^ Honors' Day (1, r 3 '' FPSil ° n; F6ndn9 ' ^ SqUad W: ^« s£ 



GRAY, MERLE PATRICIA . CRYSTAL LAKE; B.A. in L.A.S., English; ALPHA PHI; University 

Theatre Crew (3); University Chorus (3); Marquette University. 

GREEN, B»TY arJ EAN n . o . . Co . e BELV, DE R E; B.A. in L.A.S., Eng.ish; Freshman Adviser <2, 3, North 

GREEN, CAROL VIRGINIA . ALTON; B.A. in LAS., Speech; ALPHA OMICRON PI; Shorter 

Board; Torch; Mask and Bauble; National Collegiate Players; Zeta Phi Eta; The Daily 
llhni; I Mini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Manager (2, 3, 4); University 
itt UnTversity: Panhe " en ' C Ba " Committee (2, 3); Honors Day (2, 3); Southern 

GREEN, JOHN RUSSELL .... SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in General Engineering; PHI KAPPA PSI- 

For 6 /. ROTC n ;, eC A , ' Ve ,^ UnC i l - (2 ' % House Pr "'dent (3); Tactical Officer, Air 
Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); A.S.A.E.; German Club; Honors Day (1). 

GREEN, LOVELL LLOYD LITTLE YORK; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club. 

GREENBERG, JOAN FRANCIS . . LADUE, MISSOURI; B.A. in L.A.S., English; SIGMA DELTA 

Ch«t m WA°I k °I, Ch ,'n Sh D ' A L' P reside "' I 3 '; ""ni Union Committee (1); Campus 
Chest (U- W.A_A. Board (); Panhe lenic Executive Council (2, 3, 4); House President 
miJ. mr ?Ta^ \ H ; : ' el Founda J ion s »^ent Council (3); Freshman Week Com- 
N^oU Honorf DaTff, 2™? <2); PanHe " eniC Ba " C ° mmi "- e »>; kittle United 

GREENBERG, SUE VELMA CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; B F A in Art Educa 

Un?„n D r LTA T, HI M SIL ,° N ,'; S !r Ai; Gamma A ' pha Chi ' The 'Daily illini (3); Nlini 
Un,on Committee (1, 2 3); University Theater Cast (2); University Theater Crew 
' | ,; ,, Ca ? PUS C , h " t "'' Sfudent Senate (2); Hillel Foundation Student Council 
(I, 2, 3); Fine and Applied Arts Council (3); Greek Week Committee (1),- Fine and 
Apphed Arts Society; Little United Nations; Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1). 

GREENMAN, JOEL BURTON . . CHICAGO; B S. in L.A.S., Zoology; CLARK HOUSE; Omega 

Beta Pi; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GREGORICH JOSEPH EDWARD . . . JOLIET; B.S in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 
A.l.e.b.-I.K.c.; St. Joseph s College 

GREGORY, DELORIS JOANN . ... EASTON; B.S. in Home Economics; PHILEA; Y.W C A Com- 

AH^r 'fj'; V."'™"* , Lu,h 2 ran C c hapel Foundation Student Council (4); Freshen 
Adviser (4); Gamma Delta; Home Economics Club. 

GREGORY, GERALD WAYNE . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ILLINI LODGE- Stu- 

DeaUrft /I''' NaV % P ' er Al r n '' A »° ciafi °"; Physical Education Majors Club- 
Dean s Lst of Supenor Students, Navy Pier; Baseball (1, 2); Cross Country 1)- Letter- 
men s Club (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GRETHEN, GERALD JAMES . . LINCOLNWOOD; Bachelor of Architecture; BARTON PLACE; 

Alpha Phi Omega; A.I.A.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GRICE, MARCUS LLOYD, JR CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology KAPPA ALPHA PSI- 

v^y JrillinoTs " 696 '' UmVerS '' ,y ° f Phili PP ines '' Nav V P -7' Ex ten si on of tTe Cnil 
GRIFFITH, MARJ o OR,E ««. ^^HARVEY; B.S. in Elementary Education; SHERWOOD LODGE; 

GRIFFITH, WALTER EUGENE . . . . GALESBURG; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO- 
lll.n, Un.on Committee (1); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); S.N.I B (1 2 3) Director (4V 
Agricultural Council (3, 4); All-Ag Field Day Committee (1, 2); Freshman Advise 2 - 
Plowboy Prom Comm.ttee (1, 2, 3); Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club 

GRIGG, CHARLES DENNIS .LITCHFIELD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FORBES HOUSE- Sigma 

Tau; Tau Beta P, ; Ph, Eta Sigma; Chi Epsilon, President (4); A S.C.E.; Honors Day (13) 

GRONEMEIER LYIE LE.TH . . BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S.; A.S 

M.E.; Illini Sportsman s Club; S.A.E.; Illinois State Normal University. 

GRONKE, MARIAN BERNADINE ..... ELMWOOD PARK; B.S. in Music Education; PINE HALL- 
University Choir (2); Madrigal Chorus (2); Christian Science Foundation Student Council 
(i, A J, 4); Opera Workshop; Spring Musical. 

GROSE, GERALD KERN YORKVILLE; B.S. in Music Education; Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia; 

(1° r Honors Day 2). Marching Band (1, 2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band 

GROSSFELD, ABRAHAM ISRAEL . . . NEW YORK NEW YORK; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI 
SIGMA DELTA; Ma-Wan-Da; Sachem; Cheerleader (1); Gymnastics, Captain (4) Varsity 
Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (2, 3, 4), Freshman Varsity Squad P l '' V 

GRUBER, CARL LAWRENCE . ..CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; TRIANGLE; A.I.E.E, 

I.R.E.; lllini Sportsman s Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 




503 




t\A 




GRUENBERG, RONALD JAMES BROOKLYN, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., History; PSI 

UPSILON; Campus Chest (1); Junior Interfratemity Council (2); lllini Union Com- 
mittee (2); Battalion N.C.O., NROTC (3, 4); German Club. 

GRYNBAUM, HENRY CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; House President (3); 

A.I.E.E.-l.R.E.; French Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

GULICK, ROGER KENT MENDOTA; B.S. in Mathematics; ACACIA; lllini Christians Fellow- 
ship (2, 3, 4), President (4); Military Ball Committee (2); St. Pat's Ball Committee (1); 
Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); German Club; Honors Day (1). 

GUREN, GERALDINE WENDY GILMAN; B.S. in Music Education; DELTA PHI EPSILON; Mu 

Phi Epsilon; University Theatre Crew (1); University Choir (2); University Chorus (1); 
Women's Glee Club (1); Oratorio Society (3); Orchesis (1); Young Democrats Club; 
Spring Musical (3). 

GUSTAFSON, FREDERICK ALAN MAYWOOD; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; TAU KAPPA 

EPSILON; Y.M.C.A. (2); Northern Illinois University. 

GUSTAFSON, JAMES WILLIAM LI BERTYV I LLE; Bachelor of Law; BETA THETA PI; Sachem, 

President (3); Skull and Crescent; Major Chairman Stunt Show lllini Union Committee 
(2); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); Junior Bar Association; 
Marketing Club. 

GUSTAFSON, NORMAN CORBIN HIGHLAND PARK; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy 

Club; Finance Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Pre-Law Club. 

GUSTAFSON, SHARON SPRIGGS DEERFIELD; B.A. in L.A.S., History; Beloit College. 

GUTZAIT, SEYMOUR CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; ARMORY HOUSE; Accountancy Club. 

GUZZARDO, MARIANO DOMINIC LA GRANGE; B.S. in Management; KAPPA SIGMA; Skull 

and Crescent, President (2); Alpha Delta Sigma; Star Course Manager (1, 2); Junior 
Interfratenity Council (I); Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad; Campus Chest Allocations 
and Advisory Board (2); Commerce Council (3); Intertraternity Ball Committee (2); 
Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (4); Flying Club; Society for the 
Advancement of Management. 

HAAS, JEROME FRANK ALBERS; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; PHI SIGMA EPSILON; 

Baseball, Varsity Squad (4); A.S.M.E.; Southern Illinois University. 

HAAS, WESLEY CHARLES NEW LENOX; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club; Joliet 

Junior College. 

HABBEN, GRACE MARGARET ROYAL; B.A. in L.A.S., English Literature; ALLEN HALL; 

University Choir (1, 2, 3, 4); Oratorio Society (1); Young Democrats Club. 

HACKER, RICHARD WAYNE DANVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; BETA SIGMA PSI; 

Arnold Air Society (1, 2); Gamma Delta (1, 2). 

HADDIGAN, JAMES MICHAEL PEORIA; B.S. in Communications; NEWMAN HALL; Sigma 

Delta Chi; WILL (4); St. Bede Junior College. 

HAEFNER, MILTON ALVIN NEW ATHENS; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; EXMOOR 

HALL; Sigma Gamma Tau; I.A.S.; Southern Illinois University. 

HAERTJENS, BERNARD LEE EAST MOL1NE; B.S. in Physics. 

HAGLUND, GAYLE FRANCES MORRIS; B.A. in Teaching of English; DELTA ZETA; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Theta Sigma Phi; The Daily lllini (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (2); 
University Chorus (3); llligreek (3); Freshman Adviser (4); lllini Forensic Association; 
Honors Day (I, 2). 

HAHN, MARY LEE METAMORA; B.S. in Home Economics Education; Torch; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; Phi Upsilon Omicron; University Chorus (1, 2); Home Economics Club; Honors 
Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

HAINES, SUZANNE DUQUOIN; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Mortar Board; Torch; Shi-Ai; lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Manager 
(2); University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (2, 3); Panhellenic Executive 
Council (3); Panhellenic Board of Affairs (4); House President (4); Student Senate (2, 3); 
Coordination Committee (3); Greek Week Committee (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee 
(1); Concert and Entertainment Board (4); lllini Forensic Association. 

HAKIMIAN, FRIEDOON TEHRAN, IRAN; B.S. in Architectural Engineering; FORBES; A. I. Ar- 
kansas State Teachers College. 

HAKY RONALD JACK CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and B.A. in L.A.S., 

Psychology; COLLEGE HALL; Pi Tau Sigma; A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Gamma Delta; Honors 
Day (1); Navy Pier Fxtension of the University of llinois; DePaul University; Roose- 
velt University. 

HALFORD, GARY ROSS METAMORA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. 

HALL, JOHN CLIFFORD CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; MINAWA LODGE; Oratorio So- 
ciety (2); University Baptist Foundation Student Council; Mini Christian Fellowship, 
President (4); North Park College. 

HALLBERG, MILTON CHARLES BIGGSVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics 

Club. 

HAMBURG, RODNEY LEE CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; FLAGG HOUSE; Wilson 

Junior College. 

HAMEDER, KATHERINE CRYSTAL LAKE; B.S. in Physical Education; ALLEN RESIDENCE; 

Shorter Board (4); Torch (3); W.G.S. Executive Council (3, 4); Freshman Week Com- 
mittee (2); Freshman Adviser (2); Sno-Ball Committee (2); Physical Education Majors 
Club; Honors Day (1). 



504 



HAMILTON, MARGERY LOU CRYSTAL LAKE; B.S. in Physical Education; DELTA GAMMA; 

W.S.A. (1, 2, 3); House President (4); Physical Education Majors Club, President (4). 

HAMMEl, EVELYN ROSEMARY . . . CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Elementary Education; Kappa Delta 

Pi; University Chorus (3); Student National Education Association. 

HANN.NG, DOROTHY^JANE HARRISBURG; Bachelor of Music; PINE HALL; University 

HANSCOM, MARSHA ELAINE . . AURORA; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA OMICRON 

HI, The Illio (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Chorus (1). 

HANSEN, JACK PAUL . . WAUKEGAN; B.S in Music Education; Concert Band (1, 2, 3, 4); 

Football Marching Band (1, 2, 3, 4); University Orchestra (1, 2). 

HANSEN. MARVIN ARTHUR . CLIFTON; B.S. in Agriculture; FLAGG HOUSE; All-Ag Field 

a^Z^V^!^^ ^^i" ''^ Reld " d «"™> H °°< ^ »°™ 

HANSEN. PHYLLIS JEAN I ••.ARLINGTON HEIGHTS; B.A. in L.A.S., History; LINCOLN AVE- 

Day (1,2) '' FirS ' Re 9 imen,al Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Honors 

HANSON, DAVID CHARLES .... DOWNERS GROVF- R <; ;„ r c ,-,,.„,,. 

SCHni APS k-lr=„„c c o I, r ^KUVt; B.S. in Ceramic Engineering; EVANS 

SCHOLARS; Keramos; Sno-Ball Committee (1); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4). 

HARDY, PAUL J . . . WARRFNSBURG; B.S. in Physical Education; Wa-Na-See; Tribe of lllini 
ffi: &°BES£ MaTorfaut': JUni ° r GVmnaS,i " M — (3)-' Athletic lounci! 

HARMAN, BYRON NEAL . . PEORIA; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; BETA THETA PI- Sachem- 

cTLtX VMr B !' a r- Pi; Ph '' Eta Si9ma; S,ar Course Manager (12); YMC A 
Cabinet (2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); A.I.Ch.E.; Honors Day (1, 2). '-m.i-.A. 

HARNETT, DAVID EDWARD CHAMPAIGN, r <; ;„ r i c • 

DELTA; Bradley University ' Ge " eral Enaineer ' n 9; SIGMA PHI 

HARRIS, JAMES WILLIAM RICHMOND; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy. 

HARRIS, WNE LOREnA . . ELMHURST; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ALPHA DELTA PI; Presby- 

terian College; Mercer University. ' 

HARR.SON. BRUCE WILLIAM . . HARVEY; Bachelor of Architecture; TOMAHAWK LODGE- 

A.I.A.; French Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HART, DAVID ELLIS . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; NEWMAN HALL; Navy Pier Alumni 

Naw'p !S% f° C ' ety f ? r . fh 1, AdvanCement of Management; St.' John's UniversUy! 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. university, 

HART, JAMES PAUL ... LEE; B.S in Agriculture; SIGMA CHI; Gymnastic Manager (2)- Field 

College b '' Y ° Ung Democra,s Club -' Northern State Teachers 

HARTLEY, KAY 'REESE . ABINGDON; B.S. in Elementary Education; 4-H HOUSE; Kappa 

Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; University Chorus (1); Oratorio Society (2) Disciples 
Foundation Student Council, President (2); Student National Education Assoc a fon 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key association, 

HARTSTEIN, BARBARA RUT,,. . .. ^HICAGO;^^. in ^mentary Education; CEDAR HALL; 

HARVEY ' J tLS, ( ,;we»^^ s cirr ESME ^ Universi,y Re ' 

HASSELMAN PETER M GLENCOE; Bachelor of Architecture; PHI GAMMA DELTA- 

Ji £ <i C ° mm ' tte A e <"' Trac , k ' Freshman Varsity Squad; Captain Army ROTC 
(3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers (3). 

HATHORNE, MARCIA ROSE . . ELMHURST- R A i„ I A <: ciu _i<- 

KAPPA; Alpha Lambda' De^TJ'lluo",, 1 ); ttifu^^J^t S 

HAY, CAROL ANNE . URBANA; B.S. in Elementary Education; CHI OMEGA- Mortar Board- 

"" wa *°- 'ir^T^^^T&x- '- A " i °"- - A »' i """'- 1 ™-«™ 

HAYWARD, JAMES DONALD FAIRFIFin- n c ;„ n ■ ,. , „ 

WESMEN; Second Regiment'™ (if Ij; V^oriculture'ciu^ ° rnamen * a ' Horticulture; 

HEARD, RICHARD ALLEN . CHI CAGO; B s . , ^ 

Yo^Rep'Jbi^-bub CamPUS AmVe * S P ° S * N °- 202; lndus ' rial ""««<>" Society; 

HEATH, ROGER KENNETH ELBURN; B.S. in Industrial Engineering. 




505 




HEBERER WAYNE JOEl BELLEVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Alpha 

Zeta; Honors Day (1, 2, 3). 

HECHT THOMAS ERWIN LANSING; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; BETA SIGMA PSI; Campus 

Chest (3); House President (4); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Gamma Delta. 

HECKIER, BARBARA BECKMAN SULLIVAN; B.S. in Marketing; The Daily lllini (3); Y.W.C.A. 

Committee (3); Marketing Club; University of Southern California. 

HECKLER, ROBERT LOUIS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA; B.S. in Marketing; PI KAPPA 

ALPHA; Star and Scroll; The Daily lllini (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Foot- 
ball Marching Band (1, 2, 3, 4, 5); Second Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4, 5); lllini 
Sportsman's Club; Marketing Club. 

HEFTER JUNE LOUISE WILMETTE; B.S. in Home Economics; DELTA ZETA; University Theatre 

Crew (1, 2); Y.W.C.A. Committee; Campus Chest (1); W.A.A. Board (1, 2); W.A.A. 
(1, 2, 3, 4); University Chorus (1); Freshman Adviser (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee 
(1, 2); Marketing Club; Young Democrats Club. 

HEIMERDINGER, WALTER LEE CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; CHI PHI; W.P.G.U. 

(3, 4); Illinois Technograph (1); Pershing Rifles (1, 2, 3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1). 

HEINTZEN, WALTER LEONARD CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Marketing; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; 

Gamma Delta; lllini Insurance Society; Marketing Club. 

HEIT, LYLE DEAN TUSCOLA; B.S. in Agriculture; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club. 

HELGESON, KENNETH WILLIAM SYCAMORE; B.S. in Agriculture; LOU-MAC LODGE; 

House President (4); Field and Furrow. 

HELGREN, MARGE ANNE WAUKEGAN; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA ZETA; lllini 

Union Committee (3); University Theatre Crew (3, 4); Student National Education Asso- 
ciation; Young Republicans Club; Beloit College. 

HELM, ALICE CARLENE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in L.A.S., Microbiology; PHI MU; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; University Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Crew (1, 2, 3, A); Honors 
Day (1). 

HENNESSY, MARYALICE FRANKLIN PARK; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL; 

Terrapin (2); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Student National Education Association; 
Young Democrats Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HENSON, ROBERT LEE IUKA, B.S. in Agriculture; House President (3, 4); S.N.I.B. (1, 2); 

Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn. 

HERBSTER, RICHARD EMU SYRACUSE, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., History; LUNDGREN 

TOWERS; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HERMAN, ALBERT WILLIAM ANTIOCH; B.S. in Accountancy; ALPHA DELTA PHI; Ma-Wan- 
Da; Sachem; The lllio (2, 3), Associate Editor (4); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); 
Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Accountancy Club. 

HERMAN, MARVIN L CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; PHI SIGMA DELTA; The Daily lllini 

(3); lllini Union Council (1, 2, 4); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Sophomore 
Fencing Manager (2); Hillel Foundation Student Council (3); Accountancy Club; Finance 
Club; Marketing Club. 

HERMAN, NANCY MARIE LOCKPORT; B.S. in Home Economics; PHI MU; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; S.N.I.B. (2); Plowboy Prom Committee (3). 

HERRMANN JOHN EDWARD STEWARD; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; S.N.I.B. 

(2); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phalanx (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3, 4); Agricultural 
Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Northern Illinois University. 

HERWEG, MARY LUCILLE PEORIA; B.F.A. in History of Art; ARBOR SUITES; The lllio (1); 

W.P.G.U. (3); Freshman Adviser (2). 

HESS, NANCY JEAN UTICA; B.A. in L.A.S., English; EVANS HALL; LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby 

Junior College. 

HETTICK, JAMES ROBERT GREENFIELD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA; 

Star and Scroll; lllini Union Committee (1, 2, 3); A.S.C.E. 

HIATT CHARLES ARTHUR KANKAKEE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Engineering 

Council (3); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E., President (4). 

HIBLE ROBERT LESLIE DANVILLE; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA RHO CHI; Honors 

Day (1). 

HICKEY ROBERT VERNON CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; PHI KAPPA PSI; Tribe of 

lllini (2, 3, 4), President (4); Football, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (2, 3, 4), Freshman 
Varsity Squad; Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4). 

HIGGS, ROGER LEE BRIMFIELD; B.S. in Agriculture; NABOR HOUSE; M.I. A. Executive 

Council (3, 4); House President [4); University Chorus (2); Wesley Foundation Stu- 
dent Council (3, 4); Plowboy Prom Committee (2, 3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee (3, 4); 
Second Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club. 

HILL ARDIS ELEANOR DOWNS; B.S. in Home Economics Education; SIGMA KAPPA; Phi 

Upsilon Omicron (3, 4); S.N.I.B. (1, 2, 3). 

Hill, LEE EARl CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Delta Sigma; Marketing Club; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



506 



HILL, SHIRLEY DES PLAINES; B.S. , in Communications; THETA UPSILON; Gamma Alpha 

Chi; Theta Sigma Phi; The Da'ly lllini (1); The lllio (2); Major Chairman Music Hours 
lllini Union Committee (4); lUini Union Council (4); House President (2, 3, 4); Oratorio 
Society (1, 2); Honors Day (I, 2). 

HINDS, WILLIAM S. ... PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; ALPHA TAU OMEGA; 

Skull and Crescent; Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Greek Week Committee (1 2)- 
Purdue University. v ' " 

HIPPLER, MICHAEL VINCENT GENESEO; B.S. in Industrial Administration; NEWMAN HALL- 

bociety tor the Advancement of Management; Young Democrats Club. 

HIRSCH, ARNOLD LIPPERT^ .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; ARMORY HOUSE; ACS- Rifle 
and Pistol Club. 

HIRSCH, ESTHER WANE CHICAGO; B.S in Education of Mentally Handicapped Children; 

■j N VV, LN A _ VENUE RESIDENCE; Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi- Kappa Delta Pi 
lll.ni Union Committee (1); W G.S. Executive Council (3); Student Senate (2, 3); Fresh-' 

Honort dLwi' \ F ;? Sh , man A . dvlse I s in Execu, ' v ? Council (3 ' ; Youn 9 Democrats Club; 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

HISE, SHAN RICHARD RIDGEWAY; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1). 

HLAVACEK, ROY GEORGE. . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Wa-Na-See; Sigma 

Tau; P, Tau Sigma; LP C. Photography Staff (3, 4), Photo Chief (4); Honors Day (12); 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HOFF, GERALD CHARLES ...WAUKEGAN; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; Chi 

tpsilon; M.R.H.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4)- Society of American 
Military Engineers (2, 4); A.S.C.E.; Honors Day (3). American 

HOFFENBERH SHELDON ZISSE ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; NOBLE HOUSE- 
M.R.H.A. (4); House President (4); WILL (4); Young Democrats Club; Navy Pier Band- 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HOFFMAN, BRADLEY PAUL ROCKFORD; Bachelor of Architecture; FORBES HOUSE; Foot- 

Club Regimental Band (1, 2); A.I.A.; lllini Sportsman's 

HOFFMAN. EDWARD LEE . . DOLTON; B.A in L.A.S., Psychology; PI KAPPA PHI; L.A.S. 

Council (3, 4); Illinois Institute of Technology. 

HOFMAN, PAUL JEROME . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; ZETA BETA TAU; Basketball 

Manager (2); Captain, Army ROTC (4); Phi Chi Eta (4). 

HOILOCKER, STEWART WAYNE . . . LAKE VILLA; B.S. in Accountancy; ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA; 

Mini Union Committee (2); Star Course Manager (2); junior Interfraternity Counci 
(2); Accountancy Club. ' 

HOLMES, ELAINE MERRILL NEWTONVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS; Bachelor of Music; FEHNER 

HOUSE; Mil i Phi Epsilon; Oratorio Society (3, 4); Seabury Foundation Student Council 
(2); Fine and Applied Arts Council (3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee (1); Spring Musical (3). 

HOLMES, ROBERT WENDELL McCONNELL; B.S. in Agriculture; 907 CLUB. 

HOLT, CORALEE DENNIS OLNEY; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL; Terrapin (2). 

HOLT, MERL ■■•■• DECATUR; B.S in Agriculture; Alpha Tau Alpha; Agricultural Education Club; 
Illinois state Normal University. 

HOLTON, TERRENCE CHARLES . CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; ARMORY HOUSE; Alpha 

Chi Sigma; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

HOLTZ, ROBERT EDWARD . . .AURORA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; CAMPUS VIEW 
LUUljfc; Pi lau Sigma; Aurora College. 

HOLZER, ROBERT LEE CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; LUNDGREN HOUSE; MRH A (3 4)- 

First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (1, 2, 3, 4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; 'Society' for 

the Advancement of Management; Young Democrats Club; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

HOMANN, AR ™ U o R ^ c AR £ |ub - • • ■ DUQUOIN; B.S. in Agriculture; DELTA SIGMA PHI; Agricultural 

HOMMEL, VIRGINIA ELIZABETH BEARDSTOWN; B.A. in LAS English Literature- 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Lambda Delta; Star bourse Managed 
); Cheerleader (2, 3); Phalanx Sponsor (2, 3, 4); Rifle and Pistol Club; Honors Day 
(I, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key (J). 

HONCHARUK NICK, JR CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A.; Wright Junior 

College. ^ 

HOOGERWERF RUTH ANN . ATKINSON; B.A in Teaching of Speech; PALAMAR; Mortar 

PlaverV 7^ ; P A - P c<. a Chron; Mask and Bauble, President (4); National Collegiate 
12 V 3 ; Rn! 1 M 3; " l ' n ,V Un , , ,° n Commi r e (2 ' 3 < 4 >; University Theatre Manager 
11 wrTr Mana 9 er (4; University Theatre Cast (3); University Theatre Crew 

(1); W.G.S. Executive Council (3); Sno-Ball Committee (2). 

HOPPOUGH, WHAM SCOTT ROCHESTER, NEW YORK; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; 

HORNBECK. LAWRENCE FARMER . ^ WHITE HALL; B.S. in Finance; Finance Club; Society 
University ^ Management; Young Republicans Club; Western Illinois 

HORTON, ANN HARLIN . GLEN ELLYN; B.S. in Elementary Education; PRESBY HALL; Uni- 

versity Choir (1, 2, 3); Madrigal Chorus (3); William Woods College. 





HORTON, BRADLEY BURR GLEN ELLYN; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; SIGMA PHI 

DELTA; Alpha Phi Omega; Engineering Council (4); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); 
A.S.M.E.; I.S.G.E. 

HORWITZ, RICHARD HERSCHEl CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ARMORY HOUSE; 

Hillel Foundation Student Council (4); Praetorians (3, 4); University of Michigan. 

HOY GAIL ELIZABETH RIVER FOREST; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; ALPHA PHI; Alpha 

Chron; lllini Union Committee (1, 2, 3); Freshman Adviser (2, 4); LAS Council (3,4); 
Honors Day (1). 

HUBBARD, ELIZABETH ANN URBANA; B.S. in Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture; 

Pi Alpha Xi; University Chorus (1, 2, 3); Women's Glee Club (4); Floriculture Club; 
Spanish Club; Honors Day (3). 

HUBBARD, OTIS EUGENE WILMETTE; B.S. in General Engineering; SIGMA NU; I.S.G.E.; 

Lake Forest College; Northwestern University. 

HUBERT, JOHN LOUIS ASHKUM; B.S. in Agriculture; NOBLE HOUSE; Field and Furrow; 

Hoof and Horn Club. 

HUCK, AUDREY CAROL NASHVILLE; B.S. in Home Economics; SIGMA KAPPA; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; University Chorus (1); Oratorio Society (2, 3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee 
(1); Honors Day (1, 2). 

HUCK, JAMES MICHAEL RIVER FOREST; B.S. in Finance; SIGMA NU; Campus Chest 

(1, 2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Finance Club. 

HUFFAKER, DONALD C CHRISMAN; B.S. in Engineering Mechanics; Chi Gamma lota; 

Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Tau Sigma; A.F.S.; S.A.E.; Honors Day 
(1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

HUFFER, CORINNE TABOR TUSCOLA; B.F.A. in Art Education; PHI MU; University Theatre 

Crew (3); Concert Band (2); University Choir (2, 3, 4); Fine and Applied Arts Society; 
Eastern Illinois University. 

HUFFMAN, SYLVIA KAY TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA UPSILON; 

Major Chairman International Programs lllini Union Committee (3); lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2, 3, 4); Y.W.C.A. Committee (2, 3); Campus Chest (2); Freshman Week 
Committee (2); Student National Education Association. 

HUFFMAN, WILLIAM HENRY OAK PARK; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; DFLTA CHI; 

The Daily lllini (1); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4). 

HUFTALIN, JOHN GEORGE MALTA; B.S. in Agriculture; Hoof and Horn Club; Honors 

Day (3); Northern Illinois University. 

HUIZINGA, DONALD DEAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; PRICE CLUB; 

Sigma Tau; Phi Eta Sigma; I.P.C. Photography Staff (3, 4); A.I.F.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier 
Alumni Association; Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of 
llinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois; Navy Pier 
Track Team; Navy Pier Cross Country Team. 

HUMES, JOHN MACCUTCHEON URBANA; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; 

lllini Union Committee (2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (2); Honors Day (1, 3). 

HUMMER, BARBARA JEAN WAUKEGAN; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studeis; SIGMA 

KAPPA; Shorter Board; Torch; The Daily lllini (2, 3, 4); lllini Union Committee (2); 
Y.W.C.A. Committee (1). 

HUNT ROBERT LOMBARD CINCINNATI, OHIO; B.S. in Mathematics and B.S. in Indus- 
trial Engineering; BETA THETA PI; Sachem; Tribe of lllini (2, 3, 4, 5, 6); Swim- 
ming, Captain (4), Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (2, 3, 4), Freshman Varsity Squad; 
Dolphins (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6); Honors Day (1). 

HUNTER, PATRICIA ANN ELMHURST; B.S. in Elementary Education; SIGMA KAPPA; The 

lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1); Campus Chest (2). 

HURWITZ, EMANUEL CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; PRAETORIANS; Junior 

Interfraternity Council (1); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Honors Day (1). 

HUSTON, ROBERT BRUCE PLAINFIELD; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; Phi Lambda Upsilon; 

Concert Band (3, 4, 5); Football Marching Band (1, 2, 3, 4, 5); First Regimental Band 
(1, 2); University Chorus (1); A.I.Ch.E.; Honors Day (2, 3). 

HUTCHCRAFT, JUNE ANN MOUNT PULASKI; B.A. in L.A.S., English; PRESBY HALL; 

University Theatre Manager (2, 3); University Theatre Crew (1); McKinley Foundation 
Student Council (2). 

HUTTENHOFF, JOHN HARRY NEW LENOX; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Sigma Tau; Ela Kappa Nu; Honors Day (3); Lewis College. 

HUTTENHOFF, PAUL LEO NEW LENOX; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; NEWMAN HALL; 

Lewis College. 

HYMAN, MICHAEL NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; THE 

MANSION. 

IEUTER, WILLIAM CHARLES OTTAWA; B.S. in Finance; PHI GAMMA DELTA; Campus Chest 

(1); House President (4); Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad (I); IM Rec Board (2); 
lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; lllini Insurance Society; Young Republicans Club; 
Long Beach City College. 

ILIAN, ALBERTO PEREIRA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Colombian Students 

Association; University of the Andes. 

INGRAHAM, DOUGLAS RAY WHEATON; B.S. in Management; Flying Club; Society for 

the Advancement of Management. 



508 






INGRAM, ROBERT WILLIAM SULLIVAN; B.S in Electrical Engineering; SIGMA PHI DELTA; 

Sode?y (3), A.LE.E.-I.rI! er Wl Ma '° r ' Air Force ROTC (3 ' 4); Arnold A " 

INWOOD, MARY ANN . . GRAYSLAKE; B.S^ in Home Economics Education; ALPHA CHI 

aE^UI M B °r- ard; Ph ' U ? ,l ° n °™«°"; Ulini Union Committee (1, 2); Freshman 
Adviser (4); Home Economics Council (2), President (3); Honors Day (2, 3). 

IRVIN, THOMAS EUGENE CHAMPAIGN; B.F.A. in Industrial Design. 

IRVING. DONALD CHARLES . .BUCKLEY; B.S in L.A.S . English; GARNER HOUSE; University 

ot Notre Dame, Loyola University of Chicago. " 

ISAACS, GLEN HOWARD .... . MT. VERNON; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA RHO CHI- Inter- 
fraternity Executive Council (2); Freshman Adviser (2); A. LA. 

ISACKSON, ROBERT STANLEY ... FOREST PARK; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Delta Sigma- 
Marketing Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

JACOBS, HELEN MAE WAUKEGAN; B.A. in L.A.S., English- LINDEN HALL- Aloha Chrnn 

M 2)" P F^,h P ^n A A P H a - Lam ^% De,,8 , ; r-'lT ^ Committee (2h S^ Cour's^na'ger 
( A«3 : Jv u Adviser 2); French Club; German Club; Student National Education 
Association; Honors Day (I, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

JACOBSEN, ANTHONY VALDEMAR CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Painting. 

JACOBSON, CAROL ANN ...CHICAGO; B.S. in Home Economics; LINCOLN AVENUE 
RESIDENCE; Freshman Adviser (3); Home Economics Club; Wright Junior College. 



JAFFE, ALAN ST LOUIS, MISSOURI; B S. in L.A.S., Psychology; ZETA BETA TAU; Ma-Wan- 

Da Board of Fraternity Affairs (4); Interfraternity Executive Council, President (4)- 
Student Senate (3); Committee on Student Affairs (4); llligreek (4); Freshman Adviser 
4); Greek Week Committee (3, 4); Interfraternity Ball Committee (3); Spanish Club- 
Washington University. ' 

JAHN, DAVID ERIC CRYSTAL LAKE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; SIGMA NU; Y.M.C A 

Committee (1); First Lieutenant, Air Force ROTC (3); A.S.C.E. 

JANUSONIS, GAILE ANTOINETTE . CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; ALLEN HALL; German 

Club; Lithuanian Students Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



JARKE, DONALD CHRIS .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; LES MISERABLES- 
M.I. A. Executive Council (3, 4); M.R.H.A. (3); Varsity Track Squad (4); A.F.S.; A.S.M E 
Track, Navy Pier (1, 2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

JASAS, UUIAN CH .'CAGO; B.A. in LAS., English; BUSEY HALL; Newman Foundation 

Student Council (3, 4); German Club; Lithuanian Students' Club; Navy Pier Alumni 
Association; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

JASKOLSKI, LEONARD JAMES PERU; B.S. in Civil Engineering; LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby 

Junior College. r 

JAUCH, KENNETH I MAX . CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

M.R.H.A. (3); Student Senate (4); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; I.A.S.; Navy Pier Alumni Asso- 
ciation; Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (2); Wright Junior College; University 
ot California at Los Angeles; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

JEFFRIES, SUZANNE LYNN KANKAKEE; B.S in Home Economics; CHI OMEGA; Shorter 

Board; Phi Upsilon Omicron; The llho (1); Major Chairman Night Lights lllini Union 
Committee (3); llin, Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course 
Manager (2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1); Panhellenic Ball Committee (I). 

JENKINS, JULIA ELLEN ... ELMHURST; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; ALPHA PHI- 
p k'li ;»,rT n Committee (2); Star Course Manager (1); Y.W.C.A. Committee (2) 

Panhellenic-WGS. Coordinating Committee (3, 4); House President (4); Freshman 
Adviser (3); Little United Nations. 

JENNINGS, ALVIN WESLEY . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; BARTON HOUSE; Football 
Freshman Varsity Squad; Freshman Adviser (2); Cyclothem Club. 

JENSEN, BARBARA GAYLE ..... CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALPHA OMICRON PI- 
DePauw University. ' 

JENSEN, LESTER ARTHUR . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Finance; FLAGG HOUSE; Beta Gamma Sigma; 

A pha Kappa Psi; Sigma lota Epsilon; Freshman Adviser (3); Finance Club- Navy Pier 

Alumni Association; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



JEPSON, HAROLD LEE . DUNDEE; B.S. in Agriculture; GRANADA CLUB; Football Marching 

Band (1, 2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Agricultural Economics Club; 
Dairy Production Club; Dairy Technology Society,- Field and Furrow. 

JESMER, ELAINE JOYCE .... WINNETKA; B.S. in Communications; DELTA PHI EPSILON- 
Greek Week Committee (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1). 

JOHANNSEN, w A p lBERT ( SCOTT EE . |R . E CRETE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

JOHN, MARGARET . . . CHICAGO; B.S in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 

nf ^'n n ' VerS ," y f t l?i- US - (3 *M 4, 5„ Navy Pier Alumni A "°^tion; Navy Pier Extension 
ot the University of Illinois (1, 2). 

JOHN, ROBERT WILLIAM CHICAGO; B.S. in Agriculture; KOINONIA; Alpha Phi Omega- 

House President (4); University Baptist Foundation Student Council (3), President (4). 

JOHNS, BARBARA ^MAMLYi. I . WILMETTE; B.S in Home Economics; MAPLE HALL; Shorter 

Delta-' Phi MLtlL'J OS P M eS -' den ;J 2); ° m i- Cr ° n Nu ' Presiden ' < 4 >; Alpha Lambda 
(3) Mlini Union PnZZ "m* ft a| ° r . , Cha,r ™ n Cam P us ^^ 'Mini Union Committee 
4- Honors Dav T / .'"'ni Union Committee (1, 2); Home Economics Council 
I4j, Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 




509 




JOHNSON BRUCE KERMIT PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Finance; SIGMA NU; Skull and Crescent; 

| Mini Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (2); Finance Club; Rho Epsilon. 

JOHNSON JOHN GORDON MAPLE PARK; B.S. in Marketing; FORBES HOUSE; Delta 

Sigma Pi; House President (3); Honors Day (3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

JOHNSON JOYCE LOUISE BLUE ISLAND; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; ALPHA OMICRON 

PI; The Daily lllini (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (2); Business Education Club; 
w!s.A. ; Northern Illinois State University. 



JOHNSON, RONALD CHARLES MAYWOOD; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; SIGMA PHI 

DELTA; House President (4); University Chorus (1); A.I.E.E.-I.R.B. 

JOHNSON, THEODORE JOHN DEERFIELD; B.A. in L.A.S., German; PHI KAPPA THETA; 

Star and Scroll; University Theatre Crew (1); llligreek (4); German Club. 

JOHNSON WILLIAM HENRY MOLINE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; MINAWA LODGE; 

Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4). 



JOHNSTON ROBERT CHARLES SHELBYVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; PHI GAMMA DELTA; 

Ma-Wan-Da; Sachem; Star Course Manager (1, 2, 3), Senior Manager (4); Coordination 
Committee (4); Committee on Student Discipline (4); Men's Glee Club (I, 2, 3), 
Senior Manager (4); Alumni Association Board, Senior Chairman (3, 4); Concert and 
Entertainment Board (4); Freshman Adviser (2); Lieutenant-Colonel, Air Force ROTC 
(3, 4); Accountancy Club, President (4); Honors Day (3). 

JONES ADA LEE . ELMWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; The lllio 

(2)- Major Chairman Personnel lllini Union Committee (3); Department Head Personne 
llli'ni Union Committee (4); lllini Union Committee (2); Illinois State Normal 
University. 

JONES BERNICE LORRAINE HOMEWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., German; PINE HALL; Phi Kappa 

Phi; Alpha Lambda Delta; Delta Phi Alpha; Women's Glee Club (3); German Club; 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

JONES MAURICE ALLEN EDWARDSVILLE; Bachelor of Music; ACACIA; Wa-Na-See; Phi 

Mu Alpha-Sinfonia; University Theatre Cast (1, 2, 3, 4); Second Regimental Band (2); 
University Choir (1, 2, 3, 4), President (4); Madrigal Chorus (2, 3, 4); Oratorio So- 
ciety (1): Baptist Foundation Student Council (2); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of 
Illinois Scholarship Key. 

JONES NORMA LOY . . PITTSFIELD; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; PI BETA PHI; Campus 

Chest (3); Greek Week Committee (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Student Na- 
tional Education Association; Angel Flight; Illinois State Normal University. 

JONES, RICHARD MELVIN KIRKWOOD, MISSOURI; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FORBES 

HOUSE; M.R.H.A.; A.S.C.E.; University of Colorado. 

JONES ROBERT MILLARD .... URBANA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; 
Chi Epsilon; Engineering Council (4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of 
American Military Engineers; A.S.C.E., Senior Engineering Council Representative (4); 
Honors Day (2, 3). 

JONES ROGER ALLAN SALEM; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; Skull and 

Crescent- The Daily lllini (1); Junior Interfraternity Council (1): House President (4); 
Military 'Ball Committee (3); Lieutenant-Colonel, Air Force ROTC; Arnold Air Society 
(3, 4); Young Republicans Club. 

GEORGIANA GERALDINE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; EVANS HALL; 

Zeta Phi Eta; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



JORDAN, 



JOSLYN CLAUDIA ROSE SKOKIE; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; DELTA GAMMA; lllini Union 

Committee (1); Star Course Manager (2); Women's Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), President 
(4); Choristers (3, 4); Oratorio Society (1); Greek Week Committee (3); Little United 
Nations; Spanish Club; Junior Panhellenic Council (1). 

JUCAS VIDA MARISA CHICAGO; B.S. in Home Economics; VANLIG; House President (4); 

Lithuanian Students Club; German Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of 
Illinois. 

JUNKER, RONALD ERNEST VARNA; B.S. in Agriculture; BETA SIGMA PSI; Agricultural 

Economics Club; Iowa State University. 



JUST, ROSEMARY RIVER FOREST; B.F.A. in Art Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; The 

lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (1); University Theater Crew (1, 2). 

JUSTICE, WALTER SAMUEL EDWARDSVILLE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; TAU KAPPA 

EPSILON; Phi Eta Sigma; Star Course Manager (2); Football Marching Band (2, 3); 
First Regimental Band (2, 3); Second Regimental Band (1); Honors Day (1). 

KABELE MARCIA ALICE CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; DELTA ZETA; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (3); W.P.G.U.; Lutheran Student Foun- 
dation Student Council (3); Wittenberg College. 



KADLUB, MARIAN CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PALAMAR; Honors Day (1). 

KADOW, GERALD ANTHONY CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of German; German Club; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KAEFER, PAUL FRANK CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A. I. A.; Navy Pier Extension 

of the University of Illinois. 



KAISER, CARLOTTA PAULA CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; KAPPA DELTA; lllini 

Union Committee (2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (2, 3); House President (4); llligreek (2, J); 
Newman Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3). 

KALLEY EUGENE FRANKLIN MAQUON; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Sigma Tau; Tau 

Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; Pi Mu Epsilon; University Chorus (I, 2); Honors Day (I, 3). 

KAMINSKY, RAYNA JOYCE CHICAGO; B.S. In Elementary Education; LAUREL HOUSE; 

Freshman Adviser (4). 



KAMMERMEIER RALPH FRANK CHICAGO; B.S in Mechanical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

M.R.H.A. (3); Student Sena e (3); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Alumni Association- 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. ' 

KAMPWIRTH, RICHARD JOSEPH . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Biology; CLUB TOPPER- 

o N f e Z a Sn-v°e7sf,y IO o? St C ° UnCi ' Wi ^ ^^ ^ ^ Pier Extension 

KANAK, EDWARD LEE RIVERSIDE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; THE MANSION; A.I.E.E.- 



KANETAKE, THOMAS TOMOO . KAILUA, HAWAII; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E - 

I.K.C.; University of Hawaii. n.i.i-.u. 

KAPLAN, 'NA^HAR^ET SKOKIE; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE 

KAPLAN, MILES^ BARRY SKOKIE; B.S. in Communications; PHI SIGMA DELTA; Alpha 



KAPLAN, NEIL IRWIN .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; GARNER HOUSE- Freshman Ad- 
viser (3); Accountancy Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois 

KARAS, PATR ^A e(] . 2 . )/s HARVEy; e B a S e in L.A.S., Mathematics; ALLEN HALL; lllini Union Com- 
KARPEN, JULIAN ... . CHICAGO; B S. in Accountancy; MOORE HALL; House President (4)- 



KARPINSKI, MARILYN CECILIA . CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; LEEMAN LODGE- 

t N hru m nlCers ir y n of , T,^n S o , rs den, C ° UnCi ' "' ^ ^ P ^°^ (2) ' N <^ Pie ' Exten.icfof 

KARR, BRUCE LOVELl .... ELMHURST; B.S. in Marketing and Management; SIGMA NU- Delta 
Sigma Omicron; Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of Management 

KARR, JOSEPHj>AUl (2 . y ASHTON; B.F.A. in Landscape Architecture; ARMORY HOUSE; Scarab; 



KARWOSKI, W.lUA«MMES a . ;/ . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Mining Engineering; Gymnastics, Fresh- 

KASEN, ELA,NE p JUDITH . • ^ ^H ,CA G% B^J^ Teach in.^o^Socia, Studies; CEDAR HALL; 

KASTEN, RICHARD JOHN . . ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; GARNER HOUSE; Freshman Ad- 
viser (2); Finance Club; Junior Bar Association; Marketing Club. 



KATZ, HENRY "™™^ N ™YORK; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Tomahawk; House 

President (3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3, 4); I.A.S.; Praetorians. 

KAUFMAN, CHARLOTTE . . . .CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Art Education; EVANS HALL; Sno-Ball Com- 
mittee (3); Navy Pier Alumni Association; W.A.A. (1); Honors Day (3)- Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KAY, JOHN WILLIAM DIXON URBANA BS 

(3, 4); Wheaton College. 



Chemistry; lllini Christian Fellowship 



KAYNER, DAVID JULES . CH'CAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; TAU DELTA PHI; Omega Beta Pi; 

The Daily lllm, (1); lllin, Union Committee (1, 2); Interfraternity Executive Council (2) 
Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Accountancy Club. 

KAZMIERSKI, K. KURT .CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; CLARK HOUSE; The Daily lllini (4)- 

Marketmg Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Illinois Institute of 
lechnology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KECK, BRUCE LEROY . . MEDINA OHIO; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; WESMEN; Y.M.C.A. Board 

of Directors (4); Y.MC.A Committee (3, 4); Football Marching Band (3, 4); First 
Regimental Band (3, 4); Wesley Foundation Student Council (3, 4); Cyclothem Club- 
Young Republicans Club; Otterbein College ' 



KELLEN, 
KELLER, 

KELLER, 



CHARLES HENRY . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; Alpha Delta Sigma- Toma- 

(i a , W 2); Ma e rke a tin y g club"' '' ^ "' i0 P ' ^ ^ %hman Advis * r < 2 < 4 >'' Pershing Rifles 

LEON CAROL . MANTENO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; Tau 

minors i; sch h ;ia E ::hfp 9 Ke a ; s ' 9ma Gamma Tau; KA - s - ; Honors Day "- 2 < 3 ><- univ - sit v ° f 



KELLER, 
KELLY, 

KELLY, 



WAY r N h«. F m Y M--- ' a- ^ AYW „°^ ; BS - in Mar keting; TAU KAPPA EPSILON; Campus 
Chest (1); Ma,or, A,r Force ROTC (3, 4); Marketing Club; Rifle and Pistol Club. 

JAME ph i AL A AN A,\- ,/ CHAMPAIGN; B.S in Music Education; ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA; 
Phi Mu Alpha-Sinforua; Tennis, Freshman Varsity Squad; Fencing, Freshman Varsitv 
Squad; Concert Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Football Marching Band (1, 2, 3 4); Honors Day (U 

JEANNE FAITH . CHAMPAIGN; B.F.A. in Art Education; ALPHA PHI; University 

Smfonietta (1, 2, 3, 4); University Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). university 




511 




KEMMERER, RICHARD DEAN DECATUR; B.S. in Communications; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, 

Wa-Na-See; Star and Scroll; The Daily lllini (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (4); Basket- 
ball Manager (2); Senior Fencing Manager; Junior Fencing Manager. 

KENDALL, PETER LANDIS MUNCIE, INDIANA; B.S. in Communications; DELTA TAU DELTA; 

Sigma Delta Chi ; WILL (4); University of Cincinnati. 

KENNEDY, THOMAS WILLIAM PARIS; B.S. in Civil Engineering; SIGMA PI; Chi Epsilon; 

A.S.C.E.; Eastern Illinois University. 

KENNEY LOIS CATHERINE EVANSTON; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA UPSILON; 

lllini Union Council (3); lllini Union Committee (2, 3); University Theatre Crew (2); 
Panhellenic Ball Committee (2); Student National Education Association; Mundelein 
College. 

KENTISH ROXANA A HOMEWOOD; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); W.P.G.U. (1). 

KENWORTHY, GARRY VERN CRESTON, IOWA; B.S. in Management; Wa-Na-See; Military 

Ball Committee (3, 4); Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Armed Forces Council (4); 
Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Belleville Junior College. 

KEOUGH, BARBARA ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ALPHA DELTA PI; Shorter 

Board; Alpha Chron; The Daily lllini (1); The lllio (2, 3); House President (3, 4); 
llligreek (2, 3, A), Editor (4); Honors Day (2, 3). 

KESl, RANSE WALTER NORTH RIVERSIDE; B.S. in Management; PSI UPSILON; lllini Union 

Committee (3); Campus Chest (3); Society for the Advancement of Management; 
Cornell College; Lyons Township Junior College. 

KING, JACK, JR VIRGINIA; Bachelor of Architecture; ACACIA; University Theatre Crew 

(1); Lieutenant Colonel, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers 
(3, 4); Honors Day (4). 

KING, THELMA LOUISE MARSHALL; B.S. in Education of Mentally Handicapped Children; 

GAMMA PHI BETA; Shorter Board; Torch; Alpha Chron; The lllio (1, 2, 3); lllini 
Union Committee (1, 2). 

KINSELLA, LARRY LEE TAYLORVILLE; B. S. in Finance; DELTA KAPPA EPSILON; Skull and 

Crescent; Campus Chest (1); Football Marching Band (1, 2); First Regimental Band (1, 
2); Indiana University; Southern Illinois University. 

KIONKA, EDWARD JAMES LOMBARD; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALPHA CHI RHO; 

lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Cast (1); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); 
Junior Bar Association; Honors Day (1). 

KIONKA, SANDRA SELLERS VILLA GROVE; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; DELTA 

DELTA DELTA; The lllio (1); University Theatre Crew (1); Freshman Adviser (2); LAS 
Council (1, 2). 

KIRCHHOFF, DANIEL WILLIAM SCHILLER PARK; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; 

Football Marching Band (1, 2, 3); Second Regimental Band (1, 2, 3); Marketing Club. 

KIRK, EDWARD LEE NORRIS CITY; Bachelor of Architecture; COLLEGE HALL; A. I. A. 

KIRK, KAY JEANNE McHENRY; B.S. in Physical Education; McKINLEY HALL; W.A.A. (1, 2, 

3, 4); Physical Education Majors Club. 

KIRKSEY, EARNESTINE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; DIET HOUSE; Navy Pier 

Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KITTLE PAUL ALVIN LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA; B.S. in .Chemistry; Alpha Chi Sigma; 

A.C.S. 

KLAJNIK MARION ELIZABETH CHICAGO; B.S. in Secretarial Training; BUSEY HALL; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Terrapin (1, 2, 3); Freshman Adviser (2); Young Democrats Club; Honors 
Day (1, 2). 

KLAWITTER JAMES MARLOW NORMAL; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; KING'S ROW; House 

President (3); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military 
Engineers (4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

KLAZMER, BEATRICE CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; University Theatre Crew (2); 

Marketing Club. 

KLEIFIELD, ANITA ETHEL CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; LAUREL HOUSE; 

House President (3); Roosevelt University. 

KLEIN, RONALD THEODORE CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; CHI ILLINI LODGE; 

House President (4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Football Navy Pier (1, 2), Cap- 
tain (2); Basketball Navy Pier (1, 2, 3), Captain (3); Baseball Navy Pier (1, 2, 3), 
Captain (3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KLEIN, SELBY PHILLIP STREATOR; B.A. in L.A.S., Social Studies. 

KLIBANOW SAUL HOWARD CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; FLAGG HOUSE; 

M R H A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3,4); Infantry Club (3, 4); Pershing 
Rifles (1, 2); A. I. A. 

KLIEBER, JOSEPH MICHAEL STREATOR; B.S. in Accounting; THETA XI; Military Ball Com- 
mittee (3); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha; Honors Day (1). 

KLIER JEANNE MARILYN MOLINE; B.S. in Communications; PI BETA PHI; lllini Union 

Committee (I, 2); WILL-TV (3, 4); Terrapin (1). 



512 



KLORFINE, LORNA MAE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Secretarial Training; IOTA ALPHA PI- 

r? i( S u h| - A .'-- S, 9ma Iota Epsilon; lllini Union Committee (1, 2, 3); Campus Chest 
(2, 3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3, 4), President (4); lllini Traditions 
Committee (2); Scimitar; Honors Day (I, 3). 

KLOSS, KENNETH WARREN CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; LUNDGREN TOWERS- 

House President (4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KNOLL, ALFRED GEORGE MICHAEL ..... HOAAEWOOD; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; NEWMAN 
HALL; Chi Gamma Iota; Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad; Cyclothem Club; Honors 
Uay {•S). 

KNOSHER, NANCY KATHRYN CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Music Education; Phi Kappa Phi; Pi 

Kappa Lambda; Alpha Lambda Delta; Mu Phi Epsilon; University Orchestra (2 3 4)- 
McKinley Foundation Student Council (2); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
ocholarship Key. 

KNOX, THOMAS RAY .WHITE HALL; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI SIGMA EPSILON; Agricul- 
tural Council (3); Agricultural Education Club; Dairy Production Club. 

KOBES, KAREN SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in LA.S. Psychology and Occupational Therapy; 

DELTA GAMMA; III, n. Union Committee (3); University Theater Manager (3, 4) 
lerrapin (3, 4); Illi-Sota; Lawrence College. 



KOBS, JAMES FRED . . GLENVIEW; B.S. in Communications; COLONIAL MANOR; Alpha 

De a Sigma; The Daily lllini (4); W.P.G.U. (4); House President (4); Wright junior 
College; Northwestern University. 

KOCH, ERIC NEAL ..... DECATUR; B.S. in Engineering Physics; WESMEN; Tau Beta Pi- Phi Eta 
Sigma; House President (3); Oratorio Society (1, 2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; University of 
Illinois Scholarship Key. 

KOEHLER, ANDREA . . DES PLAINES; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; PI BETA PHI; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Beloit College. 



KOENIG, DONALD MORRISON ...MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN; Bachelor of Architecture; 
THETA CHI; Gargoyle; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Theatre Cast (D- 
Interfraternity Council (3); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4). 

KOEPKE, JOHN ALBERT . . . MT. PROSPECT; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering,- A.S.M.E,; llli- 

Knights; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KOGAN, CARLA KAY ...KANKAKEE; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; DELTA GAMMA- 
Torch; Shi-Ai; Alpha Lambda Delta; The Daily lllini (1, 2); Major Chairman Home- 
UnTonV llm \V n ' ?,> C °™ mlt, f? .<3); Major Chairman Town Meetings and Forums lllini 
Union Committee (2); I in, Union Committee (1, 2, 3); University Theatre Crew (1)- 
Star Course Manager ( ); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); Campus Chest (I); Freshman 
Council; Freshman Week Committee (2); Greek Week Committee (2); Junior Bar 
Association; Honors Day (1). 



KOGUT, JOSEPH ANDREW . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; University of Kansas; 

Illinois Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KOHEN, RAY WALLACE LANSING; B.S. in Economics; Marketing Club; Young Democrats 

Club, President (4); Purdue University; Indiana University. 

KOHL, REGINA ANN . . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; BUSEY HALL; Spanish Club; 

Student Veterinary Medical Association. 



KOHNER, NANCY MAR E . . . . CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; CEDAR HALL; House 
President (4); University Chorus (3); Women's Glee Club (4); Oratorio Society (4)- 
Newman Foundation Student Council (3); A.I.A.; Fine and Applied Arts Society- 
French Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Young Democrats Club; Navy Pie 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KOLLER, FRANKLIN RALPH BERWYN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Mor- 
ton Junior College; Illinois Institute of Technology. 

KOLLMAN, RONALD ADNEY . . HARVEY; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Ma-Wan-Da- 

Sachem; Basebal Manager (2, 3, 4); Senior Baseball Manager (4); Ag icultural Eco 
nomics Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club. 



KORFIST, JANICE LEE . . LAGRANGE PARK; B. A. in L.A.S., Spanish; KAPPA DELTA; The 

. \ , a'J>1 Wom c ens . Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Freshman Week Committee (1, 2); Little 
United Nations; Spanish Club. 

KORNWOLF, JAMES DAVID RACINE, WISCONSIN; B.F.A. in History of Art; PHI KAPPA 

TAU; Scarab; Star Course Manager (2); Men's Glee Club (1); Universit^ of Chicago 

KOTECKI, DC* 'KENNETH SPRING VALLEY; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; ARMORY 

HOUSE; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1, 2); LaSalle-Peru Junior College. 



KRAMER, ESTHER CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA PHI EPSILON; Student 

National Education Association; Honors Day (3). 

KRAMER, SHELDON JAY . . . .CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; Phi 
Kappa Ph,;S,gma Tau; Tau Beta P; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Lambda Upsilon; ACS, 

Scnolarsh'in kT'n Gub ,S- ? '% ." l "V < 3 >-' H ° nors °ay H, 2. 3); University of Illinois 
Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KRAMKOWSKI RICHARD STANLEY ... LA SALLE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; La Salle- 

Peru-Uglesby Junior College. 



KRAML, KENNETH WESLEY . . . .HINSDALE; B.A. in L.A.S., History,- ALPHA TAU OMEGA- Tribe 
of lllini (3 4); Football, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2); Wrestling Fresh- 
man Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (3); Letter (3); First Lieutenant; Army ROTC (3 4). 

KRAMP, DIANA JOYCE i . ELMHURST; B.S. in Speech Correction; GAMMA PHI BETA; Shorter 

let , Phi Pi*' P~ »J f aP . P uf h ,\ ! Phl Be,a TU Ka PP a ; Alpha Lambda Delta; Mask and Bauble; 
Zeta Phi Eta President (4); University Theatre Manager (3, 4); Star Course Manager (2)' 

Si^^^Wre^rSt'ciu^n) 6 PreSidem <4,; S,Udem Sen3,e '^ C0 ° Xa,i0 ' ; 

KRAMP. ^^^^^^.^CAG^B^^EIectrica, Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E, Navy 




513 




KRAUSE, NORMAN ClYDE EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Finance; SIGMA PHI EPSILON; Campus 

Chest (3); Accountancy Club; Finance Club; lllini Insurance Society; Marketing Club; 
Society for the Advancement of Management; Pre-Law Club; Belleville Junior College; 
Culver-Stockton College. 

KRAVCIK, JOHN WARREN BERWYN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KRAVETZ, HOWARD LEE CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; PHI EPSILON PI; Military Ball 

Committee (4); Lieutenant Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4). 

KRAVITZ, EUGENE PAUL CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; FLAGG HOUSE; 

M.R.H.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Junior Bar Association; Pre-Law Club. 

KREINES, EDWARD DAVID WINNETKA; B.S. in City Planning; PI LAMBDA PHI; Phi Eta 

Sigma; Student Senate (4); Forsite (3, 4); Honors Day (3, 4); Indiana University. 

KRIEGE, MARGARET MARY EDWARDSVILLE; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; PI BETA PHI; Shi-Ai; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Sigma Delta Pi; University Theater Crew (1); Star Course Man- 
ager (1, 2); Panhellenic Executive Council (2, 3); Varsity Cheerleader (2, 3); Women's 
Glee Club (1. 2); Spanish Club; Interfraternity Queen (1); Honors Day (1, 2, 3);Uni- 
versity of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



KRIEGER, ROBERT PAUL CHAMPAIGN; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; German Club; 

Teachers-in-Training Club; Young Republicans Club; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202. 

KROENCKE, SHIRLEY JEAN HULL; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALLEN HALL; House 

President (4); Student National Education Association; Western Illinois University. 



KROLAK, ROGER VINCENT PERU; 

Junior College. 



B.S. 



Mechanical Engineering; LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby 



KRUBl, JUDITH JOAN BROADVIEW; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPHA GAMMA DELTA; 

Star Course Manager (1); Orchesis (1, 2, 3, 4); Fine and Applied Arts Council (3); 
Physical Education Majors Club. 

KRUG, RONALD S SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA. 

KRUGER, VERNON CHARLES MONROE CENTER; B.S. in Physical Education; University of 

Wisconsin; University of Northern Illinois. 



KUEHL, DEAN JAMES MENDOTA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Pi Tau Sigma; Trinidad 

State Junior College; LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College. 

KUHLMAN, GEORGE CARL, JR BARRINGTON; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Tau Beta 

Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E.; Honors Day (2); Ripon College; Northwestern University. 

KUKLA, ROBERT WILLIAM DANVILLE; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; GARMEN HOUSE: 

House President (3); Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4). 



KUNCL, KAREN LENORE CICERO; B.S. in Chemistry; BUSEY HALL; Illinois Wesleyan 

University. 

KUNKEL, JAMES ANTHONY KIRKLAND; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; MOORE HALL; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Alpha Kappa Psi; Business Education Club; Marketing Club; Honors Day 
(1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

KUNZ, WILLIAM EDWARD PEKIN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; KING'S ROW; Sigma Tau; 

Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; House President (4); Concert Band (3, 4); 
Football Marching Band (I, 2, 3); First Regimental Band (1, 2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; German 
Club; lllini Sportsman's Club; Honors Day (1, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



KURINSKY, JOHN ROBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; GARNER HOUSE; Marketing Club; 

Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

KURTH CHRISTINE MARIE BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Education of Mentally Handicapped 

Children; ALPHA PHI; The lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Panhellenic 
Ball Committee (1). 

KURZWEG, PEGGY M CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; 

The lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1); Panhellenic Ball Committee (2); Student 
National Education Association; Northwestern University. 



KUSENDA, GAIL PATRICIA WILLOW SPRINGS; B.S. in Home Economics; ALPHA XI 

DELTA; University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Orchesis (2). 

LACIVITA, JAMES, JR CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Physics; GRANADA CLUB; Major, Army 

ROTC (3, 4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



LACKOVIC, THOMAS PETER RIVERSIDE; B. S. in Marketing; 

Football, Freshman Varsity Squad; Marketing Club. 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON; 



LACQUEMENT, RICHARD ARLYNN FLORA; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALPHA KAPPA 

LAMBDA; Junior Interfraternity Council; Lieutenant-Colonel, Army ROTC (3, 4); 
Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha (4); McKendree College. 

LAM, SOW CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; Hawaii Club; Chinese Students Club; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

IAMB DAVID PORTER OAKLAND CITY, INDIANA; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; FORBES 

HOUSE; Wesley Foundation Student Council (3, 4); Honors Day (!). 



514 



LAMBRECHT LYNDA LEE ... LIBERTYVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; KAPPA ALPHA 

1HETA; University of Colorado. 

LAMPS, ARDITH LOUISE . . PERU; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA- Mor- 
tar Board; Torch; Shi-Ai; Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Com- 
b !f ' V A 6 fo \ en "i Execu * ive , Council (1, 2, 3, 4); llligreek (3); Panhellenic 
,, o d ,? f ,, - ffalrs . (3) i .n Un '° r Pf nh ellemc Executive Committee (1); Honors Day 
(I, I, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

LANDT, LOUIS LAWRENCE BERWYN; B.S. in Management; TAU KAPPA EPSILON- Skull 

and Crescent; House President (4); Tribe of lllini (3, 4); Basketball, Freshman Varsity 
Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (3, 4); Society for the Advancement of 
Management. 

LANEAR, JOE EDWARD OLNEY; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; Honors Day (1); Eastern Illinois 

University. 

LANER, GLORIA ANN CHICAGO; B A. in L.A.S., Spanish; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE; 

W.P.O.U. (1, 2, 3, 4); Spanish Club. 

LANG, NORRIS GLEN . TUSCOLA; B.A. in L.A.S., Anthropology; HOUSE OF ROOJAH; 

House President (4); Danville Junior College. 



LANGE, DAVID LEE HUME; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA TAU SIGMA; Sigma Delta 

Chi; WILL (2, 3, 4); Eastern Illinois State University. 

LANGE, IRENE LYDIA CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; BUSEY HALL; Sigma lota Epsilon- 

German Club; Lithuanian Students' Club; Marketing Club; Navy Pier Alumni Asso 
ciation; Russian Language Club; Honors Day (I, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholar- 
ship Key; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

LANGFORD, BILL KAYE ... CARMI; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Chi Gamma Iota; Sigma 

Tau; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; A I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3). 



LANGHAAR, SALLY LOUISE URBANA; B.S. in Elementary Education; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1); Terrapin (1, 2). 

LANGHAUSER, LEON HENRY BREESE; B.S. in Dairy Technology; Dairy Technology Society. 

LANGKAMMERER GERALD W BERWYN; B.S. in Communications; THETA CHI- Sachem- 
Alpha Delta Sigma; Major Chairman Publicity lllini Union Committee (3); lllini Union 
Committee (2 3 4); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); House President (4); Men's 
Glee Club (4); I U.S.A. Barbershoppers (3); llligreek (4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4)- 
Scabbard and Blade (4); Trident (3, 4). 



LANIER, ALICE STEVENSON . . ARCOLA; Bachelor of Music; Alpha Chron; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; Mu Phi Epsilon; University Chorus (1); Oratorio Society (1)- University Re- 
hgious Council (1, 2); Disciples Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Honors Day 
(1, 2); University of Kentucky. 

LANIER, NANCY ANN .... . MANSFIELD; B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; SHFRWOOD LODGE- 
House President (4); Sno-Ball Committee (1). 

LANSFORD, ROBERT MAURICE ... CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Engineering Physics; Tomahawk- 

Sigma Tau- Phi Eta Sigma; Tribe of lllini (4); Tennis, Freshman Varsity Squad, Var- 
sity Squad I (3, 4) Letter (3, 4); Concert Band (1, 2, 3); Football Marching Band 
(1, 2, 3); Physics Society, President (4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3). 

LANTZ, CONRAD WALLACE .... ROCKFORD; B.S. in Accountancy; ACACIA; Wa-Na-See 
President (4); Skull and Crescent, President (2); The Daily lllini (1); Board of Fra- 
tenty Affairs (3 4); Interfraternity Executive Council (3, 4); Junior Interfraternity 
Council (1); Dolphins (2, 3, 4); Interfraternity Ball Committee (2); Ensign, NROTC 

LANZEROTTI, LOUIS JOHN ... . . CARLINVILLE; B.S. in Engineering Physics; NEWMAN HALL 
Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Alpha Phi Omega; Engineering Council (4) 
Physics Society; Engineering Open House, General Chairman (4); Honors Day (3) 
Blackburn College. 

LAPP, DOUGLAS MARTIN SPRINGFIELD: B.S. in Engineering Physics; ALPHA KAPPA 

«Un-„« ; M % ™ Se « *• , Ka Pf> a / h ." T f Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Star Course 
Manager (12, 3); McKmley Foundation Student Council (2, 3, 4); Concert and En- 
tertainment Board (4); Physics Society; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
bcnoiarship Key. 

LARSON, JAMES CLARENCE . . LYONS; B.S. in Mining Engineering; CHI PSI; University 

pubnc:ns Cr crub!. 2) A.f.M r E Course Mana9er (,); House President (4); mjs '- Yo -3 Re 

LARSON, KENNETH PAUL AMES, IOWA; Bachelor of Archilecture; SIGMA PHI EPSILON; 

tnsign, NROTC (3, 4, 5); Iowa State University. 

LARSON, RALPH GEORGE BARRINGTON; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; PHI KAPPA PSI; Skull 



LASH, KAY LINDA . DANVILLE; B.S. in Elementary Education; SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA; 

lllinMln V r : '" ?',,V n !° n Boa ^, d (4) \ Ma ' or Chaiman Union Movie Committee (3) 
lllini Union Council (3); Honors Day (1); House President (3). 

LASKE, JOSEPH DEXTER CHICAGO- B.S. in Communications; SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON; The 

uany mini I), W.P.G.U (1, 2); Interfraternity Executive Council (3); University Chorus 
Phi rhf e F, ^k Co mmitfee (,,. Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (12) 
Phi Chi Eta (3, 4); Gamma Delta; Honors Day (1). 

LATCHFORD, RAYMOND JOHN . . . . POINT PLEASANT, NEW JERSEY; B.S. in Electrical En- 
gineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. (3, 4); I.A.S.; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202 



LATHROP, GAYLON KENT LA PRAIRIE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PHI SIGMA EPSILON- 

House President (4); A.S.C.E.; Western Illinois University. croiLuiM, 



LAUFER, DAVID PETER ST. LOUIS, MISSOUR 

THETA. 



I; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; PHI KAPPA 



LAVELY, JEROME /ATRICK . JOLIET; B.S. in Marketing and Management; KAPPA SIGMA; 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Junior Interfraternity Council (3); Marketing Club; Society for the 
Advancement of Management; Joliet Junior College. oo>-iery Tor me 




515 




LAVIN, WILLIAM JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; 

Marketing Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

LAWRENCE, NORMAN RICHARD HINSDALE; B.S. in Commerce and Law; ZETA PSI; Skull 

and Crescent; Alpha Kappa Psi; Alpha Phi Omega; University Theatre Crew (2, 3); 
Y.M.C.A. Committee (2, 3); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); McKinley Foundation 
Student Council (1, 2); Commerce Council (3, 4); Junior Bar Association. 

LAWSON, DAVID EBER AUGUSTA, WISCONSIN; Bachelor of Architecture; THETA CHI; 

lllini Union Committee (1); Pershing Rifles (1); A. I. A.; University of Wisconsin. 

LAWSON, ERWIN CLAIR URBANA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Tau Beta Pi; Eta Kappa 

Nu; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (3); Northwestern University; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

LAWSON, ROBERT EUGENE EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Music Education; University Choir 

(3); University Chorus (3). 

LAWTON, EDWARD ALBERT, JR DIXON; B.S. in Dairy Technology; GARNER W.P.G.U. 

(2);M.R.H.A. (3, 4); House President (4); Freshman Adviser's Executive Council (4); 
Dairy Technology Society; Marketing Club; Young Republicans Club. 

LAZAR, BARBARA ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; INDECO; University 

Theatre Crew (I); Hillel Foundation Student Council (2); Honors Day (1). 

LAZAR, RICHARD SANDER CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; ZETA BETA TAU; Star 

and Scroll; lllini Union Committee (1); Freshman Council; Freshman Adviser (2, 3); 
S.I.E.S.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

LAX, WILLIAM PAUL . . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; FORBES HOUSE; Alpha Delta 
Sigma; The Daily lllini (3); Marketing Club; Young Democrats Club; Wright Junior 
College; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



LEBAN, MARX ISTOK CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; A.I.Ch.E. 

LEBLANC, RAYMOND ARTHUR TOLEDO, OHIO; Bachelor of Architecture; Alpha Delta 

Sigma; Forsite; Northwestern University; University of Toledo. 

LEDEBUHR, KURT LEROY EVERGREEN PARK, Bachelor of Architecture; FORBES HOUSE; 

M.I. A. Executive Council (3, 4); A. I. A.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of 
Illinois. 



LEE, PALMER DEWAIN INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI; B.S. in Economics; NEWMAN HALL; 

Young Republicians Club. 

LEEB, GERALD ALAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; HOPKINS HOUSE; Accountancy 

Club; German Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Society for the Advancement of 
Management; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

LEGAT, JOSEPH JACOB WAUKEGAN; Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA RHO CHI; Major 

Chairman Graphic Arts lllini Union Committee (2); A. I. A.; Fine and Applied Arts 
Society; Lake Forest College. 



LEIDENHEMER, JOHN LAWRENCE, JR HERRIN; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; LES 

MISERABLES; Lieutenant Colonel, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (1, 2, 3, 4); Flying 
Club; I.A.S. 

LEIKEN, LARRY MERWYN EUREKA; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; ZETA BETA TAU; Star 

and Scroll; Phi Eta Sigma; Phi Delta Phi; The Daily lllini (1, 2); lllini Union Committee 
(1); Campus Chest (1); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Freshman Adviser (1, 2, 3); 
lllini Board of Control (3, 4); Major, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3, 4); Junior Bar 
Association (4); Honors Day (1, 3). 

LEIMBACH, ANNA RACHEL ALTON; B.S. in Marketing; DELTA DELTA DELTA; University 

Theatre Cast (1); Panhellenic Executive Council (4); Campus Chest Allocations and Ad- 
visory Board (4); Freshman Adviser (4); Marketing Club. 



LEMAK, JOHN CHARLES ELMHURST; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; MEDEA LODGE; House 

President (4); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

LENTNER, KEITH JOHN DES PLAINES; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; "O" HOUSE; Phi Eta 

Sigma; Illinois Technograph (2); Lutheran Foundation Student Council (4); A.I.E.E.- 
I.R.E.; Honors Day (1). 

LENZ, WALTER CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Geography; EVANS SCHOLARS; Chi Gamma 

lota; Wright Junior College. 



LEONARD, CAROL JEAN BELVIDERE; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; PHI MU; Mortar Board; 

Torch; Shi-Ai; Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (1, 2, 3), Associate Business Manager (4); 
lllini Union Committee (1); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2); House President (4); Business 
Education Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

LEONARD, JOANNE ALDENE BETHALTO; B.S. in Home Economics; PI BETA PHI; The 

lllio (1); Star Course Manager (1); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); Honors Day (3). 

LEONARD, THERESA ROCHELLE CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; DELTA 

SIGMA THETA; House President (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (2). 



LEONG, STEPHEN MUN YOON KUALA LUMPOR, MALAYA; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ZETA 

PSI; Chinese Students Club; Little United Nations; Russian Language Club; Middle- 
bury College. 

LESSEN, LARRY LEE LINCOLN; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; CHI PHI; Skull and 

Crescent; Junior Interfratternity Council (1). 

LETWIN, CAROL PHYLLIS CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; INDECO; Kappa Delta 

Pi; lllini Union Committee (3). 



516 



LEVEY, RITA . . . HOLLANDALE, MISSISSIPPI; B.S. in Marketing; IOTA ALPHA PI; The lllio (2, 3); 
A^ ,Z ,£' »« ); L " ! n ° ls rl T echnograph (2); University Religious Council (1); Freshman 
Adviser (2); Marketing Club. 

LEVINE, ALLAN . . ■ SKOKIE; B A, in L.A.S Political Science; HOPKINS HOUSE; M.R.H.A. (3); 

B^ r«t?n. e K L 3): JU "n° r ?, a , r Assoe ^. ,ro "; N ^y Pier Alumni Association; Young 
Democrats Club; Honors Day (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. ' 

LEVINE. AAR ° c N co BART cy - c|ub BROOKLYN, NEW YORK; B.S. in Accountancy; TAU EPSILON PHI; 



LEV.N, MY "ONf c ^-.... CHICAGO; B^S. in Communications; TAU EPSILON PHI; Sigma 
Delta (.hi; The Daily lllini (4); House President (4). 

LEW.S. EDWARD STEVEN . . HARTSDALE, NEW YORK; B S in Marketing; SIGMA ALPHA MU; 

ine Daily lllini (3, 4); lllini Union Committee ; Basketball Manaaer 191- FU<»h;,l 
Manager (1) ; Hillel Foundation Student Council (I, 2, 3) Manager <2) ' B «eball 

LEWIS. ELMER EUGENE . ELMWOOD PARK; B.S. in Engineering Physics; Sigma Tau- Phi 

„ a «' 9 S. a; McKmle V Foundation Student Council (4); First Lieutenant ArmvROTC 
(3, 4); Physics Society, President (3); Honors Day (1, 2). ueuTenant - Arm V KU"- 

LEWIS, LARRY FRANK ... URSA; B.S. in Agriculture; ACACIA; Football Marching Band HI- 

First Regimental Band (2); Second Regimental Band (1 ; Men's Ghee Cub (2 3 4)' 

?nT^rol°, C, rresi ( d 2 i'nt A ( 9 2r' ,Ure C ° UnCi ' ™ ^ "^ ^ C °^"°' ^ ^ 



LEW.S, "'CHA"D CARL DOWNERS. GROVE; B.S. in Electrical Engineer! 



ng; EVANS 



C R H E° L ti R 4 tllj NaHont mm ' ,,ee »» "' ^^ nWZS% fi££ 
LEWIS, WILLIAM LEE . . JACKSONVILLE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; TAU KAPPA EPSI 

Language' Club! * ° ^ <2 ' 3 ' 4) '' Pha ' anX (4); Juni ° r Bar Association; Russ^n 
L.EBECK, MHW H^KHILD WHEATON; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; I.A.S, North 

LIEBERMAN, LAWRENCE HERMAN BROOKLYN NEW YORK- B S in I A 1 D u I 

BARTON HOUSE; M.R.H.A. (2, 3); Praetorians; Social Wort Club " Psychol °^ 



B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; DELTA KAPPA EP- 



LIESKE, EDWARD ALLEN CHICAGO; 

SILON; House President (3). 

LILJEROS, BRITTA CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology KAPPA DELTA r. m ai t, 

Chi; lllini Union Committee (3); Northern mZ™vL er 5iy ' amm3 A ' Pha 

L.LLY, LAWRENCE GREGORY . . . OAKLAWN; B.S. in Accountancy; Phi Alpha Delta- Account, 
ancy Club; Junior Bar Association; Honors Day (3). account 



LINDER, DEIRDRE LOUISE GLENVIEW; B.S. in Home Economics- KAPPA r>FI ta n, 

nomic^ClJb 1 : 9 ^' ^ 3 ''' ^^ ^ Pa " hellenic Ball ToSrni^^,, ^onfe' Ec^ 

LINDSTROM, DAVID GUSTAF URBANA; B.A. in L.A S Psycholoav Ma Wan n, II ■ 

sity Theatre Cast (2); Y.M.C.A. Board of Directors 4) Y MCA Cabi^n^p'^'' 
man' A^ise^f ^""^ ^ 3 ' 4) > W "'^ ^d'at^dent Counc^ F^n- 

LINGIE, LINDA LEE SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology ALPHA DELTA PI lllini II ■ 

Committee (2, 3, 4); Lake Forest College. Pl; " llni Un,on 

LINK, GERDA LENOR JERSEYVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Geography; BUSEY HALL. 

LIPSON, DAVID EARL ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; PI LAMBDA PHI- Phi Ft, <:;„ 

Sigma lota Epsilon; lllini Union Committee (1, 2), UniverX Theatre Crew (11 ^^ 
Interfraternity Council (1); House President (3, 4) Intramu al Manager m HMl'll F 
dation Student Council (2); Commerce Counc I (3); Freshman Week CommittiL ,9 "-.T 
Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Greek Week Committee (3) Capta" ArmyToTC (3 4 '' 
Phalanx (3); Ph, Ch, Eta (3, 4); Accountancy Club; Honors Day' (f, 2) <3, 4) '' 

LIPSON, MURIEL ROSIN CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education- IOTA ALPHA PI ill- ■ 

Union Committee 1, 2); Campus Chest (2); House President (3 4) Hi 11=1 F 'a 

USNEK ' Ell T .Daily' ^^^^^^^^T^^^^tV^ S r- 

USS - ^^^C^^^^^^^^l ^"^ — S 

lOCKHART ' ftf^s^^ House Presidenf 

LOEB, SANDRA JEAN OTTAWA; B.S. in L.A.S., Sociology; DELTA GAMMA; Drake University. 

LOHBAUER, JANETTE LEE .... ELGIN; B.S. in Elementary Education- PHI MU- YMCA Com 
miftee (1); University Orchestra (2, 3, 4); Oratorio Society"! A); Orch'esis' (1) 

LOHMAN, Ujm^K. -^.WESTERN SPRINGS; B.S. in L.A.S., Spanish; BUSEY HALL; Little 




517 




LONGNECKER, ALBERT A JOLIET; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Eta Kappa Nu; A.I.E.E.- 

I.R.E.; University of the Philippines; Joliet Junior College. 

LOTZ, THEODORE VICTOR EAST ALTON; B.A. in L.A.S., History; FORBES HOUSE; Southern 

Illinois University. 

LOWMAN, PATRICIA ANN FLOSSMOOR; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; SIGMA KAPPA; 

The lllio (1, 3); lllini Union Committee (1); Young Republicans Club. 

LUCAS, STEPHEN BARRY JOLIET; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; NOBLE PENTHOUSE; Ma- 
Wan-Da; Tomahawk; Phi Kappa Phi; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; 
M.R.H.A. (3, 4), President; M.R.H.A. Executive Council (2, 3, 4); House President (2); 
Student Senate (2); Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Society 
for the Advancement of Management; Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

LUCZAK, CAROL ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in the Teaching of Spanish; CHI OMEGA; lllini 

Union Committee (1); Star Course Manager (1); Greek Week Committee (1, 3); Spanish 
Club. 

LUEBKE, CHARLENE ELIZABETH CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; Blackburn College; 

Chicago Teachers College. 

LUKER, CAROL WROBLEWSKI URBANA; B.S. in L.A.S., Microbiology; ALPHA PHi; lllini 

Union Committee (1); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1); University Chorus (1). 

LUSTFIELD, CHARLES DAVENPORT LA GRANGE; B.S. in Mathematics; MOORE HALL. 

LUSTIG, HANS ALBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; Sigma Delta Chi. 

LUTHER, LAWRENCE ALEXANDER MAYWOOD; B.S. in General Engineering; PHI KAPPA 

THETA; University Theatre Crew (3); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Lieutenant, 
NROrc (3, 4); Trident (3); I.S.G.E. 

LYNCH, JOHN MICHAEL JOLIET; B.S. in Finance; KAPPA SIGMA; Alpha Kappa Psi; Uni- 
versity Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Crew (1); Campus Chest (1); Junior 
Interfraternity Council (1); Committee on Student Affairs (3); Commerce Council (3); 
Interfraternity Ball Committee (2); Accountancy Club; Finance Club; Society for the 
Advancement of Management. 

LYONS, KEVIN JOSEPH GRANVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; Dairy Pro- 
duction Club, President (4); LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College. 



LYTLE, JAMES CRAYTON WINNETKA; B.S. in Finance; THETA CHI; Ma-Wan-Da; Sigma lota 

Epsilon; The Daily lllini (1, 2, 3), Business Manager (4); lllini Union Committee (I); Star 
Course Manager (]); Interfraternity Executive Council (3); Junior Interfraternity Council 
(1); House President (3); Golf, Freshman Varsity Squad; Commerce Council (2, 3); 
Interfraternity Ball Committee (3, 4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (1, 2, 3, 4); Phi Chi 
Eta (3, 4); Finance Club; Honors Day (1, 2). 

MACHON, GRAY FREEMAN PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Industrial Education. 

MACK, RICHARD NORMAN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; FLAGG HOUSE; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Omega Beta Pi; Honors Day (1). 

MACKEY, JO ANN EAST ST. LOUIS; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; ALLEN HALL; University 

Theatre Cast (3, 4); University Theatre Crew (3, 4); Newman Foundation Student 
Council (2, 3, 4); St. Louis University. 

MACNEISH, THOMAS BRUCE CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Administration; SIGMA NU; 

Society for the Advancement of Management. 

MADING, JAMES EMMETT CLAY CITY; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; HOPKINS HOUSE; 

University Chorus (3); St. Ambrose College. 

MADSEN WAYNE ARTHUR CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Tau Beta Pi; 

Sigma Gamma Tau, President (4); University Chorus (3); Men's Glee Club, Navy Pier 
(4); I.A.S.; Tennis Manager, Navy Pier (2); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); Navy Pier Extension 
of the University of Illinois. 

MAGDZIASZ, DONALD MICHAEL CALUMET CITY; B.A. in L.A.S., Economics; HOPKINS 

' HOUSE; Sachem; House President, College Hall (2); lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 
202; Young Republicans Club. 

MAGINOT, RICHARD ANTHONY CALUMET CITY; B.S. in Communications; WILL-TV (3, A). 

MAGUIRE MICHAEL EUGENE CAMPUS; B.S. in Finance; Lieutenant Colonel, Army ROTC 

(3, 4); Army Council (4); Phalanx (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3, 4). 

MAH, GEORGE FOREST HILLS, NEW YORK; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; M.I.S.; 

Honors Day (2). 

MAHLER ANNE ELIZABETH ELMHURST; B.A. in L.A.S., Rhetoric and Composition; ALPHA 

DELTA PI; The lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Student Senate (1); llligreek 
(1, 2); McKinley Foundation Student Council (4); Young Republicans Club. 



MAISH MINA .... FLUSHING, NEW YORK; B.S. in Physical Education; EVANS HALL; Shorter 
Board; Torch; Alpha Chron; W.A.A. Board (2, 3, 4), President (4); W.A.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Student Senate (4); Physical Education Majors Club; Honors Day (1). 

MAKARSKI RICHARD ALLEN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; GARNER HOUSE; 

French Club; Young Republicans Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of 
Illinois. 

MALAVOLTI, EMIL PEKIN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; TOWN HOUSE; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 



518 



MAUINSON, ROY CHARLES . DANVILLE; B.S. in Industrial Education; PHI KAPPA TAU; The 

lllio (2); Industrial Education Society; Danville Junior College. 

MALMBERG, DIANE ELIZABETH CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; PHI MU; University 

Theatre Crew (3); W.P.G.U. (3); University of Dubuque; Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 

MALMQUIST GLEN AARON . . VERONA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; THETA XI; A.I.E.E.- 

I.R.E.; Honors Day (1). 



MALSTROM, GORDON EDWARD . . . . GALESBURG; B.S. in Communications; TAU KAPPA 
EPSILON; Alpha Delta Sigma; Sigma Delta Chi; Interfraternity Executive Council (2)- 
Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Golf, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 
Club Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3); Marketing 

MALVEN, PAUL VERNON. . KINGSTON; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Phi 

Kappa Ph.; Alpha Zeta, President (4; Phi Eta Sigma; Junior Interfraternity Council (2); 
Agricultural Council (3 4) All-Ag Field Day Committee (3); Plowboy Prom Committee 
(3); Dairy Production Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

MANDL, EVA ANN AURORA; B.S. in Elementary Education; INDECO. 



MANION, JERRY ROBERT . . . MT VERNON; B.S. in Management; BETA THETA PI; Sachem; 

lllim Union Committee (2); Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement. 

MANN, MARILYN ELIZABETH . . . KANKAKEE; B.F.A. in Painting; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; Mortar 

Board; lllini Union Board (4; Major Chairman Homecoming lllini Union Committee 
(3); University Theatre Crew (1); Terrapin (1, 2). 

MANNING, KATHRYN LUCILLE .... LADD; B.S. in Home Economics; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; 
Torch; Phi Upsilon Omicron; The lllio (1, 2, 3), Associate Editor (4). 



MAPES, DONALD ROGERS . OAKLAND; B.S. in Agriculture; M.R.H.A. (3); Military Ball 

Committee (4); Second Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha (4)- Field 
and Furrow. ^ l " 

MARCELLIS, JACK CHARLES ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; A.S.C E 
I. I.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

MARCUS, STEPHEN LARRY . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; PHI EPSILON P|, Baseball 

l-reshman Varsity Squad; Freshman Adviser (3); Accountancy Club. 



MARELLA, GUY JOSEPH . . BERWYN; B.S. in Civil Engineering; EVANS SCHOLARS; M.I.A. 

Executive Council (3); A.S.C.E. 

MARQUARDT, WALTER OTTO . CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Concert Band (1); 

A.l.t.fc.-I.R.E.; Wright Junior College. 

MARRS, RICHARD KENT . . TUSCOLA; B.S. in Accountancy; LOU-MAC; Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Freshman Adviser (3, 4); IM Rec Board (4); Accountancy Club. 



MARSHALL, CHARLES EDWARD . . . SOMONAUK; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI KAPPA TAU; Alpha 

Phi Omega; Football Marching Band (2); Second Regimental Band (1, 2)- Newman 
Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Honors Day (1). 

MARTIN, ALVIN SKOKIE; 

Football Manager (1). 

MARTIN, AR A ^^^^ 4) - A H^ED^E; E B.S s/ ,n Mechanical Engineering; First Lieutenant, 



B.S. in Accountancy; SIGMA ALPHA MU; Delta Sigma Pi 



MARTTILA, PATRICIA M. . . CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Communications; University Theatre Cast 

(3, 4); University Theatre Crew (3); WILL-TV (4); lllini Board of Control (3, 4). 

MARVIN, HARRY NICHOLAS EVANSTON; B.S. in Mathematics. 

MASTERS, JERRY RICHARD . . FREEPORT; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Chi Epsilon (3, 4); Society 

of American Military Engineers (1, 2); A.S.C.E. 



MATSUI, WARREN M. WAILUKU, HAWAII; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A.; Hawaii Club- 

University of Hawaii. 

MATTICK. ELDON ARTHUR . . . .ELMHURST; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; BETA SIGMA 
Blade (3 1 ' 4)""^ | C s ° mm,t,ee (3 ' 4); F ' rs < Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and 

MAULDING, DELORIS LOUISE . . MT. VERNON; Bachelor of Music; PINE HALL; Mu Phi 

F„, „2 ;'■ Un ' v f er , s, *y Cho'r 3); Women's Glee Club (2, 3); Madrigal Chorus (3); Baptist 
Foundation Student Council (2, 3, 4); Mt. Vernon Community College. 



MAURER, HELEN «ATIA . •STREATOR; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; GAMMA HOUSE; House 

President (3); lllini Christian Fellowship (3, 4); Honors Day (3); Bob Jones University. 

MAYER, NORMAN EDWARD . ELMHURST; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI KAPPA PSI; House Presi- 

dent (4); Track, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2); Men's Glee Club (1, 2, 
J, 4); Agricultural Economics Club. 

MAYER, WILHELM KARL C , HIC ,AGO; B.S. in Industrial Education; lllini Union Committee 

roi,nr| m ^ S - CH rf i2 M u W ',^ G o U -o ( " ; Committee on Student Affairs (3); Freshman 
Council; Mens Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Dolphins (1); Plowboy Prom Committee (3). 




519 




MAZE, KAY AURORA; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA ZETA; Illinois State Normal 

University. 

McBETH, DALE EDWIN ELMWOOD; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club. 

McCABE, JOHN RAUD WAYNE; B.A. in L.A.S., English; FOUR COLUMNS; Wabash College. 



McCARTNEY, WILLIAM WARD .... CISCO; B.S in Agriculture. 

McCASLIN, SANDRA CAROLE ROCKFORD; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; STRATFORD 

HOUSE; Northern Illinois University. 

McCLORY, JOHN PATRICK CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; PHI KAPPA THETA; House Presi- 
dent (4); Baseball, Freshman Varsity Squad; llligreek (4); Marketing Club. 

McCLOSKEY KEITH RICHARD PORTSMOUTH, OHIO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI KAPPA 

TAU; Phi Alpha Mu, Presient *4); Omega Beta Pi, Presient (4); lllini Union Committee 
(4); German Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

McCORD, LENORE MARIE LAKE VILLA; B.A. in Teaching of English; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

lllini Union Committee (3); Beloit College. 

McCORMICK, AURELIA MARY RIVER FOREST; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; ALPHA 

GAMMA DELTA; Gamma Alpha Chi; University Theatre Crew (2); House President (2); 
Newman Foundation Student Council (2); St. Mary's of Notre Dame. 

McCORMICK, NORMAN JOSEPH NORMAL; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Sigma Tau; 

' Tau Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma, President (4); Engineering Council (3, 4); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; 
S.A.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

McCOWAN ALLEN CHESTER ELMWOOD; B.S. in Agriculture; Chi Gamma lota; Alpha Tau 

Alpha, President (4); University Theatre Crew (3, 4); Agricultural Education Club; 
Joiiet Junior College. 

McCULlOUGH, BETTE MERLENE SALEM; B.A. in L.A.S., English; ALPHA OMICRON PI; 

University of Colorado. 

McGLENN, THOMAS RICHARD KEWANEE; B.S. in Accountancy; NEWMAN HALL; Alpha 

Kappa Psi; Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1). 

McGOVERN, ELMO JAMES, JR ROBINSON; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; EL PATIO; Cyclo- 

them Club. 

McGRATH, ARLENE C CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Rhetoric and Composition; THETA 

UPSILON; lllini Union Committee (2, 3); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordination Commit- 
tee (2, 3). 

McGUIRE RICHARD OLIVER BENTON; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Alpha Eta Rho; 

University Chorus (2, 3); Men's Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Flying Club; I.A.S.; Rifle and 
Pistol Club. 

MclNERNEY, JAMES FRANCIS CHICAGO; B.S. in Physics; Physics Society; Navy Pier Ex- 
tension of the University of Illinois. 

McKEMIE, KERMIT MONROE BENTON; B.S. in Agriculture; FORBES HOUSE; Southern 

Illinois University. 

McKINNEY PATRICIA RUTH ROCK FALLS; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; HOSTE HOUSE; 

Mask and Bauble; Zeta Phi Eta; University Theatre Manager (3); University Theatre 
Cast (2); University Theatre Crew (2, 3, 4); W.A.A. (1); House President (2). 

McLEY KAY SANDRA CHAMPAIGN; B.A. in Teaching of English; CHI OMEGA; Mortar 

Board- lllini Union Committee (1); Star Course Manager (1, 2, 3); Women's Glee 
Club (1). 

McMICKEN, CAROLYN AGNES PLAINFIELD; B.S. in Marketing; PALAMAR; Marketing Club. 

McMILLEN NANCY DARLENE LINCOLN; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; McKINLEY 

HALL; Torch; lllini Union Committee (1); Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (1, 2, 3, 4), President (4); 
Y.W.C.A. Committee (I, 2, 3, 4); Wesley Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Pre-Law 
Ciub. 

McNAMARA, JAMES PAUL CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ILLINI LODGE; House 

President (4); Navy Pier Varsity Football (1, 2); Navy Pier Varsity Baseball (1, 2); 
Host of lllini; Physical Education Majors Club; Navy Pier Extension of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

McQUIlKIN, CAROL MILDRED HENNEPIN; B.S. in Music Education; 4-H HOUSE; University 

Chorus (1); Women's Glee Club (3, 4); McKinley Foundation Student Council (2, 3, 4); 
Honors Day (3). 

McSORLEY, DONALD VINCENT WAUKFGAN; B.S. in Accountancy; SIGMA PHI EPSILON, 

Alpha Kappa Psi; House President (4); Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1). 

McVICKAR, DAN BRUCE SUMNER; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; PARK LANE LODGE; 

A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; Eastern Illinois University. 

McWARD RICHARD ALAN GLEN ELLYN; B.S. In Agriculture; SIGMA CHI; WaNaSee; 

Basketball Manager (1, 2, 3); First Class Petty Officer, NROTC (4); Agricultural Eco- 
nomics Club. 



520 



MEAD, MARY LOUISE . . . ROCKFORD; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALLEN HALL; Terrapin 
(J, 4); Bowling Green State University. 

MEANS, JOHN BARKLEY KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI; B.A. in L.A S Latin American 

S 'r^f'M P l^ PP C A PH '-\ S '- *" d Scroll; Si9ma Del,a Pi <- Juni ° r Interfratelity Coun 
A ' ); DOTr n ,? y £° U Eu- 8t J?J S c ' ud ?o' 9>° U ? cil (2); LAS - Council < 3 ' 4 ); Firs ' Lieutenant, 
Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3, 4); Spanish Club; Young Republicans Club. 

MECH. ROBERT JOSEPH HARVEY; B.S. in Management; ALPHA DELTA PHI; Navy Pier 

Extension of the University of Illinois. 



MELINDER, RICHARD GEORGE . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA; 

"'' n '. U " ,on T Com k ml,, ? c < 4 ;. Campus Chest (3, 4); German Club; Navy Pier Alumn 
Association; Teachers-in-Traming Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

MELN.CK, BONNIE SUE ! WILMETTE; B.F.A. in Art Education; MAPLE HALL- Mortar 

Board; lllm, Union Board (4); W.G.S. Executive Council (3); House President (2) 

MELTON, JAMES ORA ... . KIRKWOOD; B.S. in Agriculture; NABOR HOUSE- Aloha Zeta- 

cu^r^C^T^ ^Vr < 2 ' 3); ^ F °-da,ion Student CouncH (3); Agrll 
cultural Council (4); Sno-Ball Committee (3); Agricultural Economics Club, President (4). 



MELVIN, JOHN WILLIAM . . PEORIA; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; PHI KAPPA TAU- Star 

Course Manager (2); House President (3). ' oa 

MERCER, WILLIAM STUART DECATUR; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club; Society 

tor the Advancement of Management. jutieiy 

MERKELO, HENRY .... -CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; HOPKINS HOUSE; Eta Kappa 

Pier Ex ensi'on f"',h^°l, 0rS D "? W i uf*?* M ° deme and ^^"'^ de Reims; Navy 
ner txtension ot the University of Illinois. 



MERLANDER, HARRIET MARGIE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech- MAPLE HALL- Uni 

MERRIELL, iOSEPH o ALB I ON i . f . . . . CLINTON; B.S. in Dairy Technology; NEWMAN HALL; Dairy 

METTA, SAROJA SRIRAMULU ... HYDERABAD INDIA; B.S. in Home Economics; Indian Stu- 
dents Association; Women's College; Osmania University. 



METZGER, DONALD lee EAST PEORIA; B.A. in L.A.S., Polici.cal Science; BETA SIGMA 

PSI; University Theatre Manager (3); University Theatre Crew (1, 2) Interfraternity 

cZTL, :"! 1 (4) '' J R Un '°; ln,erfra ' erni, V Council, Adviser (4),- House Present (3), 
oamma Delta; Junior Bar Association. 

MEYER, BARBARA HANLEY MATTOON; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; Delta Sigma Omicron 

MEYER, CARLES HENRY CHICAGO; B.S in LAS., Mathematics; FLAGG HOUSE; Maior, 

University oMMinois ''' " ^ A ' Umm AsS ° c ' a ' ion ; N -V Pier Extension of 'the 



MEYER, GLENDON SHEIBY HINTON IOWA; B.A in L.A.S., Political Science; Phi Kappa 

Honore Dav t\ P B 3 T%s P, „ S .'9™ Alpha; Delta Sigma Om icron,- Junior Bar Association; 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

MEYER. WILLIAM LANWONY . . BROADVIEW; B.S in Aeronautical Engineering; LES MISER- 

ABLE5; Sigma Tau; Sigma Gamma Tau; Flying Club; IAS- St Ambrose Cn\\l7Z 
Navy Pier Extensoin of the University of Illinois. Ambrose College; 

M.CHAEL, R .CHARD 3 DALE s . ^^^ Marching Band 



MICHALSKI, CHA^A|NE NANCY CHICAGO ; B A. in L.A.S., English; LE-EMAN LODGE; 

iiavy rier extension ot the University of Illinois. 

MICHELA, JOHN FREDERECK .... HIGHLAND PARK- RA in I A <: d i. i c • 

^^OS^ 1 Sena,e «^'«'. unU A N.;^ ; A WSbteff H S A 

M.CHENER, ELIZABETH LOUISE . TUSCOLA; B.S. in Speech Correction; CHI OMEGA; Shorter 

YWCA tommittee'cuT V CreW ( ' ); S,ar C ° UrSe Manager (, < 2 ' >>' 



M ' HAl0PUl0 L\u^n^Air Force %g%3,£ ^TS^SZ^' ^ 

M,KYSKA ' ^fm^ipr^gW 8 : in Economi " ; THE MANSION -' A ~v 

M.LET.CH, «ARUYN o JOAN ^. . . . CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Ar, Education; ALLEN HALL; lllini 



MILLAN. BETT ^ o A a 7 Board .- -PEORIA; B.A in , LAS. English Literature; KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA; 
U? in J ■ u ■' £ ' Sh'-Ai; Alpha Lambda Delta, President (2); lllini Union Board 
(4); lllm. Union Committee (1, 2); Panhellenic Executive Council (3 4- Student Sen 
CoJmit. ); C M mm "rl e ° n Sru , den *, Affairs < 3 ' 4); Freshman Adviser (3); Greek Week 
^^'^L£l^ a ^% 1M " S C0mmi '* ee ^ Hono'rs'-Day^ it 

MILLER, CATHERINE ANN CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Speech Correction; DELTA DELTA DELTA- 

Et fl J °?[ d; T °; Ch; Sh| - Al '- / Mask ^d Bauble; National Collegiate Players- Zeta Phi 
lal A . U-? 10 " .Committee (4); University Theatre Manager (2, 3), Production Man 
ager (4); University Theatre Crew (1); Home Economics Club (1). " oauc,lon ™ an 

MILLER, DON EDWIN . CHICAGO R s ;„ aa„,i, i c 

ql ii , •! ■ ■ ■ <-i-ik.«(jU; B.S. m Mechanical Engineer nq- PHI SIGMA KAPPA. 

Honors%VctT " Sl9ma; " Hni Uni ° n <*™'"«V Campus "1 ChesT^ 




521 




MILLER DONALD EUGENE CRETE; Bachelor of Agriculture; PSI UPSILON; Skull and 

Crescent; Men's Glee Club (1, 2); A. I. A.; Kansas State University. 

MILLER DONALD MORTON CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; HOPKINS HOUSE; 

M.R.H.A. (4); House President (4); Northwestern University. 

MILLER GEORGE EDMUND ELMHURST; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; MEDEA LODGE 

House President (4); A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; North Central College. 



MILLER JOSEPH CONRAD LINCOLN; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; WESMEN; Wa-Na-See; 

Tomahawk; House President (3); Football Marching Band (1, 2); Second Regimental 
Band (1, 2); Wesley Foundation (1, 2, 3), President (4). 

MILLER JOY DIANE BLOOMINGTON; B.A. in L.A.S., English; MAPLE HALL; Shorter 

Board; The Daily lllini (3, 4); DePauw University. 

MILLER KEITH . . MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN; B.S. in Marketing; SIGMA CHI; Swimming 

Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2); Dolphins (2, 3, 4); Captain Army ROTC 
(3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha (4); Marketing Club, President 
(4); Honors Day (3). 



MILLER, LAWRENCE CHARLES BAY CITY, MICHIGAN; B FA in Advertising Design; 

FORBES HOUSE; First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); it. 
Ambrose College. 

MILLER, LEE N CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL. 

MILLER, LESLIE WARREN NORMAL; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; DELTA SIGMA PHI; Star 

and Scroll. 



MILLER, LOIS RAE WESTERN SPRINGS; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; HOSTE HOUSE; 

Colorado College; American University. 

MILLER, RICHARD WALLACE HOMEWOOD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PHI KAPPA TAU; 

Chi Gamma lota; A.S.C.E.; Mu-San. 

MILLER, ROBERT RAY PEKIN; B.S. in Accountancy; DELTA PHI; Y.M.C A Committee (2); 

W.P.G.U (1, 2); Track, Freshman Varsity Squad; Football Marching Band (2, 3); Second 
Regimental Band (1, 2, 3); Accountancy Club 



MILLER WILLIAM LOWELL .... INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A.; 
Mini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Honors Day (1). 

MILLIS, DALE EVAN PALESTINE; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Ma-Wan-Da; Junior 

Interfraternity Council (1); Tribe of lllini (4); Track Manager (2, 3 4); Senior Track 
Manager (4)- S.N.I.B. (1, 2); All-Ag Field Day Committee (2); Athletic Council (4); 
Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club; Young Republicans Club. 

MILLMAN ROZANNE CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALLEN HALL; House 

President (3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (I). 

MILLNER BEATRICE . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 

DENCE; University Theatre Crew (2); W.P.G.U. (1); Student National Education; Honors 

Day (3). 

MIRTO MAE ANTOINETTE ROCKFORD; B.S. in Communications; DELTA GAMMA; Shorter 

Board President (4); Torch; Shi-Ai; Zeta Phi Eta; Major Chairman Personnel II in, 
Union Committee (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Theatre Manager 2 ; 
University Theatre Cast (I); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); House President (4); 
Panhellenic Ball Committee (1). 

MISHER GRETCHEN IRENE CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; PI BETA PHI; The 

Daily lllini (2); The lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee 1, 2); University Theatre 
Crew (1); University Chorus (2); llligreek (2, 3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); 
Honors Day (2). 

MITTENDORF, LARRY RAY METROPOLIS; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; GRANADA CLUB; Delta 

'Delta Sigma; Second Regimental Band (2). 

MIZELLE MARGUERITE CECILE SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA; B.A in L.A.S., German; 

GAAtMA PHI BETA; Pi Delta Phi; Major Chairman Fine Arts lllini Union Committee 
(3); lllini Union Committee (2); German Club; Honors Day (3); Indiana University. 

MOBERG VERNALIE ANN .... EAST MOLINE; B.A. in L.A.S., Rhetoric and Composition; 
LOWRY LODGE- Theta Sigma Phi; The Daily lllini (1); House President (3); University 
Theatre Crew (2); N.S.A. Senate Subcommittee (3); Channing-Murray Foundation 
Student Council (2, 3); Sno-Ball Committee (2); French Club. 

MOLDAL SUSAN RUTH OLYMPIA; B.S. in Education of Mentally Handicapped Children; 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA; The lllio (1). 

MOLDOW, RAYMOND E FOREST HILLS, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., English; TAU DELTA 

PHI; House President (4). 

MOLDT ELVIRA ANNA . . NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., Fconomics; ALPHA 

OMICRON PI; The Daily lllini (4); Spanish Club; New York University. 

MOLE PAUL ANGELO .... JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI KAPPA 
SIGMA; Phi Epsilon Kappa, President (4); Football, Freshman Varsity Squad; Physical 
Education Majors Club. 

MOLITOR MARGARET ELGIN; B.S. in Communications; PHI MU; Mortar Board; Torch; 

MOLITOK, N1AKOAI 1^. ^^ ph , ; ' Th , DaMy ||| ini (1 , 2 . 3, 4); Campus Chest (2, 3); Honors 

Day (1). 

MOLNAR, DONALD JOSEPH SPRINGFIELD; B.F.A. In Landscape Architecture; ALPHA CHI 

RHO; Foothill Marching Band (I, 2); First Regimental Band (1, 2); Forsite (3, 4); 
Honors Day (1, 2). 



522 



MONGE, JOSE GABRIEL . . . . . BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; A.S.A.E ■ 
Colombian Students Association; University of the Andes. 

MONROE, JOHN WILLIAM II BENTON; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA TAU OMEGA; Cap- 

tain, Army ROTC (3, 4). 

MONTAGNO, ELIZABETH ANNA . . CALUMET CITY; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; 

ALLEN HALL; lllini Union Committee (3, 4); French Club; Thornton Junior College. 

MONTGOMERY, RICHARD DAVID CENTER HARBOR, NEW HAMPSHIRE; BS in Recrea- 

MTl LAM R B ^ A r CHI ALPH V"r u Uni ° n C °mmmee (3); University Theatre Crew 3; 
Military Ball Committee (2); Pershing Rifles (1, 2); American Recreational Society 
U. ot I. Student Chapter. 

MONTGOMER ^ir R y rh D nolo l g y YD Socie, y : ' *"** "" '" ™* ^"°^ ^ SIGMA ^OH; 
M0M "«'OlO^OSEPH d ^|NE« . . ^BROOKLYN. N ™ YORK ; Bachelor of Architecture; 

MOOBERRY, LINDA LEE . MACKINAW; B.S. in Home Economics; 4-H HOUSE; Omicron Nu; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Ph, Upsilon Omicron; W.A.A. (I, 2, 3, 4); Freshman Advise 
2); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Home Economics Club; Honors Day (1 2 3)- 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

MOORE, DAVID EDGAR ! ONEIDA; B.S. in Agriculture; KING'S ROW; Agricultural Eco- 

nomics Llub; Held and Furrow. 

MOORE, MARTA 2 ANN. .... CUBA; B.S. in Music Education; ALLEN HALL; Concert Band 



MOORE, MOLLY ALEXANDRIA VIRGINIA; B.A. in L.A.S., Politcial Science; KAPPA ALPHA 

THETA; Y.W.C.A. Committee (1); Campus Chest (2); House President (3, 4). 

MORENO, JAIME^ _ BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; University 

MORGAN, MARILYN JO . BLOOMINGTON; B.A. in L.A.S., English; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; 

lllini Union Committee (3); University iheatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (1, 2). 

MORLEY, LYNN . CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; GAMMA PHI BETA; Torch; Shi-Ai- 

Alpha Lambda Delta; lllmi Union Committee (1, 2); Star Course Manager 1); Stu- 
dent Senate (1, 2); Freshman Council; Freshman Adviser (3); Honors Day (2). 

MORRIS, MILDRED ANN . .HIGHLAND PARK; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA EPSI- 

LUN PHI; Freshman Adviser (4). 

MORRISON. MARY BAKER ... .HIGHLAND PARK; Bachelor of Music; PI BETA PHI; Sigma 

Honors nf'' ,Tnr, Ch0 ; r ,P' 3 ' 4); Universi, y Chorus (2); Young Republicans Club; 
Honors Day (3); Oberlin College. 

MORTON, MARGARET ANN . MT. STERLING; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; McKINLEY HALL; 

;, W , C -A. Committee (3); McKinley Foundation Student Council (2); Commerce Council 
[J, 4); Sno-Ball Committee (2); Business Education Club. 

MOSILLO, THOMAS OWEN . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE- 

Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Tau Sigma; M.R.H.A. (4); House President (A) A.S.M E- Honors 
Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois 

MOSNY, IBWtttt^. _ . CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; BETA SIGMA PSI; University 

MOSS, JOHN HARRY WILMETTE; B.S. in Marketing; THETA CHI; The lllio (2, 3); Freshman 

Adviser (3, 4); Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Marketing Club; Society for he Ad 
vancement of Management; University of Michigan. V ° 

MOSS, MICHAEL HERBERT . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; ALPHA EPSILON PI- Hillel 

Foundation Student Council (4); Drake University. 

MOUNT, JOHN THOMAS . . . . CARLYLE; B.S. in Marketing; DELTA CHI; Star and Scroll- Delta 

F eshman'' AHviser ^ 5 , 6 #T 9 .? r { Wll ln,erfraf emit y Council Executive Council '(12); 
rresnman Adviser (2); Marketing Club. 

MOY, RAYMOND YIN CHEW CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering. 

MOYER, FREDERICK DERR . CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; THETA XI; Gargoyle- 

r/" ; ' U , e » P J ; „ Ph o, E '? S ' 9ma; Scarab '- Junior Interfratemity Council \\). 

vfser f 2 3 9 'T) en A I A and A ( s'r 2 F ); h"* and A PP[ ie dArts Council (4, 5); Veshman A6- 

ship Key ' AS - C - E ' ; Honors Da V <', 2, 4); University of Illinois Scholar- 

MUELLER, DON LEROY . PEORIA; B.S in Engineering Physics; BARTON HOUSE; Pi Mu 

Epsilon; First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1) 

MUIRHEAD, JAMES SEGNER . . PLATO CENTER; B.S. in Chemistry; THETA CHI; Phi Eta Sigma; 

Ph, Lambda Upsilon; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key 

MUIRHEAD, PATRIC'A WEBB , URBAN . ^ ^ phj 

Day (12) Lambda Delta; lota Sigma Pi; The Daily lllini (2); Honors 

MULBERRY, ALBERT _ERVW .PIKE . . MOUNT AUBURN; B.S. in Physical Education; TAU KAPPA 

menta? Band [2). ' Y ^^ (2 ' 4); F ° 0,ba " Mana9er "' 2 >' Second Regi- 




523 




MULLETT CHARLES EDWIN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; ALPHA 

CHI RHO; Star and Scroll; lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Campus Chest (2); House 
President (4); Concert Band (1, 2); Football Marching Band (1, 2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

MURDOCK ROBERT CARL URBANA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Captain, Army 

ROTC (3, 4). 

MURRAY, DAVID EUGENE THOMSON; Bachelor of Laws; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; Phi Delta 

Phi, President (4); Trinity College. 



MURRAY JOHN SHERIDAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (2, 3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Cross Country (1); Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 

MUSKAL, JAMES EVANSTON; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; House 

President (3, 4); A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

MUSSMAN, FREDRIC PHILLIP CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; University Theatre Crew (1); 

Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1). 



MYERS PHILIP MARTIN CAIRO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA; 

Y.M.C.A. Cabinet (3, 4); Y.M.C.A. Committee (3, 4); Young Republicans Club. 

MYERS, RONALD KEITH GRIGGSVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; TRI-M HOUSE; Alpha Zefa; 

Alpha Tau Alpha; Agriculture Education Club; Western lllniois University. 



NADZIEJA, 



FRED RONALD CHICAGO; 

Club; Wright Junior College. 



B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Kappa Psi; Marketing 



NASH, REBECCA LEE DANVILLE; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Student National Education Association; Iowa State University. 

NATHANSON LEIGH .... CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English Literature; DELTA PHI EPSILON; 
'lllini Union Committee (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); Little United Nations. 

NAYGEN, JOHN MICHAEL CANTON; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PARK LANE LODGE; 

Honors Day (1). 



NEAL JAMES PRESTON IV CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; KAPPA SIGMA; 

Y.M.C.A. Committee (3); University Chorus (2, 3); Greek Week Committee (3); A.S.M.E.; 
Ohio Wesleyan University. 

NEELMAN, GERALD EUGENE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; FLAGG HOUSE; I.P.C. 

Photography Staff (2, 3, 4). 

NEKRITZ BARRY B CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; VAN DOREN; The Daily 

lllini (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Junior Bar Association; Pre-Law Club. 



NELLIGAN BRENDAN THOMAS CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Engineering Council (4); St. Pat's Ball Committee (4); A.S.C.E.; Mu-San. 

NELSON CLIFFORD MELVIN, JR CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; MEDEA LODGE; 

First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers (3), Presi- 
dent (4); Cyclothem Club; I.A.S.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

NELSON DELMER REYNOLDS CORDOVA; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; KOINONIA; 

A.S.A.E, 



NELSON JOHN ERIC CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; DELTA UPSILON; Wa-Na- 

See- lllini Union Board (4); Major Chairman International Programs lllini Union Com- 
mittee (3); Student Senate (4); Committee on Student Affairs (4); Coordination Com- 
mittee (4); Wright Junior College; Pensacola Junior College. 

NELSON PHILIP ALAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; SIGMA PHI DELTA; 

Sigma Tau; Pi Tau Sigma; Freshman Adviser (3); Lieutenant, J.G., NROTC (3, 4); 
A.S.A.E.; S.A.E. 

NELSON RONALD WARREN OAK LAWN; B.S. in Management; Sigma lota Epsilon, Presi- 

' dent (4); W.P.G.U. (1); Society for the Advancement of Management. 



NEMSICK JOHN JOSEPH CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; En- 
gineering Council (4); St. Pat's Ball Committee (4); I.T.E.; St. Mary's College. 

NEUHAUSER PAUL GEORGE SKOKIE; B.S. in Marketing; MOORE HOUSE; House President 

' (3); Freshman Adviser (4); Marketing Club (4); Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

NICCOLAI, RAYMOND JOSEPH OAK PARK; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES 

HOUSE; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; St. Joseph's College. 



NICHOLAS PAUL PETER CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Chemistry; SHAWNEE; A.C.S.; German 

' Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

NICHOLS CHARLES DAVY CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Management; DELTA UPSILON; Foot- 
ball, Freshman Varsity Squad; Society for the Advancement of Management; Lawrence 
College. 

NICKEL RONALD GLENVIEW; B.S. in Accountancy; FLAGG HOUSE; Alpha Kappa Psi; 

Beta Alpha Psi, President (4); Freshman Week Committee (3); Freshman Adviser (3); 
Accountancy Club; Honors Day (2, 3); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



524 



NICOU. GILBERT MATHEWS . . JOLIET; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; Chi Gamma Iota; 

M R.H.A (3); House President (3); Freshman Week Committee (3); Freshman Adviser 
(3); Pershing Rifles (1); Rifle and Pistol Club; Teachers-in-Training Club; Joliet Junior 
College. 



NIEMANN, CONRAD RICHARD ELMWOOD PARK BFA 

SIGMA PHI. 



Industrial Design; DELTA 
NIEMI, DORIAN ARVO . . . NAPERVILLE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 






NILSSON, JERRY RAGNER <?™ C *?°> B -S- in Forestry; M.R.H.A. (1, 2); House President 

(3); Forestry Club, President (4). 

NOERO, VICENTE . . . CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

A.b.C.fc.; Colombian Students Association; University of the Andes. 

NOLAN, ROBERT JAMES . . . . CHICAGO; B.S in Mechanical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 
House President, Cosine Club (3); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202^ 



NOGGLE, THOMAS BRUCE ELMHURST; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON- 

Alpha Delta Sigma; W.P.G.U (1, 2 3, 4); Concert Band (4); Football Marching Band 
(1, 2 3, 4); First Regimental Band (I, 2, 3); WILL (3, 4); Marketing Club; Young 
Republicans Club. 

NORDSIECK, RICHARD ARNOLD URBANA; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; PHI SIGMA 

EPSILON; Sigma Tau; Sigma Gamma Tau; Engineering Council (4); |!a S • Honors 
Day (3, 4). 

NORTON, JAMES AUSTIN .... ROCK FALLS; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; SIGMA NU; Freshman 
Council; Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4). 



NORTON, STEPHEN LEONARD SIBLEY; B.S. in Food Technology; ACACIA- Second Reai- 

mental Band (2); Men's Glee Club (1, 2, 3). oecona Kegi 

NOUBAR, NINA ARMEN CHICAGO; B.S. in Home Economics; BUSEY HALL- The lllio (2)- 

lllini Union Committee (2); Sno-Ball Committee (2); Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Exten- 
sion of the University of Illinois. 

NUDELMAN, ADRIANNE CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Social Studies; ALLEN HALL- Young 

Democrats Club. M 



NUSSBAUM, JAMES GORDON JOLIET; B.S. in Accountancy; MOORE'S HOUSE; Alpha Kappa 

Psi; Accountancy Club; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Joliet Junior College. 

OAKWOOD, ELIZABETH DOROTHY WESTERN SPRINGS; B.S. in Physical Education- lllini 

Union Committee (2); W.A.A. (1); Physical Education Majors Club. 

O'BRIEN, NANCY FUNKHOUSER CHARLESTON; B.S. in Agriculture- ALPHA DELTA PI- Shi 

Ai; Phi Upsilon Omicron; The Daily lllini (1, 2); S.N.I.B. (2, 3, 4); Plowbov 'Prom 
Committee (2); Home Economics Club. 



O'DONNELL, JOHN WAYNE JOLIET; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; FORBES HOUSE. 

OGNIBENE, JUDITH ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; ALLEN HALL; Wright Junior 

College. 

OHLSON, JUDITH LOUISE ROCHELLE; B.S. in Elementary Education; PRESBYTERIAN HALL- 

Mini Union Committee (3); University Chorus (1); Student National Education Asso- 
ciation; University of Illinois College of Nursing; University of Wisconsin. 



i.S. in Electrical Engineering; TRIANGLE; Sigma Tau; 



OKON, WALTER JOHN JOLIET 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

O'LEARY, ROBERT THOMAS . . OTTAWA; B.S. in General Engineering; I.S.G.E.; LaSalle-Peru- 

Oglesby Junior College. 

OLIN, CAROL JUNE ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA XI DELTA- Shi-Ai- 
Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (12); Department Head, lllini Union (4); lllini Union 
Committee (1 2 3); University Theatre Crew (1); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2); House 
President (4); Military Ball Committee (3); Honors Day (1). 



OLIILA, RICHARD GIIBERT . CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; THETA XI- lllini 

sSr C dTnd , & , (3f , i); W l i .A t r Ba " C ° mmittee (3,; ^ A " **» ™Wt 

OLSON, MAX . . ALTONA; B.S in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Junior Interfraternitv 

Cru^ l Ho ( oh^ r, Ho l r t n Ur c l .u^ UnCil (3 " ^^ """" C ° mmit,ee (2 »'' ^'OS& 

OLSON, ROBE^ W.LUAM^. . _ EVA NSTON; B.S. in Finance; PS, UPSILON; Alpha Kappa Psi; 



ONDRLA, JUDITH JOSEPHINE BERWYN; B.S. in Communications; ALLEN HALL- Illinois 

Technograph (4); Morton Junior College. 

ONODERA, ROBERT KOJI HONOLULU, HAWAII; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; University 

of Hawaii; Art Institute of Chicago. a ' university 

OSMAN, MER B E e D ™ Coliege • GLEN ELLYN; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; 





OSORIO, ANIBAl BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; Colombian 

Students' Club; University of the Andes. 

OSTERMEIER, ROBERT CHARLES CHATHAM; B.S. in Agriculture; BETA SIGMA PSI. 

OSTROWSKI ALFRED JOSEPH CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ILLIN1 LODGE; Navy 

Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Football (1, 2), Letter (2); Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 



OTTO RONALD LEE LOCKPORT; B.A. in L.A.S., History; NOBLE HOUSE; M.R.H.A. Execu- 
tive Council (4); House President (4); Student Senate (3); Society for the Advancement 
of Management; Young Republicans Club. 

OZOLINS, ELFA CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; McKINLEY HALL; A. I. A.; Wright 

Junior College; Roosevelt University. 

PABEN, PAUL THOMAS QUINCY; B.S. in Marketing; SIGMA PI; Skull and Crescent, Presi- 
dent (2); Interfraternity Executive Council (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); 
Freshman Week Committee (3, 4); Major, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (2); 
Marketing Club; Honors Day (3); West Point Military Academy. 



PALM, PATRICK JOSEPH CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; FORBES HOUSE; Marketing Club; 

Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

PANEK ARLENE VALENTINE CHICAGO; B.S. in Education for Mentally Handicapped 

Children; ALPHA DFLTA PI; The lllio (2); lllini Union Committee (1); Freshman Adviser 
(4); Young Democrats Club. 

PARK, CHUNG HO SEOUL, KOREA; B.S. in Chemistry; WESMEN; A.C.S.; Honors Day (1, 

2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



PARKER JUDSON FLOYD LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA; B.S. in L.A.S., Physics; WESMEN; 

Tomahawk, President (2); Phi Eta Sigma; Concert Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Football Marching 
Band (1, 2, 3); Wesley Foundation Student Council; Honors Day (1). 

PARKER NANCY KAY MAROA; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI MU; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (2, 3); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1); W.A.A. Board (2, 3); W.A.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Freshman Adviser (4); Physical Education Majors Club. 

PARMALEE, JANET MAE WATSEKA; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; EVANS HALL; Elmhurst 

College; Illinois Institute of Technology. 



PARRISH JOHN BRETT PONTIAC; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Beta 

Kappa; Phi Eta Sigma; lllini Campus Amvets Post No. 202; Honors Day (2, 3). 

PASSAGLIA DONALD LOUIS CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; NEWMAN HALL; Delta Sigma 

Pi; The Daily lllini (4); Campus Chest (3); Honors Day (3). 

PASTERIS, ROBERT FRANK JOLIET; B.S. 

Junior College. 



Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Joliet 



PATTEN, CLAUDE ALFRED PLAINFIELD; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; LUNDGREN HOUSE; 

Joliet Junior College. 

PAWLUS, JOHN JOSEPH ROCKFORD; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA SIGMA PHI; Alpha Phi 

Omega; Gymnastics, Varsity Squad (2), Freshman Varsity Squad (1); Marketing Club; 
Society for the Advancement of Management; Young Republicans Club. 

PAYNE, CHARLES CIFFORD OAK LAWN; B.S. in Chemistry; COLLEGE HALL; German Club; 

Illinois Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



PAYNE, MARCIA JOAN LA GRANGE; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA XI DELTA; 

University Theatre Crew (1, 2). 

PEARCE, RONALD DEAN JACKSONVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; THETA CHI; Swimming, 

Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (1, 2). 

PEARMAN, SARA JANE PARIS; B.S. in Home Economics; KAPPA DELTA; Stephens College 



PEARSON LINNEA JUANITA BLUE ISLAND; B.S. in Communications; CEDAR HALL; Kappa 

Tau Alpha; Alpha Delta Sigma; Theta Sigma Phi, President (4); The Daily lllini 
(1, 3); Elmhurst College. 

PECKHAM HAROLD ADDISON MADISON, WISCONSIN: Bachelor of Architecture; ALPHA 

RHO CHI; Freshman Adviser (3); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (4); A.I.A.; 
University of Wisconsin. 

PENNER, PHILLIP BRUCE CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; PHI SIGMA DELTA; lllini Union 

Committee (31; Greek Week Committee (2); Marketing Club. 



PENNIMAN, WILLIAM DAVID KIRKWOOD, MISSOURI; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA; Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Tau Sigma; Illinois Technograph (1, 2), Editor 
(3, 4); Honors Day (1). 

PENNINGTON, JOHN WILLIAM SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES 

HOUSE- Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; Campus Chest (3); M.R.H.A. (2, 3); House 
President (2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (1). 

PENNINGTON, KENNETH, JR CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; ALPHA PHI 

ALPHA; I.A.S. 



526 



PENUELA ALVARO BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; DELTA SIGAAA PHI, 

A.S.C.E.; Colombian Students' Association; University of the Ancles. 

PERKINSON, LEATCN DEE PEORIA; B.S. in Agricultural Finance; NOBLE HALL; Gamma 

Sigma Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; lllini Christian Fellowship (1); Agricultural Economics 
Club; Honors Day (], 2, 3); University of Illinois Scho'arship Key. 

PERRI, THERESE MARIE . . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; DELTA ZETA; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; The Daily lllini (1); lllini Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (2); Honors 
Day (1). 

PERRY, BARBARA JOAN CHICAGO HEIGHTS; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA UPSI- 

lON; lllini Union Committee (3); Student National Education Association; Rosary 
College. 

PERRY, EDWARD EUGENE SALEM; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPHA SIGMA PHI- Wa- 

Na-See; Phi Kappa Epsilon; Tribe of lllini (2, 3, 4); Basketball, Freshman Varsity 
Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, A), Letter (2, 3, A). 

PERSAK, ROBERT ANDREW CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; ALPHA CHI SIGMA- 

Sigma Tau; Phi Lambda Upsilon; A.I.Ch.E.; Honors Day (2). 

PETER. MARY KATHRYN MINFRAL; B.S. in Home Economics; McKINLEY HALL- Wesley 

Foundation Student Council (2); Home Economics Club; Plowboy Prom Committee (3)- 
MacMurray College; University of Colorado. 

PETERLIN, FRANK ADOLPH OGLESBY; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; LaSalle-Peru- 

Oglesby Junior College. 

PETERS, BARBARA JANE ST. JOSEPH; B.S. in Physical Education; McKINLEY HALL 

W.A.A. (1, 2, 3); Physical Education Majors Club; Young Republicans Club; Honors 
Day (1). 

PETERS, SUZANNE ELAINE LA GRANGE; B.F.A. in Painting; CEDAR HALL- Shi-Ai- The 

Daily lllini (!)■ University Theatre Crew (1); Campus Chest (1): Young Republicans 
Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

PETERSON, CAROL MARIE CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA OMICRON 

PI; lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1); Campus Chest (1). 

PETERSON, CAROLYN MARIE LYNN CENTER; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA 

ZETA; Phi Upsilon Omicron; lllini Union Committee (3); House President (4)- 
Women's Glee Club (2, 3); S.N.I.B. (2, 3, A); Home Economics Council (3); Plowboy 
Prom Committee (I, 2, 3); Home Economics Club. 

PETERSON, CYNTHIA ANN ROCKFORD; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; DELTA GAMMA- lllini 

Union Committee (2); Spanish Club; Northern Illinois University. 

PETERSON, LEROY DAVID LOMBARD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; EVANS SCHOLARS- 

Sno-Ball Committee (]); A.S.C.E. 

PETERSON, LINN ALBERT BLANDINSVILLE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering- PRICE CLUB- 

House President (4); A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; Western Illinois State College. 

PETERSON, SYBIL RUTH LOMBARD; B.A. in L.A.S., English; KAPPA ALPHA THETA- The 

Daily lllini (1); llligreek (2). 

PETTIGREW, JOHN CUNNINGHAM CHICAGO; B.S. in City Management; GRANADA CLUB- 

Forsite (1, 2, 3, 4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

PETTINGELL, DIANNE NHSCILLA . . PARK FOREST; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA 

UPSILON; Shi-Ai; Maior Chairman Coffee Hours lllini Union Commitee (3); lllini Union 
Committee (1, 2, 3); Universtiy Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Crew (1 )■ 
Y.W.C.A. (1); W.A.A. (1). " 

PFLUM, CHARLES EDWARD VILLA GROVE; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; Cyclothem Club. 

PHELPS, CLOTILDE YVONNE CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Sociology; ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA- 

Shorter Board; The lllio (2)- House President (2, 4); Student Senate (3, A)- Oratorio 
Society (1, 2); Social Work Club. 

PHILHOWER, PETER PHILIP EAST MOLINE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering- NEWMAN 

HALL; llmois Technograph (1, 2, 3); Engineering Council (4); Military Ball Committee 
)\l ! C , h ?'^? n ' St ' , Pat ' s BaM Committee (4); Ensign, Navy ROTC (3, A); Navy Council 
(2); A.S.M.E.; I.A.S.; Honors Day (1). 

PHILLIPS, BRUCE ALAN CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Microbiology; ARMORY HOUSE- Fresh- 

man Adviser (3); Armed Forces Amateur Radio Club (2, 3). 

PIERCE, NANCY GAYE MOLINE; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMFGA- The 

lllio (1, 2); lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1)- YWCA Com- 
mittee (1). 

PILCH, MARY ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; THETA UPSILON- lllini Union 

Committee (4); University Theatre Crew (2); Wright Junior College. ' 

PINE, HARVEY STANFORD LINCOLNWOOD; B.S. in Accountancy; PRAETORIANS. 

PINES, GERALD MARVIN BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Communication; ZETA BETA TAU; Sigma 

Delta Ch,,- The Daily lllini (3); W.P.G.U. (2, 3); WILL (4); Miami University. 

PINNEY, ROBERT IVAN SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; Cyclothem Club. 




527 




PIPPINS EMMA L MAYWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., English; DELTA SIGMA THETA; The Daily 

lllini (2, 3). 

PISZEK, PAMELA ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of History; CHI OMEGA; lllini Union 

Committee (I); Campus Chest (1); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1). 

PITEIKA, RUTH ANN BERWYN; B.S. in Home Economics; LEEMAN LODGE; Y.W.C.A. 

Cabinet (3); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 2); Freshman Adviser (3). 



PLACKO, DUANE RICHARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; Marketing Club; Wright 

Junior College. 

PLAUTZ, HAROLD CURTIS PROPHETSTOWN; B.S. in Urban Land Economics; ACACIA; 

Football, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Captain, Air Force ROTC 
(3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4). 

PLEASANT, MARILYN LEE NEOGA; B.S. in Communications; PHILEA; Theta Sigma Phi; 

Honors Day (2); Southern Illinois University. 



PLESKYS, BIRUTE ALDONA CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Physiology; ALLEN HALL; Omega 

Beta Pi; German Club; Lithuanian Students' Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Exten- 
sion of the University of Illinois. 

PODESZWA, JOHN JOSEPH ROCKFORD; B.S. in Management; WIKIA; Alpha Kappa Psi; 

House President (3); Society for the Advancement of Management; Young Republicans 
Club; Honors Day (1, 3); University of Kansas City. 

PODLIN GEORGE JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; CHI PHI; Skull and Crescent. 



PODOLSKY, JOSEPH LEONARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE 

Delta Sigma Rho; W.P.G.U. (3); M.I. A. Executive Council (4); Student Senate (4) 
Committee on Student Affairs (4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.. 
lllini Forensic Association; Praetorians; Honors Day (1, 2); Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

POKORNY, ROBERT JOSEPH BERWYN; B.S. in L.A.S., Botany; SIGMA TAU GAMMA; 

Phi Eta Sigma; The lllio (2, 3); Honors Day (1). 

POLKOFF, ELEANOR CAROL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; BUSEY HALL; 

University Theatre Cast (3); University Theatre Crew (3); W.P.G.U. (3); WILL (3); 
German Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 



POMBERT, JACK LEE KANKAKEE; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; CAGLE HALL; House 

President (3); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); University of Dayton. 

POOL, LARRY JOE ST. FRANCISVILLE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; EL PATIO; A.I.E.E.- 
I.R.E.; Eastern Illinois University 

POPP, JOAN LOIS NEENAH, WISCONSIN; B.A. in L.A.S., Sociology; University Chorus 

(3); Sociology Club; Marquette University. 



POPPE, RONALD MARTIN ANCHOR; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. 

POSLOSKY MAXINE MARSHA CLAYTON, MISSOURI; B.S. in Communications; DELTA PHI 

EPSILON; Shi-Ai; Gamma Alpha Chi; Junior Panhellenic Executive Council (1); Pan- 
hellenic Ball Committee (1); Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1). 

POSSELT, STUART LOOMIS MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN; Bachelor of Architecture; BARTON 

PLACE; lllini Union Committee (5); M.R.H.A. (3, 4, 5); M.R.H.A. Executive Council (5); 
A. I. A.; Young Republicans Club. 



POTTS SANDRA LOU PEKIN; B.A. in L.A.S., English; KAPPA DELTA; University Theatre 

Crew (1); Y.W.C.A. (2, 3, 4) 

POWERS, BRUCE FRANK CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; EBEL HALL; I. U.S. A. Barber- 
shoppers; A.C.S.; German Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Honors Day (3, 4); 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

POWERS, ELLEN CARYL STREATOR; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; DELTA GAMMA; Gamma 

Alpha Chi. 



PRESS, JERRY LEE KIRKWOOD; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Western 

Illinois University. 

PRICE, ANNE MARIE NEOGA; B.S. in Secretarial Training; PHILEA; Alpha Chron; House 

President (4); Commerce Council (1, 2, 3, 4). 

PRIETO, ULADISLAO VILLAVICENCIO, COLOMBIA; B.S. Civil Engineering; Chi Epsilon; 

A.S.C.E.; Colombian Students' Club; University of the Andes. 



PRIMROSE, DALE RIVER FOREST; B.S. in Elementary Education; CHI OMEGA; University 

of Kentucky. 

PRUITT, BEVERLY ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; DELTA SIGMA THETA; Uni- 
versity Chorus (3); French Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Student National 
Education Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

PU, ARTHUR TA-SHIANG TAIPEI, CHINA; B.S. In Electrical Engineering; Alpha Phi 

Omega; Chinese Students Club; Hamline University. 



528 



PURZE, JEROME CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA EPSILON PI; Freshman Council; 

Marketing Club. 

PYATT, ROGER ALLEN PINCKNEYVILLE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Sigma Tau; Tau 

Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; Honors Day (3, 4); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; 
Bronze Tablet; Harris Teachers and Junior College; Baylor University. 

QUARTETTI, RALPH WILLIAM . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Delta Sigma; The Daily 

lllini (3, A); Marketing Club. 



QUINN, LAURA ELEANOR . CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; PI BETA PHI; Sigma 

Alpha Nu; Orchesis (1, A); Bradley University. 

RADEMACHER LON DIETRIG , . HILLSBORO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; SIGMA CHI; Football 

Manager (1); Dolphins (3 4; Greek Week Committee (2); Ensign NROTC (3, 4); Navy 
Council (3); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); Trident (3, 4); Honors Day (3). 

RADER, LYNNE DIANE ..... LA GRANGE PARK; B.S. in Home Economics Education; PHI MU; 
Nlim Union Committee (2, 3); S.N.I. B. (2, 3); lllini Christian Fellowship (2, 3, 4) 
Home Economics Club; Lyons Township Junior College. 



RAJEWSKI, GLORIA ANN. . . ELMHURST; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; SHERWOOD 
LODGE; lllini Union Committee 2; University Theatre Crew (1 2)- Y W C A Com 
mittee (2); WAA (1. 2); L.A.S. Council (1, 2, 3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee H 2); 'Young 
Republicans Club (2); University of Wisconsin. U 

RANTIS, GEORGE CHARLES . OAK PARK; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; KAPPA SIGMA; 

Football, Freshman Varsity Squad (1); Track, Freshman Varsity Squad (1)- Younq 
Democrats Club. B 

RAUEN, LARRY JOSEPH CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; Scarab; AIA- Wriqht 

Junior College. ' 



RAYBURN, SANDRA BETH CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Home Economics; SIGMA KAPPA- Phi 

Upsilon Omicron; First Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, A); S.N.I.B. (2); Home Economics Club. 

REA, MYRNA ALENE^ .... AURORA; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA ZETA- Phi 
Upsilon Omicron; Home Economics Club; Illinois State Normal University. 

READ, COURTNEY SUSANNAH BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Recreation; PI BETA PHI- lllini 

Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Star Course Manager (1); 
Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); American Recreational Society, U. of I. Student 
Chapter. 



READLE, ELMER LEE CHENOA; B.S. in Agriculture; BRIARWOOD; University Theatre Crew 

(4); Field and Furrow; Illinois State Normal University. 

RECHTORIS, RUTH ELIZABETH CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; EVANS HALL- 

Wright Junior College. 

REED, CORDELL . . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; HOPKINS HOUSE; ASME- 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of llinois. 



REED, DONNA LEE . . . CHICAGO; B.A. in Elementary Education; EVANS HALL- Navy Pier 

Alumni Association; Student National Education Association; Young Republicans Club- 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

REED, VIRGIL LESTER, JR DECATUR; B.S. in Management; NOBLE HOUSE- M R H A (4)- 

Ji ou , s . e Resident (4); University Chorus (1); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Ch'i Eta 
(J, 4); Society tor the Advancement of Management. 

REEDER, THOMAS MACKLIN . CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; ALPHA KAPPA 

LAMBDA; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu; Concert Band (1, 2); Football 
/ r m' n9 - B c n u d , (, V 2); University Choir (4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (3); University 
of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



MANHATTAN; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Joliet Junior 



REEVES, HOWARD ESTES . 

College. 

REEVES, JANET KAY . . MOLINE- B^S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA; Shorter 

Board; Torch; The llho (1, 2); lllini Union Board, Director (4); Major Chairman lllini 
Relations II mi Union Committee (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); University Theatre 
Manager ( 1 ), ' 

REGENTZ, RICHARD DALE . . PEKIN; B.S. in Economics; SIGMA PI; Sachem; Skull and 

Crescent; House President (4). 



REHLING, CHARLES JOHN. CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

A. Kb.; A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

REICHMAN, DONALD LEWIS ...CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; S.I E S • Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

REINBOLD, NORMAN WAYNE .... PALESTINE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.F.S.; ASME - 
b.A.fc.; Vincennes University. "' 



REINERS, ROBERT HAROLD GIBSON CITY; B.S. in Agriculture; NABOR HOUSE; Alpha 

Zeta; S.N.I.B. (3); Plowboy Prom Committee (2, 3, 4).- Sno-Ball Committee (3); Cap- 
tain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Hoof and Horn Club; Honors Day (1). 

RE.NHARDT, CHARLES FRANK ... MASCOUTAH; B.S in Engineering Physics; BARTON HOUSE; 

Sigma lau; Phi Eta Sigma; Honors Day (I, 2). 

REINTS, ROBE ""« l .«- ■ ■ • ■ • SYCAMORE; BS in Agricultural Engineering; HOPKINS HOUSE; 
Tau Beta Pi.; A.S.A.E.; Honors Day (2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 




529 




REISMAN, ARTHUR LEE CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; CAMPUS VIEW LODGE; 

University Chorus (1); Praetorians, President (4). 

RETEL, ROBERT EDWARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; Junior Swimming Man- 
ager (3). 

RETTKO SUSAN JANE DE PUE; B.S. in Elementary Education; KAPPA DELTA; The lllio 

(1, 2); Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (2, 3); Y.W.C.A. Committee (2, 3, 4). 

RHODES, CHARLES RUSSELL VILLA PARK; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; PHI KAPPA SIGMA; 

lllini Union Committee (3); Football Marching Band (2, 3, 4, 5); First Regimental 
Band (2 3, 4, 5); A. I. A.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

RICH, SHIRLEE JUDITH CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; INDECO; University Theatre 

Crew (3); WILL (3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (2); Indiana University. 

RIDDLE, LES PAUL EUREKA- B.S. in Engineering Physics; LONESOME PINE; House Presi- 
dent (3); Honors Day (1). 



RIECKS, KENNETH WILLIAM SAYBROOK; B.S. in Agriculture; KINGS ROW; Agricultural 

Economics Club. 

RIEMER, JOHN MARVIN ELMHURST; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; M.R.H.A. 

(3); A.S.C.E.; llli-Knights; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

RIMLAND, TEMA BEVERLY CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; ARBOR SUITES; Uni- 
versity Theatre Crew (4); Spanish Club; Young Democrats Club. 

RINKEN, JOAN ADRIEN CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; CEDAR HALL; Accountancy 

Club; Marketing Club; Thornton Junior College; Northwestern University. 

RIODAN, NORMAN CLEMENT REDDICK; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 

RIPLEY, WILLIAM FRANKLIN .... MONTICELLO, INDIANA; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; Purdue 
University. 

RISER, VIRGINIA EFTING PARK RIDGE; B.A. in L.A.S., English; KAPPA DELTA; Mortar 

Board; Torch; Shi-Ai; Alpha Lambda Delta; The lllio (1); lllini Union Committee (4); 
Panhellenic Executive Council (2, 3), President (4); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordinating 
Committee (4); House President (3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); Honors Day 
(1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

RISSKY, JAMES JOHN CICERO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; FORBES HOUSE; lllini Christian 

Fellowship (4); Morton Junior College; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illi- 
nois. 

RIZZO, FRANK JOSEPH MORTON GROVE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

Sigma Tau; Chi Epsilon; St. Pat's Ball Committee (4); A.S.C.E.; Honors Day (4); Navy 
Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROBB, DONALD ALLEN ROCKFORD; B.S. in Agriculture; Concert Band (4); Football March- 
ing Band (3, 4); First Regimental Band (3); Northern Illinois University. 

ROBBINS, RONALD BRIAN OAK PARK; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; ALPHA EPSILON PI; 

Wa-Na-See; Y.M.C.A. Committee (2); Student Senate (2); University Religious Council 
(2); Hillel Foundation Student Council, President (3); Little United Nations; Western 
Reserve University; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROBERTS, PHILIP ARLEIGH KEWANEE; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; THETA CHI; lllini 

Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1). 

ROBINS DONALD ANTON CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; BETA SIGMA PSI; 

A.F.S.; S.A.E. 

ROBINSON, JOHN WILLIAM LINCOLN; B.S. in Commerce and Law; NEWMAN HALL; 

Phi Alpha Delta; Junior Bar Association; Lincoln College. 

ROBINSON, SHEILA CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; IOTA ALPHI PI; University 

Theatre Crew (1, 2, 3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Hillel Foundation Student 
Council (1, 2, 3); Young Democrats Club; Dophin Queen; Honors Day (1, 3). 

ROBISON, CAROL SUE MORTON; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA DELTA 

DELTA; Mask and Bauble; Phi Upsilon Omicron; University Theatre Manager (2, 3); 
University Theatre Cast (2); University Theatre Crew (1); S.N.I.B. (1); Greek Week 
Committee (2); Home Economics Club; Spring Musical; Honors Day (2). 

ROBISON, ELSIE LOU MORTON; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Mask and Bauble; Phi Upsilon Omicron; University Theatre Manager (2, 3); University 
Theatre Cast (2); University Theatre Crew (1); S.N.I.B. (1); Home Economics Club; 
Spring Musical; Honors Day (2). 

ROCHELLS, ANDREW JEROME CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; KAPPA SIGMA; Skull and 

Crescent; University Theatre Crew (1); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Marketing 
Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University 
of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

ROCKWELL ROBERT IRVING CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Economics; NOBLE HALL; lllini 

Christian Fellowship (3, 4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Young Republicans Club; 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROEMER GEORGE HERBERT CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; Tau Beta Pi; 

A.I.Ch.E.; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROGAN, GEORGE WILLIAM HIGHWOOD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 



530 



ROLLINS, PATRICIA ALMA ... ROCKFORD; B.S. in Communications; Alpha Sigma Alpha; 

Delta Sigma Omicron; Rockford College; Missouri State Teachers College. 

ROPERS, BARBARA ANN . . . PEORIA; B.S. in Communications; DELTA DELTA DELTA; Mortar 
Board; Torch; Gamma Alpha Chi; Theta Sigma Phi; The lllio (1, 2, 3); Star Course 
Manager (1); Marketing Club; Panhellenic Rush Evaluation Committee (3); Honors 

RORER, NANCY JEANE DIXON; B.A. in Teaching of Spanish; EVANS HALL; University 

Theatre Crew (1); W.A.A. (1); Spanish Club; University of Madrid. university 



ROSEN, IRWIN ... CHICAGO; B.S in Teaching of Speech; FORBES HOUSE; Delta Sigma Rho; 

University Theatre Crew (3); W.P.G.U. (3); I Mini Forensic Association; Navy Pier 
Alumni Association; Praetorians; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROSENBERG ROCHELLE MYRA . . CHICAGO; BS. in L.A.S., Psychology; EVANS HALL; Sno- 

Ball Comm tee (3); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versiiy ot 1 1 1 inois. 



ROSENFELDT MARVIN ARTHUR ..... OAK PARK; B.S. in Marketing; Navy Pier Extension o 
University of Illinois. 



f the 



ROSENTHAL, LYLE STEPHEN ... CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; GARNER HOUSE- 
University Theatre Cast (3); Hillel Foundation Student Council (4); Honors Day (!)• 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROSS, ADA GERTRUDE OAK PARK; B.S. in Physical Education; LINDEN HALL; Alpha 

Sigma Nu, President (4); Physical Education Majors Club; Honors Day (2, 3). 

ROSS, EDWARD THURBER SKOKIE; B.S in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 



ROSS, MARILYN EVELYN . . . MAYWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; CHI OMEGA; Theta 
Sigma Phi; Student Senate (2); University of Wisconsin. 

ROSS, WILLIAM DAVID . CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA EPSILON PI; Captain, Army 

KUIC (3, 4); Drake University. * 

ROST, GEORGE MICHAEL . . . . NEW PALTZ, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., Mathematics; GARNER 
„f°K, ; 9 , a t 9 T a ?™' c ' on ; German Club; Princeton University; State University 
ot New York Teachers College. 



ROSTETTER, LAWRENCE JOHN . . PEORIA HEIGHTS; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; TAU KAPPA 

EPSLON; The Daily II in, (2); Student Senate (2, 3); LAS Council (2); Young Re- 
publicans Club; St. Louis University. 

ROTH, LARRY DWIGHT . . ... EL PASO; B.S. in Agriculture; KING'S ROW; Freshman Adviser 
(3); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha (4). 

ROTH, MARTIN LEE . CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; WIKIA; Intramural Manager (3); 

French Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



ROTH, RICHARD^OSWALD WAUPUN; B.S. in City Planning; Forsite (2, 3, 4); University of 

ROTHEISER, MIMNIM . LINCOLNWOOD; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; B.S. in Industrial 

Engineering; The Daily llini (3, 4); M.R.H.A. (3); House President (3); I.D.SA- 
b.l.t.S.; Northwestern University. 

ROTHENBERG FRED .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; PRAETORIANS; Accountancy Club 
4); Honors Day 3 ; University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 



ROTHERT, DIANA DIXON . . RACINE, WISCONSIN; B.S. in Teaching of French; DELTA DELTA 

DELIA; University of Wisconsin; University of Colorado. 

ROTT, DONNA JEAN .LISLE; B.S. in Recreation; ALLEN HALL; University Theatre Crew (1): 

American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter; Young Republicans Club. 

ROTTER, JOANNE . . HIGHWOOD; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; ALPHA EPSILON PHI- Zeta 

Phi Eta; llhni Union Committee (3); Campus Chest (2); University of Colorado. 



ROTTER, MICHAEL THEODORE CHICAGO- B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; A.S.M.E, Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ROTZ, WILLIAM MICHAEL . KEWANEE; B.S. in Communications; Sno-Ball Committee (3); 

Marketing Club; Elmhurst College. 

ROZINSKY, JOHN PAUL . . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy ARMORY HOUSE; Alpha Kappa 

Psi; Accountancy Club; llhni Forensic Association; Honors Day (2, 3); De Paul Uni- 
versity; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. "e raui uni 



RUNGE, CLYDEJUBEM OHO ST. PETER; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club; 

RUNTZ, JOSEPH JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing. 

RUPPEL, RICHARD ALLEN . BEARDSTOWN: B S. in Electrical Engineering; Tau Beta Pi; Fta 

Lfolarsftp Key! C ° m ™»^ 0, 4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois 




531 




RUSH, HENRY JAMES EVANSTON; B.S. in Accountancy; University Theatre Crew (3); Ac- 
countancy Club; Finance Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

RUSSELL, GEORGE EDWARD HILLSBORO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; Honors Day (I). 

RUSSELL, JANE PARKER PEORIA; B.A. in L.A.S., History; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; Campus 

Chest (3); lllini Union Committee (3); Terrapin (3); Smith College. 

RUSSELL, ROBERT JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Veterinary Medicine; GARNER HALL; Ameri- 
can Veterinary Medical; Student Chapter Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau 
Sigma; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

RUSSELL RONALD LEE TINLEY PARK; B.S. in Forestry. 

RUSSO, THOMAS FRANK NILES; B.S. in Physical Fducation; ILLINI LODGE; Navy Pier 

Alumni Association; Navy Pier Basketball, Letter (2); Baseball, Navy Pier (4); Navy Pier 
Lettermen's Club (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

RUTTER, DARRELL EDWARD LOMBARD; B.S. in Accountancy; GARNER HOUSE; House 

President (4); Accountancy Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

RUYLE, JAMES BECKER ELMHURST; B.A. in L.A.S., Anthropology; PHI GAMMA DELTA; 

Wa-Na-See; I.P.C. Photography Staff (1); McKinley Foundation Student Council (3, 4); 
Lieutenant Junior Grade, NROTC (3, 4). 

RUZA, JANICE ELLEN WILMETTE; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; PALAMAR; Navy Pier Ex- 
tension of the University of Illinois. 

RYAN, DANNA JEAN .... OAK PARK; Bachelor in Music; BUSEY HALL; University Chorus (2); 
Oratorio Society (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3). 

RYDER, HARL EDGAR, JR MOUNT VERNON; B.S. in Accountancy; HOPKINS HOUSE; Beta 

Alpha Psi; Accountancy Club; Mount Vernon Community College. 

SADEWATER, RONALD WOODROW ROCKFORD; B.A., in Teaching of Social Studies; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; Honors Day (1, 3). 

SAER, JAMES RIDGLEY CARY; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA DELTA PHI; Alpha Phi Omega; 

The Daily lllini (2); Field and Furrow. 

SALAZAR, PEDRO NEL MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineernig; University of 

the Andes. 

SALVATO, JOSEPH CHARLES CHICAGO; B.S. in Mining Engineering; FLAGG HOUSE; 

M.I.S.; Young Republicans Club; Swimming Team (2); Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 

SANDEEN, JOHN ANDREW CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; St. Olafa; 

Wright Junior College. 

SANDLER, ALAN JAY EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Communications; TAU EPSILON PHI; Star 

and Scroll; Alpha Delta Sigma; lllini Union Committee (1, 2). 

SANQUIST, JEANINE RUTH CAMBRIDGE; B.S. in Home Economics; PHI MU; Mask and 

Bauble; University Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Plowboy Prom 
Committee (2), Co-Chairman (3); Home Economics Club. 

SARWINSKI, RAYMOND JOSEPH PERU; B.S. in Engineering Physics; Physics Society; 

LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College. 

SATTEM, DAVID NORMAN METAMORA; B.A. in L.A.S., History; DELTA TAU DELTA; Omega 

Beta Pi. 

SATTERTHWAITE, HARRY LEONARD VANDALIA; B.S. in Agriculture; WIKIA; Field and 

Furrow; Young Republicans Club. 

SAULE, JAMES ROY VILLA PARK; Bachelor of Architecture; A. I. A.; University of Arkansas. 

SCHAECKENBACH, GEORGE LEE CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FLAGG HOUSE; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SCHAEFER, DAVID ARTHUR ALTON; B.S. in L.A.S., Geology; THE MANSION; Alpha Phi 

Omega; Cyclothem Club, President (4). 

SCHAEFFER PRISCILLA LAIRD METROPOLIS; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; PHILEA; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; House President (3); University Chorus (1); Lutheran Students' 
Foundation Student Council (2); Freshman Adviser (2); Honors Day (I, 2). 

SCHAEFER ROBERT STEPHEN FOX LAKE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Engineering Council (2, 3); Flying Club; Mu-San, President (3); Honors Day 
(1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

SCHATZ HAROLD STEVEN WEST BEND, WISCONSIN; Bachelor of Architecture; TWIN 

ESTATES; University Theatre Crew (1); University Chorus (1, 2, 3, 4); A.I. A.; University 
of Wisconsin. 



532 



SCHAUFF, CHARLENE JOYCE DEER GROVE; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINDEN HALL- 

Mt. St. Clare College. 

SCHAUNER, GEORGE JOSEPH VILLA PARK; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; M.I.S. 

SCHECK, CHARLES SPRINGER CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; EXMOOR HALL; 

University Lutheran Chapel Student Council (3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Gamma Delta, Presi- 
dent (4); Honors Day (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SCHIELE, RUSSEL JOSEPH CICERO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PI KAPPA ALPHA- The 

Daily lllini (1); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); A.S.C.E. 

SCHINDEL, ELAINE ROSE CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; ALLEN HALL; Student 

National Education Association; Honors Day (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

SCHLIFKE, GORDON ABEL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI SIGMA DELTA. 

SCHLUETER, DONALD KAY MOLINE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; TRIANGLE; Junior 

Interfraternity Council (3); A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; St. Ambrose College. 

SCHMEICHEl, MARYLYN ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in Home Economics; ZETA TAU ALPHA; 

Home Economics Club; Valparaiso University. 

SCHMIDT, JEANNE CAROLINE ELMHURST; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; ZETA TAU ALPHA- 

Albion College. 



SCHMIDT, ROBERT PAUL KANKAKEE; B.S. in Accountancy; SIGMA CHI; Basketball, Fresh- 
man Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi 
Chi Era (3, 4). 

SCHMUCKY, HANS JOSEPH ASTORIA, NEW YORK; B.S. in Management; Honors Day (2). 

SCHNEIDER, THEODORE CLYDE SKOKIE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

A.S.C.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SCHRAM, WILLIAM ANTHONY, JR MIDLOTHIAL; B.S. in Physical Education; Wrestling 

Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Freshman Varsity Squad; Physical Education Majors Club. 

SCHRAMM, WALTER MILTON EDWARDSVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; DELTA CHI; 

Star and Scroll; lllini Union Board (3, 4); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Interfraternity 
Executive Council (3, 4); House President (3, 4); Student Senate (1, 2, 3, 4); Coordi- 
nation Committee (3, 4); IM Rec Board (3, 4); Interfraternity Ball Committee (3)- 
Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Navy Council (1). 

SCHREINER, CAROL SUE DIXON; B.A. in Teaching of English; ALLEN HALL; lllini Union 

Committee (3, 4); Oratorio Society (3, 4); French Club; North Central College. 

SCHROEDER, DUANE HERBERT GRAND RIDGE; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; S.N.I. B. 

(1, 2, 3); Agricultural Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club- 
Young Republicans Club. 

SCHROEDER, LEAH SCHROTBERGER GLEN ELLYN; B.A. in L.A.S., History DELTA ZETA- 

Alpha Lambda Delta (1); Honors Day (1, 2). 

SCHROEDER, RAYMOND LEON COWLING; B.A. in L.A.S., History; ALPHA CHI RHO; lllini 

Union Committee (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); First Lieutenant Army ROTC 
(3, 4); Young Republicans Club. 

SCHUBERT, WILLIAM LORENZ TRENTON; B.S. in Agriculture; LONESOME PINE; A.S.A.E. 

SCHULTZ, BRUCE SHERWOOD CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design; TAU DELTA PHI- 

Omega Beta Pi; lllini Union Commitee (1, 2); University Theatre Crew (4); Inter- 
fraternity Executive Council (2, 3); Junior Interfraternity Council (1). 

SCHULTZ, FINIS WILLIAM JERSEYVILLE; B.S. in Agricultural Engineering; Alpha Zeta- 

Agricultural Council (4); Engineering Council (4); St. Pat's Ball Committee (4)- 
A.S.A.E., President (4). 

SCHULTZ, WAYNE LEE PERU; B.S. in Management; SATYR HOUSE; LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby 

Junior College. 

SCHWANTES E. DOUGLAS, JR GLENCOE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; ARMORY HOUSE- 

The Daily lllini (3); A.S.C.E.; Middlebury College. 

SCHWARTZ, ARTHUR WARREN WAUWATOSA, WISCONSIN; Bachelor of Architecture- 

U.S A. Barbershoppers (2); Lutheran Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3)- Phalanx 
(3); A. I. A.; University of Wisconsin. 

SCOTT, GAYLAND OMER . FAIRFIELD; B.S. in Physical Education; Lieutenant Colonel, Air 

Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4). 

SEARING, DONNA LUCILLE .... LINCOLNWOOD; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINDEN HALL- 
Alpha Chron; Kappa Delta Pi; University Theatre Crew (1, 2); WGS Executive 
Council (3); House President (3); Sno-Ball Committee (2, 3); Student National Educa- 
tion Association; Young Republicans Club. 

SEARS, FRANCES^ ANN ROCK ISLAND; B.A. in L.A.S., English; EVANS HALL; Orchesis 




533 




SEDLACEK GEORGE JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ILLINI LODGE; Navy 

Pier Alumni Association; Baseball Team, Navy Pier (1, 2, 3), Letter (4); Baseball Cap- 
tain (2); Host of lllini (1, 2); Physical Education Majors Club; Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 

SEIBERLING, DAVID HARRY JOLIET; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics; SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON; 

Junior Interfraternity Council (2); Cornell College. 

SEILER, DANIEL JOHN PEORIA; B.S. in Management; PHI DELTA THETA; Sachem; Skull 

and Crescent; Phi Alpha Mu; Board of Fraternity Affairs (2, 3); Interfraternity Execu- 
tive Council (1, 2, 3); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Student Senate (3); Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs (3); Greek Week Committee (2); Interfraternity Ball Com- 
mittee (1, 2, 3, 4); Major, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phi Chi Eta (3 A), President (4); Society 
for the Advancement of Management; De Pauw University. 

SEIZINGER, HOWARD WILLIAM CAIRO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; BETA SIGMA PSI; 

Lutheran Foundation Student Council, President (3); Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); 
Arnold Air Society (4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

SELEGA, ISABELLA MARIA CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Social Studies; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SELLERS, GEORGE JOSEPH BERWYN; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; ALPHA CHI RHO; 

lllini Union Committee (2, 3 4); A.I.Ch.E. 

SELLMYER, DAVID JULIAN MONEE; B.S. in Engineering Physics; DELTA SIGMA PHI; 

Sigma Tau; Physics Society; Honors Day (2). 

SELLS, SANDRA STEWART WONDER LAKE; B.S. in Recreation; 4-H HOUSE; W.A.A. Board 

(2); W.A.A. (1, 2 3, 4); American Recreation Society U. of I. Student Chapter; 
Physical Education Majors Club 

SEMER, BARRY EDWARD LINCOLNWOOD; B.S. in Accountancy; TAU DELTA PHI; Swim- 
ming Manager (1); Accountancy Club; De Paul University. 

SEMIANCZUK, HELEN MARIE CHICAGO; B.S. in Communications; ALLEN HALL; Gamma 

Alpha Chi; Theta Sigma Phi; University Choir (1, 2); Orchesis (1, 2); Ukranian Students' 
Club; Honors Day (1, 2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SETCHELL, NEAL HOWARD OTTAWA; B.S. in Agriculutre; FARMHOUSE; Alpha Tau Alpha; 

University Theatre Crew (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3, 4); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); 
Agriculture Education Club; Field and Furrow. 

SEYBOLD, JAMES EDWARD WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN; B.S. in Communications; FORBES 

HOUSE; Alpha Phi Omega; Sigma Delta Chi; M.R.H.A. (3); House President (3); Delta 
Sigma Omicron; Gizz Kids; Carroll College. 

SHAFFER, ELIZABETH HAMILTON ELMWOOD PARK; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; Phi Kappa 

Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Lambda Delta; Freshman Adviser (3); lllio Beauty (2); 
Homecoming Queen (3); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship 

Key (3). 

SHAPIRO, PAUL CHARLES VINELAND NEW JERSEY; B.S. in Finance; ZETA BETA TAU; 

Cempus Chest (1). 

SHAUGHNESSY, MARY ALICE EVANSTON; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; ALLEN HALL; Uni- 
versity Theatre Crew (1, 2); Russian Language Club; Spanish Club; Young Republicans 
Club. 

SHAVER, ROBERT WILLIAM CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI DELTA THETA; 

Golf, Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (1). 

SHEERIN, JERRY COLMAN CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; THETA CHI; A. I. A. 

SHEFFER, DONALD DAVID DECATUR; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 

SHEPARD, HARVEY KENNETH CHICAGO; B.S. in Physics; FORBES HOUSE; Phi Kappa Phi; 

Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; M.R.H.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Physics Society. 

SHERMAN, THOMAS FILSON ROCKFORD; B.S. in Management; MOORE HALL; Marketing 

Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Milton College; Rockford College. 

SHIERRY, ROBERT STEPHEN ROCK FALLS; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E.; Mu-San; 

Honors Day (1). 

SHILGALIS, THOMAS WALTER KEWANEE; B.S. in Teaching of Mathematics; NEWMAN 

HALL; Pi Mu Epsilon; The Daily lllini (4); Freshman Adviser (4); Physics Society; 
Honors Day (2, 3). 

SHIPP, NANCY JANE PEORIA; B.S. in Accountancy; PRESBY HALL; Beta Gamma Sigma; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Beta Alpha Psi; Commerce Council (4); Accountancy Club; 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

SHISSLER, ROBERT GEORGE ELMWOOD; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI GAMMA DELTA; Sachem; 

Gymnastic Manager (1, 2). 

SHMIKLER, REVA LEAH CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Speech Correction; ALPHA EPSILON PHI; 

Zeta Phi Eta; lllini Union Committee (1, 2, 3, 4); University Religious Council (1, 2, 
3, 4); Hillel Foundation Student Council (4). 

SHOBE, MAX LEON CASEY; B.S. in Agriculture; Agricultural Economics Club. 

SHOGER, ALICE LORRAINE OSWEGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; 4-H HOUSE; Shorter 

Board; Phi Kappa Phi; Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (3); Y.W.C.A. 
Committee (1); W.G.S. Executive Council, President (4); Panhellenic-W.G.S. Coordi- 
nating Committee (4); Student Senate (4); Committee on Student Affairs (4); McKml.-\ 
Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Campus Chest Allocations and Advisory Board (3); 
Young Republicans Club; Honors Day (1, 2). 



534 



SHUFORD, DONNA MILLER CLINTON; B.S. in Home Economics Education; Illinois State 

Normal University. 

SIEGEL, IRIS CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; Campus Chest (1); W.A.A. 

(1, 2, 3); Honors Day (2). 

SIEGRIST, KAREN LEE SAN JOSE; B.S. in Music Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; Uni- 
versity Chorus (2, 3, 4). 



SIGRIST, RICHARD DONALD CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; THE MANSION; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; A.S.C.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

SIMMONS, HARRY DADY, JR ANTHENS, GEORGIA; B.S. in Chemistry; FLAGG HOUSE; Phi 

Lambda Upsilon; Football Marching Band (2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (3 4); 
Second Regimental Band (1, 2); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Phalanx (4); Trident (3 4)- 
Honors Day (3, 4). ' 

SIMON, WILLIAM DANIEL KENOSHA, WISCONSIN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Navy 

Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



SINGER, MERLE JOAN CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; BUSEY HALL; Navy Pier Ex- 
tension of the University of Illinois. 

SINKS, KAYETTA PEORIA; B.A. in Teaching of Fnglish; WESCOGA; Alpha Chron; French 

Club. 

SKAGGS, WILLIAM BROCK HARRISBURG; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI SIGMA KAPPA; 

Star Course Manager (1). 



SKEEN, LYNN ANN AURORA; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; SIGMA KAPPA; The lllio (2, 3); 

lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1); llligreek (]); Terrapin (2); 
Panhellenic Ball Committee (2); Sno-Ball Committee (1). 

SKINNER, SAMUEL KNOX WHEATON; B.S. in Accountancy; PI KAPPA ALPHA; Star and 

Scroll; lllini Union Board (3, 4); Major Chairman State Tournament (3); lllini Union 
Council (3, 4); lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad; 
Commerce Council (3); Intramural Manager (1); Military Ball Committee (3); Captain, 
Army ROTC (3, 4); Zeta Sigma Alpha; Accountancy Club; Finance Club; Pre-Law Club. 

SKLAR, STANLEY PAUL CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Administration; FORBES HOUSE; 

German Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement; Illinois Institute of Technology; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 



SKOGLUND, SHARON LOUISE ROCHELLE; B.A. in Teaching of Speech; PI BETA PHI; Zeta 

Phi Eta; University Theatre Crew (1, 2); Campus Chest (1). 

SLACK, CHARLES EDWARD, III BROOKFIELD; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science- GARNER 

HALL; Y.M.C.A. Committee (3); M.R.H.A. (2, 3); House President (2); Lieutenant NROTC 
(3, 4); Young Republicans Club. 

SLANINKA, THOMAS FRANK CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; NOBLE HALL; 

S.I.E.S.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



SLOAS, MARGARET ELLEN BELLEVILLE; B.A. in L.A.S., English Literature; ALPHA GAMMA 

DELTA; lllini Union Committee (2); Campus Chest (2, 3), Major Chairman (4); Belleville 
Junior College. 

SLOTNIKOFF, JUDITH RAY CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; Phi Beta Kappa; Freshman Adviser (2); German Club; Honors Day (3). 

SMALLWOOD, DONALD LEE FAIRBURY; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Alpha 

Zeta; Agr. cultural Council (3), President (4); Plowboy Prom Committee (2, 3); Agricul- 
tural Economics Club; Hoof and Horn Club; Honors Day (3). 



SMITH, ALBERT EDWARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club; Navy Pier 

Alumni Association; Young Democrats Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

SMITH, BERYL GERALDINE SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Communications; MAPLE HALL- WPGU 

(1, 2, 3, 4); University Theatre Cast (2); WILL (3, 4); Freshman Adviser (3). 

SMITH, CAROLYN SUE CARMI; B.S. in Elementary Education; 4-H HOUSE; Student Na- 
tional Education Association; Lindenwood College. 



SMITH, CHARLOTTE RITA DOWNERS GROVE; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE. 

SMITH, CLYDE FRANK FAIRMOUNT; B.S. in Agriculture,- First Llieutenant, Army ROTC 

(3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4). 

SMITH, DALE ARNOLD CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; Chi Gamma Sigma; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Gamma Delta, President (3); Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of 
the University of Illinois. 



SMITH, DALE EDWIN TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Communications; Alpha Delta Sigma, Presi- 
dent (3, 4); Y.M.C.A. Committee (2); House President (2); Agriculture Club; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Marketing Club. 

SMITH, DONALD LYNN WOOD RIVER; B.S. in Commerce and Law; ALPHA SIGMA PHI- 

Football Marching Band (3); Second Regimental Band (1, 2, 3); Junior Bar Association- 
Marketing Club; Honors Day (1). 

SMITH, JOHN THOMAS ELKHART; B.S. in Agriculture; MEDEA LODGE; Phi Eta Sigma- 

A l-Ag Field Day Committee (2, 3, 4); Agricultural Education Club; Hoof and Horn 
Club; Little United Nations; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); St. Bede's Junior College. 




535 




'%L^ 




21ml 




SMITH, KAREN KATHALEEN KEWANEE; B.S. in Music Education; THETA UPSILON; Sigma 

Alpha lota; lllini Union Committee (4); First Regimental Band (2); University Orchestra 
(1, 2, 3); Honors Day (1). 

SMITH, LYLE DAVID BATAVIA; B.S. in Accountancy; MEDEA LODGE; Beta Alpha Psi; Ac- 
countancy Club; Honors Day (2, 3). 

SMITH, MARGARET ANN ..... CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of English; WESCOGA; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 



SMITH, PHYLLIS KNPGHT FITHIAN; B.S. in Teaching of Biology; THETA UPSILON; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Lambda Delta; Second Regimental Band (1, 2); 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

SMITH, STEVEN ROY GENESEO; B.S. in Agriculture; COLLEGE HALL; Field and Furrow; 

Sportsman's Club, President (3, 4). 

SMITH, TED FRED ELMHURST; B.S. in Marketing; DELTA PHI; Alpha Kappa Psi; Junior 

Interfraternity Council (1); Freshman Adviser (3, 4); lllini Sportsman's Club; Mar- 
keting Club; Young Republicans Club, President (3). 



SMITH, WILLIAM VAN HORN EMPORIA, KANSAS; B.A. in L.A.S., History; GARNER 

HOUSE; Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia; M.R.H.A. (4); Concert Band (4); Football Marching 
Band (4); Kansas State Teachers College. 

SMITHING, WILLIAM PAUL ELGIN; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Kappa Psi; lllini Campus 

Amvets Post No. 202; lllini Insurance Society; Marketing Club; Honors Day (3); Elgin 
Community College. 

SNODGRASS, RICHARD PRYCE GENESEO; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE; Alpha Zeta; 

Phi Eta Sigma; S.N.I.B. (1, 2}; Agricultural Council (4); Lieutenant Colonel, Army 
ROTC (3, 4); Army Council (4); Field and Furrow, President (4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); 
University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



SNOW, ROBERT ADRIAN, JR WINNFTKA; B.S. in Finance; SIGMA NU; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); House President (4); Track Freshman Varsity 
Squad; Freshman Adviser (2); Marketing Club; Rho Epsilon. 

SNYDERS, EUGENE RAPHAEL BATCHTOWN; B.S. in Accountancy; NEWMAN HALL; Campus 

Chest (3); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Pershing Rifles (1, 2, 3, 4); Accountancy Club; 
Honors Day (2). 



SOBIESK, NORMAN MICHAEL CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., History; lllini 

lion; Loyola University of Chicago. 



Forensic Associa- 



SOMMERFIELD, CARLA JOYCE RIVER FOREST; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINDEN HALL; 

Gamma Delta; Student National Education Association; Young Republicans Club. 

SORRELLS, LINDA MARY SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI MU; W.A.A. Board 

(3, 4); W.A.A. (2); Physical Fducation Majors Club; Springfield Junior College. 

SORRELLS, THOMAS EDWARD HILLVIEW; B.S. in Agriculture; PHI SIGMA EPSILON; Alpha 

Tau Alpha; Agricultural Council (3, 4); Agricultural Education Club, President (3). 



SOTO MALDONADO, ALFREDO BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Colom- 
bian Students' Association, President (4); University of the Andes. 

SPACHMAN, JAMES JOSEPH BERWYN; B.S. in Ceramic Engineering; SIGMA PHI DELTA; 

Keramos; Morton Junior College. 

SPADARO, JOSEPH CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; NOBLE HOUSE; Alpha Delta Sigma; 

W.P.G.U. (3); M.R.H.A (3); M.R.H.A. Ball, Chairman (3); Marketing Club; Navy Pier 
Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



SPA1DE, JOANNE KAY FREEPORT; B.S. in Home Economics; McKINLEY HALL; Seabury 

Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Plowboy Prom Committee (2); Home Economics 
Club. 

SPEES, CAROLYN LEE ELMHURST; B.S. in Recreation; CHI OMEGA; lllini Union Committee 

(1); Star Course Manager (1); American Recreational Society U. of I. Student Chapter. 

SPILLMAN, CHARLES KENNARD SUMNER; B.S. in Agriculture Engineering; A.S.A.E.; 

Vincennes University. 



SPRAGUE, RONALD KAY TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA; B.S. in Mining Engineering; EL PATIO; 

M.R.H.A. (1); Engineering Council (3, 4); Lieutenant Colonel, Army ROTC (3, 4); 
Pershing Rifles (1); M.I.S. 

SPRY, ROBERT JAMES MIAMISBURG, OHIO; B.S. in Engineering Physics; BARTON PLACE; 

Tau Beta Pi; Physics Society; Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

SQUIRES, ROBERT REGINALD ATLANTA, GEORGIA; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; PHI SIGMA 

KAPPA; Alpha Phi Omega; Georgia Institute of Technology. 



STACELL, NELDA LOU STREATOR; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; SIGMA KAPPA; Shi-Ai; 

University Theatre Manager (2); University Theatre Crew (1). 

STACKHOUSE, CAROLE KAY TUSCOLA; B.A. in L.A.S., French; CHI OMEGA; Shorter 

Board; Torch; lllini Union Committee (1); Star Course Manager (2, 3); Y.W.C.A. (1, 2); 
House President (3, 4); LAS Council (1, 2). 

STAES, JAMES PAUL MOLINE; B.S. in Finance; DELTA TAU DELTA; lllini Union Committee 

(1, 2, 3); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Trident (3, 4); Finance Club; lllini Insurance Society. 



536 



STANKAITIS, LOUIS CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; A.I.A.; Lithuanian Students- 
Association; Herzl Junior College. 

STANLEY, ANN WATSEKA; B.A. in L.A.S., English; CHI OMEGA. 



STANLEY; WIILARD HARRISON STERLING; BS i 

LODGE; A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; North Central College. 



Mechanical Engineering; MEDEA 



STAUB, DENNISON PALMER . . ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI; B.S. in Physical Education; Tomahawk; 

Delta Theta Epsilon President (4); Football, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad 
(2, 3, 4); Physical Education Majors Club. 



STEFANICH, MARY KATHRYN STERLING; B.A. in L.A.S. 

LODGE; Spanish Club; New York University. 



Latin-American Studies; LOWRY 



STEIGER, ROBERT STEVEN DANVILLE; B.S. in Industrial Administration; PHI EPSILON PI- 

lllini Union Committee (1); Y.M.C.A. Committee (1); Accountancy Club; A I E E -I R E '• 
Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of Management; Washington University! 



STEINAM, EDWIN JOHN, JR CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Speech; PHI KAPPA SIGMA- Uni- 
versity Theatre Cast (3); University Theatre Crew (3); W.P.G.U. (1, 2, 3, 4). 

STEINBERG; BENJAMIN BRUCE ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Economics; PI LAMBDA PHI; lllini 
Union Committee (2; First Regimental Band (1, 2, 3, 4); Football Marching Band (1, 
i., 3); Spring Musical. 

STELLE, JERRY DALE ... KANKAKEE; B.S. in Management; DELTA PHI; Star and Scroll- 

lllini Union Committee (1); Interfraternity Executive Council (3, 4); Junior Inter- 

traternity Council (1); House President (3, 4); Marketing Club; Society for the 
Advancement of Management. 



STELMACHOWSKI ARLEEN PATRICIA .... CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Bacteriology; LEEMAN 
LODGE; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

STEPHENSON MARILYN JANE .... SADORUS; B.S. in Elementary Education; SIGMA SIGMA 
SIGMA; Mini Union Committee (2, 3, A), Major Chairman (3); Freshman Adviser 14); 
Student National Education Association. 

STERRETT, ELIZABETH ELLEN KENILWORTH; B.A. in L.A.S., History; KAPPA ALPHA THETA- 

Star Course Manager (1); Terrapin (1); Little United Nations. 



STEVENSON, JOHN ADAMS, JR. .... DANVILLE; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; SIGMA ALPHA 
EPSILON; House President (4); Baseball, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2 
Club' Freshman Varsity Squad; Intramural Manager (4); lllini Sportsman's 

STEWARD, PAUL JOSEPH . CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; ARMORY HOUSE; University 

Theatre Crew (4); Marketing Club. 

STEWART, GEORGE LAWRENCE RIVER FOREST; B.S. in Accountancy; NEWMAN HALL- 

Accountancy Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



STICKEl, KENNETH ALFRED .... TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; KING'S KASTLE; House 
President (2); Commerce Council (2, 3); Accountancy Club; Little United Nations; 
Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (1). 

STICKGOLD, MARC . . . WILMETTE; B.A. in L.A.S., History; GARNER HOUSE; University 
Iheatre Crew (3, 4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Honors Day (1 2)- Navv Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

STICKLING, JOHN EDWARD . . PEORIA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering- House President (4); 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; lllini Campus Amvets Post No 202. 



STIMPERT, SHIRLEY ANNE EL PASO; B.S. in Secretarial Training; LINDEN HALL. 

STONE, FRED JOHN, JR SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 

STONE, REVA RAE .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; IOTA ALPHA PI- lllini 
Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (1, 2); House President (4); Freshman Adviser (3)- 
Young Democrats Club. 



STONE, RICHARD DANIEL ..... EAST MOLINE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; TRIANGLE- 
Junior Interrfaternity Council (3); A.S.M.E.; S.A.E.; St. Ambrose College 

STORCK, DALE HERMAN CHARLES NASHVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture- TEN-O-ONE CLUB. 

House President (4); S.N.I.B. (3, 4); Field and Furrow; Honors Day (2). ' 

STOUT. JERRY LEE . . BEMENT; B.S. in Management, COLLEGE HALL; Baseball, Freshman 

Varsity Squad; Society for the Advancement of Management; Honors Day (I). 



STOVER, SUSAN ANN CENTRALIA; B.S. in Accountancy; LINCOLN AVENUE RESIDENCE- 

Disciples Foundation Student Council (1, 2); Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment. =* 

STRAKA, JOY KATHERINE CICERO; B.F.A. in Art Education; ALPHA GAMMA DELTA- 

The II ho (2 3); llmi Union Board (4); lllini Union Department Head (4); lllini Union 
Comm, ee 2 3); Y.W.C.A Committee (3); Campus Chest (2, 3); Freshman Week 
Committee 4; Freshman Adviser (4); Greek Week Committee (2, 3); Panhellenic Ball 
Committee (3); Honors Day (2, 3); Rosary College. rannenenic Ban 

STRAUSS, RICHARD MYRON . . . NEW YORK, NEW YORK; B.S. in Physical Education; PRAE- 

TORIANS; Pershing Rifles (1); Praetorians (2, 3, 4). 




"3L ^1 Jh 








537 




STRIET JOHN FRANK BROOKFIELD; B.S. in Marketnig; MEDEA LODGE; lllini Forensic 

Association; Little United Nations; Marketing Club. 

STRIMLING RICHARD BARRY CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Psychology; German Club; Prae- 
torians; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

STRODE JOSEPH ROGER MAGNOLIA; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; Phi Kappa Phi; 

Sigma Tau; A.F.S.; Honors Day (3); United States Coast Guard Academy. 



STROHMAN, IOREN DALE GENESEO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; COLLEGE HALL; 

House President (4); Second Regimental Band (I, 2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.t. 

STROUD, FRANKLIN LYLE SOMONAUK; B.S in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI GAMMA DELTA; 

Men's Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Knox College. 

STROUGAL, EDWARD JOSEPH LA GRANGE PARK; B.S. in Civil Engineering; FLAGG 

HOUSE; Sigma Tau; Phi Eta Sigma; Chi Epsilon; Honors Day (1, 2, 4); University 
of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



STUART, GORDON FAY BATH, NEW YORK; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; 

Illinois Campus Amvets Post No. 202. 

STUCKER CAROLYN SUE .... WAUKEGAN; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA GAMMA; 
STU , Torch; Shi Ai ; Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); Little United 

Nations (1); Honors Day (I, 2). 

SULDA, LEO LAWRENCE CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Administration; A.S.M.E. 



SULLIVAN DAVID RAYMOND .... PARK RIDGE; B.A. in L.A.S., Finance; Finance Club; lllini 
' Insurance Society; lllini Sportsman's Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

SULLIVAN EILEEN MARGARET PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Elementary Education; THETA UPSI- 

LON; lllini Union Committee (3, 4); Student National Education Association; Marquette 
University. 

SULLIVAN JAMES OWEN CHICAGO; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; CHI PSI; lllini Union 

Committee (2); Star Course Manager (1); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E. 



SURBER, J. D STANFORD; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Phi Epsilon 

Kappa. 
SUSIC, ANTHONY STEPHEN SUMMIT; B.S. in Management; De Paul University. 

SUTTER FREDERICK MICHAEL, JR CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; GRANADA CLUB; 

A.I.A.; Young Republicans Club; Wright Junior College; Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 



SWALLOW ROBERT FRANK LOMBARD; B.S. in Restaurant Management; DELTA KAPPA 

' EPSILON- Navy Pier Alumni Association; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Elmhurst College; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Chicago. 

SWANSON, ALLEN KEITH UTICA; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; GARNER HOUSE; 

LaSalle-Peru-Oglesby Junior College. 

SWANSON CAROL SUE BYRON; B.S. in Speech Correction; SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA; Zeta 

Phi Eta. 



SWANSON DENNIS DARRYL SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Communications; SIGMA CHI; Ma- 
Wan-Da; Sachem; W.P.G.U. (4); Tribe of lllini (3, 4); Basketball Manager (1, 2, 3); 
Athletic Council (4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); A.I.Ch.E. 

SWANSON LINNEA ANN CHICAGO; B.S. in Speech Correction; LOWRY LODGE; Alpha 

' Lambda Delta; Zeta Phi Eta; lllini Christian Fellowship (1, 2, 3, 4); Illi-Sota; Honors 
Day (1). 

SWANSCN MARJORIE ANN MEDIA; B.S. in Home Economics; McKINLEY HALL; Phi 

' Epsilon Omicron; Lutheran Foundation Student Council (3, 4); Home Economics Club; 
Carthage College. 



SWARTZ JOEL CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of History; FORBES HOUSE; Wrestling, Varsity 

Squad (4), Freshman Varsity Squad (3); Little United Nations; Young Democrats Club; 
Wright Junior College. 

SWEENEY, JACK THOMAS CHARLESTON; B.S. in Agriculture; KAMPUS KNIGHTS; Field 

and Furrow; Eastern Illinois College. 

TADIN ANTHONY SPIRO PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Civil Engineering; NEWMAN HALL; 

A.S.C.E.; Roosevelt University; Illinois Institute of Technology. 



TAMPA GEORGE R BLUE ISLAND; B.S. in Industrial Administration; NOBLE HOUSE; 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Society for the Advancement of Management; Thornton Junior 
College. 

TAN, BEE LENG SINGAPORE, MALAYA; B.S. In L.A.S., Mathematics; VANLIG; Hawaii 

Club; Chinese Students Club. 

TAN, KWANG GUN TAIWAN, CHINA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

Arkansas Agricultural and Mining College. 



538 



TARGUM, STEVEN JOSEPH . BELLE HARBOR, NEW YORK; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PHI 

SIGMA DELTA; lllini Union Committee (2); Student Senate (3). 

TASSISTRO, CARL RALPH . CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; PRICE CLUB; Omega Beta Pi- 

Honors Day (2); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

TATOIAN, VAHAN CHARLES CHICAGO; B.S. in Marketing; FIRESIDE; Alpha Delta Sigma; 

House President 3); Marketing Club; Society for the Advancement of Management 
Wright Junior College; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

TEMPLE, RONALD EUGENE ... .. PEKIN; B.S. in Industrial Administration; GARNER HOUSE; 
M.R.H.A. 3); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Society for the Advancement of Management; Society 
of General Engineers. 

TEMPLE, VIRGINIA CHAMPAIGN; B.A. in Education; B.A. in Journalism- ALPHA CHI 

OMGEA; Theta Sigma Chi (3, 4); The Daily lllini (,') ; The lllio (1 . 2); University Theatre 
Crew (1); Star Course Manager (1 2); Panhelllenic-W.G.S. Coordinating Committee (2); 
University Chorus 1 3); llhgreek (1); S.N.I.B. (3, 4); Freshman Week Committee 2 ■ 
Freshman Adviser (2). 

TERZIAN, GEORGE ALEXANDER . CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPINE; Football 

Freshman Varsity Souad, Varsity Squad (2); lllini Campus Amvets Post No 202- 
Ihornton Junior College. 

TEWS, MARY JO ... SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Elementary Education; ALPHA DELTA PI- Kappa 

Delta Pi; lllini Union Committee (I, 2); Women's Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Student Na- 
tional Education Association; Honors Day (I, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship 
Key. 

THUKER, I'NDELL^ ERNEST LOUISVILLE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; BRIARWOOD; 

THOMAS, CHARLES RUEL ... VIRDEN; B.S. in Management; PHI DELTA THETA; Society for 

the Advancement of Management, President (4); University of Arizona. 

THOMAS LUCIA FRISK .... SCARESDALE, NEW YORK; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; ALLEN 
HALL; House President (4); Bradford Junior College. 

THOMAS, SUSAN ANN . . . HIGHWOOD; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA- 

House President, Walnut Hall (4); Beloit College. ' 

THOMPSON .MARSHALL RAY ... BROWNING; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Phi Eta Sigma; 
Chi Epsilon; A.S.C.E., President (4); Honors Day (1, 3). 

THORBURN EVA ELLIS . . URBANA; B.S. in Communications; University Theatre Cast (4); 

WILL (3, 4); Indiana University. 

THORNBERRY CAROLE COUSLEY ALTON; B.S. in Communications; PRESBY HALL- lllini 

Union Committee (2). 

THORNTON, JOSEPH ERNEST PEORIA; B.S. in Electrical Engineering,- A.I.E.E-IRE 

President (4); Honors Day (1). 

THURBER, JOHN RAY . -FARMER CITY; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; 509 CLUB; House 

President (2); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

TICE, ANN . . GREEN VIEW; B.S. in Home Economics Education; DELTA ZETA; University 

Theatre Crew (1); Campus Chest (1); Home Economics Club; Rifle and Pistol Club- 
Young Republicans Club. 

TIEDJE, PATRICIA ANNE RIVERSIDE; B.S. in Communications; DELTA ZETA; Shi-Ai ; Mask 

Tw!r2l '% Un '°", Co 1 7 1 T ltte ? 0.2)1 Universtiy Theatre Manager (3); University 
WIU TV n A 'd'u 3 'm 4) < U D m M e ; sitv Thea,re Crew 0, 2, 3); Campus Chest (1, 2); 
WILL-TV (3, 4); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1, 2). 

TIETZ. GERALD FRANCIS . . . SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Accountancy; PHI DELTA THETA; The Daily 

lllini (4); Campus Chest (2); House President (4); Men's Glee Club (1, 2, 3). 

TINNEY, ROGER WARREN . WATERLOO; Bachelor of Architecture; LAMBDA CHI ALPHA- 

Star and Scroll; lllini Union Committee (1); Greek Week (3); Military Ball Committee 

Society (3 4). A? A" 6 (3 ' 4); Air F ° rCe Council (4); Arnold Ai ' 

TOBOR, BARBARA ARLENE ... WILMETTE; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; LINDEN HALL; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; llim Union Committee (4); W.G.S. Executive Council (3 4- Hillel 
Foundation Student Council (2, 3); Freshman Steering Committee; Honors Day (I). 

TOLLE, ALVIN WILLIAM . . STEUBENVILLE, OHIO; B.S. in Recreation; ALPHA DELTA PHI- 
Tomahawk; Alpha Phi Omega; lllini Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1 )'■ 
American Recreational Society, U. of I. Student Chapter. 

TOLLIVER, RONALD JOE .... LAWRENCEVILLE; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering,- CHI PSI- 
lllini Union Committee (1); Star Course Manager (1); I.A.S. 

TOMASKO, RAYMOND RICHARD . . STREATOR; B.S. in Civil Engineering,- EXMOOR HALL- 

Phi Eta Sigma (1),- House President (4); A.S.C.E.; lllini Sportsmen's Club; LLE. 

TOMKINSON, JOAN CAROL . . . PEORIA; B.S. in Communications,- SIGMA KAPPA- University 
Theatre Crew (2); S.N.I.B. (3, 4); Illinois Wesleyan University. University 

TOUGH JAMES THOMAS PARK RIDGE- B S in Pkv.Ir. tucta yi , 

8532 iocietT 6 Presiden * ™^™^i^G£i ^cfflsra 

TOWER. »VjD. =e ... ; . SYCAMORE; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; M.I.S.; Northern 







539 




TRAVIS THEODORE OAK PARK; B.S. in Finance; GARNER HALL; M.R.H.A. (3, 4); Finance 

Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

TREFIl JAMES STANLEY BERWYN; B.S. in Physics; FORBFS HOUSE; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 

Beta Kappa; Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; M.R.H.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); House President 
(2, 3); M.R.H.A. Executive Committee (3, 4); Student Senate (3); Oratorio Society (1); 
Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

TRESLO, GUS H CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; NOBLE HOUSE; A.F.S.; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; A.S.M.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 



TRICE, ISAIAH JOLIET; B.S. in Physical Education; Physical Education Majors Club; Uni- 
versity of Denver. 

TRILK, MARIAN ELSIE RIVERSIDE; B.F.A. in Art Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; lllini 

Union Committee (1); Oratorio Society (1); Terrapin (1). 

TRIPP, ROBERT SHIMMIN BELVIDERE; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; DELTA PHI; Star 

and Scroll; Alpha Eta Rho; Tribe of lllini (3, 4); Fencing, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), 
Letter (3, 4), Freshman Varsity Squad; Football Marching Band (1, 2); First Regimental 
Band (1, 2); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Flying Club; I.A.S.; Scimitar; Cornell College. 



TROUSIL, THOMAS FRANK JOLIET; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; ALPHA CHI SIGMA; 

Wa-Na-See; Alpha Chi Sigma; Wrestling, Varsity Squad (3, 4), Letter (3); Tribe of 
lllini (2, 3, 4); Freshman Adviser (2); A.I.Ch.E. 

TROUT, HAROLD ROBERT WILMINGTON; B.S. in General Engineering; S.A.E.; I.S.G.E., 

President (4); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

TROUTMAN LARRY LEON BRADLEY; B.S. in Accountancy; Accountancy Club; A.S.C.E.; 

Olivet College. 



TRUCKENBRODT CHARLES DAVID ELMHURST; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; PHI KAPPA 

SIGMA; The lllio (1, 2 3); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

TRULL, GEORGE BRUCE JACKSONVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; BETA THETA PI; Sachem; 

The lllio (1, 2, 3); Dolphins (2); Commerce Council (3); Ordnance Club (4); Ac- 
countancy Club; Finance Club. 

TUCKER, CAROLE ARDELIA CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; ALLEN HALL; lllini Union 

Committee (4); German Club; Spanish Club. 



TUITE, MARGO HELTON CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; French Club; Honors Day 

(1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

TULLIS, CAROLYN SUE FAIRFIELD; B.S. in Elementary Education; BETA HOUSE; Baptist 

Student Union Student Council (2, 3, 4); lllini Christian Fellowship (1, 2, 3, 4); Stu- 
dent National Education Association. 

TULLY, THOMAS FRANCIS HONOLULU, HAWAII; Bachelor of Architecture; FORBES 

HOUSE; A. I. A.; University of Hawaii. 



TUN, TIN RANGOON BURMA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E. 

TUNNICLIFF, ROBERT PAYNE QUINCY; B.S. in Agriculture; PSI UPSILON; Hoof and 

Horn Club. 

TURNER, SARAH LOUISE TOULON; B.S. in L.A.S., English; ALPHA DELTA PI; The Daily 

lllini (2); University Theatre Crew (3); Greek Week Committee (3); Little United Nations. 



TURNER WILLIAM RAYMOND ELDORADO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; FORBES 

HOUSE; M.R.H.A. (4). 

TUSHAUS, WILLIAM RALPH . . . . BLOOMINGTON; B.S. in Communications; DELTA SIGMA PHI; 
Alpha Delta Sigma; lllini Union Committee (4); Junior Interfraternity Council (3); St. 
Joseph College. 

TYNDALL, HUGH ALLEN WESTCHESTER; B.S. in Economics; FLAGG HOUSE; M.R.H.A. (3, 4); 

Student Senate (3, 4); Committee on Student Affiairs (4); Coordination Committee, 
Chairman (4); Lyons Township Junior College. 



UHLMAN, WILLIAM GEORGE TREMONT; B.S. in Agriculture; Alpha Tau Alpha; University 

Chorus (3, 4); Agricultural Economcis Club; Agricultural Education Club; Western 
Illinois University. 

UNEY, MARIE SONIA CHICAGO; B.A. in English; VANLIG; Alpha Lambda Delta; Orchesis, 

President (2); Honors Day (1, 2); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois; University of Chicago. 

UNISON, JOHN DREW CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; TRIANGLE; First Lieu- 
tenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers (2, 3, 4); A.S.M.E. 



URBAN, GWENDOLYN DAVIES BERWYN; Bachelor of Architecture; A. I. A.; Navy Pier 

Extension of the University of Illinois. 



URBAN, RONALD HENRY 



ARGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; Dolphins (1, 2); I.A.S. 



URDANETA, GERMAN IGNACIO BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; PI 

KAPPA ALPHA; Colombian Students' Club; University of Los Andes. 



540 



URE, WILLIAM EDWARD CHICAGO; B.S. in Management; FORBES HALL; Alpha Kappa Psi; 

M.R.H.A. (3); Marketing Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management; Northwestern University; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. ' 

VANDEMORE JAMES JUDE GENESEO; B.S. in Electrical Engineernig; A.I.E.E.-I R E ■ lllini 

Campus Amvets Post No. 202. ' """' 

VAN DEURSEN SEYMOUR ROBERT . . SOUTH HOLLAND; B.S. in Civil Engineering; TRIANGLE- 

Star and Scroll; Star Course Manager (2); Cadet Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); A.S.C.e! 

VANDYKE, RANDALL SCOTT . . . CASEY; B.S. in Civil Engineernig; SIGMA PI; A.S.C.E ■ I T E ■ 

Eastern Illinois University. 

VAN KLEEF, DEANNA . CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA; 

Kappa Delta Pi; Northern Illinois University. 

VAN MYNEN RONALD . SOUTH HOLLAND; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; Football March- 

ing ^Band (2, 3, 4); First Regimental Band (2, 3, 4); Second Regimental Band (1); 

VATTHAUER, RICHARD JAMES GREEN VALLEY; B.S. in Agriculture; FARM HOUSE- Alpha 

Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; Track, Freshman Varsity Squad; Freshman 
Adviser (2, 3); Agriculture Economics Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club- 
Honors Day (2). ' 

VAUGHN, GOVONER ... EDWARDSVILLE; B.S. in Physical Education; GARNER HOUSE- 

Sachem; Tribe of lllini (2, 3, 4); Basketball, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (3, 4). 

VAUGHN, ROBERT LEE . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Sociology; Sociology Club; Navy Pier 

Football (2 3), Letter (2, 3); University of Hawaii, Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

VAUGHT, JENNA LEE DANVILLE; B.A. in L.A.S. Speech; DELTA GAMMA; Shorter Board; 

Mask and Bauble; National Collegiate Players; Zeta Phi Eta; lllini Union Committee 
r. 7o IV |[ S '!T • Theatre ^nager (2, 3); Personnel Manager (4); University Theatre 
Cast (2 3; University Theatre Crew; Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); University The- 
ire board (3, A). 

VELASQUEZ, DARO WENCESLAO . . . . MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Colom- 
bian Students' Club; University of the Andes. 

VERMETTE, JAMES E . . . CHICAGO; B S. in L.A.S., Psychology; NOBLE HOUSE; House Presi- 
de^ (3); Tribe of I Mini (3 4); Baseball, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4), Letter (3, 4), Freshman 
varsity Squad; Spanish Club. 

VIGLIOCCO, MATTHEW, JR. COAL CITY; B.S. in Finance; Alpha Kappa Psi; lllini Insurance 

Society, President (4); Joliet Junior College. 

VOHS, CHARLES EDWIN LASALLE; B.S. in Management; PHI SIGMA EPSILON- Society 

tor the Advancement of Management; St. Bede College. 

VOLKSTORF, LOUISE ANNETTE .OAK LAWN; B.S. in Physical Education; VANLIG; Alpha 

Chron; W.A A Board (2 3); W.A.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); House President (4); Terrapin (4) 
Freshman Adviser (2); Physical Education Majors Club. 



VON STOESER, JOANNE CAROLE LAKE VILLA; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; BUSEY HALL- 

Freshman Adviser (4). 

VORONOFF, MELVYN GRAY .... CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; DePaul University; 
Northern Illinois University; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

VOSS, RAYMOND ALEXANDER . CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FLAGG HOUSE- 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

VREELAND, MARIAN MURRAY ... LEROY; B.S in Home Economics; ALPHA PHI; Torch; Alpha 

Chron; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Disciples Foundation Student Council (1, 2, 3); Freshman 
Week Committee (2); Freshman Adviser (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Plowboy 
Prom Committee (1); Home Economics Club; Honors Day (2, 3) 

VYTANOVYCH, ZVENYSLAVA .KA1HERING CHICAGO; B.F.A. in Advertising Design,- 

EVANS HALL,- Society of Illustrators; Honors Day (2); Navy Pier Extension of the 
University of Illinois. 

WACKER, RONALD CHARLES . . EAST ST. LOUIS; B.S. in Marketing; Alpha Kappa Psi; Mar- 

keting Club; Spanish Club. 

WAGNER, GEORGE RICHARD .... McCOOK; B.S. in Engineering Physcis; Sigma Tau; Tau Beta 
Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; Honors Day (3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WAGNER, LOUIS HERMAN . SCHELLER; B.S. in Agriculture; TOWNHOUSE; Alpha Tau Alpha- 

House President (2, 4); Agricultural Education Club; Field and Furrow 

WAIGHT, KENNETH THOMAS JR . . ALEXIS; B.S. in Management and Geography; Phi Eta 

Sigma; Society for the Advancement of Management; Honors Day (1). 

WAITZMAN, JUDITH ARLENE . CHICAGO; B.A in Teaching of Social Studies; LINDEN HALL; 

W.P.G.U. (3); W.G S. Executive Council (3, 4); Student Senate (3, 4); Coordination 
Committee (3 4); University Chorus (2); WILL (3); Hillel Foundation Student Council 
i o> u p n °- Bai ' Committee (4); lllini Forensic Association; Spanish Club; Pier lllini 
(I, 2); Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WAKUZAWA, RAYMOND HARUO HONOLULU, HAWAII; B.S. in Management; University 

ot Hawaii. ' 

WALBAUM, RICHARD S. SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Physical Education; ALPHA TAU OMEGA- 

Skull and Crescent; Interfraternity Executive Committee (3, 4); House President (4)- 
Track; Freshman Varsity Squad (1); Young Republicans Club. l '' 




541 




WALBERG, JANET ALMA HARVEY; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA DELTA DELTA; 

Star Course Manager (1, 2). 

WALDIE BENJAMIN DICKINSON, JR LAKE BLUFF; B.S. in Marketing; PHI KAPPA PSI; 

Golf, Varsity Squad (3, 4), Letter (3, 4); Marketing Club. 

WALKER, THOMAS HENRY HAZEL CREST; B.S. in General Engineering; BETA THETA PI; 

Wa-Na-See; Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Tribe of lllini 
(2, 3, 4); Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (2, 3, 4); Letter (2, 3, 4); 
Dolphins (1, 2, 3, 4), President (3); Freshman Adviser (3) Military Ball Committee (3); 
Lieutenant Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Air Force Council (4); Armed Forces 
Council (4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Scabbard and Blade (3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; 
I.S.G.E. (3, 4); Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



WALL, BERNARD TALBOT BLOOMINGTON; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; DELTA TAU 

DELTA; lllini Union Committee (2, 3); Campus Chest (2); Greek Week Committee (2); 
Junior Bar Association; Pre-Law Club. 

WALL, PATRICIA HONIPUA HAGER KEALAKEKUA, HAWAII; B.A. in L.A.S., Latin Ameri- 

can Studies; ALLEN HALL; Terrapin (2, 3, 4); Southern Methodist University. 

WALLEN, RAYMOND DEAN URBANA; B.S. in Commercial Teaching; Business Education 

Club; Lincoln College. 

WANNINGER, ALBERT MAX CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

M.R.H.A. (4); House President (4); Navy Pier Alumni Association; Honors Day (2); 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WARD JOHN PHILIP CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemical Engineering; ALPHA CHI SIGMA; En- 
gineering Council (1); A.C.S., President (1); A.I.Ch.E.; Navy Pier Alumni Association; 
Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WARREN, JUDITH MAY MAYWOOD; B.S. in Recreation; DELTA GAMMA; University The- 
atre Crew (2); American Recreational Society, U. of I. Student Chapter. 

WATSON, JOSEPH STROUD, JR HINSDALE; Bachelor of Architecture; TAU KAPPA EPSI- 

LON; Fine and Applied Arts Council (4); Military Ball Committee (4); Lieutenant 
Colonel Army ROTC (3, 4); Armed Forces Council (4); Military Council (4); Scabbard 
and Blade (3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers (3); A. I. A.; Georgia Institute 
of Technology. 

WEAVER, DONALD LEE GALESBURG; B.S. in L.A.S., Mathematics; HOPKINS HOUSE; 

House President (3); Western Illinois University. 

WEAVER, MAURICE JOHN LODA; B.S. in Economics; PHI GAMMA DELTA; Skull and 

Crescent; University Theatre Crew (1); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Alumni 
Association Board (1); Military Ball Committee (3); Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); 
Armed Forces Council (3); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Honors Day (1). 

WEBER, DOROTHY LAWRENCE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; DELTA GAMMA; 

lllini Union Committee (2); Honors Day (2); Lawrence College. 

WEBER, GLEN DAVID LONG POINT; B.S. in Agriculture; MOORE HALL; House Presi- 
dent (3); Agricultural Education Club; Field and Furrow. 

WEBER, RONALD FRANK GILMAN; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; BARTON HOUSE; 

Junior Interfraternity Council; Engineering Council; St. Patrick's Ball Committee (4); 
A.S.M.E. 

WEIDNER, URBAN ANDREW, JR PARK RIDGE; B.S. in Marketing; SIGMA NU; Ma-Wan-Da; 

Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Intramural Manager (2, 3, 4); Senior Intramural 
Manager (4); Athletic Council (4); Captain, Army ROTC (3, 4); Phalanx (4); Marketing 
Club; Young Democrats Club; Honors Day (2 3); Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

WEIHL, CAROL KELLER BELLEVILLE; B.S. in Elementary Education; DFLTA DELTA DELTA; 

The lllio (1); University Theatre Crew (2); Student National Education Association. 

WEINERT, ROBERT WILLIAM CHICAGO; B.S. in Engineering Physics; NEWMAN HALL; 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Physics Society; Honors Day (2); University of Chicago; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois 

WEISBERG, LOUISE GERYL CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Biology; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 
DENCE; Hawaii Club; Russian Language Club; Young Democrats Club. 

WEISENBERGER, JOHN THERON OAK PARK; B.S. in Marketing; ALPHA CHI RHO; Star 

and Scroll; lllini Union Committee (2); Interfraternity Executive Council (2, 3); House 
President (3); Freshman Week Committee (3); Colonel, Air Force ROTC (3, 4); Arnold 
Air Society (3, 4). 

WEISS, CARL DAVID ROXANA; B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering; M.I.S. 

WEISS, STANLEY MAURICE CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; FLAGG HOUSE; 

Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; Freshman Adviser (2); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E. 

WEITZ, JUDITH ANN MORRIS; B.S. in Elementary Education; BUSEY HALL; Wesley 

Foundation Student Council (2); Freshman Adviser (3); Sno-Ball Committee (1); Home 
Economics Club; Honors Day (3). 

WELLEK, RICHARD LEE AURORA; B.S. in Management; PHI EPSILON PI; lllini Union 

Committee (1, 2); Campus Chest (2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Dolphins (I); 
Freshman Adviser (3); Military Ball Committee (3, 4); Lieutenant Colonel, Air Force 
ROTC (3, 4); Arnold Air Society (3, 4); Society for the Advancement of Management; 
Young Democrats Club. 



WELLS, GARY LYNN PORT BYRON; B.S. in Agriculture Engineering; ILLIKNIGHTS; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Gamma Sigma Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; House President (3, 4); A.S.A.E., 
President (5); Honors Day (1, 2, 3, 4); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

WENBERG, BARBARA KAY CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE 

RESIDENCE; W.P.G.U. (3); Iowa State Univeersity. 

WENDELL, KAYE DARLENE NEW HOLLAND; B.S. in Music Education; ALPHA OMICRON 

PI; Sigma Alpha lota; Star Course Manager (I); Orchesis (1). 



542 



WERNER, JOHN RICHARD JOLIET; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; M.R.H.A. 

(3, 4); Joliet Junior College. 

WERTH, ROBERT LEE CHAMPAIGN; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; BETA SIGMA PSI- 

A.I.E.E.-I.R.E. 

WESSON, HESTON KENT LFLAND; B.S in Agriculture; ILLI-DELL; Tomahawk; Alpha Zeta- 

Gamma Sigma Delta; All-Ag Field Day Committee (2, 3); Plowboy Prom Committee 
(1, 2, 3); Sno-Ball Committee (2); Dairy Production Club; Field and Furrow; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Honors Day (1, 2 3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 



WESTROM, JOHN IYIE CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Northern 

Illinois State Teacher's College. 

WHEAT, IARRY UNDER SHELBYVILLF; B.S. in Engineering Physics; ILLIKNIGHTS. 

WHEELER, GERALD FRANCIS CHICAGO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; M.R.H.A. (3); House 

President (3); University Chorus (3); Illinois Technograph (2, 4); A.S.C.E.; Navy Pier 
Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WHITAKER, SHIRLEY KAY HARRISBURG; B.S. in Elementary Education; LEEMAN LODGE; 

Floriculture Club; Student National Education Association; Honors Day (1). 

WHITING, SARAH ISABELLE MAHOMET; B.S. in Special Education of Mentally Handicapped 

Children; PHI MU; First Regimental Band (3, 4); Channing-Murray Foundation Student 
Council (3, 4); German Club; Student National Education Association; Antioch College. 

WHITMAN, CHARLES ELDON KANKAKEE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; HOPKINS 

HOUSE; A.S.M.E.; Synton; University of Cincinnati. 

WHITNEY, GEORGE IVAN ELMWOOD; B.A. in L.A.S., English; PHI GAMMA DELTA; Phi 

Eta Sigma; lllini Union Committee (2, 3); Freshman Adviser (2, 3); Pre-Law Club- 
Honors Day (1, 2). 

WIGHTMAN, NANCY JANE WAUKEGAN; B.A. in L.A.S., French; SIGMA KAPPA- lllini 

Union Committee (1); University Theatre Crew (1 2); Campus Chest (1). 

WIHKSNE, KARIN IRENE CHICAGO; B.S. in Chemistry; ALLEN HALL; Alpha Lambda De!ta; 

A.C.S.; German Club; Honors Day (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WILCOX, ROBERT JOSEPH McLEAN; B.S. in Marketing; FORBES HOUSE; Alpha Kappa Psi, 

Sigma lota Epsilon; Marketing Club; Honors Day (2); Illinois State Normal University'. 

WILDE, DANIEL UNDERWOOD DAYTON, OHIO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering- PHI 

SIGMA KAPPA; Ma-Wan-Da, President (4); Sigma Tau; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma- 

Phi Alpha Mu; Eta Kappa Nu; lllini Union Board, President (4); Major Chairman Block i 

lllini Union Committee (3); lllini Union Council (3); lllini Union Committee (1, 2)- 

Campus Chest Allocations and Advisory Board (4); Colonel, Air Force ROTC (j' 4,' 

Arnod Air Society (3, 4); A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Honors Day (I, 2, 3); University of Illinois 
Scholarship Key (3). 

WILK, BETTY ANN . . CHICAGO; B.S. in L.A.S., Psychology; PHILEA; University Chorus (3); 

Gamma Delta; Student National Education Association; North Park College- Wriqht 
Junior College. 

WILK, CARL JOHN CHICAGO; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Phi Eta Sigma- First 

Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); A.F.S.; A.S.M.E.; Honors Day (1). 

WILL, ROBERT PAUL, JR ZION; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; SIGMA PI; Junior Inter- 

fraternity Council (1); Junior Bar Association; Young Republicans Club; Pre-Law Club. 

WILLETTS, JUDITH ANNE ROCK ISLAND; B.S. in Elementary Education; DELTA ZETA- 

Kappa Delta Pi; lllini Union Committee (2, 3); University Theatre Crew (3); Campus' 
5 s '»!?'' Panhellenic - w -G.S. Coordinating Committee (2); Campus Chest Allocations 
and Advisory Board (3); Sno-Ball Committee (2); Teachers-in-Training Club; Student 
National Education Association; Graceland College. 

WILLIAMS, CAROLE DOLORES CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Political Science; ALPHA XI 

DELTA; Shi-Ai; The lllio (2); lllini Union Committee (1, 3); University Theatre Crew (I)- 
Student Senate (2); Terrapin (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (2); Sno-Ball Committee (1) 
Little United Nations (3); Honors Day (1); Northwestern University. 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH JOYCE CARMI; B.F.A. in Art Education; ALPHA CHI OMEGA- 

lllini Union Committee (1); Campus Chest (2); Air Force ROTC Sponsor (3); Arnold 
Air Society Sponsor (4). 

WILLIAMS, JERRY GAYLOR PADUCAH, KENTUCKY; B.S. in L.A.S., Economics,- PHI KAPPA 

PSI; Phi Eta Sigma; House President (3, 4); Ensign, NROTC (3, 4); Honors Day (1). 

WILLIAMS, MARILYN ANN CHICAGO; B.A. in Teaching of Social Studies; CHI OMEGA- 

The Daily lllini (2); lllini Union Committee (2); University Theatre Crew (2); Campus 
Chest (3); llligreek (1); Freshman Week Committee (3); Freshman Adviser (3)- Greek 
Week Committee (1); LAS Council (2); Little United Nations; Young Republicians Club- 
Mudelein College, 

WIlllFORD, ROBERT MARION MURPHYSBORO; B.S. in Civil Engineering; MR HA (1 2 

3); First Lieutenant, Army ROTC (3, 4); Society of American Military Engineers (2,' 3, 

WILLSON, MICHAEL OWEN . . . CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., English; SIGMA CHI; Studsnt Senate 

(3, 4); Ripon College. 

WILSON, BONITA EILEEN LUDLOW; B.S. in Music Education; LINCOLN AVENUE RES- 
IDENCE; Sigma Alpha Iota; Concert Band (1, 2, 3, 4); University Chorus (2); Oratorio 
Society (2, 3, 4); Freshman Adviser (2). 

WILSON, GERALD ANDERSON CHICAGO; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA CHI RHO; Basket- 

bal -Varsity Squad (3); Agricultural Council (2); All-Ag Field Day Committee (2 3)- 
Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club; Millikin University. 

WILSON, JOHN ROBERT ... FITHIAN; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO; Star and 
Scroll; Alpha Zeta; Gamma Sigma Delta; Agriculture Council (3, 4); Field and Furrow- 
Hoof and Horn Club; Honors Day (1, 2). 




543 




WILSON, NANCY IEE EAST ALTON; B.S. in Elementary Education; PI BETA PHI; Shi-Ai; 

Phi Kappa Phi; Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Lambda Delta; lllini Union Committee (1, 2); 
Panhellenic Executive Council (3); House President (4); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); 
Honors Day (3); University of Illinois Scholarship Key. 

WILSON, SHEILAH RUTH CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of History. 

WILTJER, JAMES RAY MARTINTON; B.S. in Forestry; FARMHOUSE; Alpha Phi Omega; 

Y.M.C.A. Cabinet (4); M.R.H.A. (1); Tennis Manager (3); Agricultural Council (3, 4); 
Major, Air Force ROTC (3, 4). 

WINCHELL, RONALD CYRIL WILMETTE; B.S. in Communications; TAU DELTA PHI; Ma-Wan- 
Da; Sachem; Alpha Delta Sigma; Mask and Bauble; National Collegiate Players; The 
Daily lllini (1); University Theatre Manager (4); University Theatre Cast (1, 2, 3, 4); 
University Theatre Crew (1, 2, 3, 4); Student Senate (4); Coordination Committee (4); 
Freshman Adviser (2, 3); University Theatre Board (4). 

WINDY, RONALD EUGENE MOLINE; B.S. in Agriculture; DAS HAAS; S.N.I.B. (4); Field 

and Furrow; lllini Sportsman's Club. 

WINELAND, JONI KAY FLORA; B.S. in Elementary Education; PI BETA PHI; University 

Theatre Crew (1); Women's Glee Club (1, 2, 3); Panhellenic Ball Committee (1); Junior 
Panhellenic (]); Honors Day (1). 

WINSLOW, LUCIA DIANE WATSEKA; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; THETA UPSILON; The Daily 

lllini (2); lllini Union Committee (2); Y.W.C.A. Committee (1, 3); Campus Chest (3); 
Student Senate (2); Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Illinois Wesleyan University. 

WINTER, FRANK THEODORE HINSDALE; B.S. in Management; Business Education Club; 

Finance Club; Lyons Township Junior College. 

WINTER, SANDRA SUE HINSDALE; B.S. in Home Economics; PHI MU; Y.W.C.A. Com- 
mittee (1, 2, 3); Home Economics Club; Honors Day (1, 2). 

WINTERS, RAYMOND STEELE SHIRLAND; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; University Theatre 

Cast (2, 3); University Theatre Crew (2); House President (3, 4); Fine and Applied Arts 
Council (3); A.S.I.D. 

WISEMAN, ORVILLE AUSTIN GREENVILLE; B.S. in Accountancy; Alpha Kappa Psi; Ac- 
countancy Club; Young Republicans Club; Greenville College. 

WISSELL, RICHARD ALLYN MC HENERY; B.S. in Dairy Technology; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (3); Men's Glee Club (1); Oratorio Society (2, 3, 4); Dairy Production Club. 

WITTENBORN, HELEN SUE CHESTER; B.S. in Recreation; ALPHA DELTA PI; lllini Union 

Committee (1, 2, 3); Women's Glee Club (2); American Recreational Society, U. of I. 
Student Chapter. 

WITTENKELLER, BRIAN GENE OAK LAWN; B.F.A. in Landscape Architecture; PHI KAPPA 

SIGMA; Scarab; Forsite (1, 4); Interfraternity Ball Committee (3). 

WOGNUM, MARION CAROL .... SOUTH HOLLAND; B.F.A. in Art Education; ZETA TAU 
ALPHA; Society of Illustrators; Panhellenic Ball Committee (3); Thornton Junior College. 

WOLF, JACQUELINE JEANNE OAK PARK; B.S. in Recreation; KAPPA ALPHA THETA; 

lllini Union Committee (3); American Recreational Society, U. of I. Student Chapter; 
Lindenwood College. 

WOLFMAN, HOWARD LAURANCE SKOKIE; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FLAGG HOUSE; 

Alpha Phi Omega; W.P.G.U. (2, 3, 4); Hillel Foundation Student Council (2); 
A.I.E.E.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University 
of Illinois. 

WOLZ, WILLIAM FRANCIS CHICAGO; B.S in Aeronautical Engineering; I.A.S.; Miami 

University. 

WOOD, CAROL DAWN SULLIVAN; B.S. in Home Economics; McKINLEY HALL; Plowboy 

Prom Committee (3); Home Economics Club; Bradley University. 

WOODRUFF, JAMES HENRY LINCOLN; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering. 

WOODS, JOHN FRANCIS CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; PHI KAPPA THETA; 

Wrestling, Freshman Varsity Squad, Varsity Squad (3, 4); Navy Pier Fxtension of the 
University of Illinois. 

WOODS JOHN LARUE TAYLORVILLE; B.S. in Agriculture; ILLI-DELL; Alpha Zeta; I.P.C. 

Photography Staff (I, 2); S.N.I.B. (1, 2, 3, 4); Agriculture Council (3, 4); All-Ag 

Field Day Committee (3); Plowboy Prom Committee (2, 3, 4); Sno-Ball Committee 

(2, 3); Field and Furrow; Hoof and Horn Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3); University of 
Illinois Scholarship Key. 

WORTHINGTON, BARBARA ANNE SPRINGFIELD; B.S. in Elementary Education; St. Mary's 

of Notre Dame. 

WOTAN, LEO SKOKIE; B.S. in L.A.S., Zoology; PHI GAMMA DELTA; lllini Union Com- 
mittee (1, 2); Junior Interfraternity Council (1); Senior Tennis Manager (4); Tennis 
Manager (3); University Chorus (2); Athletic Council (4); Navy Council (2); Russian 
Language Club; Young Republicans Club. 

WRIGHT HOMER FRANKLIN WILMETTE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; KOINONIA; 

Phi Eta Sigma; Pi Tau Sigma; Second Regimental Band (1, 2); American Baptist 
Foundation (2); S.A.E.; Honors Day (1, 3). 

WRIGHT, JAMES HARVEY MURPHYSBORO; B.F.A. in Industrial Design; PHI KAPPA TAU. 

WRIGHT JUDITH SUSAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Teaching of Chemistry; INDECO; lllini Union 

Committee (2, 3, 4); W.G.S. Executive Council (3); House President (3); Student Sen- 
ate (4); Hillel Student Foundation (2, 3); Freshman Adviser (2); Home Economics 
Club; Little United Nations; Roosevelt University; Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 



544 



WRIGHT, KENNETH TERRILL MACOMB; B.S. in Veterinary Medicine; SON'S HOME; West- 
ern Illinois University. 

WRIGHT, NEAL MOFFITT ... . BRADFORD; B.S. in Agriculture; SON'S HOME; Agricultural 
Economics Club. 

WRIGHT, OSCAR GENE . . BRADFORD; B.S. in Agriculture; SON'S HOME; Agricultural Eco- 

nomics Club; Illinois State Normal University. 

WROBKE, SARAH ... MAYWOOD; B.S. in Physical Education; KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA; 
Mortar Board; Torch; Shi-Ai; Alpha Sigma Nu; W.A.A. Board (1, 2, 3); W.A A 
.*' 3 / 4 ><' House President (4); Physical Education Majors Club; Honors Day (1, 2, 3)- 
University of Wisconsin. 

WU, EDWARD MING CHI KOWLOON, HONG KONG; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; Sigma 

lau; Tau Beta Pi; Pi Tau Sigma; A.S.M.E.; Chinese Students' Club; Honors Day (!)■ 
Marquette University. 

WU, RICHARD LEE . . . CHICAGO; Bachelor of Architecture; HOPKINS HOUSE; A.I.A.; Hawaii 

Club; Chinese Students' Club; Honors Day (1); Illinois Institute of Technology Navv 
Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

WUTH, ERIC DONALD . . FERGUSON, MISSOURI; B.S. in L.A.S., Political Science; BARTON 

HALL; Baseba.l Manager (4); Harris Junior College. 

WYSOCKI, LEO WALTER . CHICAGO; B.S. in Accountancy; GARNER HALL; M.R.H.A. (3 4)- 

Accountancy Club; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Commerce Club; Baseball, Naw 
Pier (2); Boxing, Navy Pier (1); Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

YAGHOUB.AN^DE^IA^.^. . . TEHRAN, IRAN; B.S. in Civil Engineering; A.S.C.E, Iranian 

YEAGER, KAREN LOUISE ...... WILMINGTON; B.S^ in Elementary Education; SIGMA SIGMA 

idu««on T Assoc i l ation. Unl0n C ° mm " ,ee X " h H °^ Presiden ' (4); S,udent Na ' ional 
YEPES, OU.LLERMO^ „ ^BOGOTA, COLOMBIA; B.S. in Civil Engineering; Chi Epsilon; A.S.C.E.; 

YERKOV.CH, MAR.LYN I DIANE CHICAGO; B S in Teaching of Biology; LINCOLN AVE- 

ffitl V d '' c Teachers-in-Training Club; Navy Pier Student Senate; Phi Kappa 

Delta; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

YOUNG, DANIEL HOWARD .... CHICAGO; B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering; EBEL HALL- 
UnTJersiTof "*' ^ *>' ^ "° nm Day ( ' ); NaVy P '^ E *' ensi ° n ° f ^ 

YOUNG, JAMES DALE . . . BENLD; B S. in Management; NOBLE HALL; Campus Chest (3); 
M.R.H.A. Executive Council (4); House President (3, 4); Society for the Advancement 
of Management; M.R.H.A. Ball Committee (4). Advancement 

YOUNG, IAVERNE -CHICAGO; B.S in LAS English; ALPHA GAMMA DELTA; Shi-Ai; 

The lllio (1); University Theatre Crew (1); Star Course Manager (2); House President (4)! 

YOUNG, MARY JUZABETH OAK PARK; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; KAPPA DELTA; Law- 

YOUNG, OI WUN HONOLULU HAWAII; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.E -I R E ■ 

Hawaii Club; University of Hawaii; Washington State College. 

YOUNG. ROBERT DALE ONEIDA; B.S. in Agriculture; ALPHA GAMMA RHO. 

YUEN, MICHAEL PAUL HONOLULU, HAWAII; B.S. in Accountancy; NEWMAN HALL- Ac- 

countancy Club; Hawaii Club; University of Hawaii; Universit^ of Michigan 

ZACHARY, RONALD EUGENE ..... CHICAGO; B.S. in General Engineering; PHI KAPPA THETA- 
Tecn°n r olog n ; e a,em ' ,y d ' 0) f Market ' n9 C ' ub; '-^.E.; Illinois Institute of 

ZAHLER, ADRIENNE CLA.E ^^^0^00^ ^^^^c^^t and 
Co e u C n U ciirwrL L U ?3 C :'4) n,; Pa ^" e - W -G-S. CoordinaT^ C^mk^Tl jfWfcSS 

ZARA, NORMA JEAN .. CHICAGO; B.S. in Elementary Education; LINCOLN AVENUE RESI- 

lllinois.' Association; Navy Pier Extension of the University of 

ZAVER, ROYWGENE^. . . . . MOUNT PROSPECT; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; FORBES HOUSE; 

ZEITER, MAR.LYN TANNINE . ... DANVILLE, B.S. in Elementary Education; SIGMA SIGMA 
SIGMA; lllmi Union Committee (3); University Theatre Crew (2). ^""« siuma 

ZEITLIN, DENNIS JAY . . HIGHLAND PARK; B.A. in L.A.S., Philosophy; ZETA BETA TAU- 

Ph.. Kappa Phi; Ph, Beta Kappa; Phi Alpha Mu; Phi Eta Sigma; Omega Beta Pi- IMini 
Sch'dar^rKly 6 ' ''' "" ^'^ & ' 3) ' "^ ° SV (3) < Unfv'ersity of lll!no?s 

ZEITLIN, MICHAEL BARRY REGO PARK, NEW YORK; B.F.A. in Architecture; A.I.A. 

ZELASKO, WALTER EDWARD ... CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering- A I E E -I R E - 

Navy P.er Extension of the University of Illinois. «-i-t.t. i.K.t., 




545 




ZEUNSKI AlBERTA JEAN CHICAGO; B.S. in Physical Education; BUSEY HALL; W.A.A. 

Board (4); W.A.A. (1, 2, 3, 4); Student Senate (4); Orchesis (1, 2); Physical Educa- 
tion Majors Club; Navy Pier Extension of the University of Illinois. 

ZESCH, EDWARD EARL CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; A.I.E.F.-I.R.E.; Chicago 

Technical College; Illinois Institute of Technology. 

ZETER, LEON ROBERT LINCOLN; B.S. in Industrial Engineering; S.A.E.; Bradley University. 

ZIKAS FREDERICK DAVID HILLSIDE; B.S. in Mechanical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

A.S.M.E. 

ZIPPERMAN SIDNEY ANTHONY CHICAGO; B.S. in Commerce and Law; FORBES HOUSE; 

Swimming, Freshman Varsity Squad; Dolphins (1, 2); Junior Bar Association (4); Prae- 
torians; Pre-Law Club (3). 

ZIS JEROME CLIFFORD CHICAGO; B.S. in Electrical Engineering; GARNER HOUSE; 

W.P.G.U. (3, 4); Football Marching Band (3, 4); Second Regimental Band (3, 4); 
A.I.E.F.-I.R.E.; Navy Pier Alumni Association; Navy Pier Extension of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

ZUNG, CYNTHIA BEI-LING KOWLOON, HONG KONG; B.S. in Dietetics; VANLIG HOUSE; 

College of St. Elizabeth. 

ZUPNIK, SYLVIA CHICAGO; B.A. in L.A.S., Spanish; ALLEN HALL; Navy Pier Extension 

of the University of Chicago. 




)ne of the most memorable senior gifts, the Senior Bench, locatsd near the north end of the Broadwalk, was left by the Class of 1900. 




A similar gift was received from the 1912 Seniors in the form of another bench located between Lincoln Hall and the English Building. 



546 




Veterinary 
Medicine 



ALTERA, KENNETH PAUL RIVERSIDE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

BRATTHAUAR ROBERT ERWARD ST. CHARLES; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student 

Chapter American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

BROWN, CHARLES WILLIAM CANTON; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

CLEM, SAMUEL EDWARD, JR. . TRILLA; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

ERICKSON, LEROY FLOYD. . . .CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 
American Veterinary Medical Association- Omega Tau Sigma. 

FERUCKA. DONALD PAUL . . . . BARTLETT; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 
American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

FRA.LEY, KERM.T WILLIAM . . . . PAXTON; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 
American Veterinary Medical Association. 

GEIGER, MELVIN DUWAYNE . . EUREKA; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. <-napter 

GUM.NSKI, ALBERT CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter American 

Veterinary Medical Association. 

HARVEY, WILLIAM JOSEPH . . THOMPSONVILLE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine- Student 

Chapter American Veterinary Medical Association. oruaenr 

HUGHES, MAX [ALLEN I . . . TISKILWA; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

HUSMANN, RAYMOND JOSEPH . . BREESE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. v-naprer 

JACKSON, ROBERT GEORGE NAPERVILLE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine- Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. eaieine, oiuaent (.napter 

JAMES, HAROLD DEAN ..... BUNCOMBE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine- Student Chapter 
American Veterinary Medical Association. sruaent Chapter 

KNIGHT, JOHN LESLIE BISMARCK; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 




547 




KOBROW, WILLIAM RUDOLPH CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

KOLAR, RONALD JOSEPH BERWYN; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

KOSTECKI, ADAM CHAMPAIGN; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 



LEE, NELLY EDITH WEST CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

LEWIS, ALBERT ARNOLD URBANA; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

MANN, DENNIS KEITH MT. CARMEL; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 



MATTHEWS, LYNDEL RAY WATERLOO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

MILLER, RAY EUGENE BLOOMINGTON; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

MONTGOMERY, EARL EDWARD CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 



MUSOLINO, JOSEPH LOUIS QUINCY; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

PENS1NGER, ROBERT RIX DECATUR; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Association. 

RASH, DAVID MILTON GENESEO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 



REEDER, DONALD GENE PRAIRIE CITY; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 

REICHARD, ROBERT ELLIOT GLEN ELLYN; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

REILING, RUSSELL NORMAN FOREST PARK; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student 

Chapter American Veterinary Medical Association. 



SAMUELSON, WINFIELD LAWRENCE GENESEO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student 

Chapter American Veterinary Medical Association. 

SCHNOWSKE, HARLEY DEAN CAMBRIDGE; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chap- 
ter American Veterinary Medical Association. 

SMITH, PAUL BARTON RIDGWAY; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter Ameri- 
can Veterinary Medical Association. 



SPIRA, RICHARD STUART CHICAGO; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

STARLING; CHARLES AUGUST SPRINGFIELD; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student 

Chapter American Veterinary Medical Association. 

STEPHENS ROGER CLAYTON BAYLIS; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 



TROTTER, VIRDEN LEE ADAIR; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter American 

Veterinary Medical Association. 

WATSON, PHILLIP DEAN WESTFIELD; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 

WHITE, THOMAS PRESTON OAK LAWN; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association. 



WILSON, LEE OLIVER CHAMPAIGN; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. 

WOOD, BYFORD EARL WAYNE CITY; Doctor of Veterinary Medicine; Student Chapter 

American Veterinary Medical Association; Omega Tau Sigma. 



548 



INDEX 



Acacia, 104 

Agricultural Economics Club, 429 
Agricultural Education Club, 430 
Agriculture Cooperative Exten- 
sion Club, 430 
Agriculture Council, 345, 4.'11 
Allen Hall, North, 140 
Allen Hall. South, 141 
Alpha Chron, 400 
Alpha Chi Omega, 110 
Alpha Chi Kho, 165 
Alpha Delta Phi, 19, 100 
Alpha Delta Pi, 111 
Alpha Delta Sigma, 87, 432 
Alpha Epsilon Phi, 112 
Alpha Epsilon Pi, 167 
Alpha Gamma Delta, 113 
Alpha Gamma Kho, 16S 
Alpha House, 162 
Alpha Kappa Alpha, 114 
Alpha Kappa Lambda, 10!) 
Alpha Kappa Psi, 30, 431 
Alpha Lambda Delta, 400, 408 
Alpha Omicrun Pi, 115 
Alpha Pi, 110 
Alpha Phi Omega, 429, 433 
Alpha Kho Chi, 170 
Alpha Sigma Nil, 407 
Alpha Tau Omega, 172, 401, 402 
Alpha Xi Delta, 117 
Alpha Zeta, 409 
American Foundrvmen's Society. 

433 
American Recreation Society, 435 
American Society of Agricultural 

Engineers, 435 
American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, 430 
Angel Plight, 409 
Armed Forces Council, 408 
Armory House, 401, 402 
Arnold Air Society, 410 
Aagaard, Jeanette, 408 
Aasbrein, Victoria C, 115 
Abadarango, Leon Dario 439 
Abbit, Barbara Thelma, 147 
Abbott, Lawrence Allen, 437, 480 
Abbott, Margaret Merrick, 140, 344 

462 
Abby, Darwin Gene, 247 
Abel, William Russell, 243,418 
Abeles, John Henry, 186 
Abell, Janet Kay, 148, 301, 480 
Abell, Roberta Ellen, 118, 427 
Abell, Theodore Lee, Jr., 437, 480 
Abelson, Herbert Alan, 217, 417 
Abendroth, John Carl, 248 
Abernathy, Gary Michael, 228 
Abraham, Eugene Victor, 480 
Abrahamsen, David Lloyd, 235 
Abrahamson, David Alan, 174 
Abrahamson, Mark Jay, 237 
Abramikas, Violet Angela, 143 
Abramowski, Harold J., 436, 480 
Abrams, Carole Elinor, 141 
Abrams, Idajean, 132 
Abrams, Judith Ann, 301 
Abrams, Richard Neal, 217 
Absher, Ronald Deon, 197 
Abt, Diane Lois, 408 
Achilles, Dennis Mann, 187 
Ackerman, Leta Ann, 141, 457 
Ackerman, Roberta Rose, 150, 448 
Ackerman, Owen, 390, 391 
Ackland, Lloyd William, 228 
Ackley, Stephanie Ann, 124 
Adair, Rebecca Ann, 156, 457, 458 
Adam, Ernest William, 165, 410 
Adami, Daniel Gene, 231 
Adams, Alice Irene, 138, 408, 414 
Adams, Charles Roger, 278 
Adams, Charles Wesley, 172, 330, 331 
Adams, George Lawrence, 431 
Adams, James Mansfield, 236 
Adams, Joan, 123, 344 
Adams, John Yates, 480 
Adams, Joseph John, 232 
Adams, Lawrence, 164 
Adams, Leon Lovejoy, Jr., 338 
Adams, Richard Charles, 453 
Adams, Richard Lee, 269, 456 
Adams, Robert Edward, 179, 328, 338 
Adams, Robert Julius, 247 
Adams, Shirley Esta, 145 
Adams, Ward Thomas, 204, 480 
Adams, Warren Robert, 456 
Adams, William Bert, 166 
Adams, William Blaine, Jr ,164 414 

435 
Adamski, Max, Jr., 433 
Addis, Howard Michael, 240 
Adduci, Angela, 155 
Ade, Frederick C, Jr., 187 
Adell, James Michael, 244, 450 
Ades, Leonard Stanford, 480 
Adkins, Paul Louis, 227 
Adler, Michael Arnold, 203 
Adra, Mohamad, Siham R., 255 



Affolter, Anita Elise, 279, 350, 422 
Africk, Deanna Louise, 121, 295 

413, 480 
Agay, Michael Stanford, 189 
Ager, David Louis, 245 
Agrella, Joan Patricia, 1 10, 285 
Ague, James Charles, 212 
Ahearn, Carol Louise, 145 
Ahlberg, David Craig, 247, 305 
Ahlberg, Harold Lee, 425 
Ahlquist, Gene Fredrick, 227 
Ahlstrom, Frank C, 253 
Aibara, Kageaki, 440 
Aiblik, Daniel, 249 
Aiken, William Paul, 177 
Aikin, Joan Elizabeth, 128 
Aikman, James Henry, 436, 480 
Aikman, Peter Rentschler, 186, 234 

340, 417 
Akers, Charles Robert, 215 
Akin, Janet Louise, 150 
Akin, Mary Anne, 150 
Alaupovic, Alexandra V., 413 
Albers, George Arthur, 434 
Albers, John Joseph, 183 
Albert, Marilyn Kay, 127 
Albert, Waco, Dr., 409, 445 
Albertin, Wilhelm, 480 
Albin, Harriet Ailene, 159, 438, 480 
Alblinger, Judy Ann, 136 
Alborg, William, 452 
Albrecht, James Walter, 232 
Albrecht, Susan Laverne, 119 
Albright, John Phil, 208 
Albright, Richard W., 222 
Aldag, Arthur William, Jr., 198 
Aide, Helmi, 138, 342, 422 
Aldeen, Donald Robert, 480 
Alderman, Allen Burton, 210 
Alderson, Barbara Lynne, 149 
Aldridge, Arthur William, 207, 480 
Alexander, Barbara, 151, 480 
Alexander, Ben, 248 
Alexander, Joseph David, 167 
Alexander, Marilyn Marie, 435, 480 

458 
Alexander, Paul Joseph, 245 
Alexander, Sonja Marie, 1 10, 480 
Alexis, Richard Joseph, 221 
Alexis, Ronald Michael, 221 
Alfonsi, Loretta Helen, 145, 260, 298 

309, 415 
Alford, Harold Dean, 197 
Allabaugh, Stephen R., 208 
Allen, Arnold William, 208, 412 
Allen, Dean C. M., 77 
Allen, David Joseph, 431, 480 
Allen, Donald Robert, 175 
Allen, Eddie Keith, 338, 339, 451 
Allen, Georgia Rachel, 150, 301 

413, 480 
Allen, James L. Jr., 188 
Allen, John Joseph, 202 
Allen, Margaret, 133, 419, 480, 583 
Allen, Patricia Grace, 110 
Allen, Roy Lee, 411, 480 
Allen, Walter L. Jr., 436 
Aller, Mary Jo, 110, 260 
Allers, Richard William, 213 
Allison, Carl Edward, 204, 289 
Allison, Jane Elizabeth, 1 13, 349, 480 
Allison, John Richard, 172, 480 
Allison, Max Lee, 247, 444 
Allison, Stephen Leroy, 175 
Allison, Thaine H., Jr., 238 
Allison, Theodore Edward, 175, 480 
Allison, William Allen, 181, 285 
Allison, William Bruce, 442, 480 
Allyn, Dorothy, 128 
Almquist, Richard Allen, 480 
Almquist, Robert L., 197, 393, 395 
Alonzo, Annette Bette, 141 
Alpert, Arthur Alan, 204, 480, 203 
Alt, Charles Robert, 193, 481 
Altemeyer, Lavern Wayne, 212, 373 

374, 377, 397, 453 
Alter, Anita Louise, 441 
Altera, Kenneth Paul, 242, 449, 547 
Alterio, Frank Caesar, 242 
AlthofF, Diane, 131 
Altmin, Dale Carter, 204 
Alton, William Louis, 227 
Altschul, Richard Jerome, 21 1 
Altschul, Sheldon, 412 
Alverson, Bruce John, 220 
Amann, Henry Jacob, 208 
Ambrose, David Lawrence, 176 
Ambrose, Rev. W. Haydn, 462 
Ambrose, Richard William, 22] 
Ambrosius, Lloyd Eugene, 228 
Ames, John William, 216 
Ameter, Malcolm Lee, 434 
Amsberg, Lou, 371 
Amundsen, William Allen, 248 
Anable, Mark Edward, Jr., 242 
Ancizar, Duque Manuel, 439 
Anagnostopoulos, Bob, 245 
Anderhub, Bonita Lucille, 128, 260 

481 
Anderle, Kenneth James, 228 
Anderle, Patricia Anne, 137, 481 



Anders, Barry Ernest, 169 
Andersen, Joan Elaine, 138 
Andersen, Robert Thomas, 244, 481 
Anderson, Allan Melvin, 243 
Anderson, Amos Lewis, 166 
Anderson, Anita Marie, 155, 481 
Anderson, Ann Marie, 148 
Anderson, Beatrice Joy, 148, 481 
Anderson, Bruce Coleman, 216, 289 

481 
Anderson, Carol Marie, 147 
Anderson, Christine Eve, 155 
Anderson, Dale Charles, 239 
Anderson, David Earle, 213, 481 
Anderson, David R., 336 
Anderson, David Theodore, 227 
Anderson, Dawn Carol, 135, 414 
Anderson, Dennis Peter, 205 
Anderson, Dennis Winfred, 190, 414 
Anderson, Dona Jane, 140, 344 
Anderson, Donald Gene, 197 
Anderson, Donald Harry, 179, 431 
Anderson, Edward Leon, 481 
Anderson, Elaine Doris, 278 
Anderson, Elizabeth, 156 
Anderson, Elaine Doris, 131, 276 
Anderson, Emma Lee, 154, 260 
Anderson, Ernest Donald, 430, 431 
Anderson, Eugene, 450 
Anderson, Fred Bernard, 228, 453 
Anderson, Gene Scott, 481 
Anderson, Hershel Murray, 438 
Anderson, James William, 481 
Anderson, Jane Ellen, 156, 457 
Anderson, Joan Deanne, 148, 337 
Anderson, John Lawrence, 232 
Anderson, Joyce Louise, 141 
Anderson, Karen Dae, 123, 140, 481 
Anderson, Lawrence Brent, 204, 233 
Anderson, Loleta Mae, 120 
Anderson, Marie Ann, 154, 260, 346, 

465 
Anderson, Nancy Jones, 481 
Anderson, Neal, 250 
Anderson, Neil Donald, 181, 422 
Anderson, Patricia L., 163 
Anderson, Paul R., 248 
Anderson, Paul Roger, Jr., 481 
Anderson, Paul William, 228, 435 
Anderson, Ray Bertil, 229, 410 
Anderson, Ray Henry, 481 
Anderson, Richard Leslie, 457 
Anderson, Robert Harold, 41 1 
Anderson, Robert Roy, 216, 425, 481 
Anderson, Roy Gunnar, 248 
Anderson, Roy Vernon, 481 
Anderson, Russell Lee, 176, 344 
Anderson, Savilla W., 129, 345 419 

481 
Anderson, Sherwood Eric, 221 
Anderson, Stanley L., 239 
Anderson, Thomas Ralph, 172, 261 

481 
Anderson, Vera Carolina, 134 
Anderson, Virgene S., 138, 423 
Anderson, Virginia Lou, 158 
Ando, Kenji George, 481 
Andreasen, Christian H., 244, 436 
Andreotti, Roy Joseph, 338, 339 
Andresen, Hans Jens, 481 
Andrews, Andrew Dr., 454 
Andrews, Beatrice Janice, 457, 458 
Andrews, Donald Eugene, 452 
Andrews, Donald James, 169 
Andrews, J. David, 452 
Andrews, Joseph Louis, 175 
Andrews, Robert Burton, 169, 202 
Andrews, William Pratt, 214, 330 
Andrle, Lucia Ann, 1 10, 481 
Andros, Theodora Margo, 113, 414 
Andrykowski, Harold J., 448 
Angell, Barbara Jane, 128 
Angelo, Norman Bruce, 434, 481 
Anglin, Judith Yvonne, 148 
Anider, Randall, 190 
Annes, George Paul, 481 
Anslow, Bonita Louise, 464, 162, 447 
Antczak, James Thomas, 234 
Anteneh, Addis, 429 
Anthony, Robert Bradford, 481, 225 
Antonelli, George A., 213 
Antonini, Robert, 172 
Antonson, John Robert, 245, 305 

453, 481 
Anway, Sue Ellen, 149 
Aper, Charles Robert, 482 
Appel, Leslie, 210 
Appell, Phyllis, 482 
Appelquist, April Irene, 110 
Appenbrink, Paul Edward, 401 
Apple, Cass Peters, 169 
Applegate, Charles Allen, 186, 482 
Applegate, Susan, 140 
Appleman, Jean, 482 
Apt, Diane, 132 
Apter, David, 243 
Arangelovich, Danilo, 175 
Arbelaezuribe, Raul, 439, 196 
Arbenz, Mary Hedwig, 309 312 

415,416 
Arbetman, Gerald Ira, 249 



Arbogast, Clifford, 185 
Archbold, Richard A., 30, 192 259 

265, 482 
Archer, Kenneth Davidson, 244 
Archer, Revonda Lee, 145, 438 
Archer, Robert Luther, 253 
Archer, Tobey Elaine, 145 
Archila, Reyes Luis E., 439 
Arcuri, Liborrio Phillip, 339 
Arcus, James S., Ill, 214 
Ardente, John, 244 
Arehart, David Lynn, 183, 412 
Arends, Erwin Onno, 435, 482 
Arentsen, Karen Estelle, 1 13, 346 
Areson, Barbara Carol, 161 
Arewd, John, 450 
Argires, Constance, 149, 482 
Arias, Velez German, 166, 435, 439 
Arieff, Allen Ives, 195, 417 482 
Arkin, Arthur M., 203 
Arkin, David Myron, 242, 482 
Arkin, Stuart, 482 
Arloff, William Ernest, 482 
Armato, Samuel George, Jr 201 

344, 414 
Armstrong, Beverly Ann, 157, 343 
Armstrong, Bonnie Kay, 156 
Armstrong, George R., 234, 450 
Armstrong, John Harold, 452 
Armstrong, Lorna Karen, 129, 344 
Armstrong, Robert John, 247, 444 
Armstrong, Robert Miller, 190, 261 
Armstrong, William J., 190, 482 
Arneson, Paul Clifford, 387, 385, 397 
Arnholt, Mary Jane, 144 
Arnholt, Philip John, 165 
Arnold, Andrea, 344 
Arnold, Barbara Fay, 140, 463 
Arnold, Bruce Lee, 371 
Arnold, Donald Ray, 190 
Arnold, Jeffrey Michael, 166, 414 
Arnold, Susan Ann, 110 
Amos, Irene Katherine, 139, 311 446 
Aronson, Jerrold Lloyd, 211 
Arseneau, Donald Carl, 383 
Arthur, Robert Dean, 240 
Arzt, Thomas Ladendorf, 242, 482 
Asato, Edward Eisho, 242, 482 
Ash, David Irwin, 191, 371 
Ash, David Milton, 482 
Ash, David Roy, 222, 482 
Ash, Dennis Roger, 242 
Ash, Judith Gail, 126, 137, 482 
Ashbrook, Robert Michael' 212 280 

432, 482, 583 
Ashby, Paul David, 202 
Ashe, Cheryl Linda, 140 
Asher, Keith Gene, 190, 422 
Ashkenaz, Paul Joel, 210 
Ashley, Frances Carol, 160 
Ashley, James Lee, 223 
Ashmore, Constance Marie, 337, 482 
Ashurst, Albert Nolan, 463 
Ashwill, Rosamund A., 154, 448 482 
Ashworth, Richard Landon, 188,41 4 
Asper, Constance Mae, 155 
Ast, Bruno, 421 
Astheimer, Arline Ruth, 152 
Astorian, John Arthur, 449 
Aten, Robert Holmes, 179, 289 
Atkinson, Joseph Martin, 188 289 

421,428,475 
Atkinson, Michael, 222 
Atkinson, Neil Roland, 176 
Ator, Joseph D., 103 
Attebery, John Manford, 202, 432 
Atwood, David Phillip, 214 
Atwood, James William, 248 
Auble, Barbara Ann, 127, 423, 450 
Auble, Bonnie Jean, 127, 450' 
Aubrey, Sharon Ruth, 138 
Auchampaugh, George F., 242 
Audi, Louis Delbert, 438 
Audo, Carl Paul, 482 
Audo, Rosilla, 344 
Aufrecht, Michael Dan. 203 
Augustine, Judith E.. 162, 301 
Aukamp, Donald Richard, 253 
Auler, Robert Isham, 244 
Ausfermiller, Larry Lee, 172 
Austin, Harold Kent, 233 
Austin, John Michael, 371 
Austin, Marilyn Kay, 427 
Austin, Van H., 172, 414 
Auyoung, Patricia Mary, 163 
Awe, Robert Roy, 401 
Aye, Robert Frederick, 229 
Aye, Tin, 221 
Ayers, Sandra Faye, 463 
Ayres, Maxine Lee, 156, 482 
Ayton, William Byron, 191, 340 
Azuma, Yasuo, 440 

B 

Balmoral Club, 220 
Baptist Student Foundation, 4(1° 
Baptist Student Union. 461 
Band, First Regimental Band. 336 
Band. Second Regimental, 336 



549 



Barton Heights MKH, 239, 402 

Beta Alpha Psi, 438 

Beta Sigma Psi, 173 

Beta Theta Pi, 174, 202 

Bevier, Isabel Home Economics 

Club, 448 
Birch Hall, 160 
Block I, 274 
Busey Hall, 142, 143 
Business Education Club, 438 
Babb, Louise Ann, 1 16 
Babbs, Howard, 432 
Babbitt, Nancy Millen, 141, 301 
Babcock, Carolyn Ann, 1 1 5, 260, 296 
Babler, Egon Stephan, 437, 482 
Babler, Mary Jane, 134, 419, 448, 482 
Babler, Myron John, 196 
Bacchetti, Jerome Allen, 179, 336, 

434, 482 
Bach, Jan Morris, 338, 418 
Bach, Lydia Sue, 131 
Bacheidor, Ned William, 450 
Bachelor, David Lawrence, 232 
Bachenheimer, Franklin, 246, 305, 

340, 464, 482 
Bachli, Lance Joseph, 236 
Bachman, Joseph Rexel, 482 
Backoff, Robert William, 192, 259, 

265, 282, 283, 286, 347, 483 
Backus, Lucia Irene, 483 
Bader, Donald James, 410 
Bado, John Ernest, 222, 436, 483 
Baecker, Grant Richard, 164 
Baer, Russell Ernest, Jr., 483 
Bagby, Col., 410 
Baggerly, Lawrence Allen, 424 
Baggesen, Phyllis Myrtle, 141 
Bahadori, Mehdi Nejad, 437 
Bahor, Louis Rudolph, 401 
Baile, Hallett Parlett, 241 
Bailey, Barbara, 465 
Bailey, Bruce Walter, 250, 410 
Bailey, Carl David, 193, 417 
Bailey, Jay Thomas, 182 
Bails, Elmer Richard, 429, 483 
Bailie, Philip James, 239 
Bailleu, John Richard, 178 
Baird, Glenn Russell, 214 
Baizer, Beryl Marilyn, 132 
Baker, Barbara Helen, 119 
Baker, Barbara Jean, 119, 343, 427 
Baker, Darlene Janet, 1 19, 483 
Baker, David Hiram, 418 
Baker, Frederick S„ 203 
Baker, Harold George, 247, 483 
Baker, Prof. Jack, 421 
Baker, Kay Lynn, 128 
Baker, Lester Sidney, 203, 483 
Baker, Marian Ruth, 163 
Baker, Myrna Lynn, 328, 344 
Baker, Myron Alan, 233 
Baker, Robert Gale, 233, 445 
Baker, Robert Jethro, Jr., 230, 454, 

483 
Baker, Virginia April, 1 18 
Baker, Warren Stannard, 170, 344 
Baker, William Dryden, 190 
Baker, William Franklin, 222 
Balash, Richard Lee, 236 
Balbach, Sara Lily, 1 17 
Balcn, Lucille, 458 
Balden, Larry David, 227 
Baldridge, Marlena Kay, 153, 406, 

457, 458 
Baldwin, Judith Elaine, 153, 463 
Baldwin, Margaret Lynne, 163, 483 
Baldwin, William Edward, 218 
Balgemann, Henry, 170 
Ball, Beverly Ruth, 122, 344 
Ball, Lawrence Michael, 177 
Ball, Susan, 126 
Balogna, John, 272 
Baiter, Alan Larry, 167 
Balzaras, Vytautas, 483 
Baizer, James Philip, 430, 483 
Barnes, Lester, 453 
Banash, Jeanne Gantt, 483 
Banash, Robert Charles, 483 
Bandson, John, 397 
Bandy, Larry Lee, 230, 435 
Bandyk, Diane Rose, 148 
Bane, Arlo Gregory, 483 
Banish, Marion Irma, 151, 349, 483 
Banker, Larry Dean, 188 
Banknieder, August R„ 253, 483 
Banning, Roger Eugene, 209 
Bannister, Annie Pearl, 140, 483 
Banta, William Edwin, 433, 465 
Baran, Walter Joseph, Jr., 166 
Baranowski, Leroy C, 249, 349 
Barasch, Alvin, 396 
Barber, Judy Ellen, 120 
Barbosa, Gabriel, 439 
Barcus, Connie Wynne, 1 1 7, 338, 

339, 450 
Bardos, Denes Istuan, 449 
Bardsley, John Lester, 247 
Barger, Allan Russell, 483 
Barickman, Bert Elwyn, Jr., 434 
Barkan, Stephen Yale, 248 
Barker, James, 422 
Barker, Janet Carolyn, 124, 338 
Barker, Lora Phyllis, 154, 438, 446 
Barker, Richard Dean, 431, 439 
Barnes, Barbara E., 483 
Barnes, Earleen Louise, 124, 422 
Barnes, Edward Norris, 255 
Barnes, Floride Helen, 116 
Barnes, Larry Edward, 238, 424 



Barnes, Thomas Charles, 190 
Barnett, Allen Marshall, 203, 276, 289 
Barnett, John Arthur, 452 
Barnett, Marilyn Ann, 128 
Barnett, Richard Dean, 180, 247 
Barnett, Stephen Samuel, 248, 261, 

415, 453, 456, 483 
Barnhill, Mrs., 205 

Barnstable, Barbara J., 143, 163, 483 
Barnstable, Sandra Lou, 117, 458 
Baron, Rachel Minna, 148 
Barr, James Franklin, 186 
Barr, Jesse William, 456, 483 
Barragan, Ruiz Jose A., 439 
Barratt, Naomi Ruth, 163 
Barrera, Alvaro, 439 
Barretocaipa, Juan Pablo, 419, 439, 

483 
Barrett, Nancy Carol, 141 
Barrett, William Bernard, 186 
Barsky, Robert Fred, 242 
Barszca, Casimir, 386, 387 
Bartel, Donald Leonard, 229 
Bartelsmeyer, Karl Louis, 245 
Bartelstein, Ida, 132, 295, 297, 483 
Barth, Edgar Leslie, 273 
Bartholmey, Sandra Jean, 148 
Bartlit, Fred Holcomb, Jr., 452 
Bartolo, Julie Marie, 157 
Barton, Judith Lee, 1 1 1 
Barton, Larry Wesley, 205 
Bartsch, John Richard, 193, 483 
Bartuska, Tom Joe, 412, 421, 483 
Basedow, Susan Ann, 1 10, 484 
Bash, Thomas Joseph, 176 
Bass, Harvey Bert, 426 
Bass, Vivian Dee, 162 
Bassett, Mark, 249 
Basten, Raymond Francis, 411, 484 
Bateman, John Russell, 255 
Bates, Alice Jane, 147 
Bates, Richard Ludwig, 188 
Bateson, Charles Edward, 182, 422 
Batson, Billy Bob, 484 
Batt, Cherie Roberta, 141 
Battles, Virginia Ann, 135 
Baudino, Donald Raymond, 232 
Bauer, Warren Robert, 434 
Bauer, William Lee, 181 
Baughn, Harold Cameron, 179 
Bauling, Douglas Bert, 435 
Baum, David Harold, 217, 457, 484 
Baum, Richard Alan, 210 
Bauman, Jon Wayne, 242 
Bauman, Leanne Rose, 131, 285 
Bauman, Ralph Lee, 247, 456 
Baumann, Carl William, 215, 421, 484 
Baumann, Edward John, 419 
Baumeister, Eileen, 467 
Baumgardner, Clyde Allen, 252 
Baumgartner, David Erwin, 247 
Baumgartner, Donald H., 247 
Baus, Judith Jutta, 147, 450 
Bayles, Michael Dale, 418 
Bayley, Richard Bennett, 190, 338, 

341, 453 
Baymiller, Bonnie, 344 
Bayne, James, 419 
Bays, Michael Allan, 433 
Beabout, Jerry Kieth, 213 
Beal, David Lee, 181 
Beals, Robert William, 206 
Bean, Reginald Eugene, 164, 261, 

416, 428 
Bean, William Alan, 177 
Bear, Anita, 132 
Bear, Nancy Lee, 123, 423 
Beard, Charles Russell, 255 
Bearman, Larry Lincoln, 236, 484 
Beastall, Theodore W., 242, 380, 383 
Beattie, Harry Herbert, 184, 443 
Beatty, Robert Keith, 227, 465 
Beatty, Thomas F., 170 
Beaty, Carolyn June, 124, 336 
Beauchamp, Eleanor A., 133 
Beauchamp, Mada Ann, 154, 446, 484 
Beauchamp, Mary Ann, 154, 301, 484 
Beazley, Raymond Arthur, 174 
Becherer, Charles B., 425 
Beck, Byron Kenneth, 418 
Beck, Richard Keith, 484 
Beck, Robert James, 484 
Becker, Carl Dennis, 255 
Becker, Harold Neil, 484 
Becker, Harriet Murphy, 152 
Becker, Herman William, 452 
Becker, Jacquelyn B., 140 
Becker, John Otto, 239, 305, 419, 

484 
Becker, Neil, 449 
Becker, Robert Dean, 261 
Becker, Robert William, 391 
Becker, Sheldon Theodore, 401, 484 
Beckerhaupt, Charles, 445 
Beckerman, Joseph W., 168, 484 
Beckett, Grace, 339 
Beckman, Kenneth, 465 
Beckman, William Paul, 244 
Beckmann, Bruce N., 371, 397 
Beckmann, James Lewis, 192, 371 
Beckway, Gayle, 135 
Bedal, Robert Melvyn, 220 
Bedford, Norton, 438 
Bednarz, Bernadine Eve, 157 
Bedrick, Samuel Peter, 252, 305, 434 
Beecher, John William, 251 
Beeler, Vivian, Jr., 446 
Beeler, William Guy, 168, 445 
Begando, Joseph S., 103 



Beh, Sue Marie, 128 

Behm, Kenneth Richard, 176 

Behner, Anna Jeanette, 163 

Behnke, Robert Samuel, 165, 336 

Behr, Calvin H., 237 

Behrends, Sharon Darlene, 144 

Behringer, Clara, 309, 415, 416 

Behrstock, Adrienne Sue, 140 

Beitz, Donald Clarence, 418, 440, 443 

Bejna, Barbara Ann, 427 

Bekermeier, David C, 222 

Bekiares, Byron Thomas, 245 

Belgrado, Albert John, 255 

Bell, Betty Lou, 135 

Bell, Dorothy, 140, 298 

Bell, Gerald Dean, 164 

Bell, John Oliver, 190 

Bell, Judith Sara, 446 

Bell, Leslie Frank, 210, 289, 442 

Bell, Lorna Jane, 1 15 

Bell, Lynn Ellen, 119, 260, 455, 484 

Bell, Nancy Grant, 260, 484 

Bell, Patricia Marie, 133, 338, 339 

422, 484 
Bell, Phyllis Elaine, 140 
Bell, Taylor Harvey, 185, 328 
Bellanca, Joseph Kenneth, 180 
Bellmar, John Thomas, 450 
Bellows, Sylvia Dean, 441, 484 
Bellrose, Ronald Bruce, 229 
Belnap, Bonnie Ann, 126 
Belsley, Glenn Wayne, 197, 484 
Belsley, Margaret Gene, 1 10, 293 
Belson, Jerry Jay, 200, 432, 484 
Bender, David Allen, 261 
Bender, Deena Louise, 119 
Bender, Donald Ames, 338 
Bender, Ladonne Kay, 141, 344 
Bender, Larry Scott, 229, 252 
Bender, Maynard Gary, 251, 254 
Benefield, Polly Ann, 115 
Benes, Ronald Jerry, 249 
Benesch, Katherine Jean, 130 
Benford, Clyde Myron, 213 
Benjamin, Anne, 124 
Benjamin, Elaine, 152 
Benkendorf, Helen L., 116 
Bennett, Carol Jean Marsh, 135 
Bennett, Leon William, 208 
Bennett, Linda Lea, 68, 113, 428 
Bennett, Paul George, 218, 261, 484 
Bennett, Rhoda Elaine, 148 
Bennett, Roberta Sue, 143, 457 
Bennett, Rodger Alan, 337, 401 
Bennett, Stanley Hughes, 169, 436 
Bennett, Zelinda Anne, 457, 458 
Benson, Carol Angela, 116, 342 
Benson, Donald Edward, 216 
Benson, Jacqueline Sue, 1 12 
Benson, James William, 191, 484 
Benson, John Albert, 225, 421, 484 
Benson, Roger Lee, 253 
Bentley, Thomas, 239 
Berchert, Edmund S., Jr., 208 
Beres, Dimitri Harry, 181, 291 
Berezniak, Jan Patrick, 208, 484 
Berg, Brian Miles, 175 
Berg, E. Kurt, 198 
Berg, Judith Dee, 112, 297 
Berg, Raymond Edward, Jr., 242, 452 
Berge, Knud Ottar, 240, 419, 484 
Bergen, Donald John, 177 
Berger, Alan John, 336 
Berger, Barbara Lois, 125 
Berger, Mary Frances, 141, 441 
Berger, Michael Alan, 189 
Bergeron, Eugene Louis, 202, 250 
Bergman, John Grant, 187, 418 
Bergman, Stephen Hale, 214 
Bergmann, Mary Ann, 117 
Bergnach, Lawrence C., 460, 484 
Bergquist, Richard Harry, 242 
Bergstrom, John Carl, 452 
Bergstrom, Karen Louise, 119, 484 
Berholtz, Marlene, 151 
Berk, Ivan Paul, 436, 485 
Berk, Susan Beth, 141 
Berke, Gerald Martin, 210 
Berkley, Sharon Brenda, 148 
Berkovitz, Alan, 244 
Berkson, Jonathan Milton, 251, 433 
Berline, Howard Gollier, 282, 287, 

304, 305, 320 
Berliner, Francine, 149, 485 
Berliner, Judy Helen, 147 
Berman, Arthur Myron, 211, 237 
Berman, David Ira, 209, 485 
Berman, Ethel Charlene, 148 
Berman, Geraldine Marie, 141, 408 
Berman, Janet Ann, 147 
Berman, Lowen Brooks, 245 
Berman, Myrna Rae, 143 
Berman, Myron David, 432 
Berman, Nancy Rochelle, 121, 485 
Bermingham, Harold M., 437, 485 
Bernal, Augusto, 439, 485 
Bernard, Clark Lees, 193 
Bernardin, Donald Pierre, 239 
Berney, John Peter, 225, 485 
Bernhard, Rudolph Jacob, 248 
Berns, Max Harold, 166 
Bernstein, Donald Hugh, 217, 274, 

289, 485 
Bernstein, Eugene Mante, 21 1 
Bernstein, Sidney Steman, 252 
Berry, Stephen David, 337 
Bers, Howard Martin, 229 
Bertagnolli, Leonard Max, 247, 450 
Bertetti, David Dominic, 425 



Bertha, Brian Albert, 190, 414 
Bertoldi, Richard John, 437, 485 
Bertoleit, Thurman M., 247, 465 
Bertolino, Bart Howard, 236 
Bertoncini, Peter Joseph, 247 
Bertram, Janice Louise, 128 
Best, Donald Charles, 201 
Best, William John, 250 
Beste, Barry, 202 
Bethel, Patricia, 127, 450 
Betker, Richard Carl, 248, 485 
Betley, Harry Jule, 170 
Betourne, Gary Paul, 247 
Bettisworth, Denny Lee, 212 
Belts, Marlin Keith, 485 
Betz, Pauline Marie, 160 
Beube, Leigh Gene, 245, 340 
Bex, Leslie Ernest, 485 
Beyaert, Robert Owen, 222 
Beyer, Howard Edward, 183, 337 
Bezane, Norman Gilbert, 328, 432, 

485 
Bezkoroviny, Georgy, 253 
Bezman, Victor Herbert, 252 
Biallas, William Claus, 225, 437, 485 
Bialy, Loretta Victoria, 163 
Biba, David Lee, 432 
Biba, Frank James, 432, 460 
Biby, Richard Lee, 250 
Bice, Bevra Ann, 124 
Bickel, Karen Lynne, 120 
Bickelhaupt, Charles O., 230 
Bickhaus, Richard George, 194 
Bicklein, John Phillip, 248 
Biddle, Delories Lynne, 143 
Biderman, John Harry, 450 
Biehl, Luanne Barbara, 153 
Biek, Kenneth Arthur, 179 
Bielawa, Richard Lyle, 343 
Bielby, Arthur Duane, 166 
Bielenberg, John Raymond, 339 
Bielfeldt, William R., 191 
Bielicki, Michael, 251 
Bienfang, Don Carl, 173, 485 
Biere, Andrea Kay, 141, 414 
Bieritz, Carolyn Alma, 153 
Bierly, Doral Lee, 160 
Bierman, Roger William, 207 
Biersach, Frank J., Jr., 248 
Biester, Gerald Nelson, 485 
Biggers, James Paul, 485 
Biggerstaff, Ronald Hays, 252 
Bilderback, Richard L., 338, 339, 451 
Bilisoly, Walter Ellis, 229 
Biller, Robert Martin, 243, 465 
Billings, Patricia Ann, 111, 282 
Billingsley, John Allen, 180 
Binde, Mrs., 128 
Binkele, Jane Marlene, 140, 339 
Binkley, Dane Richard, 168 
Binner, Bernhard Paul, 246, 434 
Bins, Milton, 485 
Biondi, Roy James, 232 
Bird, Patrick Joseph, 388, 389 
Birke, Professor, 91 
Birkenbeuel, Richard E., 246 
Birkey, Harold Eugene, 164, 436, 485 
Birks, Barbara Ann, 485 
Birman, Lynn Esther, 140 
Birndorf, Norman Irwin, 401 
Birney, Kenneth O., Jr., 190 
Birney, Sharon Pearl, 125 
Bischoff, Charles Gerald, 245 
Bise, Marion Ruth, 148 
Bishop, Patricia Ann, 1 16, 274 
Bishop, Ronald Taylor, 339 
Bishup, Bernard Wendel, 175, 282, 284 
Biskup, Louis Paul, 251 
Bissey, Trevor Ellis, 247 
Bissi, Millicent Lorren, 149, 485 
Bissing, Joseph John, Jr., 176 
Bitter, Robert Phillip, 173, 293 
Bitterman, Naomi Yaida, 125, 485 
Bjick, Ronald Lloyd, 215, 289, 485 
Black, Marshall William, 485 
Black, Prof. Robert, 439 
Black, Ruth Marie, 155 
Black, William Z., Ill, 190 
Blackaby, Ethan Allan, 188, 356, 358, 

361, 362, 366, 371 
Blacker, Sally Lou, 156, 260, 485 
Blackmore, Nancy Ellen, 128, 338, 458 
Blackstone, Howard Gary, 217 
Blada, Henry Frank, 175 
Blaesing, Robert Wade, 188 
Blaho, Milan Daniel, 242 
Blair, Coena Blossom, 150, 448, 485 
Blair, Gerald Allen, 213 
Blair, Mary Jean, 448, 485 
Blair, Phyllis Kay, 163 
Blair, Sally Virginia, 118, 342, 409 
Blaising, James Scott, 475 
Blake, Carol Louise, 163 
Blake, Charlene Annette, 133 
Blake, Daniel Bryan, 232, 486 
Blake, Ronald Vincent, 197 
Blake, William L., Jr., 213, 214, 421, 

427, 460, 469, 470, 486 
Blakesley, Leonard E., Jr., 240 
Blakley, John Michael, 182 
Blakslee, John Charles, 41 1 
Blanchard, Mark, 180 
Bland, Brian Robert, 239 
Blanda, Andrea Marie, 136, 414 
Blanford, Frederick Lee, 248 
Blanford, Myrna Kaye, 486 
Blanke, John David, 243 
Blanke, Melissa Jean, 118, 260, 296, 
309, 415, 423 



550 



Blanke, Paul Frederick, 452 
Blankenburg, James G., 239 
Blankenhorn, Carol Sue, 155 
Blankenship, Jerome Lee, 207 
Blanton, Melvin Roy, 240 
Blatt, George Douglas, 176 
Blatt, Richard Lee, 198 

Blatter, Alfred Wayne, 242, 338, 
339, 451 

Blaz, Norman Yale, 486 

Blazek, James, 388, 389 

Bleck, Robert Daniel, 235, 338 

Bledsoe, John Francis, 3, 205, 486, 
428, 432, 583 

Blenker, Mary Elizabeth, 342 

Bley, Charles Morris, 237 

Blink, James Seymour, 170 

Blinstrubas, Daiva S., 147 

Bliss, Anthony Earle, 433 

Bliss, Bette Zoe, 160 

Bliss, Martha Ann, 131, 448 

Bloch, Michael, 217 

Bloechle, Robert Allen, 173, 410 

Blome, James Clement, 230, 454, 486 

Blomgren, Richard Marold, 452, 486 

Blomquist, James Carl, 486 

Blomquist, Jay Lorentz, 191 

Blond, Ann Joy, 132 

Bloom, Aleza S., 121 

Bloom, Eileen Linda, 149, 486 

Bloom, James Clifford, 486 

Bloom, Joel Arlen, 250, 410 

Bloom, Robert William, 254 

Bloom, Stuart E., 189 

Bloome, George William, 434 

Blue, Edward Alfred, 486 

Blue, Harold Darrell, 456 

Bluestone, Arthur Barry, 200 
Bluestone, Howard Ira, 210, 457, 486 

Blum, Donald Allen, 183, 412 

Blum, Eleanor, 426 

Blumenthal, Donna Rae, 121 

Blumenthal, Joan Susan, 112 
Blumhardt, Glen, 358 
Blundell, Joyce Anne, 156 
Blunier, Glenna Jean, 150, 430, 448 
Blunier, Wayne Harold, 230, 443, 445 
Bluth, Barbara Ann, 137 
Boam, Jeannette Margaret, 148 
Boatman, Tommy Roy, 188, 422 
Bobak, George Joseph, 180 
Bobert, Lee Allan, 337, 401 
Bobicz, John Milton, 456 
Bobrich, Melsa Nancy, 141, 457 
Boch, Frederich Charles, 252 
Bock, Walter Hans, 247 
Bockwinkel, Sara Jane, 124 
Boden, Barbara Lee, 147 



Bodman, Julia Hammond, 126, 346, 

349, 408, 423, 465 
Bodnar, Dean Andrew, 190 
Boehm, Edward Allan, 182 
Boehm, Howard Martin, 203 
Boehm, Kenncih Michael, 250 
Boehm, Marvin Jay, 432, 486 
Boehm, Robert Ira, 195 
Boeke, Gary Emmert, 247 
Boerner, David, 168 
Boers, Burdetie, 401 
Bogard, William Joseph, 417, 420 
Boge, David Springer, 191 
Boggs, Clifford Ga.e, 431, 439 
Boggs, Susan May, 133 
Bogue, Charles, 202 
Bohart, Karen Leslie, 154 
Bohl, Prof. Robert, 286, 287, 331, 

425 
Bohlen, Robert Martin, 247 
Bohnenstiehl, Rosalie L., 150, 462 
Boidy, Paul Gregory, 212 
Boirun, Barclay Hudson, 254, 337 
Boitz, Donald, 233 
Bokios, Caroline, 140 
Bolden, John Robert, 249, 486 

Bolen, Kenneth Ray, 247, 443, 451 

Bolen, Patsy Threewitt, 486 

Bolen, Thomas Gerald, 452 

Bolin, Joan Sharon, 136, 486 

Bolin, Richard David, 387 

Boling, Dave, 397 

Boling, Robert Thomas, 191 

Bolland, Karen Marie, 155 

Bolland, Terry William, 196, 486 

Bollier, Jacques Renard, 190, 414, 422 

Bollman, Allen Robert, 253 

Bolt, Janet Sue, 141 

Bolton, Richard Luke, 436, 486 

Bomball, William Allen, 222 

Bond, James Frederick, 239 

Bond, Linda Gail, 115, 260, 268, 295, 
307, 308, 413, 416, 486 

Bond, Shirley Jean, 1 19 

Bonesteel, Barbara Ruth, 163 

Bonflglio, Alfred Joseph, 449, 486 

Bonior, Andrew Wa'.ler, 182, 274 

Bonnem, Kenneth Alan, 165, 261, 
276, 279 

Bonslett, Richard Alan, 434 

Boodin, Susan Laura, 131 

Book, Tom Edward, 238 

Booker, Merrel Daniel, Jr., 296, 450 

Booker, Wallace Duane, 486 

Bookey, Carolyn Susan, 1 12, 135, 
414 

Boone, David Howard, 193, 486 

Boor, Peter Teneyck, 338 



Boos, Charles William, 212 

Boos, Darryll Gene, 244, 437 

Booth, Nancy Louise, 137 

Borasky, Maurice Edward, 337 

Bores, Joseph James, 2j0, 444 

Borg, Melvin Burach, 337, 412 

Borgmann, Albert, 194 

Borga, Joseph An.hony, 486 

Boris, Kenneth John, 249 

Bork, Lynn Ellen, 1 2d 

Bork, Ronald Richard, 248, 412 

Borland, Lore ei Joy, 140 

Born, Stephen Michael, 212 

Bornhoeft, Barbara Jane, 111, 486 

Boros, Eugene Joseph, 227, 412 

Boros, Rhoda Ellen, 140 

Boros, Stephen John, 182 

Borowitz, Judith Rae, 148 

Borshell, Myles Stuart, 200 

Borus, Jonathan F., 195, 282, 418 

Borwn, Dr. Richard, 440 

Boschek, Charles Bruce, 248, 336, 452 

Boscher, Robert Warren, 214 

Bosen, Nicholas Joseph, 190, 285 

Bossarte, George Pryor, 193, 261, 329, 

432, 486 
Bossert, Karen Lee, 150, 345, 445 
Boston, Andrew Chester, 247 
Boston, Jennie Lou, 148, 301, 486 
Botek, George, 450 
Botsford, Bruce Ferguson, 222 
Botsford, Terry Kent, 222 
Bottomley, William James, 172 
Bottrell, Roger Keith, 429, 486 
Bouchard, Michael B., 391 
Boughton, Patricia Lou, 110 
Bouque, David Lawrence, 230 
Bourland, Jack D., 417, 418 
Bourn, Harry Joseph, 171, 430 
Bourque, Sara Mae, 148, 414 
Bove, James Vincent, 242 
Bowden, Donald Warren, Jr., 207 
Bowen, Francis Harry, 451 
Bowen, Frank, 339 
Bower, Arthur Oliver, 185, 289, 340, 

451 
Bower, Brenda Agnes, 135 
Bowers, Francis Leroy, 183, 410 
Bowers, James Scott, 184, 264, 289 

383, 397, 487 
Bowers, Kriss Edward, 222 
Bowman, Prof. Charles, 452 
Bowman, Harry Lewis, 254 
Bowman, Paul Dean, 205, 487 
Bowman, Ronald Stanley, 229 
Bowron, Bonita Blanche, 117, 275, 342 
Boyansky, Marsha 147 
Boyd, Bill Ray, 487 



Boyd, Charles Hugh, 227 
Boyd, Doretta Lynn, 138 
Boyd, Gerald Lee, 193 
Boyd, James Allan, 185, 291 
Boyd, James Austin, 244,336 
Boyd, James Wilson, 243 
Boye, Lee Alan, 180, 452 
Boyer, John Randolph, 430 
Boyer, Ronald Eugene, 446 
Boyland, Gloria Frances, 1 16, 435 
Boyle, Dennis Kane, 220 
Bozarth, Joyce Ann, 1 19, 31 1, 346 
Bozin, Daniel Mark, 249 
Brackebusch, Robert A., 230, 445 
Bracken, Hiram Leroy, 235 
Bradbury, Richard Patton, 449 
Braden, David Newman, 344 
Braden, Mary Lynn, 148 
Bradfield, William R., 176, 450 
Bradley, Jerome David, 230, 418 
Bradley, John Leonard, 244 
Bradley, Lloyd Roy, 243 
Bradley, Marcia Kay, 154 
Bradley, Richard Allen, 463 
Bradley, William C, 450 
Bradshaw, Kay Helen, 143, 487 
Bradtke, Wayne Harold, 344 
Brady, Betty Jeanne, 141 
Brady, James Scott, 204, 274, 276 
Brady, Kenneth Edward, 183 
Brahms, John Denis, 339 
Brahms, William Arthur, 165, 339 
Brakenhoff, Bernard M., 465 
Brammer, Bruce Alan, 401 
Bramson, Alan S., 450 
Branch, Burleigh L., 228 
Branch, Karen Sylvia, 136, 413 
Branch, Kenneth Eldon, 237, 259, 

267, 273 
Branch, Sharon Kay, 131 
Brand, Robert Jan, 215, 487 
Brand, Stuart Harvey, 210 
Brandenburg, Joyce E., 145 
Brandenburg, Karen Lee, 144 
Brandt, Rita Jean, 119, 297 
Brandt, Thomas Harrison, 168, 487 
Brantner, Carter, 234 
Brannam, Mrs., 1 14 
Brannan, Jon Vandeventer, 243 
Branson, Richard Paul, 230 
Brantner, Carter Howard, 417, 450 
Brash, Carolyn Avery, 149 
Brarthauar, Robert E., 449, 547 
Brattland, Shirley Ann, 464 
Bratzler, John Henry, 180 
Braun, Judith Anne, 163, 299, 343 
Braun, Howie, 377, 392, 394 



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551 



Braun, Mary Brenda, 126, 260, 296, 

298 
Braun, Randal Rae, 234 
Braun, Robert Louis, 190 
Braun, Sherwin Jack, 434, 487 
Brawar, Joanne, 140 
Bray, Donald, 451 
Brazle, Vernon Lee, 233, 407, 417, 

430, 487 
Brebach, Gresham T., Jr., 172, 422 
Breckenridge, Robert, 392, 394 
Brede, Roger, 245 
Bredek, Roger Solem, 183, 418 
Breeding, Kenneth James, 65 
Breeze, Marilyn Margaret, 149, 48/ 
Breitenbach, Barbara Ann, 148 
Bren, Barbara Marie, 141 
Brennan, Thomas Michael, 254 
Brenner, Bruce Hartman, 167, 48/ 
Brent, Richard Melvin, 428 
Brent, Verla Rae, 144 
Bresee, Melinda, 126,260,296 
Bresler, Martin Bruce, 200 
Brewe, Ruth Ann, 141 
Brewer, Joseph Arthur, Jr., 255 
Brewer, Melvin, 371 
Brewer, Richard Bennett, 166 
Brewer, Richard Lyle, 242 
Brewster, John Alden 437 
Breyer, James Leonard 177, 417, 418 
Brever John Edward, 177 
Breza Michael John 242 487 
Brickman, Kenneth A Ian, 198 
Bridgeland, William M., 487 
Bridgewater Frank A 95 
Bridgwater, Nea H., 21b 
Brienza, Bonnie Lucille 142 
Brieser, Gene Raymond, 14 I 
Brieser, William Earl, 229 
Briggs, Susan, 131 
Brightbill, Charles, 435 
Brightbill. Fredericks. 174.487 
Brighton, Gerald, 347 438 
Brill, Ralph Lewis, 452 
Brim, Jerrold Lee, 434 
Brindmann, Dale, 173 
Bringmann, Richard C, 245 
Brink, Allan Blaine, 454 
Brinker, Barbara Dixon, 457 ,48/ 
Brinker, John Anderson, 487 
Brinkerhoff, Jerry Lee, 209 
Brinkerhoff, Tommy J , 209,431' ,487 
Brinkmann, Dale Charles, 419, 442, 

454, 487 
Brissenden, Jane, 140 
Bristol, Ted H., 217 
Britt, Ruth Ann, 1 1 1 , 342 
Broadbent, David, 261 
Broaddus, Katharine H.,W 
Broadrick, Georgia Lee, 141 
Broadrick, King, 347 
Brock, Curtis Gilbert 487 
Brockman, Ann Elizabeth 131 137 
Brockman, Patricia Lou 1 59 350 
Brockway, Ellen C, 116,409 
Brodd, Jon Landin, 439, 442, 487 
Brodd, Mary Jo., 154 
Brodlie, Jerome Flagg, 210, 4b/ 
Brodsky, Eugene Raymond, 21 1 
Brodsky, Gerald Jack, 453 460, 487 
Brodsky, Sheldon Bernard, 487 
Broil, Warren James, 216 
Bronkhorst, Daniel, 449 
Bronson, John Arthur, 188, 419, 487 
Bronson, Kenneth George, 188 
Bronson, Robert, 392 
Bronstein, Gary Martin, 261, 282, 487 
Brook, Ruth, 141 

Brookhart, Jerry Raymond, 233, 435 
Brookhouzen, Shari Lou, 115 
Brooks, George Nelson, 242, 456 
Brooks, Roger Herbert 195 
Broom, Glen Martin, 233, 350, 426 
Broomfield, John Charles, 254 
Bross, Edward Charles, 239 
Brost, David Lee, 487 
Brostoff, Stuart Spencer, 244, 431, 

439, 487 
Brothers, Judith Ann, 128 
Broughton, Charles Omer, 488 
Brouk, Clifford Otto, 179, 488 
Broun, Kenneth Stanley, 203, 261, 

269, 327, 453, 488 
Broverman, Ada Jean, 156 
Brown, Barbara Ann, 118, 423, 458 
Brown, Barbara Lee, 327 
Brown, Benjamin Thomas, 420 
Brown, Betty Sue, 1 19 
Brown, Beverly Anne, 138 
Brown, Carole Rita, 140 
Brown, Carson Thurston, 248 
Brown, Charles Patrick, 431, 460, 488 
Brown, Charles William, 547 
Brown, David Frederick, 166, 262, 

282, 283, 488 
Brown, David Joel, 286, 320 
Brown, Earl Stanley, 187, 285, 410 
Brown, Edward Francis, 172 
Brown, Elizabeth Louise, 344, 441 
Brown, Evelyn Phyllis, 155, 276, 

301,311 
Brown, Gary Sandy, 205, 371 
Brown, Gary Wayne, 186 
Brown, George Quentin, 212 
Brown, Georgia Elizabeth, 139, 446 
Brown, James Elmen, 191, 350, 361, 

369, 371, 397 
Brown, John Warren, Jr., 383 
Brown, Karen Irene, 129 



Brown, Katherine Louise, 119 
Brown, Kathryn Virginia, 117, 488 
Brown, Kenneth Gerald, 379, 380 
Brown, Kenneth Robert, 247 
Brown, Larry Wayne, 229, 344 
Brown, Margaret Sheila, 275 
Brown, Marianna, 124, 260 
Brown, Marjorie Ann, 408, 457 
Brown, Marlene Ann, 134 
Brown, Mary Elizabeth, 118, 260 
Brown, Mary Helen, 310, 415 
Brown, Melissa Moore, 339 
Brown, Nancy Howard, 123, 163, 438 
Brown, Peter Melvin, 339 
Brown, Phillip Lee, 193 
Brown, Phillip William, 438, 442, 488 
Brown, Richard Edwin, 164, 293 
Brown, Richard Martin, 454 
Brown, Robert J., 261 
Brown, Robert Lee, 174 
Brown, Robert Marshall, 339 
Brown, Ronald Dale, 442 
Brown, Ronald Scott, 182 
Brown, Seymour Aaron, 434, 488 
Brown, Stephen Ralph, 204, 488 
Brown, Susan Gail, 121 
Brown, Thomas, IV, 453 
Brown, Thomas Henry, 450 
Brown, Vernie Kent, 187 
Brown, Vivian Nan, 488 
Brown, William Albert, 213, 243, 488 
Brown, William Dorsey, 207, 261, 
356, 362, 365, 366, 370, 371, 
381,383, 397 
Brown, William James, 364, 428 
Browne, Cynthia, 161, 488 
Browne, Stanley Harold, 187, 225 
Browning, Don Sheldon, 193 
Browning, Norman Lee, 222, 337 
Brownlee, David Allen, 488 
Brownlee, James Archie, 371 
Brownson, Louise May, 148 
Brownstein, Gary, 283 
Brownstein, Harold, 392 
Brubaker, Elizabeth Ann, 131 
Brubaker, John Emmett, 166 
Brubeck, Sally Jean, 141, 488 
Bruce, Beverly Jane, 143 
Bruce, Birtus Warren, 174 
Bruce, Carol Jean, 120 
Bruce, William Henry, Jr., 252 
Brucker, John Raymond, 429 
Bruckner, Audrey E., 157 
Bruckner, Walter, 449 
Bruen, James Patrick, 448, 488 
Bruggen, Willard S., 181, 456 
Brugger, Richard Michael, 225, 41 1, 

488 
Bruhon, Kenneth, 160 
Brumlik, Arlene Ellen, 148, 413, 426, 

488 
Brumlik, Donald Julian, 240, 304, 

305, 442, 488 
Brummer, Jean Carol, 1 10, 488 
Bruni, John Gordon, 434 
Bruninga, George Lammert, 240 
Brunkow, Nancy Louise, 128 
Brunnenmeyer, Dennis Dee, 177 
Brunner, Myra Jean, 155 
Bruns, Robert Eugene, 181 
Bruns, Mrs., 113 
Brunsman, Kenneth S., 247 
Brunsman, Robert Wood, 212 
Brunton, Warren Richard, 449, 488 
Brunzell, Wayne Robert, 224 
Brusatori, Bonita Jean, 408 
Bruun, David Edward, 202, 291 
Bryan, Leslie A., 76 
Bryant, William F., 187, 460 
Bryterton, Eugene G., 328, 453 
Brynjolfsson, Kenneth L., 417 
Brzezicki, Richard C, 434 
Brzyski, Thomas Francis, 452 
Bubeck, Patricia Ann, 128, 409 
Bublick, Janice Harriet, 141 
Bubolz, Emily Catherine, 160 
Buch, Mark Joel, 189, 289 
Buchanan, Ann, 143 
Buchanan, Bobette Ann, 488 
Buchanan, Margaret L., 157 
Bucher, Mary Ann, 124, 280 
Buchholz, Rogene August, 462 
Buck, Gwen, 1 13 
Buck, Julia Ann, 127 
Buck, Maureen Helen, 446 
Buckeley, Peter, 289 
Buchlar, Charles W„ Jr., 171 
Buckles, Alan Wade, 174,261, 347 
Buckles, Karen Lee, 143 
Buckley, Stephen S., 172 
Buckman, James Wendel, 172 
Buckman, John Dustin, 198 
Buckner, Roy Bernard, 215, 421 
Bucnis, Edward Henry, 410, 488 
Budach, Elaine Marlene, 141 
Budd, Roger, Jr., 433 
Buddenbaum, James Albert, 488 
Budelsky, Carl Albert, 193, 456 
Budinger, Jean Paul, 412 
Budinger, Susan Winslow, 155 
Budka, Harold Gene, 436, 488 
Budka, Sonya Olson, 488 
Buehler, Judith Ann, 133 
Buell, David Logan, 176 
Buelow, Edward H„ Jr., 172 
Buente, Barbara Ann, 138, 295, 488 
Buente, John William, 197, 291 
Bueschel, Bruce Benjamin, 223, 343, 
462 



Buescher, Kathryn Louise, 153 
Bugg, James Edward, 230, 345, 

409, 465 
Bugg, William Edmunds, 164 
Bugnis, Edward, 173 
Buhrmester, Leslie W., 411, 489 
Buhrmester, Ray Loren, 235, 489 
Bulfln, Mary Therese, 136, 311, 450 
Bulin, Ronald Joseph, 253 
Bulkeley, Peter Clough, 178, 337 
Bullock, Joyce Lorene, 1 19 
Bullock, Linda Ann, 128 
Bumgarner, John Riley, 238 
Bunch, William Jesse, 255 
Bunde, Karen Nina, 282, 284, 406, 

413 
Bunkenburg, Bruce W., 212, 373, 

377, 397 
Bunting, John Russell, 233 
Bunting, Ross J., 247 
Burch, Betty Jean, 118, 342, 409 
Burch, Kenneth William, 242, 305, 

448, 489 
Burcham, James Jay, 252 
Burchfield, Barbara Ann, 115, 329 
Burck, Philip John, 193 
Burckhard, Paul Fredrick, 337 
Burdette, Stephen D., 220 
Burdick, Jerome Stewart, 204 
Burdin, Thomas Warren, 198 
Burdon, Barbara Ann, 120, 413, 489 
Burdon, Sharon, 120, 489 
Bures, Daniel John, 347 
Burfeind, Raymond F., 242 
Burgbacher, Marianne, 111, 275, 

293, 423 
Burger, William Harold, 198 
Burgess, James Edward, 229 
Burgett, William Russell, 169 
Burgin, Sybil Sue, 1 1 1 
Burgner, Charles William, 243 
Burgoyne, George William, 192 
Burgoyne, Robert, 227 
Burk, Arlene Beatrice, 142, 444 
Burke, Diane, 416 
Burke, Janece Ellen, 441 
Burke, Marianne Bemice, 111,417 
Burke, Ralph Eugene, 230, 440 
Burke, Sarah Anne, 134, 489 
Burke, Terry Richard, 199, 452 
Burke, William John, 180, 289, 489 
Burkey, Ronald Keith, 171, 340 
Burkhardt, Joyce Lenora, 414, 462 
Burkhart, Thomas Henry, 232, 489 
Burkland, Janet Mary, 147 
Burkons, Phyllis Ann, 130 
Burley, Marsha Ann, 149, 489 
Burling, Lloyd Douglas, 340 
Burn, Julian Mitchell, 208 
Burnett, Robert Layne, 242, 304, 

305, 306 
Burnham, Mary Jane, 139, 301, 465 
Burns, Barbara Alice, 148 
Burns, Jack William, 469, 470 
Burnside, John Wayne, 166 
Burokas, Robert Raymond, 214 
Burrell, Carolyn Grace, 133 
Burrell, Sally Anne, 140 
Burrell, William Ford, 263, 356, 359, 
361, 362, 363, 366,371, 391, 
397, 481 
Burrus, John William, 184, 445 
Burstein, Eleanor Esther, 147, 438, 446 
Burt, Judith Annette, 162 
Burton, Gary Verne, 208, 414 
Burton, Raymond Gerald, 231 
Burton, Robert Arthur, 249 
Burton, Robert Bailey, 456 

Burwell, William George, 245 
Busboom, Vernon Eugene, 464, 489 

Busby, Ronald Roy, 233 

Busch, Barbara Frances, 489 

Buser, David Allan, 244 

Buser, Robert Edward, 228, 437 

Bush, Arlene Barbara, 112, 135 

Bush, Donald Alan, 371 

Bush, George Ray, 232, 489 

Bush, James Leland, 250 

Bush, John Fred, 172 

Bush, Judy Ann, 120 

Bush, Robert Frank, 175, 291 

Bushdiecker, Roger Kent, 188 

Busher, Robert Joseph, 194 

Bushnick, Roger Alan, 193 

Busick, Robert Donald, 248 

Busse, Jon Henry, 489 

Butler, Amy Lou, 159, 489 

Butler, Bartlett Russell, 435 

Butler, David Richard, 182 

Butler, Jeffrey Sheridan, 205 

Butler, Jewel Edward, 247, 412 

Butler, Linda Marie, 156 

Butler, Patricia Ann, 153 

Butler, William Sloan, 248, 338 

Butner, Mrs., 174 

Butt, Jay Stanley, 193 

Butterman, Inez Lee, 132 

Butterworth, James B., 186 

Button, James Edward, 166, 234 

Button, Richard, 289 

Butzer, Charles, 358 

Buxton, Vernon Gene, 234 

Buyher, David Smith, 431, 439, 460, 
489 

Buzdygan, Christine E., 149, 489 

Byard, Helen Bell, 441 

Byer, Stephen Barry, 248 

Byerly, Kellie Sylvester, 164 

Byrd, Frances Jean, 148 



Byrne, James Otto, 347 

Byrne, Kay Jean, 131 

Byrne, Mary Ann, 128 

Byrne, Timothy Kehoe, 178, 339 

Byrns, Bonnie Kay, 1 18, 328, 408 

Byrom, Tracy Gay, 127 



Campus Chest, 349 
Campus View Lodge, 227 
Calhoun Hull. 227 

i lareer < lonfereuce, 3-15 

Cedar Hall, 149 

Chi Omega, llts 

Chi Phi, 175 

Chi Psi, TTll 

Christian Science Organization, 
4112 

Clark House, 240 

College Hall, 221. 401 

Colombian Students' Associa- 
tion. 439 

Commerce Council. 4:19 

Committee on Student Affairs, 
286 

Cooperative Extension Club, 430 

Cosmopolitan club. 22s 

Caballero, Fernando, 180, 437, 439, 
489 

Cable, Ronald Gay, 247 

Cablk, Joseph, 181 

Cacciapaglia, Bruce S., 252, 371 

Caddy, George Keith, 248 

Cade, David Giller, 174 

Cadwell, Wilfred Clifton, 215 

Cage, William Edwin, 175 

Cahill, James Michael, 243 

Cahoon, Thomas Hart, 192, 421 

Cain, Raymond Frederick, 192, 421, 
489 

Cairns, John James, 214 

Calamaras, George Peter, 453, 489 

Caldwell, Alan Claypool, 243 

Calhoun, David William, 181 

Call, John Foster, 207 

Callahan, Mary Jane, 126, 396 

Calloway, Barbara Anne, 116, 409 

Calusio, Joseph Charles, 247 

Calverley, David Lake, 169, 489 

Calvert, Barbara Rae, 457 

Camden, Ronald Wilber, 418 

Cameron, Charles Robert, 197 

Cameron, David Hugh, 172 

Cameron, George Alan, 172, 460, 489 

Cameron, Sara Duncombe, 489 

Cammack, Prof. Emerson, 442 

Campbell, Bonnie Sue, 140 

Campbell, Charles Edward, 187, 391 

Campbell, Craig Stewart, 228, 489 

Campbell, Gaylord Keith, 249 

Campbell, James B., 103 

Campbell, Ruth Elizabeth, 154, 467, 
489 

Campbell, Susanne Marie, 162, 301 

Camplin, Charles Roger, 222 

Cann, Lelia May, 144 
Cannon, Bevely Jane, 1 17 
Cannon, James Calvin, 489 
Cannon, Larry Lee, 188, 418 
Capes, Eugene Meredith, 209 
Cappa, Laurel Ann, 131 
Caputo, Vincent John, 255 
Caravello, John Joseph, 208 
Carberry, James Francis, 243, 434 
Cardulla, Francis George, 418 
Carey, Brian Eric, 208, 489 
Carl, David, 449 
Carl, Harry Lee, 410 
Carl, Henry, 250 
Carl, Linda Lea, 128 
Carlington, Barbara Sue, 148 
Carll, Wade Monroe, 164, 274, 277 
Carloye, Mary Helper, 413 
Carls, Glen Alvin, 242 
Carlson, Arthur George, 220 
Carlson, Arthur Waldemar, 197 
Carlson, Carol Diane, 1 18, 276 
Carlson, Dale Elmer, 490 
Carlson, Dennis, 391 
Carlson, Donald Earle, 419, 425, 

437, 490 
Carlson, Duane Gregory, 202 
Carlson, Hilding Dale, 245, 305 
Carlson, Jack William, 452 
Carlson, Judith Louise, 140, 301 
Carlson, Judith Vivian, 160 
Carlson, June Carol, 157 
Carlson, Marlene Ann, 446 
Carlson, Martha Susan, 150 
Carlson, Richard Earl, 193, 432, 490 
Carlson, Richard Eugene, 227 
Carlson, Roger Harold, 247 
Carlson, William Arthur, 198 
Carlson, William Roger, 172, 428, 490 
Carlston, Prof. Kenneth, 452 
Carmean, Ronald Eugene, 418 
Carnes, Cornelia, Marie, 338 
Carney, Allan Herbert, 167, 460, 490 
Carney, James C, 417, 420, 438, 490 
Carollo, Anton John, 228, 434, 490 
Carpenter, Myron Arthur, 179, 469, 

470, 490 
Carr, Harold Dean, 238 
Carr, Richard Edward, 176, 401 
Carr, Thomas Harvey, 253 
Carr, William John, 401, 453, 490 
Carrier, Norman Kendrick, 204 



552 




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Carriger, Henry Nicholas, 248 
Carrillo, Anne, 439 
Carrillo, Mario, 439 
Carrizosa, Gomez Alfredo, 439 
Carroll, Carolyn Jane, 148 
Carroll, Dennis Bruce, 205, 418 
Carroll, Don Allan, 187 
Carroll, Henry William, 170 
Carroll, Michael O., 337 
Carroll, Patricia M., 118, 149 
Carruthers, George, 330 
Carskadon, William E., 178 
Carson, James Wendell, 184, 337, 

456 
Carson, Jerry Lind, 174, 446 
Carson, William H., Jr. ,172 
Carter, David Carlson, 239 
Carter, David William, 454, 490 
Carter, Diana Lee, 161, 406, 463 
Carter, Janice Elizabeth, 148 
Carter, Michael Robert, 242 
Carter, Naman Ray, 180 
Carter, Norma Jean, 122 
Cartwright, Glen Phillip, 207, 340 
Case, Charles Thomas, 425, 490 
Casey, Charmayne Villona, 124 
Casey, Jeanne Slovacek, 455, 490 
Casey, William Robert, 490 
Cash, Alan Sherwin, 206, 291 
Casleton, Ronald Glenn, 220 
Cassel, Donald Keith, 233 
Cassell, Charles W., Jr., 204 
Cassell, Sharon Lee, 141 
Cassens, Audree Mae, 115, 438, 490 
Cassity, Rebecca Jane, 117, 343 
Cast, Dick Fronas, 371 
Castagnello, Mary E., 163 
Castelein, Leo Hilaire, 171 
Castelein, Paul Thomas, 228 
Castino, Guy Thomas, 437, 490 
Castor, Kathryn Regina, 137 
Castor, Linda Kay, 124 
Castro, Amado, 252 
Catalano, Philip, 387, 490 
Catalano, Phyllis, 138 
Catlett, Jerry Denis, 253 
Cattapan, Louise Mary, 149 
Caughey, Robert Ray, 184, 274, 445 
Caughron, Mary Lou, 1 15, 31 1 
Cavanah, Jack Allan, 243, 443, 490 
Cavitt, John, 184 

Cawelti, Stephen Wayne, 250, 456 
Cazolas, Anthony Richard, 183 
Cecil, Kenneth Bradley, 166 
Celarec, Michael Carl, 192 
Centanni, James Daniel, 490 
Center, Charlene, 140 
Cepon, Louis John, Jr., 185 
Cernota, Jane Adelyn, 140 



Cerskus, Vita Antanina, 143, 490 
Cerven, Frank George, 234 
Cervenka, Richard Carl, 197 
Chaden, Recille, 490 
Chaet, llene Joy, 152 
Chalcraft, Kenneth G., 171, 371 
Chamberlain, Paul Dean, 249, 456 
Chamberlain, Susan Tacey, 343 
Chamberlin, Dennis R., 188, 428 
Chambers, Marcia Jean, 148 
Chambless, James Earl, 450 
Chamlin, Roger John, 190 
Chamy, Virgina Cleo, 37, 119, 408 
Chan, Paul, 437, 490 
Chan, Russell, 248 
Chandler, Georgia, 140 
Chandler, Virginia A., 136, 279 
Chanock, Carole Rae, 141, 301, 490 
Chaplik, Harvey Allen, 227, 237, 490 
Chapman, Earnest Laverle, 433 
Chapman, Henry Llewellyn, 171, 435, 

452, 490 
Chapman, Howard Stuart, 249 
Chapman, Larry William, 208 
Chapman, Mary Campbell, 149 
Chapman, Toby Marshall, 247 
Charles, Maureen V., 117, 457 
Charous, Michael Steven, 232, 417 
Charter, Diana Lea, 113 
Chase, Kayla Iris, 141 
Chasen, Martin Max, 247, 305, 431, 

464, 490 
Chaudhary, Ram Autar, 440 
Chauveau, Christian P., 460 
Chayko, Robert John, 344 
Cheatham, Robert Allen, 247 
Cheffer, Charles Marion, 193 
Chelin, Hartley Ames, 248 
Chen, Frank Ching You, 246, 490 
Chen, Joseph Zuen Yuen, 239, 416, 

425, 490 
Chen, Kwanshei, 246 
Chen, Stephen, 232 
Cheng, Cheng Yin, 449 
Chenoweth, Amos Junior, 233 
Cheopelas, Georgia, 140 
Cherbo, Joni Maya, 121 
ChernofT, Jo Ann, 148 
Cherry, Bernard Hugh, 210 
Cherry, Sheila, 148 
Chertkow, Glenn, 243, 328 
Chertow, Bruce Sherwin, 195 
Chertow, Laurel Sara, 140 
Chesney, Gary Wayne, 248 
Chesrow, Giselle, 143 
Chesson, Prof. Eugene, 436 
Chester, Douglas Charles, 453 
Chez, Ronald Lee, 200 
Chicon, Charles D., Jr., 244 



Chidichimo, August Carl, 222 
Chierico, Richard V., 249 
Chilcote, Wayne Seton, Jr., 175, 336 
Childress, Barry Lee, 249 
Childs, Elizabeth Ann, 163, 491 
Chiles, Diana Kay, 158, 301, 462, 

491 
Chimelina, John, 220 
Chinnock, Thomas Gordon, 248 
Chious, John Michael, 183 
Chipain, Nicholas Chris, 205 
Chirikos, Dennis William, 243 
Chisek, Robert James, 194 
Chisenhall, Ronald Lee, 418 
Chisenhall, Wayne Allan, 448 
Chiss, Gerald David, 210 
Chittick, Kathaleen, 138 
Chlebicki, Cynthia Maria, 161 
Chmurny, William Wayne, 249 
Cho, Alfred, 491 

Chocholek, Raymond S., 170, 434, 491 
Chonowski, Walter John, 252 
Chou, Cheng Ngok, 240 
Chow, Donald Hukkeung, 454 
Chow, Henry Shuiching, 491 
Christensen, Arnold L., 491 
Christensen, Jerene Inez, 441 
Christensen, Kent R., 185 
Christensen, Ronald F., 457, 491 
Christensen, William M., 235 
Christian, Kenneth H.,336, 433 
Christiansen, Beverly Jo, 144 
Christie, John Tait, 247, 337 
Christie, Virginia Alice, 135 
Christopher, Joan Marie, 131 
Christopherson, David E., 233, 350, 

409, 431 
Chroman, Richard Jay, 412 
Chulock, Karen Hope, 140 
Chumbley, Janet Marie, 126, 439, 491 
Church, Harrison Leon, 243 
Church, Thomas Albert, Jr., 437 
Churchill, Mac Milo, 207, 417, 431 
Chutrau, Norbert, 491 
Chval, Mary lee, 127, 344 
Chylek, Sherry Lee, 148 
Ciasto, Theodore Leslie, 225 
Cibulsky, Josephine Anne, 141 
Cicero, Joaquin Carlos, 222 
Cicero, Joseph Benjamin, 222, 445, 

491 
Ciesiel, Allen Robert, 243 
Cieslewicz, Norbert W., 336, 451 
Cini, Dale Arthur, 232 
Cipriano, Frank Joseph, 183, 417 
Citro, Marvin Howard, 244, 418 
Citti, Barbara Louise, 116, 491 
damage, Barney David, 491 
Clammer, Carol, 147 



Clampitt, Ohma Rosemarie, 154 

Clapper, Patricia Leach, 491 

Clarage, Edward Braun, 176 

Clarage, James Braun, 176 

Clarey, Paul Thomas, 191 

Clarida, Harold Glenn, 228, 436, 491 

Clark, Cheryl L., 413 

Clark, Iris Lynn, 1 16 

Clark, James Charles, 205, 280, 282, 

349 
Clark, Kermit, 272 

Clark, Larry Lynn, 221, 410, 430, 491 
Clark, Larry William, 176 
Clark, Mary Margaret, 148 
Clark, Nancy Lou, 140 
Clark, Paul Edward, Jr., 227, 337 
Clark, Richard Lamont, 343 
Clark, Stewart Alan, 240 
Clark, Thomas Elliott, 183 
Clark, Thomas Wayne, 204, 285 
Clark, William David, 221 
Clark, William Lawrence, 337 
Clarke, Kenneth Stevens, 441 
Class, Richard Earl, 216 
Claudon, Paul Lynn, 243 
Clausen, Edward Martin, 454 
Clauson, Florence Marie, 144, 455, 491 
Clawson, Ardeth Kay, 163, 439 
Clay, Daniel Jefferson, 401 
Clay, David George, 491 
Claycomb, Gordon, 388, 389 
dayman, Sandra Dee, 132 
Clayton, James Melvin, 192, 456 
Clayton, Sheryl Fae, 111, 275, 428, 

491 
Cleary, Michael Douglas, 183, 491 
Cleaver, Joyce Helen, 136, 278 ' 
Cleaves, Belinda Ellen, 148 
Cleckner, Thomas John, 222 
Clegg, Joseph John, 230, 435, 491 
Clein, Gerald, 401 
Clem, John Richard, 3, 182, 259, 266 

491,583 
Clem, Samuel Edward, Jr., 547 
Clement, David Eugene, 235 
Clement, Howard, 105 
Clemente, Ralph, 433 
demons, Carol Margaret, 128 
Cleveland, Anne E., 131 
Cleveland, Clinton John, 242 
Cleveland, Edward Craig, 204, 491 
Clever, Darlene Joane, 133, 298, 427, 

435, 491 
Clickener, John Ross, 231, 450 
Cliff, Paul Lawrence, 196, 330 
Clifford, Candace Ruth, 491 
Clinch, William Lee, 208, 435 
Cline, Charles Henry, 465, 491 
Cline, Katherine Hirt, 465, 491 



LL 1 u Lu 




Designed for 
University of Illinois Students 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 
BANK AND TRUST CO. 



MAIN AT BROADWAY, URBANA 



Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



553 



Cline, Kathleen Joyce, 157 

Cline, Michael L., 172, 475 

Cline, Tilford Robert, 409, 491 

Clinton, Frank Lee, 460 

Close, Barbara Anne, 141, 344 

Close, Djvid W„ 233 

Close, Margaret Mary, 344 

Clotkin, Sue, 301 

Clow, Robert Sterling, 233 

Clover, Charles, 231 

Cloyd, Neale Arthur, 196, 291 

Cluver, John, 463 

Coane, Charles C, 261 

Coats, Boyd Russell, 462 

Cobb, Donald Porter, 207 

Cobb, James Alan, 187 

Coburn, Dorothy Roberta, 408, 450 

Coburn, Michael Bertram, 304, 305 

Cocagne, James Michael, 213 

Cochran, Dean Joan, 295, 296, 297 

Cochran, Rachel, 458 

Cochran, Ray, 120 

Cochran, Richard Duane, 84 344 

Coda, Bernard Anthony, Jr., 438 

Coddington, Joseph P., 218 

Coddington, Richard Cary, 197, 274, 

343 r, a 991 

Coe, Dennis Raymond 2il 

Coe, Richard Allen, 171,291 

Coe, Samuel B., 228 

Coenen, Rodney Marcus, 434 

Coffman, Carol Ann, 157 

Coffman, Nancy Jean, 141 

Coffman, Robert Howard, 233, 4JU, 

Cogan, Alyce Clare, 112 

Cogan, Irene, 143 

Coggins, William R., 492 

Coghlan, George Dunn, 19/ 

Cogurn, Michael, 248 

Cohan, Donald Gene, 243, 452 

Cohen, Bari Sue, 125 

Cohen, Daniel Sacks, 2o2 450 

Cohen, David Maurice, 195 

Cohen, Diane Roberta, 142 

Cohen, Gerald, 442 

Cohen, Harvey Edwin, 460 

Cohen, Rabbi Hirsch, 464 

Cohen, Jane Ellen, 141 

Cohen, Lawrence Joseph, 24/ 

Cohen, Marilyn, 132 

Cohen, Meryl Beverly, 1-0 

Cohen, Nancy Edes, 143 

Cohen, Lawrence, 237 

Cohen, Pam Sidne, 121, 423 

Cohen, Phyllis Susan, 147 

Cohen! Ray Jeffrey 203 ; 328 

Cohen, Stephen Joel, 252, 492 

Cohen, Sluart Behr, 247 

Cohen, Stuart Lyle, 401 

Cohen, Tanya, 160, 492 

Cohler, Alan Jay, 167 

Cohn, Eileen Rose, 152 

Cohn, Judith Merle, 125 

Cohn, Linda Sue, 141 

Cohn, Prof. Rubin, 452 

Cohn, Stuart Roosevelt, 21/, ^VJ 

Cohn, Terry Dee, 143 

Colangelo, Gerald John, 191, 376, 

377 
Colbnrn, Stephen, 179, 216 
Colburn, Steven Clyde, 454 
Colby, Edward S., 203 
Colby, William Andrew, 224, 340, 

492 
Cole, Harvey Louis, 21 1 
Cole, Jewett, 190 
Cole, John Sammis, Jr., 460 
Cole, Kendall Paul, 230 
Cole, William Robert, 233, 435 
Colegrove, Linda Mae, 128 
Colegrove, Norma Louise, 123, 492 
Coleman, Ann Sherwood, 137 
Coleman, Charles Ira, Jr., 238 
Coleman, Dejustice, 356, 358, 364, 

366, 371 
Coleman, Delbert Leon, 380, 381, 

382, 383, 397 
Coleman, Michael Garm, 218, 449, 

492 
Coleman, Robert Mallone, 229 
Colleen, James Dwight, 336, 401 
Collens, Lewis Morton, 237, 261, 282, 

283, 492 
Collie, John Anthony, 254 
Collier, Richard Cecil, 222 
Collins, Alex, 248 
Collins, Dan Sherwood, 201 
Collins, Ernest Edward, 193 
Collins, Frederic Robert, 205 
Collins, James Fredrick, 179, 418 
Collins, Mary Elizabeth, 143 
Collins, Mary Kathryn, 128 
Collins, William Edward, 249 
Collins, William F., 253 
Collymore, Earl N., 249 
Colman, Thomas Edward, 215, 421 
Colmey, John Campbell, 440 
Colombo, Carl Leo, 434, 492 
Coltman, Marcia Lee, 132 
Clover, Larry Allen, 243 
Colvin, Bobby Joe, 248, 492 
Colvin, James, 103 
Colwell, James Allen, 208, 422 
Colwell, Ronald Ray, 228, 337 
Colwell, Susan Dodge, 131 
Combs, Harry, 373, 374, 375, 376 
Combes, Jane Austin, 126 
Comstock, David Preston, 171, 492 



Conant, Barbara Ann, 1 19, 293, 349, 

414, 423 
Conant, John Charles, 193, 428, 492 
Conard, Sheryl Lynn, 162, 344 
Condict, Rupert Dewayne, 492 
Condit, Polly, 116 
Condon, William John, 429 
Cone, Robert Dexter, 238 
Conley, Dennis Terry, 248 
Connel, Miss Barbara, 146 
Connor, Mary Linda, 158 
Connor, Patricia Ann, 137, 492 
Connors, Chester Lee, 240 
Connors, Larry Richard, 328 
Conrad, Keville Mary, 133 
Conrad, Laurel Anne, 136, 336, 492 
Conroy, Bruce, 166 
Converse, Ralph James, 243 
Conway, Everett Wayne, 434 
Conway, Gene Francis, 198, 462 
Coogan, Margaret Ann, 3 17, 337, 344 
Cook, Diane Mae, 408 
Cook, Earl Joseph, 192 
Cook, Joyce Elaine, 148 
Cook, Dr. Ralph, 454 
Cook, Roberta Robin, 160, 492 
Cook, William Edward, 193, 421 
Cooke, Leon Robert, 21 1 
Cooley, Marlene Jo, 1 14, 450 
Coombe, Martha Virginia, 154, 258, 

346, 492 
Coomber, Barry Gilbert, 175 
Coomer, Terry Eugene, 240 
Coon, Mary Jo, 127 
Coon, Richard, 239 
Cooper, Duncan Brown, 207 
Cooper, Gary Leo, 213 
Cooper, Gary Neal, 168, 445 
Cooper, Iris Ruth, 417 
Cooper, James Carter, 351 
Cooper, James Everett, 442 
Cooper, Jeanne Ellen, 157 
Cooper, Kathryn Carol, 148 
Cooper, Mary Linda, 126, 492 
Cooper, Virginia Ellen, 133 
Cooper, William Kenneth, 187 
Coorens, Elaine Alice, 141, 301, 329, 

344 
Coots, Jerald Wayne, 492 
Copeland, Sheldon Martin, 250 
Coplan, Benny Lee, 238 
Coplan, Robert Galen, 410 
Copp, Gloria Mary, 153, 492 
Corbett, Norma Joyce, 154 
Corbett, William Thomas, 228 
Corbin, Kathryn Jeanne, 160, 339, 422, 

492 
Cordes, Cynthia Sue, 136 
Cordogian, Linda A., 143 
Corkill, Ann Marie, 136 
Corlew, Philip Morgan, 336 
Corliss, Richard Lee, 462 
Cornelisen, Robert Paul, 204 
Cornell, Daniel Lee, 251 
Cornell, Edward Lyman, 291, 450 
Cornell, Jackie Lavern, 247 
Cornick, Lynn, 1 25 
Coroneos, Donald Lee, 254, 306 
Corsten, John Thomas, 401 
Cortright, Ruth Lucille, 156, 343, 

406, 465 
Corum, Janice Deane, 338 
Cosek, Edwin George, 434 
Cosme, Judith Kay, 148 
Cosme, Robert Peter, 207 
Cosnow, Marvin Allen, 449 
Costa, Richard Louis, 174, 261, 428 
Cotner, Robert Lee, 247 
Cottay, Judith Ann, 155 
Cotter, Judith Kay, 156, 338 
Cotton, Alison Dean, 235 
Cotton, Thomas Richard, 248 
Coufal, Delwin Terry, 205 
Coultas, Wilber H., Jr., 176 
Coulter, Donald Edward, 227 
Coulter, Janet Elizabeth, 135 
Counts, John Edward, Jr., 255, 356, 

358, 359, 360, 363, 366, 371 
Courter, George Edward, 239, 44j 
Courtney, Richard Lee, 254 
Courtright, Diane Mary, 128, 462 
Covert, Nadine Elizabeth, 467 
Covey, Charles Allen, 452 
Cowan, Maryellen, 162, 463 
Cowan, Penelope Sue, 140 
Cowell, Myron Dean, 463 
Cowen, William Wright, 193, 456 
Cowgill, Roberta Lucille, 157 
Cowill, Myron, 248 
Cowman, Gary Laverne, 180, 492 
Cox, Andrew Joseph, 208, 452 
Cox, Claude Edward, 208, 433 
Cox, Delano Kimberling, 492 
Cox, Gary Bruce, 238 
Cox, James Hilton, 248, 412 
Cox, Robert, 220 
Coxhead, Alan Bruce, 175 
Coykendall, Janice Ann, 158 
Crabtree, Elizabeth Ann, 143 
Crabtree, John Richard, 238 
Crackel, Ted, 176 
Craig, Linda Miller, 426, 492 
Craig, Paul William, 492 
Craig, Richard Lynn, 492 
Craig, Robert Mackenzie, 208 
Craig, Ronald Floyd, 202 
Craig, William Scott, 416 
Craigle, Walter Stephen, 239 
Cramer, Launa Rochelle, 149, 492 



Cramer, Marlene Ann, 457 
Cramer, Patricia Ann, 161 
Cramer, Patricia Joan, 140 
Cramer, Sharon Anne, 163, 492 
Crandall, Carol Lee, 141, 444 
Crane, Alexandra, 116, 280 
Crane, George Larry, 242 
Crane, Herbert Pond, Jr., 188, 417 
Crane, Karen Mclntrie, 117, 343 
Crane, Noreen Hope, 151, 301 
Cranford, Ronald Eugene, 183, 417, 

418 
Crapple, Robert William, 170 
Crater, Patricia Louise, 159, 440 
Cravens, Bonnie Lee, 156, 457, 458 
Cravens, Mary Helen, 156 
Crawford, James Edward, 452 
Crawford, John Wickham, 493 
Crawford, Marva Ann, 140 
Crawford, Roger Allen, 243 
Creamer, Bruce C, 410 
Creamer, Linda Jean, 1 13, 276, 278, 

342, 423 
Creamer, Sharon, 328 
Creasy, Robert Leonard, 196 
Cremieux, Faith Mildred, 127, 493 
Cremieux, Karen Eleanor, 127, 414, 

448 
Creviston, Robert Louis, 164, 371 
Crexler, Jack, 211 
Cribb, Arlene Yvonne, 143, 350 
Cribb, lone Ruth, 147, 457 
Cribbet, John, 347, 452 
Criley, Bruce Benner, 227, 493 
Cripe, Jerry Wayne, 371 
Crippen, Kent Robert, 222 
Crocker, Hector Jose, 243 
Croll, John Henry, 401 
Crombie, Howard Franklin, 411 
Cromwell, Sharon Lee, 136 
Crone, David James, 401 
Crone, Henry Lincoln, 214 
Cronk, Howard Stanley, 191 
Crook, Adrian Charles, 261, 442, 453, 

454 
Crook, Ronald Louis, 433, 437 
Crosby, Marcia Ann, 127, 438, 439, 

446, 493 
Crose, Cynthia Anne, 1 17, 435, 493 
Cross, Cherry Lee, 148, 344 
Cross, John Scholl, 187 
Cross, Patricia Ann, 1 14 
Crotser, Freddie Max, 387 
Crouch, Lindley Jane, 407, 450, 493 
Crout, Carol Ann, 156, 225, 465 
Crowell, Ronald Dennis, 196, 436, 493 
Crowley, Sharon Lea, 118, 260, 309, 

415 
Crowley, Walter Lewis, 212 
Crownson, Robert Stephen, 253 
Crozier, William Robert, 493 
Crull, Stanley Warren, 238, 435 
Crum, Jerry Dean, 250 
Crum, Raymond Russell, 231 
Crum, Robert Lynn, 231 
Crumback, Donald T., 250 
Crump, Barbara Ann, 158, 342, 406, 

422 
Cryder, Mrs., 180 
Csicvara, Margaret Mary, 441 
Cubbage, Mariorie Anne, 156 
Cubitt, Llewellyn M., 229 
Cudzik, Joseph Robert, 425 
Cuerden, Glenn Alan, 199, 493 
Culbertson, Frank Allan, 202 
Culbertson, Nancy Ann, 123, 458 
Culkin, Helen Mary, 110, 260, 493 
Culleton, Carson Gregory, 253 
Culumber, Michael Joseph, 229 
Culver, John Blaine, 410 
Cummings, Deborah Jane, 2, 435 
Cummings, James Winfred, 235 
Cummins, James Daniel, 412 
Cummins, Vance Ashley, 197 
Cunningham, Elizabeth J., 129 
Cunningham, James F., 182, 349 
Cunningham, Ruth Ann, 150, 467 
Curless, Jerry Verne, 205, 377 
Curley, John Michael, 248 
Curran, Thomas Francis, 493 
Curry, Janet Elaine, 126 
Curry, Robert Lee, 227 
Curry, Stephen Harlan, 249 
Curtis, Carolyn Rosann, 1 10, 260 
Curtis, Sandra Jo, 140, 298, 300 
Curtiss, Richard Baker, 184, 261, 347 
Cusey, Robert Eugene, 246 
Cushing, Victor M., 250 
Cutler, Alan Keith, 447 
Cutler, Jean Valjean, 312 
Cutler, Keith, 179 
Cutler, Leonard Ray, 250 
Cvik, James, 387 
Cwik, Joseph Chester, 393, 395 
Cyborski, Thomas Jerome, 194 
Czarnecki, Leonard C, 209, 493 
Czajkowsky, Miroslaw, 215 
Czekala, Rose Marie, 144, 493 
Czurylo, Christine E., 328 
Czyszczon, Robert Peter, 239 



I) 



Dad's Day Revue, 278, 290 
Dairy Production club. 440 
Dairy Technology Society, 140 
Dally mini, 32t>, S28 
Delta Chi, 177 



Delta Delta Delta, 119 

Delta Delta Sigma, 412 

Delta uamma, i2u 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, 178 

Delta Phi, 17!) 

Delta 1 hi Epsilon, 121 

Delta Sigma Omicron, 441 

Delta Sigma Phi, 180 

Delta Si. ma Pi, 442 

Delta Sigma Theta, 122 

i.elta Tau Delta. 181 

Delta Upsilon, 182 

Delta Zeta, 123 

Disciples Student Fellowship, 

4(13 
Doll Show, 346 
I lolpllin Fraternity, 414 
Dolphin Show, 21 
Drill Team Navy ROTC, 47.1 
Dadney, Adolphus, 493 
Dacks, Herbert Mitchell, 210 
Daehn, Marcia Ann, 111 
Daems, Richard Edgar, 232 
Daggett, Judith Ann, 147 
Dagis, Randall Bryant, 255, 425 
Dahl, Delbert Theodore, 230, 440 
Dahl, Dennis Alan, 172 
Dahl, Melford Arthur, 436, 493 
Dahl, Robert John, 337, 344, 465 
Dahlgren, Thomas William, 250 
Dahlin, Bruce Harrison, 191 
Dahltorp, Bruce Lawrence, 202 
Dahman, Homer Marc, 493 
Daigh, Charles Francis, 243, 282, 493 
Daily, Carolyn Joyce, 260, 426 
Daily, John Edmund, 168 
Dale, Dr. Edwin, 447 
Dale, John William, 196, 434 
Daley, Mrs., 110 
Dalitsch, Walter W., Jr., 198 
Dallach, Robert L., Jr., 201, 291 
Dallman, Bonnie Marie, 131, 435, 493 
Daly, Edward Nelson, 197 
Daly, John Edward, 445 
Daly, Marylin Ann, 3, 136, 260, 263, 

330, 413, 493, 583 
Dameron, Eldon Wayne, 493 
Damerow, Robert William, 452 
Dammerman, Bonnie Sue, 139, 465 
Dammerman, Sara Lynne, 123 
Damon, Daniel Alden, 190, 493 
Dan, Stewart King, 189 
Dancey, Deborah Ann, 120 
Dandurand, David Allen, 191, 422 
Dandurand, Richard J., 218, 288, 289, 

431 
Danek, Stanley Michael, 216, 410, 433 
Danforth, Jordan Charles, 239 
Dangerfield, Helen Kay, 110, 269, 270, 

273, 493 
Daniel, Arthur John, 225, 493 
Daniels, Arthur, 453 
Daniels, John Francis, 410 
Daniels, Kristin Michal, 160 
Daniels, Mrs., 155 
Daniels, Robert Edmund, 249 
Daniels, Thomas Edward, 182, 243 
Danielson, David Charles, 197 
Dankers, William Gene, 240 
Danko, John Howard, 242 
Danley, Barbara Louise, 116 
Danna, Gary Lee, 212 
Dannells, Phyllis Helen, 141,361 
Dannenfeldt, Dan John, 261 
Danoff, Michael, 243 
Danzer, Warren Keith, 391, 433, 493 
Dapin, Geraldine, 143 
Dapin, Marshall Seymour, 249 
Darby, Jack Edwin, 176 
Darby, Louise Ellen, 110, 311, 408 
Darling, Nancy Jane, 136 
Darnell, Jess Lewis, 493 
Dart, Richard Allen, 463 
Dattilo, Anita Lynne, 143 
Datz, Robert Edward, 249 
Daughters, George T., 215 
Davenport, Carolyn Sue, 148 
Davidson, Alan Norton, 208, 422 
Davidson, Deborah Jane, 160 
Davidson, Ronald Eugene, 233 
Davidson, Shirley Jean, 309 
Davies, John Haskett, 166 
Davies, Patricia Sue, 155, 338, 422, 493 
Davis, Alfred Stewart, 455, 493 
Davis, Ann Judith, 112 
Davis, Barry Stuart, 210 
Davis, Beverley Gene, 159, 343 
Davis, Brent Layman, 229 
Davis, Champ Wilburn, Jr., 190 
Davis, Clarence Oliver, 235, 429 
Davis, Deanna Kathryn, 113, 275, 344 
Davis, Geoffrey Noel, 240 
Davis, James Henry, 165, 222 
Davis, James Lloyd, 454 
Davis, Janice, 157 
Davis, Jean, 120 

Davis, Jerome Howard, 217, 494 
Davis, Jerry Wayne, 231 
Davis, Joan, 128 
Davis, John Charles, 204 
Davis, John William, 248 
Davis, Lyndel Loren, 338, 451 
Davis, Newell, 467 
Davis, Robert Dykeman, 192 
Davis, Roger Hal, 182 
Davis, Russell Melville, 227 
Davis, Sally S., 163 
Davis, Sheila, 151 
Davis, Shirlee Dakota, 148 



554 



Time Tells the Tale 




j 



ust as classrooms and buildings have become 
more modern and functional, so have means and 
methods of producing engravings. 

But hand-in-hand with moderness go tradition and 
experience . . . and fine engravings for yearbooks have been 
a tradition with us for 48 years. 



OFFICIAL ENGRAVERS FOR THIS PUBLICATION 

G. R. Grubb & Co. 



ARTISTS • ENGRAVERS 



116 N. WALNUT ST., CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 



555 



Davis, Stephen Robert, 454 

Davis, Terry Joalda, 113, 297, 450 

Davis, William Kase, 412, 417, 434, 494 

Davis, Prof. Wylie, 452 

Davison, Alan, 410 

Davison, Charles Foster, 170, 232 

Davy, Nira Jeanne, 157 

Dawson, Patrick Edward, 194 

Dawson, Russell Leonard, 202, 289 

Day, Donald James, 191 

Day, Jay Martin, 212 

Day, Joseph Patrick, 191 

Day, Marilyn Jean, 154, 330, 331 

Day, Ronald Lee, 181 

Deal, John Edward, 243 

Deal, Joseph Edwin, 243 

Deal, Philip Luster, 184 

Dean, David Walter, 255 

Dean, James Stewart, 194 

Dean, Leslie Alan, 410, 418 

Dean, Norman Robert, 401 

Deano, John Michael, 202, 253 

Dearborn, Luther Henry, 188 

Deason, Vernon Keith, 247, 418 

Deasy, Gerald Kenneth, 243 

Deatley, Jack Hinds, 166 

Debysingh, Sylvin Una, 408 

Decardy, William Dennis, 229 

Dechow, John Philip, 212, 234 

Dechristopher, Donald J., 209, 494 

Decker, Darwin Kent, 194 

Decker, Prof. Harold, 340, 343 

Decker, Margaret Ann, 128 

Decker, Margaret K., 126, 343 

Deckowitz, Philip Arthur, 245, 433 

Decocker, James, 180 

Decook, Gordon Lee, 195, 432 

Decook, Ronald Neil, 195 

Dedecker, Darrel Francis, 356, 371 

Dee, Avery Edward, 249 

Deering, Joyce Annette, 150 

Degenford, James Edward, 416, 494 

Degenhart, Thomas Wayne, 255 

Dehass, James Lawrence, 416, 494 

Dehner, Charles John, 204 

Deimer, Nola Zoe, 157 

Deiro, Terry Lee, 181 

Dekker, David Alan, 228 

Delaney, John Michael, 230, 494 

Delaurenti, Nancy Jane, 1 15, 295 

Delano, Charles, 172 

Delano, Mrs., 129 

Dellenback, Barbara Kay, 154, 494 

Dellert, Robert C, 420, 494 

Dellin, Edward Joseph, 207 

Delong, Prof. Charles C, 103 

Deiong, John Raymond, 240 

Delong, Julia Annette, 128 

Delp, Judith Ann, 154, 298, 494 

Delveaux, John, 384, 387 

Demarais, Joseph Robert, 438 

Demarco, Daniel Joseph, 217 

Demerjian, Sandra Rose, 148 

Demoll, Rolf, 436 

Dempsey, Barry Jo, 436, 494 

Dempsey, Margaret Ellen, 111, 260, 

336, 342, 422, 494 
Dempsey, Sara Elaine, 133 
Deneen, Kathryn Ray, 117, 457, 494 
Denenholz, Judith Diane, 140 
Denger, Peter Valentine, 452 
Dennen, Beverly, 130, 450 
Dennis, Diann Joy, 1 13 
Dennis, Jerry Lee, 198 
Dennis, Robert James, 418 
Denny, Dennis Michael, 207 
Denny, Terry Patrick J., 415 
Denosaquo, Samuel, 211 
Denson, Edwin McLean, 170, 291 
Dent, Gail Marjorie, 111, 494 
Dent, John Lee, 240, 305 
Dent, Morris Dickinson, 433 
Denton, Judith Gail, 123 
Depeo, Marc Seaton, 224 
Derby, Roger Allan, 383 
Derby, Roger Malcolm, 421 
Dereu, John Al, 183, 426 
Derman, Elinor Joan, 160 
Derousse, Theodore J., Jr., 194 
Derrough, Nancy Carter, 128 
Derwelis, Stephen Koch, 174 
Desandre, Frank Arthur, 465 
Descourouez, James C, 494 
Deselms, Vernon D., II, 412 
Desjardins, Susan Jo, 117 
Destefano, Michael G., 208 
Deuel, James Peter, 494 
Deutch, Nancy Jean, 141 
Deutsch, Kenneth Charles, 211 
Deutsch, Myrna Rae, 112 
Deutsch, Owen Herman, 210 
Devey, William John, Jr., 227 
Devine, Gary David, 178, 289 
Devleschoward, Allen B., 417 
Devor, Forest, 392 
Devries, Ruth Ann, 148, 448 
Dewar, Ronald Bruce, 338 
Dewar, Sandra Barnes, 131 
Deyoung, Kathleen Mary, 140 
Diamond, Darrough Blaine, 205 
Diamond, Gerald, 200 
Diamond, Rachel Eslher, 148, 301 
Dice, Ronald Allen, 255 
Dick, Carol Diane, 134, 448, 494 
Dick, Edward John, 449 
Dickerson, V. M., Commander, 428 
Dickey, Kenneth Bruce, 181 
Dickinson, Judith Anne, 138 
Didrickson, Charles E., 197, 277 



Diederich, Jack Leroy, 190, 448 
Diedrich, Richard Joseph, 170, 289, 

412, 421 
Diefenthaler, Jack Lee, 494 
Diehl, William, 175 
Diercks, Harold Leslie, 421 
Diercouff, Michael Duane, 231 
Dierker, Lendell Henry, 168 
Dierker, Merrill Otto, 168, 410, 494 
Dierkes, James Paul, 225, 412, 494 
Dierzen, Floyd Arthur, 179, 447 
Diesner, Roy William, 449 
Diesner, Wanda Wyllie, 494 
Dieterich, Helen S., 339 
Dieterich, Kathryn V., 338, 339 
Dietrich, Loren Arthur, 336 
Dietrick, Florence E., 160 
Diez, Royal Leonard, 178 
Digiovanni, Alberta Rae, 136 
Digirolamo, James G., 371 
Dilatush, Joan Stanford, 115, 327, 329 
Dilatush, Marc Henry, 182 
Dillard, Roy Joseph, 249 
Dille, Charles E., Ill, 434, 494 
Dillen, Ralph Eugene, 221 
Dilly, Susan Ruth, 137 
Dilts, Stephen Leist, 330, 331, 401, 418 
Dinger, Raymond Lester, 172 
Dinken, Stuart Arnold, 210 
Dinkin, Eugene Barry, 242 
Dinnella, Nancy Marie, 1 10, 282, 283, 

286, 494 
Diorio, Dominic, Jr., 202, 220 
DiPasquale, Raymond, Prof., 434 
Diprima, Kenneth Joseph, 193 
Dirks, Kenneth Ray, 224 
Diserio, John, 207 

Dispensa, Salvatore A., 438, 442, 494 
Disselhorst, Delbert D., 336, 418 
Dittmann, Diana Fay, 133, 414 
Dittmann, Marcia Lynn, 143 
Dittrich, Alfred Raymond, 494 
Divan, Anthony, 233 
Divan, Lorena Mae, 301 
Divan, Mary Sue, 157, 313, 415, 428 
Divore, Irene, 132 
Dix, Florence Dorothy, 141 
Dixon, George Tucker, 244 
Dixon, Harry M., Ill, 208 
Dixon, Jon Albert, 234 
Dixon, Monty Lucille, 147 
Dixon, Nancy Elizabeth, 120, 260, 494 
Dixon, Robert Tromly, 242 
Djerf, Andy Carl, 456 
Djorf, Andrew, 253 
Diuricich, Mladen, 253 
Doan, Barry William, 240, 337 
Dobbins, Donald Cameron, 204, 414 
Dobbins, James Goodman, 204, 414 
Dobler, Elizabeth Ann, 135 
Dobrovolny, Prof. Jerry, 442, 448 
Dockendorf, Cary Edwin, 228 
Doctor, Arnold Harvey, 200 
Dodd, Marjorie Ann, 163, 336, 439, 

446 
Dodegge, Irmgarde A. D., 131 
Dodge, James Urban, 229, 460, 494 
Dodge, Virginia Louise, 135 
Dodson, Carolyn June, 140 
Dodson, Donald Glen, 229 
Dodson, John Dennis, 191, 289, 428 
Dodson, Stan, 397 
Doe, Oliver Peter, Jr., 221 
Doenier, Karen Lee, 135 
Doepp, Robert Alan, 229 
Doering, Arlin Boehme, 454, 465 
Doering, David Allen, 340, 440 
Doering, George Gerald, 181 
Doherty, Donald Patrick, 193, 259, 262, 

282, 428, 475, 494 
Dohme, Beth McCamly, 128, 260, 296, 

298, 423 
Dojnik, Leonard Albert, 248 
Dolan, Thomas Patrick, 205 
Dolby, Harriet, 144 
Dollahon, Phillip Leland, 168, 445 
Dollerhide, Floyd Ray, 214 
Dominic, Donald Louis, 249 
Dominic, Patricia, 127, 295, 298, 495 
Domino, James Stephen, 232 
Dommermuth, Dorothy Lee, 116 
Dommers, Mary Virginia, 138, 495 
Don, Dorothy Enid, 121 
Donahue, Jack David, 268, 495 
Donahue, John, 390, 391 
Donahue, James Robert, 181 
Donath, Miriam Adrienne, 260, 450 
Dondanville, Gerry Lee, 174, 495 
Doney, David Lawrence, 239 
Doniger, Jay Allan, 195 
Doniger, Lois Irene, 160, 413, 495 
Doninger, Joseph Eugene, 173, 465 
Donnelly, Mrs., 123 
Donner, Robert Julius, 416 
Donofrio, Kenneth A., 207 
Donovan, Deann Katherine, 131, 495 
Donovan, Michael Thomas, 298 
Dooley, Richard Francis, 414 
Dooley, William Humphrey, 213 
Dooling, Franklin Joseph, 338 
Doppelt, Phillip Harris, 242 
Dopuch, Nicholas, 438 
Dorazio, Harold Eugene, 244, 261, 304, 

305, 306 
Doria, John Joseph, 221 
Doris, Richard Eugene, 238 
Dornblaser, Dale Dean, 209 
Dorner, Rudolph, 208, 456 



Dotson, Lewis Stanton, 188, 259, 268, 

495 
Doty, Lawrence Gerald, 251 
Doudera, Thomas William, 442 
Dough, John, 330 
Dougherty, Allen Lee, 202, 495 
Douglas, Janet Lynn, 153, 495 
Douglas, John Goodwin, 171 
Douglas, Mollie Jeanne, 147 
Douglas, Robert S., Jr., 433 
Douglas, William, 339 
Douglass, Charles W., 338, 495 
Douglass, Kay Whitlow, 495 
Dow, David Isham, 169, 421 
Dow, Jose Kamal, 435, 439, 495 
Dow, Thomas Ernest, 202 
Dowdall, Diane Kathleen, 136, 414, 450 
Dowding, Deborah Ann, 143 
Dowdy, Janet Kay, 147 
Dowell, Joseph Harry, 220, 340 
Downer, Jerome Joseph, 215 
Downes, Valerie Jean, 116, 409 
Downey, David John, 188 
Downey, William S., Jr., 214 
Downing, Leslie Lee, 255 
Downing, Robert William, 197 
Downs, Robert Warren, 495 
Dowse, Eunice, 98 
Doyle, Daniel Dean, 495 
Doyle, Harry Edward, 168 
Doyle, James Barta, 401 
Doyle, Kirby Johnson, 455, 495 
Doyle, Rodney Ray, 430, 495 
Doyle, William Arthur, 183, 421 
Drake, Alma Winifred, 141 
Drake, Eleanor Esther, 148, 448 
Drake, Merton Paul, 169 
Drake, Patricia Lee, 344 
Darlle, Henry Edward, 182, 453 
Draper, Walter, 188, 416 
Draznik, Judith Marie, 128 
Drechsel, Milton Carl, 171 
Drenckhahn, Ann Louise, 126 
Drendel, Mary Sue, 16, 128, 262, 296, 

351, 396 
Drenk, Gary Ardelle, 401 
Drennan, John Charles, 447, 450 
Dresmal, James Eugene, 248 
Dresser, Richard Ernest, 170, 338 
Drever, Donald Charles, 181, 391, 414 
Drew, Robert Nolan, 245 
Drewer, Lawrence, 445 
Drews, Jack William, 495 
Drews, Thomas Robert W., 449 
Dreymiller, Sandra Lynne, 155 
Drinkall, Roger Lee, 339 
Driscoll, H, Frederick, Jr., 245, 410, 462 
Drogemuller, Richard A., 436, 495 
Drogosz, Adalbert Daniel, 199 
Drolet, Dale Leonard, 247 
Drolet, David Rodolph, 218 
Drost, Judy Sandra, 134 
Druktanis, Robert Joseph, 218 
Drullis, Astrida Vija, 143, 435, 495 
Drum, Alan Crawford, 241 
Drum, Dale Scott, 240 
Drummond, Madge, 113 
Dryer, Karen Elaine, 119 
Dryfus, Lee, 243 

Dubberke, Richard Walter, 245, 495 
Dubbink, David Theodore, 401 
Dubinsky, Marilyn Kay, 121 
Dubinsky, William Glenn, 202 
Dubisky, Janet Ann, 141, 446 
Duboe, Lesley Ellen, 121 
Dubois, Carol Lynn, 143 
Dubrow, Ira Will, 249 
Dubrowsky, Fred, 210 
Duckworth, Paul Edward, 239 
Ducios, Nancy Louise, 123 
Dudle, James Arthur, 248, 495 
Dudley, Richard Michael, 204 
Dueringer, David Lee, 180 
Dues, Charles, 245 
Dueser, Lynn Richard, 177, 291 
Duesterhaus, Richard Lee, 433 
Duesterhaus, Ruth Ann, 337 
Duewer, Lawrence Alvin, 233, 407, 429, 

430, 431, 495 
Duewer, Raymond George, 233 
Duey, Prof. Phillip, 340 
Duff, Bruce Nixon, 181, 229, 495 
Duff, John Edward, 245, 456 
Duffield, Dennis Wilson, 165 
Duffy, Patrick Arthur, 435 
Duffy, Robert James, 460, 495 
Dufner, William John, 193 
Dufour, Dale John, 212, 456 
Dugan, Ellen Ruth, 140 
Dugdale, Jane Eleanor, 1 19, 417 
Duies, Larry Dean, 168 
Duitsman, John Chester, 343 
Duker, Brack William, 202, 431, 446 
Dukes, Charles Donald, 428 
Dumolin, Sharon Renee, 117 
Dunbar, David George, 235 
Dunbar, Dean Arthur, 230, 495 
Dunbar, Robert Elton, 450 
Dunbar, William Henry, Jr., 291, 450 
Duncan, Barbara, 273 
Duncan, David Joe, 452 
Duncan, John A., 244 
Dunham, Lou Ann, 157 
Dunn, Wallace Burton, 251 
Dunn, William Henry, Jr., 191, 291 
Dunphy, Edward James, 418 
Dunteman, Howard Dale, 436 
Dunwoody, William Karl, 221 
Dunworth, Bruce Edward, 197 



Duran, Castro Hernando, 401, 439 
Duran, Lee Albert, 182, 349 
Durbin, Vivien Rita, 112,423 
Durkin, Frieda Marie, 123, 414 
Durko, Dennis Lee, 242 
Durra, Richard, 217 
Durrett, Ronald Hart, 221, 330, 418 
Durrie, Jeffrey Emil, 243, 450 
Dusendschon, David W., 169, 457 
Duskey, Peter John, 244, 282, 465 
Dutton, Charles Eugene, 255 
Duttweiler, Russell E., 449, 495 
Dutz, Daniel Dean, 253 
Dvesterhaus, Ruth, 150 
Dvorak, Grace C. D., 148 
Dvorak, Robert Regis, 174, 418 
Dvorin, Harold Lewis, 401 
Dworak, Gary Arthur, 242 
Dwyer, Mary Ann, 148 
Dyal, Homer Kaye, 250, 410, 418 
Dyben, John Paul, 410 
Dycus, Jerry Ray, 204 
Dyer, Betty Jane, 276 
Dyer, James Allen, 202 
Dyer, Olympia P., 157, 427 
Dykstra, Michael Donovan, 205 
Dyner, Harry Bernard, 237, 495 
Dyroff, David Ray, 207, 336, 418 
Dyson, Charles Benton, 430, 496 
Dystrup, John Alderman, 220 
Dziadula, Robert Stanley, 255 
Dzinich, Kurt Selim, 248, 305 



E 



Engineering Council, 442 
Engineering Open House, 56, 429, 

435, 442, 443. 455 
Eta Kappa Nu, 416 
Evans Hall, 145 
Evans Scholars, 183, 401. 402 
Exmoor Hall, 228, 401 
Eadie, William Robert, 460, 495 
Earl, Francis Anthony, 440 
Earley, Thomas David, 190, 289 
Eastburn, Anne, 142, 496 
Easterbrook, John W., 204, 261, 356, 

361, 368, 371 
Eastman, Heidi Susan, 344 
Eastman, Nina Elizabeth, 126, 127, 

329, 448 
Easton, Helen Kay, 149 
Eaton, James Wyman, Jr., 186 
Eaton, Jean Lillian, 144, 298, 448 
Eaton, John Smyser, 212, 422 
Eaton, Linn William, Jr., 168 
Eaton, Reaugh, 208, 496 
Ebbert, Evelyn Mae, 120, 285 
Ebel, Edward Joseph, 231 
Eberhardt, Jerry Lee, 418 
Eberhardy, Richard L., 194, 261, 381, 

390, 391, 397 
Ebers, Dale, 239 
Ebers, John, 180 
Eby, Joanne Carol, 1 17 
Echenique, Manrique R.,456 
Eckebrecht, Eugene Henry, 444 
Eckert, Elmer Richard, 230, 435 
Eckhardt, Richard J., 436 
Eckhaus, Arlene Louise, 141 
Eckland, Bobette N., 419 
Eckman, Carolyn, 133 
Eckman, Constance Joann, 119, 133, 

496 
Eckman, James Carlyle, 255 
Economos, James Nick, 182 
Eddy, Grant Lowell, 248 
Eddy, John Wesley, 337 
Eddy, Richard Ellsworth, 215 
Edelman, Gloria Joan, 112, 496 
Edelstein, Alan Earl, 189 
Eden, Jack Laverne, 199, 410 

Eden, Raymond Everett, 221 
Eden, Stanley Ray, 340, 496 

Eder, Bruce Delbert, 197 

Edge, Turner Wilson, 308 

Edidin, Fern Helene, 151 

Edler, Kathleen E., 110, 285 

Edlund, Judith Louise, 133, 414, 457 
Edminster, Warren George, 412, 434, 

496 
Edmonds, Joan Edith, 133, 295, 297 

Edmonson, Harold Arthur, 242 

Edmundson, Janice Joy, 1 1 1 

Edson, Donald Ray, 176, 343 

Edwards, Allen Leon, 197, 336 

Edwards, Mrs. Florence F., 202 

Edwards, Leatrice Yvonne, 120 

Edwards, Patricia Ann, 143, 408, 446 

Edwards, Richard Leroy, 248 

Edwards, Robert Thomes, 420, 457, 496 

Edwards, Roberta, 141, 441 

Edwards, Ruth Ellen, 129 

Edwards, Thomas Lane, 243 

Edwards, Thomasine E., 144 

Edwards, William Maxham, 187 

Edwards, Yvonne, 148 

Effron, Alan Michael, 167 

Efner, Sarah Sue, 144 

Efron, Iris Esther, 132 

Egawa, Roy Tadashi, 249 

Egbert, Patricia Joy, 143 

Eger, Julie Dale, 151 

Egert, Audrey Myrna, 142 

Egger, William, Jr., 179 

Eggers, Marion Essie, 136, 282, 496 

Eggerstedt, Charles John, 251 

Egizio, Philip John, 437, 496 

Ehler, John T„ III, 181 



556 



Ehler, Mary Marguerite, 124, 311 
Ehlers, Norman Fredric, 184, 383, 397, 

496 
Ehrhardt, Ronald Wayne, 173 
Ehrlich, Theodore Daniel, 249, 412 
Ehrlicher, Ann Louise, 124 
Ehrlicher, Mary Alice, 124, 413 
Erhman, Richard Jon, 216 
Ehrmantraut, John W., 181 
Eichelberger, Charles A., 176 
Eichen, Penny, 343 
Eicher, Joanne Patricia, 133 
Eichholz, Edelgard, 147, 496 
Eichin, Millicent Ann, 133 
Eichler, Victor Buka, 195 
Eichsteadt, Albert F., 412 
Eick, William Sigvart, 212 
Eickelman, George Allen, 227 
Eickemeyer, David Allen, 181 
Eicksteadt, Richard W., 222, 442 
Eiermann, Robert Arthur, 414 
Eigenrauch, Marie Ann, 148, 463, 496 
Eihausen, John William, 180 
Eikenmeyer, Janice Kay, 137 
Eilbracht, Lee, Coach, 384, 386, 387 
Eisen, Bernard, 452 
Eisenberg, Bonnie Jean, 125 
Eisenberg, Ronald Lee, 239 
Eisenmann, Dale Richard, 249 
Eisenstein, Merrill M., 244 
Eiserman, Michael H., 189 
Eiserman, Myrna Ida, 112 
Eissfeldt, Raymond, Rev., 465, 467 
Ek, Paul Radkoff, 202 
Ekdahl, Karin Louise, 137, 496 
Ekena, Rolland Arthur, 235 
Ekstrom, Donald Harry, 250 
Elam, John Wesley, 252 
Elder, Anita Jeanne, 153, 438 
Elder, Barbara Anne, 113, 297 
Elder, Barbara Karen, 336, 438 
Eldred, Gail Patricia, 162, 344, 454 
Eldredge, Paul Alfred, 254 
Eldridge, Cora Jane, 116 

Elfman, Bonnie Paula, 132 

Elias, Chester George, Jr., 204, 496 

Elias, Shari Esther, 147 

Eliot, Ray, 335, 367, 368, 371 

Elkins, Karen Ruth, 121 

Ellacott, Joan Marie, 119 

Ellegant, Howard Steven, 254 

Ellerbeck, Ronald Lome, 197 

Ellern, James Bernard, 174, 347, 446, 
448 

Ellinger, James Paul, 183, 337 

Ellingson, John Stewart, 248, 418 

Elliott, Beverly, 118 

Elliott, James Russell, 223 

Elliott, Judy Helen, 111 

Elliott, Lesta Jean, 118, 260 

Elliott, Mary Joanne, 336 

Elliott, Pete, 371 

Elliott, Ray, 356, 366, 371 

Elliott, Thomas Lee, 243 

Ellis, Cari Coleman, 339 

Ellis, James Franklin, 337 

Ellis, Janet Maxine, 1 10, 427, 496 

Ellis, Judith Norma, 147 

Ellis, Linda Jane, 344, 441 

Ellis, Lonnie Ray, 232 

Ellis, Richard Gordon, 205, 414 

Ellis, Richard Marvin, Jr., 243 

Ellis, Robert Chambers, 230 

Ellis, Robert William, 244 

Ellsworth, John George, 188 

Elman, Harriet Lois, 125, 423 

Elowson, David Einar, 247, 431 

Elsasser, Rosemary Jean, 127, 450 

Elson, Carol Bernadine, 150, 406 

Elston, Larry Gus, 212 

Ely, Richard Wright, 339 

Emanuel, Stephen Earl, 250, 343 

Emery, Sandra Kay, 142 

Emlund, Gail Frances, 300, 406, 444 

Emmerman, Ronald Zecil, 21 1, 496 

Emmerman, Sheila, 152 

Endliss, Sherry Lou, 408 

Endo, Setsuko Gloria, 143 

Endres, Robert Oral, 337, 456 

Endsley, Patricia E., 133 

Engberg, Stephen Norman, 248 

Engelman, Elmer Russell, 418 

England, Janet Elsie, 139, 457, 465 

England, Joseph Walker, 174 

Engler, Janet Frima, 125, 408, 423 

English, David Lee, 202 

Engquist, Barbara Lee, 344, 438 

Enoch, Sheila Lucretia, 148, 344 

Enrico, Carol Lynn, 130, 438, 439 

Enstrom, Edward Albin, 224 

Ent, Judy, 111, 295, 496 

Ent, Susan, 111, 343 

Entwistle, James Francis, 371, 496 

Entzminger, Ronald B., 241 

Eovaldi, Thomas Lawrence, 174, 278, 
338 

Epkins, Joseph Wayne, 188, 261, 392, 
394, 397 

Epperson, William Lewis, 177 

Epstein, Corinne Ann, 152, 301 

Epstein, Mrs. E. A., 217 

Epstein, Edwin Howard, 200, 464, 496 

Epstein, Gerald Bernard, 337, 401 

Epstein, Kenneth Bruce, 247 
Epstein, Maxine Lee, 151 
Epstein, Stephen James, 240 
Ericksen, Janet Ruth, 123 

Erickson, David Albert, 254, 496 

Erickson, John Lee, 190 

Erickson, Leroy Floyd, 242, 449, 547 



Erickson, Marjorie Ann, 148, 448 

Erickson, Robert John, 416 

Erickson, William H., 207 

Erikson, Richard Jay, 255 

Erkes, Ronald David, 203 

Ernst, Carl Harold, 180 

Ernst, Charles Henry, 433 

Ernst, Edward, 416 

Ernstein, William Aaron, 167 

Ervin, Gary Neil, 245 

Ervin, Susan Ann, 128 

Edwin, William Horace, 180 

Eshleman, Glenda Ann, 157, 342 

Esmeral, Carlos, 439 

Esmond, Truman Harold, Jr., 204 

Espenscheid, Lyle Lynn, 252 

Espinoza, Richard Jerome, 496 

Esselstrom, Michael John, 247, 338, 

344, 451 
Essenberg, Arline Mae, 158 
Esser, Annette Madeleine, 118, 422, 

496 
Essex, William Raymond, 205 
Estep, Gary Paul, 204 
Estes, Elaine Graham, 114 
Etheridge, Allan F., 250 
Etnyre, Roy Abbott, 181 
Etter, William Carl, 232 
Ettinger, Jerry Michael, 242 
Eubanks, Mary Ann, 496 
Evans, Charles Clark, 497 
Evans, Earl Eugene, 238, 435, 497 
Evans, Forrest Elsworth, 457 
Evans, Harold Leroy, 194, 234, 407, 430 
Evans, Janet Lee, 161, 301 
Evans, Joan Anita, 142, 342 
Evans, Kenneth Edward, Jr., 251 
Evans, Lamarr William, 238, 429 
Evans, Linda Jean, 145, 300, 349, 350, 

408 
Evans, Paul Alfred, 433 
Evans, William Alfred, 176 
Evans, William Richard, 242 
Even, Jean Ann, 128, 427 
Even, John Robert, 188 
Evens, Mark Merrill, 200 
Everbach, Otto, 358 
Everist, Donald Gilbert, 249 
Everitt, William L., Dean, 81, 347 
Evers, Barbara Ellen, 123, 408, 427 
Ewart, John Perry, 452 
Ewen, Dale Edward, 227 
Ewigleben, Jon Joel, 177 
Ewing, John Christy, 416 
Ewing, John David, 245 
Ey, John Leigh, 190, 417 
Eyer, Margaret Ellen, 159 
Eyer, Stephen Harold, 180 
Eyre, James Vinson, 171 
Ezgur, Jerrold Joseph, 200 
Ezgur, Rochelle, 141 
Ezop, John Delmar, 245 



Farm & Home Festival, 429 
Fencing Team. 393 
Field and Furrow Club, 443 
Floriculture Club, 244 
Forbes I, M.K.H., 241 
Forbes. Hilton, M.R.H., 242 
Forbes III, West, M.R.H., 242 
Forbes IV. West, M.K.H., 243 
Four Columns, 229 
Four-H House, 150 
Freshman Seminar, 284, 285 
Faatz, Clyde Albert, II, 199 
Fabbri, Louis John, Jr., 247 
Faber, Martin Robert, 200 
Fabricant, Fred t^ax t 203 
Fadden, Donald Kent, 435 
Fagan, Rosemary, 163, 339 
Fagerman, Nils Erik, Jr., 215, 391, 435 
Fagerman, Paul Robert, 215, 289 
Fago, Doris Dale, 497 
Fahey, Robert Francis, 215, 431 
Fahrenbacher, Lawrence, 410 
Fahnstrom, Dale Edwin, 340 
Fahnstrom, Judith Ann, 150, 419, 

496 
Fahrnkopf, Nancy Jo, 120 
Fairbanks, Ronald Roy, 244 
Fairchild, Lila Dawn, 120, 339 
Fairchild, Lynn Kathleen, 120, 496 
Fairchild, Sandra Lee, 1 19, 457 
Falk, Allan Herbert, 497 
Falk, Donald Gene, 253 
Falzer, Jules David, 246, 496 
Farber, Carol Ann, 152 
Farber, Herbert O., 105,347 
Farber, Marcia, 121 
Parish, Stephen T., Jr., 340 
Farley, James Charles, 212 
Farley, Mary Ann, 1 19, 465 
Farley, Rita Louise, 1 13, 457 
Farmer, Richard Dale, 238 
Faro, Jackie Ray, 428 
Farr, Ora Donald, 497 
Farrell, Michael John, 172 
Farrow, Barbara Joann, 1 16 
Farthing, Sidney, 186 
Fasnacht, Joan Mildred, 155 
Fassler, John Arden, 467 
Faulstich, Ronald Deboer, 245 
Faust, Carl Frederick, Jr., 204 
Favus, Murray Jack, 203, 291 
Fay, Jane Elizabeth, 160 
Fay, Robert Charles, 230 
Fechtig, Allen David, 497 



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557 



Fechtig, Charles William, 452 

Feddersen, William H., 223 

Federman, Lawrence Otto, 254 

Fedor, William Lawrence, 225, 497 

Fee, Sandra Kay, 163, 408 

Feehan, Raymond, 194 

Fegenhols, Judy, 1 12 

Fehr, Allen Eugene, 436, 497 

Fehrenbacher, Judy Faye, 150 

Fehrenbacher, Larry Lee, 230, 454 

Fehrenbacher, Sue Nell, 136, 276, 342 

Feige, Carol Sue, 118, 275, 277 

Feigin, Erin Anne, 145 

Feinberg, Eileen Renee, 143 

Feinberg, Paula, 149, 497 

Feineis, Theodore A., 401 

Feingold, Louis Morton, 237 

Feit, Julia Ann, 119 

Feit, Victoria Kay, 3, 119, 267, 497, 

583 
Feitler, Wende Walta C, 152, 497 
Feldman, Donald Burton, 449 
Feldman, Dorothy Hannah, 140, 250 
Feldman, Francine Ellen, 152 
Feldman, Lee Gallup, 210 
Feldman, Maureen Fern, 151 
Feldman, Sharon Irene, 140 
Feldman, Sidney, 195 
Feldmar, Gary Irwin, 167 
Feldner, Daryl Lewis, 229 
Fell, Priscilla, 298 
Fellheimer, Ronald Katz, 217, 497 
Felt, Brenda Carol, 147 
Felton, Phylis Fern, 151 
Felts, James Harvey, 336 
Fencken, Dale Harry, 216 
Fendrick, Stacy, 250 
Fengers, Anita, 147, 497 
Fennell, Robert Edwin, 248 
Ferguson, Jeffrey Lee, 250 
Ferguson, Robert Lutz, 447 
Ferguson, William, 290 
Ferlicka, Donald Paul, 449, 547 
Fernandes, Peter Stewart, 172 
Ferrante, Victor Ralph, 230 
Ferrara, William, 438 
Ferrell, Anne Marie, 1 10 
Ferris, Sara Josephine, 413, 426 
Ferry, Ann Maclay, 110, 258, 295, 

297, 497 
Ferst, Stuart Gerald, 200, 497 
Fesler, Michael Edwin, 202 
Fess, Philip Eugene, 438 
Fesser, Lamar Earl, 230, 344, 430, 

445, 465 
Fesser, Ruth Mary, 148, 344, 465 
Festen, Michael Myron, 254 
Fett, Priscilla Ruth, 134 
Fetter, Annette, 121 
Fetterolf, Rodney James, 197 
Feurer, Larry Lee, 243 
Feutz, Judith Alice, 153, 342 
Fiala, Fred Wade, 199,434, 452, 497 
Ficek, Edmund Ferdinand, 252, 452 
Fickel, Ronald Gene, 164, 434, 497 
Fidder, Charlotte Lee, 161 
Fiedler, Elizabeth J., 136, 445, 497 
Field, Lawrence Irwin, 167 
Field, Phillip Henry, 410, 497 
Fields, Adolph Belden, 242, 497 
Fields, Janice Hopper, 424, 439, 497 
Fiester, Sheryl Lee, 124, 408, 423 
Filerman, Michael, 415, 416, 456, 477 
Filios, Achilles Michael, 214, 412 
Filip, Ronald Milan, 173 
Filler, James Larry, 223 
Filurin, Ellen Joyce, 147 
Finch, Thomas Edward, 247, 44? 
Finder, Earl, 272 
Findlay, George, 197 
Fine, Edward Michael, 167 
Fine, John Samuel, 241 
Fine, Leroy Berton, 21 1 
Finical, John Arthur, 418 
Fink, Elaine Joyce, 1 12 
Fink, James Lewis, 250, 450 
Fink, Larry Richard, 199 
Fink, Melvin Ronny, 191 
Finkelstein, Harold, 497 
Finkle, Jeffrey Arthur, 244 
Finlayson, Donald Stuart, 220 
Finlayson, Douglas Ralph, 251 
Finley, Jacqueline Fay, 1 19 
Finley, John Allen, 453, 497 
Finley, Ju'ia Gregg, 140, 433 
Finnberg, Peder Axel, 253 
Finney, Sandra Rose, 148 
Firebaugh, Robert Thomas, 442 
Fisch, William Bales, 452 
Fischbein, Martin M., 210 
Fischer, Bruce Robert, 193 
Fischer, Carole Edna, 147 
Fischer, David Lewis, 187, 493 
Fischer, Donald Victor, 231 
Fischer, George Arthur, 420, 469, 

470, 498 
Fischer, Joel, 211 
Fischer, Joseph, 165 
Fischer, William Donald, 215 
Fish, Gary Lee, 252 
Fishbein, Steven Allen, 189 
Fishburn, David Harold, 232 
Fishburn, William Robert, 493 
Fishel, Frances June, 1 15, 498 
Fisher, Alice Ann, 110 
Fisher, Brenda Sue, 158, 448 
Fisher, George Myles C, 188, 418 
Fisher, Gerald D., Jr., 449 
Fisher, James Langston, 418 



Fisher, John Clifton, 243, 344 

Fisher, John Walter, 168, 445 

Fisher, John William, 239 

Fisher, Lee Edward, 447 

Fisher, Martha Rose, 135, 498 

Fisher, Michael Gail, 233 

Fisher, Robert Glendon, 227, 456 

Fisher, Sylvia Dawn, 148, 414, 444 

Fishman, Michael Barry, 203 

Fisina, Robert, 172 

Fistel, Milton Sumner, 232, 436, 498 

Fitch, Donna Jane, 498 

Fitch, Robert, 220 

Fitzgerald, Arthur G., 215 

Fitzgerald, Jane Eleanor, 161 

Fitzgerald, Mary Kay, 136, 280, 413, 
498 

Fitzgerald, Patricia G., 135 

Fitzgeraid, Robert C, 182, 247 

Fitzgerald, Roger Miller, 338 

Fitzpatrick, Joseph P., 238 

Fix, John, 391 

Fjelde, Frederick Wenman, 170 

Fjelde, Prof. Olaf, 412 

Flack, Charlene Kay, 150, 328, 465 

Flagge, Andrew Thomas, 243 

Flaherty, Richard J., 232 

Flamm, Betty Jo., 275, 408 

Flanders, Seth W., Jr., 338, 451 

Flandorfer, Max Charles, 498 

Flatt, Leslie Terrance, 196, 498 

Flax, David Bruce, 251 

Flax, Leonard, 203 

Fleck, Nancy Jean, 1 10 

Fleeger, Barbara Jean, 155 

Fleerlage, George Henry, 239 

Fleisher, Carol Sagett, 498 

Fleming, Albert William., 202 

Fleming, Carolyn Sue, 154, 301, 457, 
458, 498 

Fleming, Joe Edgar, Jr., 244 

Fleming, Margaret F., 1 13, 276, 347, 
349 

Fleming, Prof. Robben, 452 

Flemings, Joan Frances, 144 

Flemming, Richard Alan, 175 

Flener, Fred O., 183 

Flershem, John Whitney, 498 

Fletcher, Amaryllis Anne, 339 

Fletcher, David Rhea, 229 

Fletcher, Ralph, 371, 393, 395 

Fletcher, Ralph Mrs., 126 

Fletemeyer, Richard G., 204, 435, 498 

Flexman, William Leonard, 240 

Flickinger, Gary Duane, 233, 440 

Flinspach, Ann Ella, 135 

Flint, Richard Allen, 338 

Flood, Melvin Leroy, 338 

Flores, Camille Irene, 118, 170 

Florfni, Joseph Vincent, 176, 234 

Florio, Aurelio, 286 

Florio, Mary Jo., 131, 275 

Florreich, James Harold, 250, 450 

Flowers, Jonathan Max, 179 

Floyd, Curtiss Orval, 412 

Fluss, Marilyn Sue, 344 

Flynn, Joanne Storer, 498 

Flynn, John Philip, 221 

Flynn, Paul Maurice, 447 

Flynn, William Edward, 184, 261, 

274, 445 
Foehner, Olin Harold, Jr., 234, 436 
Foerner, Mary Margaret, 149, 498 
Foerster, Stephen Arthur, 183 
Fog, Regina Constance, 141 
Fogel, William Mai., 421 
Fogler, Diana, 408, 463 
Fogler, Hugh Scott, 182, 349 
Fohrman, Howard Sheldon, 243 
Foissotte, Suzanne, 143 
Foisy, Robert Louis, Jr., 236, 456 
Fo'berg, Harold Jay, 244, 439 
Folger, Donald Foster, 178 
Folkers, Beverly Kay, 139, 448, 465 
Folkers, Edgar Robert, Jr., 251, 337 
Folkerts, Ralph Charles, 173, 467 
Follensbee, Thomas Link, 425, 449 
Follmer, Leon, 164 
Fombelle, Norman Just, 452 
Fonda, Roy Douw, 186, 298 
Foos, Saul, 217 
Foote, Jeffrey H., 178, 337 
Forbes, Kathy Kay, 115 
Forbes, Lynnette Rae, 132 
Ford, Daniel, 173 
Ford, Georgia Ann, 111, 296, 498 
Ford, Thomas Edward, 254 
Foreman, Paul Leighton, 379, 381, 383 
Foreman, Paula Nan, 132, 261 
Forero, De Francisco G., 241, 439, 

449, 498 
Forester, Steve, 329 
Forestner, Mary Eve'yn, 1 1 1 
Forhan, Richard Michael, 171 
Forkash, Barbara Sue, 140 
Forland, Marlene Mary, 141, 300, 498 
Forman, Deonna Jean, 154, 413 
Formanek, Joan Katherine, 147 
Fornof, John Griffith, 240, 414 
Forrest, Ann Lee, 128 
Forrest, Llyn, 128, 260, 270, 273 
Forsberg, Milton Leonard, 433 
Forster, Mary Jean, 140, 427 
Forsyth, John Willard, 176, 259, 289, 

334, 498 
Forsyth, Martha Ann, 128, 435 
Fort, Harold Duane, 498 
Fort, Jeffrey Spain, 186 
Fortin, Raymond F., 241 



Fortner, John Phillip, 192 

Forty, Robert John, 247 

Fosdick, Robert Eugene, 247 

Fosler, Gail Marvin, 444 

Foss, Donald Nile, 238 

Fosse, William Harold, 434, 493 

Foster, Frances Roberta, 144, 458, 

Foster, Norma Jean, 113, 277, 493 

Foster, Peter Ireland, 249 

Foster, Sandra Joyce, 301 

Fournie, Thomas Allen, 187 

Fournier, Arthur Robert, 252, 306, 
447, 457, 498 

Fouts, Tom Lynn, 245 

Fowler, Eugene, 239 

Fowler, Gerald, 198, 462 

Fowler, Ronald James, 174, 274, 414, 
418 

Fox, Alan Jeffrey, 217 

Fox, Barbara Judith, 151 

Fox, Carla Alta, 141 

Fox, Dennis Richard, 190, 345, 417 

Fox, Donald Lee, 245 

Fox, Gail Elaine, 118 

Fox, Patricia Ann, 160 

Fox, Peter G., 244 

Fox, Robert Herman, 239 

Fox, Ronald Eugene, 243 

Fox, William Lyle, 190, 498 

Frailey, Kermit William, 547 

Fraker, Gere, 128 

Fraker, Guy Cronice, 201, 498 

France, Nancy Major, 137 

Francis, Diana Ruth, 129, 498 

Francis, Kent Russell, 164, 435, 499 

Franciscovich, Paul J., Jr., 227 

Franck, Joann Fern, 1 15 

Frandsen, Lee Raymond, 373, 374, 
376, 377, 381, 383 

Frank, Anne C, 132 

Frank, Elizabeth Ann, 1 13, 280 

Frank, Eugenie Louise, 154 

Frank, Gerald Edward, 195 

Frank, Ira Michel, 245, 282, 417 

Frank, John Joseph, 280, 450 

Frank, Marguerite Ellen, 428, 499 

Frank, Rudy Walter, 241, 441 

Frankel, Neil Paul, 170, 499 

Franklin, Edwin Alan, 218 

Franklin, Patricia A. M., 163 

Franklin, Shirley Jean, 134, 499 

Franks, Carolyn Sue, 115, 260, 309, 
415 

Franks, Linda Lou, 1 15, 275 

Franks, Roger Louis, 253 

Franks, Tommy Mark, 247 

Franzen, Judith Ann, 141, 457, 458 

Frase, Louis Harvey, 251 

Fraser, Prof. George, 452 

Fratia, Janet Ann, 118, 499 

Frazar, Perry Lewis, 176 

Frazier, Ronald George, 410 

Frazin, Irwin Lee, 195 

Frede, John Fredrick, 188 

Fredell, Gary Dean, 240 

Frederick, Donald F., 254 

Frederick, Jeanne Marie, 139, 448 

Frederick, Marilyn Carol, 155 

Frederickson, Charles L., 418, 433 

Fredrick, Larry, 169 

Fredrickson, Carol Ann, 143, 457 

Fredriksen, Karen Luise, 148, 336 

Freed, Maris Lynne, 121, 297, 345, 

499 
Freedlund, Lee Keith, 250 
Freedman, Alice Mynette, 1 1 2 
Freedrich, Elaine, 126 
Freehill, Joann, 396 
Freeman, Donald Bryan, 252 
Freeman, Roy Todd, 245 
Freeman, Thomas Gene, Jr., 202 
Freeman, Wade Austin, 244, 328, 418 
Freese, George Thomas, 227 
Frein, Emil Charles, 250 
Freitag, Richard Ross, 168, 445, 499 
Freitag, Robert Henry, 499 
French, Jon Dale, 214, 439, 499 
Frenzel, Richard, 189 
Frerichs, Almut K., 155, 499 
Frey, George W., Jr., 222 
Friborg, Harold Fritz, 245 
Frie, MaryeMen Thora, 147 
Friedlander, Miss Sarah, 125 
Friedman, Alan Herbert, 167 
Friedman, Andrea R., 140 
Friedman, Barry Alan, 21 1 
Friedman, Donald Sanford, 203, 261, 

327, 328 
Friedman, Emily, 135 
Friedman, Gail Rose, 121 
Friedman, James J., 452 
Friedman, Joann, 132 
Friedman, Joyce Diane, 121 
Friedman, Lawrence, 449 
Friedman, Michael Larry, 251 
Friedman, Robert Melvin, 240 
Friedman, Theodore Louis, 217, 277 
Friedmann, Suzanne Iris, 117, 465 
Friedrichs, James R., 229, 434 
Frielich, Sharon Elaine, 499 
Fries, Mary Anne, 129 
Fringer, Bert Eldon, 230 
Fris, Carole Joyce, 163, 465, 499 
Frisch, Sidney, Jr., 201, 422 
Fritsch, June Marie, 115, 260, 275, 

295, 296 
Fritsch, Ron, 234, 304, 305, 418, 447 
Fritschle, Jerry Duane, 435, 443 
Fritz, Donald Edward, 213 



Fritz, Janet Carolyn, 141 

Fritz, Mary Teresa, 160 

Fritz, Sally Lou, 124, 142, 342, 406 

Fritzsche, Raymond Paul, 17J, 467 

Froberg, David Mathews, 19J 

Frock, Barbara, 422, 499 

Frock, George A'bert, 338, 339, 409, 

451 
Frock, Julia Cash, 338 
Frodin, Mrs. Margaret, 137 
Froehlich, Rosalie Jane, 141 
Frolichstein, Seymour R., 434, 499 
Froom, Pamela Anne, 128 
Frost, John James, 166, 285 
Frost, Margaret Joan, 148 
Fruchter, Marvin, 237, 499 
Fruhauf, Dennis Anthony, 243 
Fruin, John Thomas, 225 
Fruland, Robert Mills, 227, 499 
Fry, Billy Marshall, 456 
Fry, James Clyde, 180, 336, 463 
Fry, Nancy Carol, 1 13 
Frye, Lonnie Lemarr, 249 
Frye, Mary Virginia, 435 
Frye, Sally Jean, 131 
Fryman, Bruce Leon, 410 
Fryman, Edward Leeroy, 254 
Fuchs, William Charles, 499 
Fuerst, Cheryl Irene, 139 
Fuerstein, Robert, 210 
Fuesting, Jane Eileen, 123 
Fugate, Kendall Morgan, 214, 289 

499 
Fugate, William Hedrick, 401 
Fuhrken, Marlene Joyce, 123 
Fujimoto, Christine T., 140 
Fujitani, James Yukio, 254 
Fulfs, Jon Charles, 337 
Fulk, Neal, 431 
Fuller, Bonnie Jo., 158 
Fuilerton, John Daniel, 234, 344 

450, 465 
Fulmer, Mark Theodore, 499 
Fulmer, Robert Lee, 197, 343 
Fulton, Donald Dowd, 243 
Fulton, Mildred Ann, 163 
Fulton, Robert James, 181, 330 
Funderburg, Russell E., 419, 499 
Funk, Eugene D., 103 
Funkhouser, Lyle Elbert, 431, 435, 

442, 499 
Furlong, Austin James, 204 
Furlow, Lindell Ray, 235 
Furstenberg, Joseph M., 337 
Fuss, Elizabeth Ann, 141, 441 
Fuss, Robert Carson, 241, 441 



G 



(lames and Tournaments, 278 

Gamma Alpha Chi, 413 

Gamma Delta, 4(>f> 

( lamina House, llil 

Gamma Phi Beta, 124 

Gargoyle, 412 

Garmen, 229 

earner Garrett, 247 

Garner M.R.H.. 248 

Garner I, M.R.H., 245 

(iizz Kids, 36 

Granada Club, 222 

Guppies, 412 

Gymnastics Team, 389 

Gabbard, Thomas Hardy, 392 

Gabbert, Mary Catherine, 139, 446, 461 

Gabel, Elizabeth Marie, 155 

Gabel, Judith Kay, 461, 499 

Gadau, Lloyd, 181 

Gaecke, Jean Laverne 12^ 

Gaecke, Paul Frederick, 205, 431, 457, 

499 
Gage, Barry Eaton, 447 
Gahan, Lawrence Willard, 414, 499 
Gaides, Frank Carl, 446 
Gaines, Ina Jean, 111, 450 458 
Gainsberg, Robert Paul. 252 
Gaitens, Mary Jane, 1 1 1 
Galarza, Carlos, 241 
Galbraith, Susan Anne. 145, 323 
Gale, David Mark, 243, 305, 499 
Galik, Anna, 148 
Galin, Jeffrey, 242 
Galitz, Donald Stuart 234 
Galka, Raymond Stanley 209 
Gall, Helen Elizabeth 1 "3. 350 
Gall, Leroy Charles. 499 
Gallagher, Michael J., 250 450 
Gallagher, William J., 434 
Galland, Stuart Bruce. 204, 500 
Gallati, Charlotte N. 120 
Galle, Gay Antonie, 118 
Gallehue, Dena Jill, 140 
Gallington, Roger Wayne. 500 
Gallo, William Killian, 333 451 
Galloway, Robert Gera'd, 253 
Gallup, Beverly Kay, 134. 448 
Gallup, Roger Howard 184,431,443 

500 
Galviscerra, Gabriel, 250. 436, 43? 
Gamble, Frank Leon, 240 
Gamble, Michael Robert, 219 33") 
Gamlin, Nancy Kathryn, 124 
Gammill, Carroll Edward 500 
Ganan, Clifford Irving, 250 
Gangala, Robert Francis, 245 
Ganguly, Ashok Sekhar, 440 
Gangwer, Janice, 301 
Gannon, Francis James, 225 



558 



Gannon, Joseph David, 218 

Gantt, David Aurand, 201, 384, 387 

Garavalia, Ronald C, 401 

Garbe, Joyce Mildred, 147, 327, 342 

Garber, Bette, 112 

Garber, Charles Allen, 240 

Garcia, Arthur F., Jr., 183 

Garcia, Carlos Alberto, 235, 419, 439 

Gard, William James, 229 

Gardiner, Carolyn Rose, 153 

Gardiner, Milton James, 437, 500 

Gardner, Alice Ruth, 159 

Gardner, Beverly Jane, 141, 438, 500 

Gardner, Karl Robert, 243, 425, 500 

Gardner, Keladene C, 301, 465 

Gardner, Nancy Rose, 120 

Gardner, Richard Eugene, 235, 500 

Garlich, Mary Ruth, 159 

Garlovsky, Hillard. 210 

Garlovsky, Irving Samuel, 183, 500 

Garman, Sharon Joy, 111. 282, 283, 408 

Garmisa, Robert Michael, 189 

Garms, Mrs., 229 

Garner, Edwina Marie, 1 13, 583 

Garnhart, Thomas Orin. 338 

Garoner, James Edward, 500 

Garr, Joseph Maxwell, 194 

Garrard, Mrs. Mary, 161 

Garratt, Frank Edw ; n, Jr., 241 

Garret, Coach "Mac", 391, 393 

Garrett, Frederick C, Jr., 202 

Garrigus, Vison, 347 

Garrison, David Lee, 249 337 

Garrison, John Edward, 201 

Garrison, Nicole Marilyn. 149, 500 

Garthe, Gretchen Mary. 136, 278, 500 

Gartner, Bonnie Edyne. 151 

Garver, Daniel Earl, 247 

Garvey, Gail Eve, 408 

Garvin, Muriel Esther, 161 

Gary, Gail, 250 

Garza, Miguel, 449 

Gasche, Charles Jackson, 190 

Gassisi, Joan Marie, 1 18 

Gaston. Robert Emmet, 248, 437 

Gate, Carol, 148 

Gates, Evelyn Joyce, 160 

Gates, Julia Catherine, 136, 260 

Gathman. George Franklin 463 

Gatons, Paul Kenneth. 220 

Gaudi, Bernard Scott, 169 

Gaul, Barbara Frances 282, 284 

Gaul. Don Herman, 230 

Gault, Robert Carter, 190 

Gaumer, David Robert, 500 

Gaus, Otto Frank, 243, 337 

Gausselin, Gloria Jean. 140 

Gauwitz, Ralph Joseph. 241 441 

Gawlinski, David Michael. 221 

Gay, James Clark, 230, 345, 350, 409 

500 
Gay, Kenlyn Meryl, 148, 457 
Gay, Stephen Donohoe, 223, 426 
Gayden, Lucretia, 122 
Gaylord, Edwin Joe, 213 340,451 
Gaylord, Myron Joseph. 336 
Gaynor, Mark Edward, 177. 344 
Gdala, Thaddeus Edward, 435 
Gealow, Jon Carl, 416 
Gebhardt, Alfred Erick. 500 
Geer, Richard Perlee, 248 500 
Geerlings, Jon Lewis, 205 
Gegan, Edward Joseph, 230. 410 
Gegel, Florence Elaine, 133 403 448 
Gegel, Gerald Albert, 421 
Geheber, Mary Jane, 159 342, 406 
Gehlbach, Gerald David, 169 
Gehle, Don Earl, 500 
Gehler, Kenneth Alan, 247, 371 
Gehrig, Harold William, 199 
Geissman, Patricia Elnor, 444 
Geiger, Charles, 250 
Geiger, Melvin Duwayne 449, 547 
Geiling, Terry Lee, 205, 500 
Geis, George William, 338, 339 
Geise, Ruth, 128 
Geiser, Robert James, 128, 216, 437 

500 
Geisinger, John Lawrence, 450, 468 

469, 470, 500 
Geissman, Mary Joan, 155, 260, 583 
Geissman, Patricia, 141 
Gelazius, Jura Bernice, 163, 500 
Gelfand, Susan Joyce, 125, 329, 414 
Gellentine, Joan, 135 
Gellerman, Jay Michael, 217, 500 
Gellinger, Terrence John, 385, 386, 387 
Gelman, Judith llene, 151, 500 
Gelman, William Thomas, 70, 200 
Gelstein, Leonard M., 200, 282 
Gelstein, Sally, 140, 500 
Gelwicks, Thomas, 230, 445 
Genant, Jewel Arlene, 115 
Gende, James Joseph, 452 
Gendrich, Ronald Lee, 500 
Gene, Judy Diane, 344 
Gengenbach, William L., 430, 500 
Gentes, Genevieve June. 1 13, 275 
Gentry, Deborah, 131, 295 
Georgas, Violette, 450 
George, Emory Jack, 187 
George, Richard Ervin, Jr., 172, 410 
Georges, Marian Gail, 140 
Georgopulos, Paul, 207 
Georlett, Clem Arthur, Jr., 181, 393, 

395 
Geraci, Joseph Lester, 190, 371 
Geraci, Lenard Charles, 401 
Gerber, Zane, 500 
Gerch, Edward Leslie, 167, 501 



Gerdes, Brenda Jill, 147 
Gerdes, Lyle Dean, 235, 448 
Gerhart, Virginia Louise, 457 
Gernand, Norah Mae, 336 
Gernant, Robert Everett, 251, 465 
Geroff, Helen Claire, 134 
Gerrib, Marcia Kay, 133 
Gerry, Yarol Lee, 125 
Gerson, Sharon Lee, 130, 435 
Gersein, Marvin Ira, 251 
Gerstman, George Henry, 237, 501 
Gerstner, Susan Jane, 124 
Gerulak, Bohdan Oleh, 434, 501 
Gerz, Dennis Eugene, 251 
Geschwind, Janice Ethel, 154 
Gesell, John Andrew, 429, 430, 431, 

451, 501 
Getman, Anita Louise, 1 10, 427 
Getz, Carol Jean, 143, 455, 501 
Getz, Evelyn Margaret, 140, 338 
Geyer, Wendy Gay, 126 
Ghent, Edd Leighman, 208 
Ghighi, James Lee, 501 
Giamalva, Vincent A., 194 
Giancarlo, Michael, 215 
Giarrizzo, Frank Carmelo, 501 
Gibb, James Peacock, 1 1 1, 231 
Gibbens, Willard Douglas, 180, 337 
Gibbons, Gloria Ellen, 441 
Gibbons, Sharron Eileen, 501 
Gibbs, Alan John, 442, 501 
Gibbs, Donald Dale, 223, 431 
Gibson, Maredith Lee, 427, 463 
Gibson, Michael Otis, 191 
Gibson, Raymond Paul, 191 
Gibson, Robert Heyward, 187 
Gibson, Robert Keeney, 410, 501 
Gienko, Melaniusz Jan, 338, 340 
Gierman, Phil Emroy, Jr., 181 
Giese, James William, 438 
Gieseking, Dale Edward, 454, 501 
Gieseking, Darrell Lee, 216, 425, 501 
Gieszelmann, Edward L., 197, 410, 

468, 472, 501 
Gieszelmann, Marie E., 153 
Giewartowski, Joseph E., 339 
Giffhorn, Kenwood Edgar, 240 
Giffin, David Carlyle, 182, 337 
Giglio, Pauline Dorothy, 155 
Gilbert, Carol Mary, 128 
Gilbert, Julie Annette, 148 
Gilbert, Norman Stanley, 467 
Gilbert, Sandra Ruth, 141, 455 
Gilby, Barbara Anne, 435, 501 
Gilchrest, Mrs., 119 
Gilchrist, David Glenn, 254 
Gilchrist, Duncan Lee, 254 
Giles, Barbara Kay, 126 
Gilkerson, Martha E., 123, 260, 342, 

422 
Gilkison, Donald Charles, 501 
Gilkison, Jean Pigott, 501 
Gilkison, Joseph M., 254 
Gill, Glenn, 583 
Gill, Henry Leonard, 436 
Gill, James Vincent, 196 
Giller, Curtiss Hale, 168, 418, 445 
Giller, Margaret Ruth, 140 
Giller, Sandra Nadalin, 160, 501 
Giller, Wadsworth C, 166, 31 1 
Gillespey, Craig Paul, 190 

Gillespie, Emilie Jennie, 126, 409, 501 

Gillespie, James Randall, 452 

Gillespie, Vernon P., 193 

Gillette, Mary Jane, 144 

Gillfillan, Richard A., 441 

Gillinger, Terrance, 261 

Gillingham, Larry Joe, 223, 337, 426, 
462 

Gillis, Arthur Leonard, 200 

Gilmer, James Lance, 251 

Gilmore, George William, 392, 394 

Gilmore, Walter L., Jr., 239, 269 

Gilmour, Stephen Werner, 242 

Gilster, Peter Stuart, 227 

Ginsberg, Sharon Lois, 408 

Ginsburg, Marjorie Fay, 130 

Ginsburg, Richard Allan, 242 

Ginsburg, Sharon Lynn, 140 151 

Ginther, Walter Robert, 227, 431 

Gintzler, Nancy Kay, 152 

Girard, James Michael, 436 

Girb, Martin, 453 

Gitler, Barbara Cecile, 501 

Gitzendanner, Kenneth F., 181, 457 

Giuffre, Darlene M., 155 

Gladin, Catherine B., 435 

Glair, Harold F., 103 

Glantz, Stuart Irwin, 200 

Glaser, Robert Joel, 434, 501 

Glasgow, Marcia, 131, 260 

Glass, Genevieve Elaine, 111, 342 

Glass, John Patterson, 202 

Glassman, Arthur Lewis, 217, 417 

Glaub, Gerald Robert, 501 

Glavan, James Paul, 245 

Glazer, Linda Ann, 121 

Glazer, Stanley Leon, 243, 337 

Gleasner, Patricia E., 115, 275 

Gleason, Brenda Sue, 111, 344 

Gleason, Diane Michele, 118 

Gleason, Donna Jean, 1 13, 501 

Gleason, William Donald, 337, 445 

Glenn, Norman Leonard, 501 

Glenney, Mary Elizabeth, 155, 298, 
417 

Glick, Larry N., 211 

Glick, Paul Lester, 203 

Glickman, Brona Helen, 130 

Glickstein, Sara, 144 



Glidden, Mark Lee, 208 
Glinz, Joyce Diana, 501 
Glover, Charles Floyd, 417 
Glow, Barbara Jean, 141 
Gloyd, Helen Katherine, 413 
Gluba, Blair Maure, 254 
Gobbel, Rev. Roger, 464 
Gobert, Nancy Ann, 142, 337 
Goddard, Richard John, 250 
Godfrey, Charles Ernest, 501 
Godfrey, Mrs., 151 
Godzinski, Ronald Peter, 197 
Goeke, Barbara Crispin, 120, 435 
Goembel, Marlene Marie, 301 
Goetsch, Elmer Anson, 240 
Goettsch, Everett Henry, 465 
Goettsche, Thomas Ehler, 183, 340 
Goetz, Carl Ludwig, 166 
Goff, Helen Sonora, 1 14 
Goff, James Albert, 199, 291 
Goff, Lauris Elizabeth, 455, 501 
Goff, Richard Harrison, 172 
Goggin, John Edward, 169 
Gohring, William, 450 
Going, Marie Helene, 336 
Golan, Gail Zee, 149 
Golan, Mrs., 121 

Golaszewski, Paul Peter, 205, 371 
Golbeck, Lester Joel, 249 
Gold, Arthur Samuel, 189 
Gold, Francine Lee, 121 
Gold, Jerrold Bruce, 189 
Gold, Judith Carol, 147 
Gold, Maureen Sue, 130 
Gold, Phillip, 412, 434 
Gold, Stephen Lester, 205, 417 
Goldberg, Alvin Lee, 21 1 
Goldberg, Arlene Myra, 149, 502 
Goldberg, Charlene Lois, 144 
Goldberg, George Martin, 210 
Goldberg, Honey Ann, 140 
Goldberg, Merle Dee, 121 
Goldberg, Nancy Sue, 130, 344 
Goldberg, Perry Ephriam, 167 
Goldberg, Richard Leslie, 250 
Goldberg, Samuel, 244 
Goldberg, Sandra Ann, 502 
Goldberger, David Alan, 251 
Goldblatt, David, 195 
Goldblatt, Karen Ruth, 132, 344 
Golden, Barbara Ellen, 112, 295, 297 
Golden, Caryl Susan, 1 12 
Golden, Ginger Ruth, 1 12 
Golden, Herbert Fred, 203, 502 
Goldenberg, Jane, 408 
Goldenberg, Edward, 21 1 
Goldfrab, Betty, 142 
Goldfine, Lee Mitchell, 502 
Goldfine, Sabra June, 163, 464, 502 
Goldman, Barry, 243, 502 
Goldman, Claudia Mae, 144 
Goldman, Eileen, 301, 435, 502 
Goldman, Florence B., 141 
Goldman, Glenn Mandell, 189 
Goldman, Herbert, 167, 237 
Goldman, Herbert Charles, 502 
Goldman, Judith, 140 
Goldman, Michael Robert, 217, 502 
Goldman, Patricia Jane, 160 
Goldman, Richard Stewart, 237, 502 
Goldman, Robert Udle, 243 
Goldman, Roberta Lee, 140 
Goldman, William Irwin, 195, 502 
Goldsand, Stuart Russell, 237 
Goldstein, Arnold David, 195, 502 
Goldstein, Arnold Sidney, 203 
Goldstein, Charles David, 167 
Goldstein, Charles N„ 401, 446 
Goldstein, Diane, 301 
Goldstein, Earl F., 502 
Goldstein, Jerome S., 245 
Goldstein, Lee Ellis, 211 
Goldstein, Michael Jerry, 210 
Goldstein, Sandra llene, 142 
Goldstein, Theodore B., 189, 502 
Goldwasser, Robert Aaron, 203 
Golec, John Edward, 254 
Goles, Marilyn Ann, 137 
Golin, Jeffrey Ross, 330, 337 
Goiter, Sandra Davita, 151, 502 
Goluba, Leo, Jr., 251 
Gomberg, Sheila Benita, 125 
Gomberg, Sheldon Sam, 203 
Gombos, Edward Andrew, 388, 389 
Gomez, Leonardo, 439 
Gonsewski, Leonard E., 240 
Gonzalez, Alfredo Emilio, 240 
Gooch, Kathlene Ann, 134, 448 
Good, Ruth Ellen, 148 
Good, Sarah Anne, 143 
Goodall, Karen Lee, 301, 344 
Goode, Delwin Duane, 250 
Goodell, Lois Ann, 129 
Goodleigh, Lloyd George, 247 
Goodman, Bernard, 43, 339 
Goodman, Frank Peter, 502 
Goodman, Jane Ellys, 132, 502 
Goodman, Rachel Joyce, 132 
Goodman, Sidney Herbert, 434. 502 
Goodman, Stuart Lauren, 217, 259, 

262, 282, 339, 349, 502 
Goodmon, Margaret Jean, 127, 282, 

287, 296 
Goodmon, Patricia Ellen, 156, 301, 

502 
Goodrich, Chester Lee, 243, 337 
Goodrich, John Irving, 429, 502 
Goodwin, Robert Irwin, 502 
Gorbach, Adie Ruth, 140 



Gordon, Adrienne Sue, 141, 408 
Gordon, Barbara Sue, 1 12 
Gordon, Barry Lee, 167 
Gordon, Charles David, 164 
Gordon, David, 247 
Gordon, Dennis Theodore, 240, 440 
Gordon, Gail, 140 
Gordon, Jack Edward, 189 
Gordon, Michael Maurice, 237 
Gordon, Millicent, 121 
Gordon, Richard Charles, 251 
Gorden, Robert, 204 
Gordy, Delmar Lee, 177 
Gore, Audrey Sue, 502 
Gore, Elinor Ann, 160 
Gore, Samuel Houston, 502 
Gorgal, Allan Henry, 220 
Gorman, Patricia Mary, 111, 502 
Gorr, Anita Louise, 154, 465 
Gorski, Paul Steve, 339 
Gorski, Robert William, 233 
Gorski, Wayne Roger, 401 
Gorsuch, Richard Lee, 463 
Gosnell, Alan Earl, 188, 261, 373, 

376, 377, 397 
Gosnell, Lynn Irvin, 253, 450 
Gossard, Alan Harry, 175 
Gossard, David Lee, 435 
Gotch, David Andrew, 442 
Gothard, Louis James, 502 
Gothelf, Harriet, 140 
Gottlieb, Joanne, 132 
Gould, Frank Lloyd, Jr., 236 
Gould, Herbert Michael, 434 
Gould, Raymond Theodore, 435 
Gouwens, Dan Wesley, 184, 443, 445 
Govaia, James Glenn, 204, 418 
Govich, Bruce Michael, 343 
Gowin, Marilyn, 143 
Gowrue, Richard, 232 
Goyeneche, Gerald Peter, 220 
Grabb, Laurence William, 169 
Graber, Rochelle Sivia, 151 
Grable, Lisa Rhine, 128, 260, 422 
Grace, Bernard, 411, 502 
Graden, Dennis Jon, 222 
Graefenstein, Bette Ann, 144 
Graf, Donald Lee, 465 
Graff, Madeleine Carroll, 143 
Graff, Ronald Melvyn, 245 
Gragg, Mary Lynn, 140 
Graham, Christina Isabel, 4^7 
Graham, David Michael, 243 
Graham, Gerry Allen, 503 
Graham, James Macmshon, 190 
Grammer, Larry, 232 
Granger, James Frederick, 253 
Grant, Byron, 245 
Grant, Carole Darlene, 123, 455, 

467, 503 
Grant, Dorothy Irene, 162, 344 
Grant, Melvin Robert, 456 
Grant, Michael Edward, 503 
Grant, Nancy Hunt, 111, 344 
Grant, Neil George, 234, 465, 503 
Grant, Ronald Dean, 337 
Grant, Terry Robert, 172 
Grassi, Sandra Rosalie, 136, 280 
Gratchner, Leila Carol, 127 
Graubart, Jeffrey Lowell, 167, 344 
Graunke, Marvin Gene, 465 
Graver, Michele, 152 
Gray, David Martin, 503 
Gray, Dr. Robert, 451 
Gray, Edward Ray, 227, 503 
Gray, James Edward, 450 
Gray, Jan Larry, 215, 417 
Gray, Lynn Evan, 456 
Gray, Merle Patricia, 116, 503 
Gray, Myron Paul, 421, 428, 449, 475 
Gray, William Joseph, 168, 276, 288 
Grazier, Donald, 245 
Greathouse, John Arthur, 202, 428 
Greco, Robert Joseph, 172 
Greeley, Francis E., Jr., 425 
Green, Bernard Samuel, 237 
Green, Betty Scholl, 503 
Green, Carol Virginia, 115, 260, 267. 

308, 318, 415, 416, 428, 503 
Green, Jerome Allen, 435 
Green, John Russell, Jr., 503 
Green, Judith Marcia, 339 
Green, Lovell Lloyd, 429, 503 
Green, Marcia, 1 48 
Green, Richard Jacques, 190 
Green, Roger Jeffrey, 166 
Green, Stanley David. 189, 418 
Greenburg, Edward, 200 
Greenberg, Herm Jay, 203 
Greenberg, Janet Ellyn, 132, 427, 464 
Greenberg, Joan Francis, 132, 258, 

296, 503 
Greenberg, Peter David, 240 
Greenberg, Philip Robert, 247 
Greenberg, Sally Ann, 141 
Greenberg, Shiela, 125, 464 
Greenberg, Stuart Lionel, 203 
Greenberg, Sue Velmi, 121, 503 
Greenblatt, Joel Leslie, 210 
Greene, Esther Tonia, 148, 406 
Greene, John Clarence, 240 
Greene, Nancy Kay, 153 
Greene, Philip Ashley, 243. 410 
Greenfield, Mike Jeffrey. 200 
Greenman, Joel Burton, 240. 503 
Greenman, Benita Myra, 141 
Greenspan, Jill M., 130 
Greenspon, Melvin C, 401 
Greenwood, Donald Royce, 247 



559 



Greenwood, Renny Kay, 154, 408 
Greffe, C. Dale, 351 
Greganti, Patricia E., 117 
Gregg, Charles Homer, Jr., 248 
Gregorich, Joseph Edward, 503 
Gregory, Alice Barbara, 148, 298 
Gregory, Deloris Joann, 139, 448, 

465, 467, 503 
Gregory, Mary Elyn, 143 
Gregory, Philip Arnold, 202 
Greiner, Arthur Edward, 435 
Greive, Robert James, 184, 443 
Gremer, John Andrew, 364, 371 
Gresens, Stanley Todd, 197 
Gresho, Philip Martin, 434 
Gretchen, Gerald James, 434, 503 
Grice, Marcus Lloyd, Jr., 503 
Griesbaum, Philip James, 182 
Grieve, David Lee, 401 
Griff, Joanne Carol, 148 
Griffin, Betty Dene, 119 
Griffin, Charles, 438 
Griffin, Grainne Mary, 140 
Griffin, James Perry, 250 
Griffin, William Tell, Jr., 247 
Griffis, Duane Alan, 401 
Griffith, Bette Ruth, 1 1 1 , 423 
Griffith, Carolyn Lee, 312 
Griffith, Margaret Ann, 129 
Griffith, Marjorie An, 157, 503 
Griffith, Mrs., 181 
Griffith, Sally, 145 
Griffith, Walter Eugene, 168, 345, 

409, 431, 445, 503 
Grigg, Charles Dennis, 500 
Grimes, Sally Ann, 160, 462 
Grimson, James Alan, 428 
Grinker, Bonnie Joy, 148 
Gainnell, Mrs., 144, 145 
Grise, Kathryn Ann, 441 
Grisolano, James Edward, 412, 434 
Griswold, Edward Burton, 261, 347 
Gritten, Philip Douglas, 221, 410 
Gritten, Stephen Earl, 221 
Gritton, Robert Lee, 240 
Groenier, John Kress, 222 
Groff, Karen Virginia, 123, 344 
Grogg, Ruth Eleanor, 428 
Grohar, Kenneth Edward, 208 
Grohmann, Gray Armin, 255 
Grolichstein, Seymour, 434 
Gron, Judith Theresa, 140 
Gronberg, Donald Edward, 214 
Gronberg, Janet, 412, 434, 462 
Gronemeier, Lyle Leith, 437, 503 
Gronert, Audrey Louise, 1 13, 260, 467 
Groninger, Lowell Dean, 248, 441 
Gronke, Marian Bernadine, 160, 462, 

503 
Gronquist, Robert Edwin, 227 
Groppel, Ruth Ann, 140 
Grosboll, William Cyrus, 227 
Grose, Gerald Kern, 338, 410, 451, 

503 
Grose, Martin Ernest, 184, 336 
Gross, Gerald Alan, 247, 339 
Gross, Gery Livingston, 193 
Gross, Harriett Jean, 150 
Gross, Larry Raymond, 253 
Gross, Myron Robert, 181, 278, 340 
Gross, Roberta Lynn, 140, 301 
Gross, Ronald Paul, 253 
Gross, Sharon Rosalind, 137 
Grossfeld, Abraham I., 195, 388, 389, 

398, 503 
Grossman, Ross Milton, 255 
Grossman, Susan Thea, 140 
Groth, Roger Adolph, 176, 261 
Grousd, Michael Harrison, 189 
Groves, Penelope, 113 
Groves, Stephen Staley, 419 
Grubb, Gaila Marie, 119 
Grubb, Gaynell Marie, 124, 408 
Grubb, George, Jr., 583 
Grubb, Robert Lewis, 437 
Gruber, Carl Lawrence, 216, 425, 503 
Gruber, Robert Thomas, 170 
Grubman, Alan, 209 
Gruen, Wayne Thomas, 238, 442, 467 
Gruenberg, Ronald James, 504 
Gruendling, Hilmar M., 233 
Gruenewald, Ralph M., 192, 291 
Grunden, Linda Lee, 457 
Gruner, Barbara June, 143 
Gruner, George, 217 
Grusdis, Sharon Ann, 148 
Grygienc, Lawrence S., 165 
Grynbium, Henry, 504 
Guard, Harold Lee, 221 
Guback, Thomas Henry, 456 
Gubser, Donald Urban, 174, 336 
Gudaitis, Grazina, 17, 147 
Gudas, Marianne E., 145 
Guepin, Anthony J., Jr., 209 
Guetschow, Wiliam A., 212 
Gueurekian, Prof. Gabriel, 421 
Gulick, Roger Kent, 504 
Gullakson, Gordon Lewis, 233, 445 
Gulley, H. E., 347 
Gullette, Cameron, 308 
Guminski, Albert, 547 
Gunderson, James Edward, 247 
Gunji, Ken, 433 
Gunn, John Benjamin, 181 
Gunsalus, Gene Irwin, 452 
Gunther, Mary Lou, 139 
Gurd, Leroy Babcock, 177, 414 
Guren, Geraldine Bernell, 504 
Gurvey, Leslie Dean, 167 



Gusloff, Roger William, 222, 426 
Gustafson, Donald Lee, 171 
Gustafson, Frederick A., 174, 212, 

504 
Gustafson, James William, 504 
Gustafson, Jerome Edwin, 250 
Gustafson, Judith Mae, 141 
Gustafson, Norman Corbin, 442, 504 
Gustafson, Sharon S., 504 
Guth, Kenneth Charles, 254 
Guthrie, Lyndell Leroy, 196 
Gutierrez, Dolores C, 140, 441 
Gutowsky, William F., 224 
Gutshall, James Edward, 198 
Guttman, John Thomas, 182 
Gutzait, Seymour, 401, 504 
Guyton, Fred Fleming, Jr., 188, 289, 

391, 397, 412, 421 
Guzzardo, Mariano D., 504 

H 

Home Economics Club 345, 448, 
Homecoming, 10 
Hoof & Horn Club, 445 
Hopkins II East M.K.H., 249 
Hopkins II West M.K.H., 249 
Hopkins III East M.K.H., 250 
Hopkins IV East M.K.H., 251 
Hopkins Valhalla, 250 
House of Roojah, 2.'54 
Haan, Dale, 254 
Haas, Jerome Frank, 196, 504 
Haas, Martin James, Jr., 232 
Haas, Wesley Charles, 504 
Habben, Grace Margaret, 141, 343, 

504 
Haberer, Leo Herman, 435 
Habermehl, Peggy Jean, 1 17 
Habing, Donald Herman, 416 
Hacker, Gary Dean, 222 
Hacker, Richard Wayne, 173, 504 
Hacker, Robert Curtis, 246 
Hackleman, William E. M., 190 
Haddigan, James Michael, 456, 504 
Haddock, Gary Leroy, 253, 336, 446 
Haddon, James Thomas, 189, 291 
Hadesman, Harriet Marcia, 148 
Hadler, Ruth Ellen, 149 
Hadley, Raymond Widenham, 202 
Haedike, Ronald Paul, 250 
Haefner, Milton Alvin, 228, 504 
Haertel, John David, 465 
Haertjens, Bernard Lee, 504 
Haese, Sandra Lee, 149 
Haferkamp, Clayton M„ 246 
Haferkamp, Mary E., 142, 338, 422 
Hage, Bethany Joyce, 465, 147 
Hagelow, Ellen Katheryn, 128, 327 
Haggerty, William Allan, 213 
Haglund, Gayle Frances, 123, 298, 

504 
Hagman, Marcia Gail, 485 
Hahn, Jerold Thomas, 198 
Hahn, Mary Lee, 504 
Hahn, Merrill, 260 
Haimbaugh, Barbara Jane, 157 
Haimes, Joyce Diann, 135 
Haines, Richard Kimmel, 213, 336, 

340 
Haines, Suzanne, 1 19, 258, 297, 504 
Haisley, Lernle Leighton, 379, 381, 383 
Hajek, Janet Evelyn, 140 
Hakimian, Friedoon, 242, 434, 504 
Haky, Ronald Jack, 221, 443, 504 
Halasz, Joseph Albert, 166 
Halbmaier, Mary Beth, 138 
Halcrow, Meribel Bernice, 117, 342 
Hale, Joyce, 131,275, 280 
Hale, Mary Lee, 157, 276,311 
Haley, Raphael William, 248, 441 
Halford, Gary Ross, 504 
Halin, Ann Jean, 141 
Hall, Beverly Jean, 131, 408, 465 
Hall, Carolyn Sue, 142 
Hall, Dennis Calvin, 197, 421 
Hall, Donald, 241, 431 
Hall, Janet Lou, 128, 344 
Hall, Joel Jan, 164 
Hall, John Clifford, 224, 504 
Hall, John Raymond, 254 
Hall, Loren Robert, 238 
Hall, Robert Dean, 434 
Hall, Rosalyn, 141 
Hall, Stuart Craig, 457 
Hallberg, Floyd William, 442 
Hallberg, Milton Charles, 429, 504 
Hallen, Elmer Donald, 453 
Hallerud, Dean Arnold, 391, 457 
Halliday, Robert W., 181 
Halligan, Michael Hugh, 194 
Halligan, Ruth Ann, 123 
Hallman, Helen Ruth, 162 
Halm, Marcy, 155 
Halperin, Phyllis Mary, 130 
Halpern, Hinda Carol, 148 
Halstead, Thane R., Jr., 166 
Halstead, James, 239 
Hamblet, Michael Jon, 177, 282, 284 
Hamburg, Rodney Lee, 237, 244,504 
Hameder, Katherine, 141, 260, 504 
Hamer, Lynn Felice, 151, 342 
Hamilton, Carol Eugene, 442 
Hamilton, Edwin R., Jr., 199 
Hamilton, Janet Kay, 149 
Hamilton, Margery Lou, 120, 295, 

457, 505 
Hamilton, Tom, 347 



Hamilton, Miss, 170 
Hamm, Barbara Nell, 145, 408, 463 
Hammel, Evelyn Rosemary, 455, 505 
Hammerman, Joan Elaine, 143 
Hammond, James Willard, 240 
Hampton, Curtis Dale, 179 
Hampton, Robert Eugene, 449 
Hampton, Dean Vern James, 287 
Hamre, Donald Leroy, 452 
Hamrick, David Kent, 177 
Hance, Marcia Jill, 131, 275, 277 
Hancock, E. Brady, 227, 337, 412 
Hancock, Robert Wayne, 213 
Hand, Alvin Edward, 181 
Hand, Ellen Rebecca, 139, 344 
Handlon, Jerome Raymond, 253 
Haney, Sheila Beth, 157 
Haning, Deane H., 201 
Haning, Duane Edward, 201, 422 
Haning, Janet Kay, 116, 276 
Hanks, Walter Charles, 168 
Hanna, Duane Terrance, 181 
Hanna, Richard John, 239 
Hanner, M. Michael, 235 
Hanning, Dorothy Jane, 160, 505 
Hannon, Ralph Harold, 247 
Hanover, Sara Kathleen, 148 
Hanover, Stephen John, 193 
Hanscom, Marsha Elaine, 115, 505 
Hansen, Bruce Charles, 449 
Hansen, George Morgan, 436 
Hansen, Glenn Richard, 176, 291, 344 
Hansen, Heather E., 1 18 
Hansen, Jack Paul, 338 
Hansen, Karen Lee, 126 
Hansen, Lawrence Noel, 188, 285, 291 
Hansen, Marvin Arthur, 244, 505 
Hansen, Phyllis Jean, 336, 505 
Hansen, Richard Carl, 176 
Hansen, Robert Edwin, 172, 223 
Hanson, David Charles, 183 
Hanson, Ernest Mark, 172, 465 
Hanson, Mr. Glen, 583 
Hanson, Mrs. Glen, 426 
Hanson, Martha Jean, 124, 275, 408 
Hanson, Mary Irene, 124 
Hanson, Richard Laverne, 445 
Hanson, Sonja Ingrid, 160 
Hanson, Warren August, 182 
Harbison, Kenneth George, 179, 344, 

465 
Hardesty, Mrs., 153 
Hardin, Sylvia Mary, 138 
Harding, Richard Lee, 241 
Hardwick, Herbert, 464 
Hardy, Barbara Nell, 158, 446 
Hardy, Leroy Albert, 239 
Hardy, Paul J., 261, 505 
Harewood, Richard, 105 
Hargis, Barry Stewart, 254 
Hargman, Nancy, 143 
Harker, Virginia Ann, 159, 408, 
Harkins, Michael F., 232 
Harlan, Leon S., Jr., 170 
Harlan, Mrs., 171 
Harlan, Nancy Kathryn, 111 
Harley, William F., 449 
Harlow, Mrs. Velma, 173 
Harman, Byron Neal, 174, 505 
Harmeyer, Jessie Ann, 1 16 
Harmon, Richard Lee, 164 
Harms, Paul George, 401 
Harnish, Geri, 120, 408 
Harp, Ima, 485 
Harper, Clifford Doyl, 229 
Harper, Patricia Jean, 1 18, 444 
Harper, Terry Allen, 414 
Harrell, Beverly Kay, 137 
Harrell, Judith Lee, 463 
Harrell, Virginia Ellen, 141, 441, 463 
Harrigan, Kenneth Leon, 202, 422 
Harrington, Judith Morse, 342 
Harris, Barbara Ann, 117 
Harris, Barbara Jean, 427 
Harris, Carol Joyce, 301, 336 
Harris, Carolyn Joyce, 158 
Harris, Curt Noel, 180 
Harris, David Lester, 244, 391 
Harris, Dr. Nelson, 455 
Harris, Frederick T., 205, 344 
Harris, Harold Eugene, 229, 382, 383 
Harris, Jacqueline P., 148 
Harris, James William, 505 
Harris, June Loretta, 137, 505 
Harris, Lester Howard, 222 
Harris, Lois Ellen, 1 13 
Harris, Lois Joy, 342, 452 
Harris, Marjorie, 427 
Harris, Michael Leon, 195 
Harris, Norma Jean, 160 
Harris, Patricia Ann, 301 
Harris, Patricia Louise, 147 
Harris, Ronald Eugene, 421 
Harris, Ronald James, 215, 254 
Harris, Sandra Cecelia, 148 
Harris, Sandra Lee, 133 
Harris, William Frank, 234 
Harrison, Bruce Elbert, 190, 414, 434 
Harrison, Bruce William, 505 
Harrison, Judy, 422 
Harrison, Dean Mary E., 98, 300,349, 

406 
Harrison, Robert Joseph, 253 
Harrison, Roger Lyle, 199 
Harrison, Walter H„ 183 
Harryman, Elizabeth, 155, 311, 415 
Harsh, James Phillip, 242 
Harshbarger, C. Edward, 204, 422 
Harshbarger, Michael, 221 



Harshbarger, Terry Lee, 166 

Harshbarger, Thad R., 418 

Hart, Bruce F., 204, 457 

Hart, David Ellis, 505 

Hart, George Robert, 249 

Hart, James Paul, 204, 429, 505 

Hart, Sandra Lee, 148 

Hartel, Harry Donald, Jr., 207, 452 

Harter, Jan, 145, 450 

Hartleroad, Bobby L., 216, 428 

Harltey, David Eugene, 440, 444 

Hartley, Sharon Kay, 455, 505 

Hartley, Thomas, 448 

Hartnett, David Edward, 206, 505 

Hartstein, Barbara Ruth, 149, 505 

Hartter, Donald Ray, 213, 261, 340, 

341, 421 
Hartung, Richard Lee, 197, 412 
Hartwig, Dale Edward, 181 
Harvey, Alan, 388, 389 
Harvey, Bonnie Lou, 121 
Harvey, James Donald, 238, 386, 

467, 505 
Harvey, Lee Edward, 282, 250 
Harvey, Richard, 387 
Harvey, Robert (Prof.), 273 
Harvey, William Joseph, 547 
Hasemeyer, John Diedric, 255 
Hashbarger, Jean Ann, 1 1 1 
Haskett, Anr»3tte Kaye, 142, 447 
Haskins, Judith Audrey, 131 
Haskins, Robert Eames, 401 
Hasman, Joseph John, 254 
Hass, Arthur John, Jr., 174 
Hass, Glenn, 254 
Hasse, Arthur Anthony, 172, 422 
Hassebrock, Melvin Dale, 229 
Hasselbring, Leroy W., 243, 305, 418 
Hasselmann, Peter Morton, 190, 505 
Hastings, David Campbell, 401 
Hastins, Prof. Thomas, 282 
Hastings, Thomas, 386, 347 
Hastings, Willmore Crane, 176 
Hasz, Paul Henry, 410 
Hatch, Robert Leroy, 168, 285, 445 
Hathorne, Marcia Rose, 133, 505 
Hatinger, Gaye Lenore, 143, 338 
Haugh, Clarence Gene, 435 
Haun, Mary Ann, 136 
Hauptli, Dean Allen, 193 
Hauptman, Jeffrey E., 242 
Hauschild, Raymond Lee, 240 
Hausermann, Ellen E., 123 
Hausser, Ora Paul, 461 
Havens, Dorothy Louise, 118, 444 
Havice, Robert Edmund, 252 
Hawbaker, Stuart Douglas, 229, 457 
Hawkey, Joseph Anthony, 435 
Hawkins, Carol Joyce, 138 
Hawkins, John William, 420 
Hawkins, Marilyn Joyce, 158, 406 
Hawkins, Susan, 140 
Hawkinson, Harold W., 168 
Hawley, Charles Jack, 234 
Hawley, John Edward, 238 
Hawthorne, John R., Jr., 436 
Hay, Carol Anne, 118, 228, 310, 415, 

464, 505 
Hay, Ralph, 347 
Hayden, Adair Marilyn, 140 
Hayenga, Marvin Lee, 169 
Hayes, Floyd Corliss, 246 
Hayes, Gwendolyn Jean, 156, 422, 

505 
Hayes, Michael Martin, 198 
Hayes, Robert Edward, 246 
Hayes, Thomas Mark, 202 
Hayes, William Francis, 183 
Haymes, Joyce, 1 12 
Haynes, Jerry Lee, 221 
Hays, George Burns, 215 
Hays, William Payne, 344 
Hayward, Frank Edward, 435, 505 
Hayward, Harold S., Jr., 194 
Hayward, James Donald, 238, 444, 

505 
Hazel wood, Sara Fay, 140 
Hazen, John Gerald, 249 
Heacock, Phillip Kaga, 169, 410 
Heacock, William Rex, 232 
Heads, Terry Helen, 1 18, 274, 31 1 
Heafelin, Kathy, 128 
Healy, John Mark, 436 
Healy, Kathleen Virginia, 133, 344, 

408 
Healy, Mark Patrick, Jr., 181 
Healy, Susan Lynn, 124 
Heard, Richard Allen, 505 
Hearst, Marsha Jane, 140, 298, 408 
Heasley, Frederick Hart, 212 
Heath, Brian Oakley, 414 
Heath, Charles, 205 
Heath, Edward Henry, 435 
Heath, John William, 239 
Heath, Roger Kenneth, 505 
Heathman, Jesse, 320 
Heavner, Robert Leeroy, 457 
Heberer, Jeanine Ann, 137 
Heberer, Wayne Joel, 506 
Hebert, Maurice Edward, 452 
Hechler, James Wesley, 187 
Hecht, Thomas Erwin, 173, 289 
Hecht, Thomas Henry, 248, 426, 506 
Hecht, Walter Oren, 248 
Hechtman, Henry Raymond, 167 
Hechtman, Susan Gail, 148 
Heckert, Dwight George, 235, 337 
Heckler, Barbara Beckman, 506 
Heckler, Robert Louis, 506 



560 



Heckman, Irvin, 424 
Hecktman, Melvin Lee, 210 
Hedden, Daniel Paul, 251 
Hedengren, Kristina. H. V., 344 
Hedges, Lowell Dickey, 46) 
Hedstrom, James Alden, 224 
Hedstrom, Sandra Gayle, 123 
Heely, Janet Irene, 143 
Heffelflnger, Judith Ann, 448 
Heffernan, Thomas R., 227 
Heffernan, William M., 227 
Heffington, Marvin Dean, 187, 435 
Heffley, Laura Mae, 139, 465 
Heflin, Ronald Wayne, 181, 412 
Hefner, David, 198 
Hefter, June Louise, 123 
Hegener, Henry Harlan, 204, 337 
Heidorn, Robert Don, 193 
Heil, James Richard, 207, 248 
Heil, Wallace Lee, Jr., 202 
Heiligenstein, James N., 215 
Heim, Carol Lee, 143, 298 
Heimerdinger, Walter Lee, 175, 506 
Hein, Owen Vanness, 251 
Heineken, Marie Louise E., 156, 414 

Heineman, Kenneth Robert, 174, 340 
Heiniger, Patricia Kay, 116 
Heinmiller, Richard Wine, 175 
Heinrich, Suzanne, 148 
Heintzen, Walter Leonard, 197, 460, 
506 

Heischmidl, Jesse, 430 

Heise, James Frederick, 208 

Heise, James Richard, 465 

Heisler, James Leonard, 207, 337 

Heit, Lyle Dean, 506 

Heitler, Donald Henry, 451 

Heitur, Valdmar, 412, 434 

Held, John Dennis, 215, 444 

Helding, Constance, 120, 135 

Helfand, Steven Allan, 200 

Helfinstine, Robert A., 418 

Helfrich, Clifford E., 432 

Helgeson, Kenneth W., 238, 506 

Helgren, Marge Anne, 123, 500 

Helgren, Richard Hayes, 207 

Helledy, John Allan, 190, 414 

Heller, Jerome, 210 

Heller, Ralph S., Jr., 176 

Heller, Sandra Joy, 125 

Heller, Stephen Gary, 401 

Heller, Steve Brian, 228 

Hellmann, Verna Jean, 139 

Helm, Alice Carlene, 129, 506 

Helm, Judith Boyd, 127 

Helm, M. S., 206 

Helm, Patricia Kay, 141 

Helm, Roger Dale, 243 

Helms, Ronald Nelson, 222 



Helper, Lloyd Champ, 150 

Helwig, Charles A., Jr., 344 

Hembrough, David Merle, 249 

Hembrough, Gary Don, 212, 371 

Hempel, Joan, 1 17 

Hempstead, William, 392 

Henbest, John Richard, 201, 417, 420 

Henderson, Anthony, 229 

Henderson, Donald Max, 247 

Henderson, Lois Rosanne, 127 

Henderson, Sandra L., 128 

Henderson, Stephen C., 252 

Hendrick, Elizabeth Lee, 113 

Hendrickson, Frank Scott, 232 

Hendrickson, Stewart, 464 

Hendrix, Charles Dennis, 247 

Heneghan, John Michael, 252 

Hengehold, Lawrence J., 209 

Henkle, Janis, 145, 337 

Henlein, Bette Jane, 441 

Henley, Phillip, 202 

Henness, Charles Parker, 177 

Hennessey, Robert P., 193 

Hennessey, Mary Alice, 142, 455, 506 

Henning, David Ralph, 440, 450 

Henning, Elwyn Frank, 242 

Henry, Mrs., 234 

Henry, Dr. David D., 73, 105 

Henry, George William, Jr., 252, 337 

Henry, John Andrew, 225, 433 

Henry, Michael Lee, 213 

Henry, Terry Jay, 417 

Henson, Robert Lee, 506 

Henss, Robert Paul, 230 

Hepler, Kay Joanne, 150 

Hepner, Louis Leroy, 254 

Hepner, Paul Earl, Jr., 190 

Herb, William David, 252 

Herbin, Howard, 245 

Herbst, David Ian, 211 

Herbster, Alfred Charles, 175, 456 

Herbster, Richard Emil, 252, 506 

Herbstman, Marcia Ellen, 152, 444 

Herhold, Frank F., Jr., 166 

Herman, Albert William, 3, 166, 259, 
266, 506, 583 

Herman, Carol, 142, 346 

Herman, Ellen Mary, 143 

Herman, Marilyn, 142 

Herman, Marvin L., 506 

Herman, Nancy Lou, 161, 506 

Herman, Nancy Marie, 129 

Hermann, Harvey A., Jr., 338 

Hermann, Nancy Ellen, 157 

Hermes, Paul Francis, 243 

Hermling, Barbara Jane, 119 

Hernandez, Roberto, 435, 439 

Herner, James Phillip, 249 

Herning. Lance Gale, 250 




THE UhAMPAIGN NATIONAL BANK 



PARK AND RANDOLPH. CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 




COMPLIMENTS 

and 

BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS OF 1960 

from the 
U. of I. SUPPLY STORE 

CO-OP STORE 

Corner of Wright and Green 



Herout, Roberta Marie, 115, 342 
Herrick, Wirt, 105 

Herreid, Ernest, 440 

Herringer, James Joseph, 220 

Herrmann, Albert Edward, 171 

Herrmann, John Edward, 171, 417, 
420, 506 

Hersemann, Daryll Dwayne, 242 

Herum, Floyd, 435 

Herweg, Marietta Lucille, 149, 506 

Herwitt, Phyllis Claire, 140 

Herzer, Raymond William, 252 

Herzing, William Joseph, 250 

Heselbarth, Nancy Ann, 116, 278, 423 

Hess, David William, 347 

Hess, Donald Lamparter, 174 

Hess, Nancy Jean, 144, 506 

Hess, Peter Allen, 442 

Hettick, James Robert, 169, 436, 506 

Hetzel, Maj. Foster, 417 

Heunemeier, Ray, 206 

Hewett, Barnard, 308, 309, 312, 415 

Hewett, Elizabeth Ann, 110 

Hewitt, Helen Carolyn, 127, 414, 
457, 458 

Heymann, Mrs., 130 

Hiatt, Charles Arthur, 437, 506 

Haitt, Tom, 232 

Hibbott, Linda Louise, 116 

Hible, Robert Leslie, 506 

Hickey, Brian Dennis, 242 

Hickey, Robert Vernon, 191, 267, 
358, 371, 397, 506 

Hickey, Tory Robert, 222 

Hickler, Lawrence, 239 

Hickman, Joseph Terry, 231 

Hicks, Callene Donna, 153 

Hicks, Dale Ray, 337 

Hicks, Laura, 124 

Hicks, Terrill George, 206 

Higgerson, Clifford H„ 212, 583 

Higgins, Carol Lee, 155 

Higgins, Elizabeth June, 406 
Higgins, John Patrick, 254 
Higgins, Judith, 116, 274, 342, 417 
Higgins, Richard Wallace, 204 
Higgs, Anah Christine, 147, 301 
Higgs, Leonard Arlen, 233, 345, 426, 

429, 430 
Higgs, Marilyn Joann, 145, 448 
Higs, Roger Lee, 233, 349, 350, 443, 

457, 467, 506 
Highland, Kay Annette, 124 
Highsmith, George M., 248, 338 
Hight, Joyce Maryann, 1 15 
Hilb, Harriette L., 147 
Hildenbrand, Judith Kay, 141, 300 
Hiles, Margaret Ann, 148 
Hilgenberg, Robert John, 344 



Hill, Ardis Eleanor, 133, 506 

Hill, Donald Joseph, 189 

Hill, George Lowell, 245 

Hill, Howard Wayne, 221, 418, 442, 
454 

Hill, John Peter, 250 

Hill, Joseph Dale, 340 

Hill, Judith Ann, 338, 339 

Hill, Lee Earl, 432, 460, 506 

Hill, Prof. Richard, 460 

Hill, Robert Alfred, 191 

Hill, Roger Clinton, 449 

Hill, Shirley Mae, 136, 295, 297, 
413,507 

Hillebrand, John George, 240 

Hiller, Lajaren Dr., 313 

Hillis, David Robert, 240, 344 

Hillman, Juanita Julia, 147 

Hilst, David Lee, 254, 450 

Himel, Justin Leonard, 244 

Himes, Elizabeth Ann, 163, 408 

Hinchcliff, Mrs. Beth, 98 

Hinchman, Ray Richard, 248 

Hinds, William Stanley, 233,507 
Hindsley, Robert Warner, 190, 338, 

451 
Hine, Gloria Sylvester, 465 
Hines, James Junior, 452 
Hinman, Gary, 204 
Hintz, Norman Clare, 246 
Hinze, Philip Lewis, 175 
Hippard, Raymond A., Jr., 240 
Hippler, Michael Vincent, 225, 453, 

507 
Hipskind, John Philip, 230 
Hirsch, Arnold Lippert, 401, 507 
Hirsch, Carole Ruth, 151 
Hirsch, Esther Diane, 258, 507 
Hirsch, Frederick Danner, 188 
Hirsch, Judith, 141 
Hirsch, Stephen Charles, 240 
Hiscox, Ragnhild Alice, 427 
Hise, Shan Richard, 507 
Hiss, Clyde Simons, 227 
Hites, Joyce Ann, 1 15 
Hitz, Susan Louise, 113 
Hitzeroth, Suson Alice, 160 
Hix, Truman George, 207 
Hixenbaugh, Harold Dean, 182, 337 
Hlavacek, Roy George, 419, 507 
Hletko, Barbara Karen, 154 
Hobbs, Donald Edward, 443, 457 
Hobbs, Joseph, 249 
Hochberg, Michael Louis, 244 
Hockenhull, James L., 164 
Hocking, John Ward, 194, 417, 440 
Hocking, John Wesley, 227, 420, 463 
Hocking, Paul Reid, 227, 340, 463 
Hocking, Ralph Theodore, 234 



561 



Hodam, Barbara Lenore, 154, 300, 
406, 408 

Hodash, Lawrence Irwin, 242, 337 

Hodek, Ralph Jerome, 242 

Hodel, Merle Alvin, 230, 435 

Hodel, Rondell Henry, 243 

Hodge, Prof. George, 421 

Hodgson, William John, 214, 450 

Hodurek, Sandra Kay, 162, 344 

Hoehn, Penny, 1 44 

Hoehn, Robert Stoddard, 180 

Hoepe, Carol Ruth, 163, 344 

Hoepner, Thomas Michael, 198 

Hoeppner, Steven Arthur, 190 

Hofer, James Harrison, 193 

Hoff, Gerald Charles, 242, 306, 436, 
507 

Hoffeins, Gail Marie, 139 

Hoffenberg, Sheldon Z., 253, 305, 
507 

Hoffman, Alan Bruce, 169 

Hoffman, Allan Richard, 338 

Hoffman, Barbara, 121, 293 

Hoffman, Barry Jay, 253 

Hoffman, Bradley Pau , 242, 507 

Hoffman, Bruce Wendell, 242 

Hoffman, David Kingery, 169 

Hoffman, Edward Lee, 199, 507 

Hoffman, Eileen, 1 1 1 , 403 

Hoffman, Lowell Martens, 249